Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00314


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com USS Gettysburg Holds The Line Fleet To Get Fire Resistant Coveralls From Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) and U.S. Pacific Fleet (PACFLT) will distribute flameresistant coveralls to the shipboard Sailors beginning early next year. The two fleet commanders decided to approve a Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coverall to ensure the safety of all shipboard Sailors after reviewing the findings -Photo by MC2 Donald R. White Jr.Sailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) hold the phone and distance line on the forecastle during an under way replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Patuxent (T-AO 201). Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Williamson Takes Helm Of CNRSE Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsCommander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) held a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Aug. 29. During the ceremo ny, Rear Adm. Rick Williamson relieved Rear Adm. John C. Jack Scorby Jr., as the regions commander. I can now attest first hand that the flawless reputation this region enjoys around the fleet is extremely well deserved, Williamson said. I am amazed not only at the quality of programs at our installations, but also the sheer magnitude of Sailors and families you serve throughout the region. Im sure it will be an honor and a privi lege to work with each of you over the next couple years. Williamson is a Jacksonville native and a 1985 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, where he earned a bachelors degree in computer sci ence. He also holds a masters in business administration from the Naval Post Graduate School and is a gradu ate of the Armed Forces Staff College. Williamson reported to CNRSE from his previous assignment as Commander, Navy Region Midwest. Vice Adm. William D. French, command er, Naval Installations Command, was guest speaker. Rear Adm. Williamson is an outstanding naval officer with significant operational experience as a surface warfare offi cer, French said during his remarks. I know hes excited to be back home in Jacksonville and ready for the great challeng es and rewards that this region offers. -Photos by MC1 Greg JohnsonVice Adm. William D. French, commander, Naval Installations Command, was guest speaker at the Navy Region Southeast change of command ceremony Aug. 29 for Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. (left) and Rear Adm. Rick Williamson aboard NAS Jacksonville.DESRON 14 Holds Change of CommandFrom StaffCapt. Ryan C. Tillotson relieved Capt. Paul E. Flood as Commander Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 during a pier side change of command ceremony on Aug. 30. The change of command was followedby a retirement ceremony for Flood, who plans on staying in the Jacksonville area with his family. Prior to his serving as Commander of DESRON 14, he served as Program Manager for the Biological Threat Reduction Program, in the Cooperative Threat Reduction Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. He has served as a United States Navy Surface Warfare Officer since his com missioning in February 1986. Flood commanded USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60) from March 2004 through November 2005, leading the ship dur ing her operational deployments to Southeast Asia for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT 05), and South East Asia Cooperation Against Terrorism (SEACAT 05). Flood served as Task Group Sea Combat Commander and Task Group Screen Commander for the five ship deployment group, and led ships from five South East Asian navies. He was the first Commanding Officer of USS Shamal (PC 13) taking her from fleet introduction through her first operational deployment to Southern Command. Flood was executive officer on USS Ingraham (FFG 61), overseeing the train ing and preparations for RIMPAC and an Arabian Gulf deployment. His other sea tours include Engineer Officer on USS -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Ryan C. Tillotson reads his orders to relieve Capt. Paul E. Flood as Commander Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 during a pierside change of command ceremony on Aug. 30.See CNRSE, Page 13 See DESRON 14, Page 13 See Coveralls, Page 14

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Throughout elemen tary, middle, and high school my husband was responsible for getting our two daughters out of bed and off to school since his work day started much later than mine. As part of getting them off to school, his task included making their daily lunch sandwiches. For years we would buy healthy ingre dients for sandwiches and accompanying snacks. Then one day I discov ered behind the drivers seat on the floorboard of my older daughters car a mound of brown sand wich bags with the care fully prepared lunches still inside each bag. Needless to say that was the end of lunch prepara tion for the girls! We are now into the 3rd or 4th week of school depending on when your county started, and you are probably already out of ideas for bag lunches much less healthy bag lunches. Your children are complaining that they are tired of peanut but ter and jelly and want Lunchables those neat ly packaged, expensive treats, which according to your children, other chil dren bring EVERY day! To provide you with some ideas for not only your childrens lunch es but also your own, I checked out several sites on the internet. In an online article by Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, the Recipe Doctor for WebMD, she explains that lunchbox ideas are based on four key elements: Include more whole foods and less pro cessed foods. Choose lunch items with higher amounts of fiber and nutrients children need (like calcium, protein, and vitamin C). Include fewer processed foods such as cookies, chips, and snack cakes, which have higher sodium, added sugar, and saturated fat. Be creative. Think out side the lunchbox. Does your child enjoy cheese pizza, Chinese chicken salad, or veggie/soy corn dogs at home? With a little forethought and a reus able cold pack, you can probably pack them for lunch, too. Keep it cold. For safe tys sake, pack lunch with a reusable ice pack. Better yet, freeze a small water bottle or box of 100% juice. Your child will have a slushy drink to enjoy at lunch and wont have to worry about bringing an ice pack home. Keep it fun. Include items that kids can stack or mix up to their taste when they eat. Remember that kids like to dunk, and include healthy dips with vegetables or other items. Cut foods into fun shapes with cookie cutters. While some of these were good tips like freez ing the juice box or water bottle to keep the lunch cool, others like cutting food into fun shapes with cookie cutters seemed time consuming for an already harried morning rush to get out of the door. But what do I know? Here are a few more tips from Dr. Magee that might just be the perfect lunch for your child. Mediterranean Pita Pocket. Fill a pita pock et with falafel balls and some homemade or store-bought hummus. Some falafel balls come cooked and ready to add. Fruit and Cheese Plate. Fill a divided plastic container with assorted cubes or slices of reduced fat cheese, easy-to-eat fruit such as apple and pear slices, grapes, or melon, and whole-wheat crack ers. Peanut Butter Fun Pack. Make a peanut butter fun pack by spooning two tablespoons of naturalstyle peanut butter in a reusable plastic container, along with whole wheat crackers or whole wheat pita pocket wedges and raw vegetables such as celery, zucchini, or jicama sticks. Everything Is Better on a Mini Bagel. Wholewheat bagels are a won derful foundation for hardy sandwiches which stand up to being in a backpack or locker all morning. Start with one regular or a few mini bagels. Add tuna or lean, roasted, and sliced turkey. Top it off with reduced-fat cheese and fresh tomato, onion, and Romaine let tuce or sprouts. Two mini bagels can supply 6 grams of fiber to the meal. Its a Wrap! Wraps are a nice change of pace from the usual sandwich. Use a high-fiber multigrain flour tortilla. Spread on mustard, hummus, light salad dressing, or green or sundried tomato pesto. Then fill er up with chicken Caesar salad or assort ed lean meats, cheese, tomato, sliced onion, and shredded Romaine let tuce. Just roll it up and wrap in foil. Talk About Taquitos. Taquitos are easy to eat and easy to pack. In the morning, lay a few bean and cheese frozen taqui tos on a small sheet of foil. Pop them into a toaster oven to crisp them up. Wrap them up in the foil and slide them in your childs lunch bag. For a vegetarian option, try bean taquitos. Add some of these to round out your childs lunch: sugar added) ; such as pomegranate or cranberry-raspberry (also with no sugar added); (if age and allergy appro priate), such as walnuts, pistachios, peanuts, or sunflower seeds; to pack) such as carrot sticks, sugar snap peas, celery, or jicama sticks; able in 2 percent sharp cheddar, part skim-milk mozzarella, pepper jack, and more; and (individually wrapped) with 3 or more grams of fiber, less than 10 grams sugar, and no more than 1 gram saturated fat If you enjoyed these ideas, Dr. Magee is the author of numerous books on nutrition and health. Her opinions and conclusions from this WebMD article are her own. Or for more healthy eating ideas, go to http:// Kidshealth.org/parent/ nutrition for more ideas on healthy lunches for kids. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Health Tips For Brown Bagging For StudentsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAfter nearly 20 years of marriage, my husband and I decided to separate. No, he wasnt having a midlife crisis, although he had become quite heavyhanded with his cologne lately. I wasnt feeling neglected, although his idea of a fun Saturday night was Dominoes and House Hunters reruns. No one was drinking exces sively, although we were buying more lite beer than milk these days. There were no irreconcil able differences, although he never did learn how to use the remote. Really, we were quite happy. We just thought it would be best for the kids if we went our separate ways for a while. You see, were a Navy family. And like all mili tary families, were often faced with logistical dilemmas that force us to consider separation to preserve stability through transitions. In such cir cumstances, the entire family experiences the hardships of temporary separation. However, the fringe benefits of such an arrangement are often unfairly dispersed. In other words -the hus band totally makes out on this deal, every time. The last time we sepa rated, I stayed in Germany to let the kids finish the school year, while my husband moved ahead of us to Florida to start his new job. For four months before we flew to Florida to join him, my husband was a Geobachelor. Sure, the Geobachelors life can be a bit lonely, all holed up in the base hotel for weeks on end with nothing but work, gym, books, television, and take out; but this temporary period of soli tude offers the husband complete and utter free dom from the trappings of marriage and family life. While the wife and kids are locked into a typical hectic family routine, the Geobachelor faces tough decisions such as, Hmm, maid service again today, or shall I make my own bed for a change? Sports bar with the guys, or eat dinner at my workmates house (his wife does make great lasagna after all)? Read another book, or watch the premium channels we dont have at home? Recently, my husband called from Florida. I left him there on June 10th so the kids and I could take the summer to get settled at our new duty station in Rhode Island before school started. Its hotter than blaz es down here, he said between sips of cold beer, so, what have you and the kids been up to? In excruciating detail, I vent ed to my husband about repairs being done to our base house, about need ing money for our sons textbooks, about trying to fit in with the neighbors, about the cable bill, about the dog having diarrhea at 3:00 a.m., about the mouse that ran across the family room. Hold on Honey, he interrupted, Sure, Ill take another one of Its Not All Cake As The Geobachelors WifeLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesWednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 was the 50th Anniversary of the Dr. Martin Luther Kings March on Washington. The day offered a spe cial opportunity for people to gather in our Nations capital and remember not just the vision of Dr. King but the long road that civil rights have traveled over the past 50 years. There are other events which took place in that seminal year that also cast a long shadow on the hearts and minds of our nation. The spring of that year brought Dr. King and a non-violent protest to Birmingham, Alabama. What the nation watched on their televisions is still difficult for many to understand, fire-hoses pelting the crowds, police with German shepherds biting and threatening black protestors, without a doubt, one of the dark est chapters in our history as a nation. One television jux taposed the protests in Alabama with the March on Washington, D.C. as an effort to bring the subject of civil rights into the fed eral consciousness. The special focused not only on Dr. King, but others who spoke that day and the hopes and dreams of all who had marched and gath ered around the Lincoln Memorial. Some of these individu als picked up the mantle of the civil rights struggle after Dr. Kings assassina tion; others were children and youth who wanted to be there to be a part of that special moment in time. There was an over whelming feeling that many of the marchers shared with reporters from that day. There was a sense of value that was felt for each person that their lives could change. For a little while, things did change, even in that city that was broadcast into homes just months earlier. But change did not take root for long. In September of 1963, the 16th Street Baptist Church was the target of a bombing that resulted in the death of four young girls. President John F. Kennedy appealed to nation that the time had come for the exercise of equality within our own borders and within two months, he would also lose his life. The 50th anniversary of Dr. Kings March on Washington and delivery of the I have a Dream speech could not be remembered without the terrible human cost that would be paid by many. Im sure that we all get caught up in the opera tional tempo and bat tle rhythms around us. Sometimes, we need to take a moment to pause and reflect on those peo ple who are giants of his tory and cast a long shad ow across the years. They are not only deserving of our atten tion, their actions and sto ries have been woven into the fabric of our Nation. God bless be safe, and give thanks for the many freedoms that we enjoy.Giants Of History Cast Long ShadowsChap Tom Bingol Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSSee Wife, Page 10

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 Commands Compete In 6th DC Olympics Carney Reclaims Title Of Top DC Shop At NS MayportFrom StaffEleven Damage Control teams from 10 NS Mayports commands, including USCG Valiant and Afloat Training Group Mayport, gathered Aug. 29 to compete in the sixth annual Naval Station Mayport Damage Control (DC) Olympics held at the base Fire Fighting School. During the competi tion, teams participated in 10 events with indi vidual event scores being added up to determine the overall winner. Events included pipe patching, Oscar relay, damage con trol written test, quick reaction team test, shor ing and pipe patching, fire hose relay, CBR dress out, P-100 rigging, and a fire hose tug-o-war. This year, USS Carney took back the title as top DC team. The ship had the title for the first three competitions, spent the fourth year on deployment, and lost last year to USS Roosevelt. Afloat Training Group Mayport was recognized for having the most spirit during this years event. USS Hu City was also recognized for its victory over the other commands during the Hose Tug-ofWar. The DC Olympics was sponsored by Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site Mayport and Destroyer Squadron Fourteen (DESRON 14). USS Hu City dominates the tug-o-war competition, coming out as the winners against all the competitors. DESRON 14 Commodore Ryan Tillotson presents the first place trophy to Team Carney at the Sixth Annual DC Olympics sponsored by DESRON 14 and Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site Mayport.-Photos by Paige GnannDamage Controlman 3rd Class Willie Collins mans a fire main valve as Damage Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Vyacheslav Verbovskiy and Damage Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Jos Rosario from USS Carney dress in firefighting gear as part of the Quick Response event. USS Taylor gets set to compete in the tug-o-war event. Instructors from SWOS show their hose handling expertise during a tug-o-war against USS Hu City. USS Farragut moves the P-100 into position during the rigging event. Carney team aims to knock a tennis ball off a cone during the Quick Response event. USS Vicksburg untangles hoses during the Fire Hose Relay event. USS Simpson Team 1 races to dresses out in CBR gear.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 5 Above, MK1 Casey Welch with USCG Valiant hands off a message to a runner after Chief Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuel) Javier Yllanes of SWOS dictates the incident to him during the Message Board Relay (MBR) event. Left, a runner tries to peek at the board after bringing a message to his teammates from USS Robert G. Bradley. The team fromUSS Hu City moves Oscar onto a gurney as part of the Oscar relay event, in which teams have to locate and rescue a mannequin hidden inside a mock ship space. ATG Mayport team race to bring Oscar out of an enclosed space during the Oscar Relay event. Coasties from USCG Valiant watch their team mates go thru the Pipe Patching event at the Wet Trainer. Sailors from USS Philippine Seas team works to patch pipes in the Wet Trainer during the 6th annual DC Olympics competition. The team from USS Simpson 2 works to figure out how to shore a doorway inside the Wet Trainer. USCG Valiant wins third place in this years competition. USS Philippine Sea is awarded second place in the DC Olympics.

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 1: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 4: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 6: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Kansas City Chiefs. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Sept. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5:15 p.m. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 14: Car, Truck and Automobile Show. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. FREE. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 15: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 16: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sept. 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Sept. 22: Jacksonville Festival of Horrors. Van Departs 1 p.m. at Liberty Center. $20 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 19. Sept. 28: J acksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Bogeys Specials Thursday, Sept. 5 Buffalo Chicken Wrap with a Side, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Shrimp on Mixed Greens, $9.95 Soup: Shrimp Tomato Basil Friday, Sept. 6 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich with a side, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, Sept. 9 BBQ Pork Panini with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Spicy Chicken Tortilla Tuesday, Sept. 10 Balck and Blue Burger with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Taco Salad, $7.95 Soup: White Chicken Chili Wednesday, Sept. 11 8 Oz NY Strip Steak Teriyaki with Fried Rice and Stir Fried Vegetables, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Soup: Broccoli and Cheese Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, pickles, onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Chicken, Walnut & Fruit Salad, $8.50 Grilled or fried chicken breast served on a bed of mixed baby greens with caramelized walnuts, mandarin orange segments, sundried cranber ries, sliced cucumbers, carrots and your choice of dressing Filipino-Style Lumpia, $7 Seasoned ground beef with diced carrots & celery, deep fried to a gold en crisp, served with sweet & sour sauce Turkey or Ham Club, $8 Smoked turkey or ham served on a French baguette w/ sliced tomato and arugula, drizzled with pesto, served with French fries Midwest Burger, $8 All-beef patty topped w/ seasoned pork and homemade coleslaw, served with crispy French Fries Summer Time Dogs (each), $7.50 topped with sauerkraut and English mustard, served with French Fries topped with chili and melted cheese, served with French Fries topped with topped with pickles, diced tomatoes and onions, served with French Fries French Dip, $8.50 New York-Style roast beef, thinsliced, grilled and topped with provo lone cheese, piled high on a rustic roll and served with crispy French fries Whats To Eat 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013

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Auto Skills Center August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and depen dents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be noti fied Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 6: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Over $43,000 in payouts. Only 225 packages available; mul tiple packages may be pur chased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 5: NFL Regular Season Kick Off Party. 8:30 pm kickoff Baltimore vs. Denver. Drink specials, free food, cornhole tournament and more. 2707205 Sept. 7: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and oppor tunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Sept. 4: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Sept. 18: Game Night. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. Sept. 27: Reggae Night. 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Sea World/Busch Gardens Military Special. Qualified ser vice members and veterans can receive off a 1-day pass to Sea World or Busch Gardens from now until Nov. 11, 2013. Offer only available at ITT office. 2705145 Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering ban ner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Sept. 10: Freedom 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowling for active duty when they bring a nonactive duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awe some music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day MWR Sports/Fitness Sept 6: Freedom FridayMovie Madness. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 7

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HSL-48 Detachment 5 Keeps PaceSailors approach an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to HSL-48 to conduct a refueling on the flight deck of USS Monterey.-Photos by MC3 Billy HoSailors clear the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) after refueling an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48. Monterey is deployed in sup port of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Above, Lt. Andrew Poulin, left, of HSL-48 speaks to Sailors during an aviation safety stand down aboard USS Monterey. Right, Lt. Cmdr. Stuart Lindley assigned to the Vipers of HSL-48 plays a game during a steel beach picnic aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey. Boatswain's Mate Seaman Recruit Jordan Selig, left, shows Lt. Andrew Poulin of HSL-48, a fuel sample on the flight deck of USS Monterey. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 9

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From FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 5, 6-8 p.m., Jump Start Your Career Ribault Bay Community Center Sept. 5, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 5, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 5, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, and encourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Sept. 5-6, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Boots to Business Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 9, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Sept. 9, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encour aged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 9, 1-3:30 p.m., New Dads Class, USO This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and toddlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowledge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. Sept. 9-13, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 11, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 11, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-noon, Survivor Benefit Plan FFSC Building 1 Room 719 Sept. 11, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help participants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. Sept. 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 12, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 16-20, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Military Spouse 101 Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The Fleet and Family Support Center offers this class to military spouses new to the area, and those new to the military way of life. Guest speakers from the military and civilian communities will pres ent useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. Sept. 17, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an addi tional motivator for end ing the violence and seek ing intervention. Sept. 23-27, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 104Sept. 23-27, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 11 a.m.noon, Planning For Your Retirement FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 30, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 these, and how about the Buffalo Chicken Wrap with Onion Rings? As I heard him ask the wait ress what she thought of the coleslaw, I wondered whether I could convince the kids to eat popcorn again for dinner. Where are you, any way? I inquired, know ing that he had been staying with friends since he moved out of our old house. Well, I wanted to get out of Calvins hair for the day, so I got a new book, went to the spa, and have been wandering around Fernandina Beach all afternoon. Wait, what? You went to a spa? I said, looking at my nails, which were mangled from all the unpacking. You knew I was plan ning to get my back waxed, Honey, he said defensively, and I decid ed to treat myself to a massage too. . Honey? You still there? I was too busy wonder ing if Id ever get to extract myself from the neverending hamster wheel of motherhood and fam ily life, and feel the unbridled, rollicking, delicious ly reclusive, self-indul gently relaxing experience of being a Geobachelor. After a long pause, I finally responded, Do they have chocolate cake on the dessert menu at that restaurant? Yea, why? my hus band wondered. Never mind, just order it, with a big scoop of ice cream on top. I guess someones gotta do it. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com From Page 2SpouseFFSC Offers Classes For Sailors, FamiliesPreparing For Deployment-Photo by Paige GnannTara Dotson with 1 1/2 year old son Graham and Victoria Torres man a bake sale table at the Navy Federal Credit Union. The sales went to fund children activities for the family support group while the ship is deployed. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013

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NEX Hosts CPO Select Uniform Night-Photos by Paige GnannChief Petty Officer Selects from Naval Station Mayport and its tenant commands enjoy an evening of shopping, door prizes and food thanks to the Mayport Navy Exchange (NEX). This is the 13th year Mayport NEX has held the event for the Selects. Selectees receive a gift bag and sign up for door prizes. Chief Select Operations Specialist McCajor Quinn pulls a name for the next door prize winner for NS Mayport CMC Bob White. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 11

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DoN Prepares To Face New ChallengesBy Defense Media Activity NavySecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus directed the office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy/Deputy Chief Management Officer (DUSN/DCMO) to begin a comprehensive assess ment of the business chal lenges facing the Navy and Marine Corps on Aug. 30. He also instructed the offices of the DUSN/ DCMO to begin devel oping a plan to address the multiple budgetary and resource challeng es currently facing the Department of the Navy. This is about bringing real change to our depart ment, said Mabus. This will ensure that the Navy and Marine Corps team remains the most effec tive and efficient expedi tionary fighting force the world has ever known. Weve faced these challenges in the past, said newly-appointed DUSN/DCMO Tom Hicks, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy. But, to me, whats different now is that the scale is dif ferent and the stakes are higher. As the Navy and Marine Corps continue to adapt to an evolving fiscal and global environment after more than a decade of sustained conflict, they face a series of new chal lenges. We dont have a choice, said Hicks. We have to be out in front on this. The fiscal resourc es are very constrained and thats not something thats going to end any time soon. It is, however, something that comes with the opportunity to really think, strategi cally, about how we con duct the business of the Department of the Navy in a way that maintains and protects the mission. Whats paramount, Hicks said, is being able to accomplish the mission and being able to do so in a way that responds to the realities of the resources we have. Hicks, and those work ing in the office of the DUSN/DCMO, were selected to address possi ble areas of improvement in the business practices of the Department of the Navy due to a proven abil ity to drive change and the offices position within the departments organi zation. His (Hickss) leader ship as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy and his entire career have proven Mr. Hickss inno vative vision and capac ity to drive organizational change, exactly the cre dentials and mission for the DUSN/DCMO, said Mabus. Hicks looks forward to the task ahead. We need to look at this as an opportunity to become the most efficient organization we can be in order to accomplish the mission when were called upon, said Hicks. Fiscal challenges put a strain on, for example, how, where and when we train. Thats something we have to make sure doesnt happen again and, through this effort, I think we can ensure that it doesnt, Hicks said. What this means for Sailors and Marines is that they will be able to do more of what weve actu ally asked them to do. Mabus directed the DUSN/DCMO to focus on the Secretary of the Navy priorities of people, plat forms, power and part nerships in accomplish ing several specific tasks including: Developing and implementing a vision for large-scale Department of the Navy transforma tion to include clear goals and performance assess ments. Resolving the Department of the Navys most pressing and com plex business challenges. Identifying opportu nities to shape and posi tion the Department of the Navy to meet future budget and resource chal lenges. An initial business transformation plan, an assessment of the Departments biggest challenges, and a plan of action and milestones to include a plan for reshap ing the Department of the Navy as part of a 20-per cent headquarters man power reduction are due to the Secretary of the Navy within 90 days. While Hicks will head this drive to improve the Department of the Navys business practices, the initiative will require the efforts of the entire orga nization. My goal is to do this in a way that it is a collab orative effort across the Department of the Navy to identify opportunities for efficiencies, financial savings and staff savings, said Hicks. This is a proactive chance for us to be able to position ourselves to be able to conduct the Departments missions in the future. Shipshape Start DateFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Sept. 10 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty person nel, adult dependents, and retirees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calories, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more information, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-2705251 ext. 16. Sept. 6 and 7 Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach will be hosting our annual Fall Rummage Sale 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Church at 400 Penman Road. Furniture, clothing, linens and lots of unique items are waiting for you along with biscuits and gravy for breakfast and sandwiches, soups and baked goods for sale each day. For informa tion, call 249-5370. Saturday, Sept. 7 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is host ing a one-day only used art book sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The com munity to browse the beautiful art history and gardening books avail able for purchase this day only. All funds from the book sale will support the Museums ongoing mission of engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural commu nities. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Tuesday, Sept. 10 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a Fall Gardening Workshop from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Road. The cost is $5 to attend. Topics include Garden Recyclables, Tips for Fall Edibles, and Gardening in Raised Beds. To pre-reg ister, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. The Jacksonville Public Library, 303 Laura St. N., is partnering with local organizations to host a free Community Resource and Career Fair featuring 17 compa nies looking for potential employees and 10 agen cies with resources avail able to help job seekers from 9 a.m. Noon. In addition, free workshops covering How to Write a Winning Resume, 7 Ways to Stand Out From the Crowd, and Personal BrandingInterview Techniques, will be offered. Saturday, Sept. 14 An Eating and Growing Seasonally Workshop; Learning how to grow cool-season veg etables, Composting, and Food sampling using seasonal produce at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9 a.m.1 p.m.. Cost is $10 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Volunteers needed for Childrens Tumor Foundation NF WALK at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens. Checkin is 7:30a.m. walk and 5k fun run at 8:30 a.m. Register your team at WWW.NFWalk.org/ jacksonville2013. Fees: Adults $25 and Children $15. Questions contact Chrissie Connors at ccon nors@ctf.org or 904-6195130 Trish (leave mes sage.) Come celebrate five centuries of Spanish influence in Florida with an informative talk at 2 p.m. about the San Juan del Puerto Mission on Ft. George Island. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Friday, Sept 20 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Make-and-take Rain Barrel Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-noon. The workshop will be located at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. The cost is $45 per person to make a rain barrel, $5 for atten dance only (no rain bar rel) For questions, call 904-255-7450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013

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Scorby, who was award ed the Legion of Merit during the ceremony, had commanded CNRSE since August 2011. Under his leadership, instal lations throughout the region made significant reductions in energy costs through an active region al energy council that exceeded the fiscal year 2013 energy usage reduc tion goal of 24 percent. He was also instrumen tal in the Navys pursuit of compatible land-use strategies, which includ ed the Navys installation wind turbine impact anal ysis study that developed a nationally support ed legislative outreach effort and ensured safer air operation areas and mutual co-existence. At the end of the day, its been one team, mili tary and civilian, and you proved it day after day, Scorby said. The person al award that I received today belongs to all of you and I will think of each and every one of you each time I pin it on. Scorby will assume command of Navy Region Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia in October. Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), and Main Propulsion Assistant on USS JOHN KING (DDG 3). Floods shore tours include Financial Branch Head for the Surface Warfare Directorate, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV N86); Finance Officer of the Surface Warfare Enterprise; Executive Assistant to the Director, Office of Program Appraisal, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV OPA). Additionally, he has served in the Programming Division of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV N80), and as a Type Desk officer on the staff of the Commander, Naval Surface Forces, Atlantic. Tillotson was born in Pocatello, Idaho and received his commission through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program at the University of Washington. After attending the Surface Warfare Officers School Division Officer course in San Diego, California, he served in USS Dubuque (LPD 8) as Ordnance Officer, Administrative Officer and Navigator, then home ported in Sasebo, Japan. Following his tour in USS Dubuque, Tillotson attended the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, California, earning a Masters of Science in Operations Analysis. Upon gradua tion from NPS he served as Combat Systems Officer in USS John A. Moore (FFG 19), and C4I Officer in USS Peleliu (LHA 5) both home ported in San Diego, California. Other sea duty assignments include serv ing as executive officer in USS De Wert (FFG 45) and USS OBannon (DD 987) in Mayport. Tillotson commanded USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) also home ported in Mayport. During his command tour the ship deployed to the Second, Fourth, Sixth, Fifth, and Seventh Fleets. Tillotson s shore duty assignments include the Ballistic Missile Defense Division Chief for Commander, United States Northern Command within the Directorate of Operations (USNORTHCOM J31). He also served in the Surface Warfare Directorate of the Chief of Naval Operations Staff (N96), where he was responsible for various current and advanced Land Attack Warfare and Naval Surface Fires Support Programs. He was the Lieutenant Commander Detailer and Deputy Director for Surface Warfare Officer Distribution (PERS 41), Naval Personnel Command, Millington, Tennessee. He is also a graduate of the National War College with a Masters of Science Degree in National Security Strategy. Most recently, Tillotson served as the Future Operations Director on the staff of United States Naval Forces Central Command in Manama Bahrain. He has been the Deputy Commodore of Destroyer Squadron 14 since October 2012. From Page 1DESRON 14From Page 1CNRSE Ask the docBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Question: How concerned should I be with melanoma? Answer: One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of their lifetime. Although melanoma accounts for less than five percent of skin cancer cases, it causes the major ity of skin cancer deaths. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun and indoor tan ning are major risk fac tors. Check your skin regu larly, preferably once a month, looking for any unusual mole, sore, lump, blemish, mark ing or change in skin appearance. Watch for ABCDE warning signs: Asymmetry (half of a mole or birthmark doesnt match the other), Border (the edges are irregu lar, ragged, notched, or blurred), Color (the color is not the same all over), Diameter (the spot is larger than 6 millime ters across), or Evolving (the mole is changing in size, shape, or color). If you find any of these, get it checked by your health care provider immedi ately. And remember that some melanomas dont fit these rules. Its important to tell your doctor about any changes or new spots on the skin, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles. Find our more from the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optom etrist, please send it to kwaskthedoc@med.navy. mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 13

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14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 of the Organizational Clothing Working Group. We made the decision to supply flame-resistant coveralls to all Sailors assigned to ships as an added safety precau tion, said Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Sailors at sea oper ate in an environment with inherent risks. We are always looking for ways to mitigate those risks. The FRV coverall will com bine the existing blue utility coverall design with the flameresistant fabric of the repair locker coverall. In January, the Organizational Clothing Working Group began review ing all the clothing require ments and flame resistant qualities of fleet organizational clothing being worn at sea on ships, submarines and in expe ditionary units. We reviewed all fire-related mishap reports and major ship conflagrations over the past 30 years. We looked at personnel injuries sustained as a result of explosive blast, electric arc flash, flame and smoke, said Capt. Bruce Brosch, team lead for the Organizational Clothing Working Group. We found the highest risk of severe injury from flame would be from a major conflagration a fire or explosion large enough to go beyond the control of repair parties and threaten ship sur vival. The Navy has averaged one to two major conflagrations per year over the past thirty years. Flame resistant organiza tional clothing had previously been limited to Sailors work ing in engineering departments, on flight decks and in other high-risk areas, but the working group ultimately decided every Sailor afloat should be outfitted with the additional protection. The bottom line was simple. Any Sailor at sea could be on the end of a hose fighting a fire with little or no notice. The Navy will initially issue two pairs of FRV coveralls to each Sailor serving on board surface ships and aircraft carri ers. Type commanders will pri oritize the distribution. The coverall is expected to maintain performance proper ties, durability and appearance for typical deployments of six to nine months, with an opti mal wear life of 18-24 months. Like other organizational cloth ing, the FRV coveralls will be replaced by each ship over time based on normal wear and tear. Materials that make the cov eralls flame-resistant are incor porated into the fabric fibers. Wear life is dependent on many factors, including wear and cleaning frequency, clean ing method and environmental exposure. Research by the Organizational Clothing Working Group revealed numerous different organi zational clothing styles and types being used throughout the fleet. In order to standard ize fleet coverall usage, a lon ger-term solution is also being researched. The goal is to even tually combine the flame-resistant properties of the existing engineering/damage control coveralls with the arc flash pro tection of the existing electrical coverall and submarine low-lint specifications. The new coverall design will be modeled after the existing poly-cotton utility cov erall issued in the sea-bag. The Navy is using avail able fleet funding to pay for this organizational clothing. Currently, the estimated perunit cost for the FRV coverall is $50.24. The cost to research and issue the new FRV coverall is approximately $12 million. The Organizational Clothing Working Group findings were passed to a second group, the Shipboard Clothing Working Group, which is tasked to determine the requirements for all at-sea clothing. Findings from the Shipboard Clothing Working Group are expected later this year.From Page 1CoverallsKeep Your Family Safe From Mosquito-born IllnessesFrom Mayport EnvironmentalMosquito season is rampant at Naval Station Mayport with all the rainfall over the past month. With the discovery of one case of West Nile Virus transmitted by mosquitos, residents are urged to take precautions against bites. There are a number of measures that people can take to help reduce the likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes, and the chance of contracting a mosquito-borne disease. A variety of mosqui to species inhabit the Station. While all mos quito larvae develop in water, each species favors a different type of water in which to breed. A number of mosquito species prefer man-made containers, such as tires, discarded cans, buckets, pools, and containment areas. Still others prefer to breed in stagnant water, while some species breed pri marily in swamps and marshes, some in fresh water, and others in salt water. Development from egg to adult can be completed in as little as 6-7 days in the summer. Residents and workers on the Station should be on the look-out for potential mosquito breeding con tainers and drain them, remove them, or store them so they cannot hold water. Standing or stag nant water issues should be reported to the Public Works Department. The best ways to avoid mosquito bites are to avoid infested areas, wear protective clothing, and wear insect repellent. While avoiding infested areas isnt practical in many areas of the Station due to the large amount of surrounding wetland, proper clothing and insect repellents can go a long way to reduce mosquito bites. There are several effective insect repellents on the market for personal use, however only those registered by the US Environmental Protection Agency should be used. At certain times, mosquito populations become so large that even with personnel tak ing personal measures to prevent exposure, they become such a nuisance that they interfere with the mission or prevent enjoyment of the out doors. There are several mosquito light traps loca tions on the Station that monitor mosquito popu lations. Personnel from Preventive Medicine at the Branch Health Clinic evaluate the number and type of mosquitoes caught in the traps to determine when mosquito control treatments are necessary. Another important component of track ing mosquito popula tions and determining the need for treatment is mosquito bite complaints from individuals. To report issues with mos quito populations that are interfering with the mis sion of your organization or quality of life, contact Preventive Medicine at: mayport.prevmed@med. navy.mil. Preventive Medicine will confirm the problem and arrange for appropriate control measures to be applied through the Public Works Department. Its Your Duty! Make Sure To Pick It UpStation Water Quality ManagerNaval Station Mayports ongoing commitment to being the solution to stormwater pollu tion results in a vari ety of initiatives. One of these initiatives that may seem minor is actu ally an important part of keeping our river clean and safe to use. Pet waste stations have been installed at both RV Parks on base and at the entrances to a number of the beach dune cross overs. Additional pet waste stations have been placed in strategic loca tions throughout Family Housing including at the Bark Park dog park. Dog waste left on park grass, the beach, and along trails is a common problem that generates many complaints. While the majority of dog own ers act responsibly by picking up after their pets, the few who dont cause a very significant problem. Besides being smelly, visually unappealing, and messy to step in, pet waste is also an envi ronmental and health issue. Pet waste isone of theleading causes of bacterial contamination of waterways in Duval County. Pet waste can also contribute to prob lems of excess nitrogen in the St Johns River. Roundworms, E. coli and Giardia are a fewof the harmful microorganisms that can pollute surface waters and possibly be transmitted in pet waste to humans or even other pets. Microorganisms from pet waste left on the ground dont just go away. They may stay viable in the environment for sev eral months. Children who play outdoors and adults who work in their gardens are at the great est risk for contacting pet waste and contracting infection. Surface waters with bacterial contamination may become unus able for such activities as fishing, shellfish harvest ing, and swimming. Naval Station Mayport partners with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the City of Jacksonville, JEA, and the beach communities on a management plan to reduce bacterial contamination in Sherman Creek, a tributary of the St. Johns River which runs through the Station. Provision of the pet waste stations is one of the projects initi ated to support that plan. Prior to the installa tion of the stations, many pet owners were already bringing their own plas tic bags with them when they walked their dogs. There are times, howev er, when the pets would do their business unex pectedly and the owners would be caught without something to pick up the waste. The pet waste stations are provided in rec reational areas to make it easier for pet owners to clean up after their dogs by having bags available where they are most likely to be needed. Dumpsters were already located in these areas so that after use, the bags would only have to be carried a short distance for disposal. The key to success for this program is for pet owners to actually use and properly dispose of the bags. Many posi tive comments have been received from pet owners and large quanti ties of the bags are being used, especially at the RV Parks. Still, not everyone is cooperating with the program. Even with the installation of pet waste stations, a few pet own ers still resist cleaning up after their dogs. Dog piles have been observed within just a few feet of the stations. Station residents who own pets can also con tribute to the effort to reduce bacterial pollution in local surface waters such as Sherman Creek by properly disposing of their pets waste. Proper disposal consists of col lection and placement of pet waste in the trash. Dog waste is acceptable in household trash as long as its bagged and in a trash can. Pet wastes may never be placed down a storm drain and shouldnt be tossed into the bushes. The solution to pol lution from pet waste is easy: Scoop the poop, bag it, and place it in the trash. For fur ther information, con tact the Station Water Quality Manager, Scott Dombrosky, at 270-6781.-Photo SubmittedMosquitos cover the pants of a pedestrian out for a morn ing walk. A case of West Nile Virus was confirmed in Duval County last week. Residents should take precau tions against the disease carrying insects. Conservation Pays Back-Photo by Jessica EnnisPictured from left, Finegan Elementary Assistant Principal, Jeff Collins; Community Manager, Heather Sanders; Assistant Community Manager, Victoria Dietzel. The money was earned by the base housing community reaching a 50 per cent participation goal in the Switch 4 Good program. From the office of Congressman Ander CrenshawCongressman Ander Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, will hold his 2013 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor veterans and active duty members who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm in November. The application deadline for those who have not previously been recognized with Special Recognition Certificate is Oct. 4. Through the years, Congressman Crenshaw has recognized thousands of veterans who served from the 1940s through Desert Storm. However, some vet erans who served dur ing this time period may not have been hon ored because Federal Congressional district lines were redrawn at the beginning of 2013 and eligible veterans did not pre viously live in the Fourth Congressional District. Veterans who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm, live in the Fourth Congressional District, and would like to participate are encouraged to contact Congressman Crenshaws District Office in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481 or go to his official web site at Crenshaw. house.gov to obtain an application. Click on Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly on the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the application. Completed applica tions and proof of eligi bility should be mailed to the following address: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibil ity for the certificate, vet erans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Active duty members who wear the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify.Ceremony To Honor Vets From Desert Shield/Storm

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com USS Gettysburg Holds The Line Fleet To Get Fire Resistant Coveralls From Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) and U.S. Pacific Fleet (PACFLT) will distribute flameresistant coveralls to the shipboard Sailors beginning early next year. The two fleet commanders decided to approve a Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coverall to ensure the safety of all shipboard Sailors after reviewing the findings -Photo by MC2 Donald R. White Jr.Sailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) hold the phone and distance line on the forecastle during an underway replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Patuxent (T-AO 201). Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Williamson Takes Helm Of CNRSE Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsCommander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) held a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Aug. 29. During the ceremo ny, Rear Adm. Rick Williamson relieved Rear Adm. John C. Jack Scorby Jr., as the regions commander. I can now attest first hand that the flawless reputation this region enjoys around the fleet is extremely well deserved, Williamson said. I am amazed not only at the quality of programs at our installations, but also the sheer magnitude of Sailors and families you serve throughout the region. Im sure it will be an honor and a privi lege to work with each of you over the next couple years. Williamson is a Jacksonville native and a 1985 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, where he earned a bachelors degree in computer sci ence. He also holds a masters in business administration from the Naval Post Graduate School and is a gradu ate of the Armed Forces Staff College. Williamson reported to CNRSE from his previous assignment as Commander, Navy Region Midwest. Vice Adm. William D. French, command er, Naval Installations Command, was guest speaker. Rear Adm. Williamson is an outstanding naval officer with significant operational experience as a surface warfare offi cer, French said during his remarks. I know hes excited to be back home in Jacksonville and ready for the great challeng es and rewards that this region offers. -Photos by MC1 Greg JohnsonVice Adm. William D. French, commander, Naval Installations Command, was guest speaker at the Navy Region Southeast change of command ceremony Aug. 29 for Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. (left) and Rear Adm. Rick Williamson aboard NAS Jacksonville.DESRON 14 Holds Change of CommandFrom StaffCapt. Ryan C. Tillotson relieved Capt. Paul E. Flood as Commander Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 during a pier side change of command ceremony on Aug. 30. The change of command was followedby a retirement ceremony for Flood, who plans on staying in the Jacksonville area with his family. Prior to his serving as Commander of DESRON 14, he served as Program Manager for the Biological Threat Reduction Program, in the Cooperative Threat Reduction Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. He has served as a United States Navy Surface Warfare Officer since his com missioning in February 1986. Flood commanded USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60) from March 2004 through November 2005, leading the ship dur ing her operational deployments to Southeast Asia for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT 05), and South East Asia Cooperation Against Terrorism (SEACAT 05). Flood served as Task Group Sea Combat Commander and Task Group Screen Commander for the five ship deployment group, and led ships from five South East Asian navies. He was the first Commanding Officer of USS Shamal (PC 13) taking her from fleet introduction through her first operational deployment to Southern Command. Flood was executive officer on USS Ingraham (FFG 61), overseeing the training and preparations for RIMPAC and an Arabian Gulf deployment. His other sea tours include Engineer Officer on USS -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Ryan C. Tillotson reads his orders to relieve Capt. Paul E. Flood as Commander Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 during a pierside change of command ceremony on Aug. 30.See CNRSE, Page 13 See DESRON 14, Page 13 See Coveralls, Page 14

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Throughout elemen tary, middle, and high school my husband was responsible for getting our two daughters out of bed and off to school since his work day started much later than mine. As part of getting them off to school, his task included making their daily lunch sandwiches. For years we would buy healthy ingre dients for sandwiches and accompanying snacks. Then one day I discov ered behind the drivers seat on the floorboard of my older daughters car a mound of brown sand wich bags with the care fully prepared lunches still inside each bag. Needless to say that was the end of lunch preparation for the girls! We are now into the 3rd or 4th week of school depending on when your county started, and you are probably already out of ideas for bag lunches much less healthy bag lunches. Your children are complaining that they are tired of peanut but ter and jelly and want Lunchables those neat ly packaged, expensive treats, which according to your children, other chil dren bring EVERY day! To provide you with some ideas for not only your childrens lunch es but also your own, I checked out several sites on the internet. In an online article by Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, the Recipe Doctor for WebMD, she explains that lunchbox ideas are based on four key elements: Include more whole foods and less pro cessed foods. Choose lunch items with higher amounts of fiber and nutrients children need (like calcium, protein, and vitamin C). Include fewer processed foods such as cookies, chips, and snack cakes, which have higher sodium, added sugar, and saturated fat. Be creative. Think out side the lunchbox. Does your child enjoy cheese pizza, Chinese chicken salad, or veggie/soy corn dogs at home? With a little forethought and a reus able cold pack, you can probably pack them for lunch, too. Keep it cold. For safe tys sake, pack lunch with a reusable ice pack. Better yet, freeze a small water bottle or box of 100% juice. Your child will have a slushy drink to enjoy at lunch and wont have to worry about bringing an ice pack home. Keep it fun. Include items that kids can stack or mix up to their taste when they eat. Remember that kids like to dunk, and include healthy dips with vegetables or other items. Cut foods into fun shapes with cookie cutters. While some of these were good tips like freezing the juice box or water bottle to keep the lunch cool, others like cutting food into fun shapes with cookie cutters seemed time consuming for an already harried morning rush to get out of the door. But what do I know? Here are a few more tips from Dr. Magee that might just be the perfect lunch for your child. Mediterranean Pita Pocket. Fill a pita pock et with falafel balls and some homemade or store-bought hummus. Some falafel balls come cooked and ready to add. Fruit and Cheese Plate. Fill a divided plastic container with assorted cubes or slices of reduced fat cheese, easy-to-eat fruit such as apple and pear slices, grapes, or melon, and whole-wheat crack ers. Peanut Butter Fun Pack. Make a peanut butter fun pack by spooning two tablespoons of naturalstyle peanut butter in a reusable plastic container, along with whole wheat crackers or whole wheat pita pocket wedges and raw vegetables such as celery, zucchini, or jicama sticks. Everything Is Better on a Mini Bagel. Wholewheat bagels are a won derful foundation for hardy sandwiches which stand up to being in a backpack or locker all morning. Start with one regular or a few mini bagels. Add tuna or lean, roasted, and sliced turkey. Top it off with reduced-fat cheese and fresh tomato, onion, and Romaine let tuce or sprouts. Two mini bagels can supply 6 grams of fiber to the meal. Its a Wrap! Wraps are a nice change of pace from the usual sandwich. Use a high-fiber multigrain flour tortilla. Spread on mustard, hummus, light salad dressing, or green or sundried tomato pesto. Then fill er up with chicken Caesar salad or assort ed lean meats, cheese, tomato, sliced onion, and shredded Romaine let tuce. Just roll it up and wrap in foil. Talk About Taquitos. Taquitos are easy to eat and easy to pack. In the morning, lay a few bean and cheese frozen taqui tos on a small sheet of foil. Pop them into a toaster oven to crisp them up. Wrap them up in the foil and slide them in your childs lunch bag. For a vegetarian option, try bean taquitos. Add some of these to round out your childs lunch: sugar added) ; such as pomegranate or cranberry-raspberry (also with no sugar added); (if age and allergy appro priate), such as walnuts, pistachios, peanuts, or sunflower seeds; to pack) such as carrot sticks, sugar snap peas, celery, or jicama sticks; able in 2 percent sharp cheddar, part skim-milk mozzarella, pepper jack, and more; and (individually wrapped) with 3 or more grams of fiber, less than 10 grams sugar, and no more than 1 gram saturated fat If you enjoyed these ideas, Dr. Magee is the author of numerous books on nutrition and health. Her opinions and conclusions from this WebMD article are her own. Or for more healthy eating ideas, go to http:// Kidshealth.org/parent/ nutrition for more ideas on healthy lunches for kids. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Health Tips For Brown Bagging For StudentsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAfter nearly 20 years of marriage, my husband and I decided to separate. No, he wasnt having a midlife crisis, although he had become quite heavyhanded with his cologne lately. I wasnt feeling neglected, although his idea of a fun Saturday night was Dominoes and House Hunters reruns. No one was drinking exces sively, although we were buying more lite beer than milk these days. There were no irreconcil able differences, although he never did learn how to use the remote. Really, we were quite happy. We just thought it would be best for the kids if we went our separate ways for a while. You see, were a Navy family. And like all mili tary families, were often faced with logistical dilemmas that force us to consider separation to preserve stability through transitions. In such cir cumstances, the entire family experiences the hardships of temporary separation. However, the fringe benefits of such an arrangement are often unfairly dispersed. In other words -the hus band totally makes out on this deal, every time. The last time we sepa rated, I stayed in Germany to let the kids finish the school year, while my husband moved ahead of us to Florida to start his new job. For four months before we flew to Florida to join him, my husband was a Geobachelor. Sure, the Geobachelors life can be a bit lonely, all holed up in the base hotel for weeks on end with nothing but work, gym, books, television, and take out; but this temporary period of soli tude offers the husband complete and utter free dom from the trappings of marriage and family life. While the wife and kids are locked into a typical hectic family routine, the Geobachelor faces tough decisions such as, Hmm, maid service again today, or shall I make my own bed for a change? Sports bar with the guys, or eat dinner at my workmates house (his wife does make great lasagna after all)? Read another book, or watch the premium channels we dont have at home? Recently, my husband called from Florida. I left him there on June 10th so the kids and I could take the summer to get settled at our new duty station in Rhode Island before school started. Its hotter than blaz es down here, he said between sips of cold beer, so, what have you and the kids been up to? In excruciating detail, I vented to my husband about repairs being done to our base house, about need ing money for our sons textbooks, about trying to fit in with the neighbors, about the cable bill, about the dog having diarrhea at 3:00 a.m., about the mouse that ran across the family room. Hold on Honey, he interrupted, Sure, Ill take another one of Its Not All Cake As The Geobachelors WifeLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesWednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 was the 50th Anniversary of the Dr. Martin Luther Kings March on Washington. The day offered a spe cial opportunity for people to gather in our Nations capital and remember not just the vision of Dr. King but the long road that civil rights have traveled over the past 50 years. There are other events which took place in that seminal year that also cast a long shadow on the hearts and minds of our nation. The spring of that year brought Dr. King and a non-violent protest to Birmingham, Alabama. What the nation watched on their televisions is still difficult for many to understand, fire-hoses pelting the crowds, police with German shepherds biting and threatening black protestors, without a doubt, one of the dark est chapters in our history as a nation. One television jux taposed the protests in Alabama with the March on Washington, D.C. as an effort to bring the subject of civil rights into the federal consciousness. The special focused not only on Dr. King, but others who spoke that day and the hopes and dreams of all who had marched and gath ered around the Lincoln Memorial. Some of these individuals picked up the mantle of the civil rights struggle after Dr. Kings assassina tion; others were children and youth who wanted to be there to be a part of that special moment in time. There was an over whelming feeling that many of the marchers shared with reporters from that day. There was a sense of value that was felt for each person that their lives could change. For a little while, things did change, even in that city that was broadcast into homes just months earlier. But change did not take root for long. In September of 1963, the 16th Street Baptist Church was the target of a bombing that resulted in the death of four young girls. President John F. Kennedy appealed to nation that the time had come for the exercise of equality within our own borders and within two months, he would also lose his life. The 50th anniversary of Dr. Kings March on Washington and delivery of the I have a Dream speech could not be remembered without the terrible human cost that would be paid by many. Im sure that we all get caught up in the opera tional tempo and bat tle rhythms around us. Sometimes, we need to take a moment to pause and reflect on those peo ple who are giants of his tory and cast a long shadow across the years. They are not only deserving of our atten tion, their actions and stories have been woven into the fabric of our Nation. God bless be safe, and give thanks for the many freedoms that we enjoy.Giants Of History Cast Long ShadowsChap Tom Bingol Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSSee Wife, Page 10

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 Commands Compete In 6th DC Olympics Carney Reclaims Title Of Top DC Shop At NS MayportFrom StaffEleven Damage Control teams from 10 NS Mayports commands, including USCG Valiant and Afloat Training Group Mayport, gathered Aug. 29 to compete in the sixth annual Naval Station Mayport Damage Control (DC) Olympics held at the base Fire Fighting School. During the competi tion, teams participated in 10 events with indi vidual event scores being added up to determine the overall winner. Events included pipe patching, Oscar relay, damage control written test, quick reaction team test, shor ing and pipe patching, fire hose relay, CBR dress out, P-100 rigging, and a fire hose tug-o-war. This year, USS Carney took back the title as top DC team. The ship had the title for the first three competitions, spent the fourth year on deployment, and lost last year to USS Roosevelt. Afloat Training Group Mayport was recognized for having the most spirit during this years event. USS Hu City was also recognized for its victory over the other commands during the Hose Tug-ofWar. The DC Olympics was sponsored by Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site Mayport and Destroyer Squadron Fourteen (DESRON 14). USS Hu City dominates the tug-o-war competition, coming out as the winners against all the competitors. DESRON 14 Commodore Ryan Tillotson presents the first place trophy to Team Carney at the Sixth Annual DC Olympics sponsored by DESRON 14 and Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site Mayport.-Photos by Paige GnannDamage Controlman 3rd Class Willie Collins mans a fire main valve as Damage Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Vyacheslav Verbovskiy and Damage Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Jos Rosario from USS Carney dress in firefighting gear as part of the Quick Response event. USS Taylor gets set to compete in the tug-o-war event. Instructors from SWOS show their hose handling expertise during a tug-o-war against USS Hu City. USS Farragut moves the P-100 into position during the rigging event. Carney team aims to knock a tennis ball off a cone during the Quick Response event. USS Vicksburg untangles hoses during the Fire Hose Relay event. USS Simpson Team 1 races to dresses out in CBR gear.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 5 Above, MK1 Casey Welch with USCG Valiant hands off a message to a runner after Chief Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuel) Javier Yllanes of SWOS dictates the incident to him during the Message Board Relay (MBR) event. Left, a runner tries to peek at the board after bringing a message to his teammates from USS Robert G. Bradley. The team fromUSS Hu City moves Oscar onto a gurney as part of the Oscar relay event, in which teams have to locate and rescue a mannequin hidden inside a mock ship space. ATG Mayport team race to bring Oscar out of an enclosed space during the Oscar Relay event. Coasties from USCG Valiant watch their team mates go thru the Pipe Patching event at the Wet Trainer. Sailors from USS Philippine Seas team works to patch pipes in the Wet Trainer during the 6th annual DC Olympics competition. The team from USS Simpson 2 works to figure out how to shore a doorway inside the Wet Trainer. USCG Valiant wins third place in this years competition. USS Philippine Sea is awarded second place in the DC Olympics.

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 1: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 4: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 6: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Kansas City Chiefs. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Sept. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5:15 p.m. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 14: Car, Truck and Automobile Show. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. FREE. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 15: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 16: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sept. 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Sept. 22: Jacksonville Festival of Horrors. Van Departs 1 p.m. at Liberty Center. $20 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 19. Sept. 28: J acksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Bogeys Specials Thursday, Sept. 5 Buffalo Chicken Wrap with a Side, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Shrimp on Mixed Greens, $9.95 Soup: Shrimp Tomato Basil Friday, Sept. 6 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich with a side, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, Sept. 9 BBQ Pork Panini with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Spicy Chicken Tortilla Tuesday, Sept. 10 Balck and Blue Burger with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Taco Salad, $7.95 Soup: White Chicken Chili Wednesday, Sept. 11 8 Oz NY Strip Steak Teriyaki with Fried Rice and Stir Fried Vegetables, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Soup: Broccoli and Cheese Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, pickles, onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Chicken, Walnut & Fruit Salad, $8.50 Grilled or fried chicken breast served on a bed of mixed baby greens with caramelized walnuts, mandarin orange segments, sundried cranber ries, sliced cucumbers, carrots and your choice of dressing Filipino-Style Lumpia, $7 Seasoned ground beef with diced carrots & celery, deep fried to a golden crisp, served with sweet & sour sauce Turkey or Ham Club, $8 Smoked turkey or ham served on a French baguette w/ sliced tomato and arugula, drizzled with pesto, served with French fries Midwest Burger, $8 All-beef patty topped w/ seasoned pork and homemade coleslaw, served with crispy French Fries Summer Time Dogs (each), $7.50 topped with sauerkraut and English mustard, served with French Fries topped with chili and melted cheese, served with French Fries topped with topped with pickles, diced tomatoes and onions, served with French Fries French Dip, $8.50 New York-Style roast beef, thinsliced, grilled and topped with provolone cheese, piled high on a rustic roll and served with crispy French fries Whats To Eat 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013

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Auto Skills Center August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and dependents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be notified Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 6: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Over $43,000 in payouts. Only 225 packages available; mul tiple packages may be pur chased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 5: NFL Regular Season Kick Off Party. 8:30 pm kickoff Baltimore vs. Denver. Drink specials, free food, cornhole tournament and more. 2707205 Sept. 7: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and opportunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Sept. 4: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Sept. 18: Game Night. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. Sept. 27: Reggae Night. 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Sea World/Busch Gardens Military Special. Qualified ser vice members and veterans can receive off a 1-day pass to Sea World or Busch Gardens from now until Nov. 11, 2013. Offer only available at ITT office. 2705145 Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering banner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Sept. 10: Freedom 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowling for active duty when they bring a nonactive duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day MWR Sports/Fitness Sept 6: Freedom FridayMovie Madness. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 7

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HSL-48 Detachment 5 Keeps PaceSailors approach an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to HSL-48 to conduct a refueling on the flight deck of USS Monterey.-Photos by MC3 Billy HoSailors clear the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) after refueling an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48. Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Above, Lt. Andrew Poulin, left, of HSL-48 speaks to Sailors during an aviation safety stand down aboard USS Monterey. Right, Lt. Cmdr. Stuart Lindley assigned to the Vipers of HSL-48 plays a game during a steel beach picnic aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey. Boatswain's Mate Seaman Recruit Jordan Selig, left, shows Lt. Andrew Poulin of HSL-48, a fuel sample on the flight deck of USS Monterey. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 9

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From FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 5, 6-8 p.m., Jump Start Your Career Ribault Bay Community Center Sept. 5, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 5, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 5, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, and encourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Sept. 5-6, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Boots to Business Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 9, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Sept. 9, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 9, 1-3:30 p.m., New Dads Class, USO This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and toddlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowledge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. Sept. 9-13, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 11, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 11, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-noon, Survivor Benefit Plan FFSC Building 1 Room 719 Sept. 11, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help participants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. Sept. 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 12, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 16-20, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Military Spouse 101 Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The Fleet and Family Support Center offers this class to military spouses new to the area, and those new to the military way of life. Guest speakers from the military and civilian communities will pres ent useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. Sept. 17, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. Sept. 23-27, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 104Sept. 23-27, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 11 a.m.noon, Planning For Your Retirement FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 30, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 these, and how about the Buffalo Chicken Wrap with Onion Rings? As I heard him ask the wait ress what she thought of the coleslaw, I wondered whether I could convince the kids to eat popcorn again for dinner. Where are you, any way? I inquired, know ing that he had been staying with friends since he moved out of our old house. Well, I wanted to get out of Calvins hair for the day, so I got a new book, went to the spa, and have been wandering around Fernandina Beach all afternoon. Wait, what? You went to a spa? I said, looking at my nails, which were mangled from all the unpacking. You knew I was plan ning to get my back waxed, Honey, he said defensively, and I decid ed to treat myself to a massage too. . Honey? You still there? I was too busy wonder ing if Id ever get to extract myself from the neverending hamster wheel of motherhood and fam ily life, and feel the unbridled, rollicking, deliciously reclusive, self-indul gently relaxing experience of being a Geobachelor. After a long pause, I finally responded, Do they have chocolate cake on the dessert menu at that restaurant? Yea, why? my hus band wondered. Never mind, just order it, with a big scoop of ice cream on top. I guess someones gotta do it. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com From Page 2SpouseFFSC Offers Classes For Sailors, FamiliesPreparing For Deployment-Photo by Paige GnannTara Dotson with 1 1/2 year old son Graham and Victoria Torres man a bake sale table at the Navy Federal Credit Union. The sales went to fund children activities for the family support group while the ship is deployed. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013

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NEX Hosts CPO Select Uniform Night-Photos by Paige GnannChief Petty Officer Selects from Naval Station Mayport and its tenant commands enjoy an evening of shopping, door prizes and food thanks to the Mayport Navy Exchange (NEX). This is the 13th year Mayport NEX has held the event for the Selects. Selectees receive a gift bag and sign up for door prizes. Chief Select Operations Specialist McCajor Quinn pulls a name for the next door prize winner for NS Mayport CMC Bob White. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 11

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DoN Prepares To Face New ChallengesBy Defense Media Activity NavySecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus directed the office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy/Deputy Chief Management Officer (DUSN/DCMO) to begin a comprehensive assess ment of the business challenges facing the Navy and Marine Corps on Aug. 30. He also instructed the offices of the DUSN/ DCMO to begin devel oping a plan to address the multiple budgetary and resource challeng es currently facing the Department of the Navy. This is about bringing real change to our department, said Mabus. This will ensure that the Navy and Marine Corps team remains the most effec tive and efficient expedi tionary fighting force the world has ever known. Weve faced these challenges in the past, said newly-appointed DUSN/DCMO Tom Hicks, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy. But, to me, whats different now is that the scale is different and the stakes are higher. As the Navy and Marine Corps continue to adapt to an evolving fiscal and global environment after more than a decade of sustained conflict, they face a series of new chal lenges. We dont have a choice, said Hicks. We have to be out in front on this. The fiscal resourc es are very constrained and thats not something thats going to end any time soon. It is, however, something that comes with the opportunity to really think, strategi cally, about how we con duct the business of the Department of the Navy in a way that maintains and protects the mission. Whats paramount, Hicks said, is being able to accomplish the mission and being able to do so in a way that responds to the realities of the resources we have. Hicks, and those work ing in the office of the DUSN/DCMO, were selected to address possible areas of improvement in the business practices of the Department of the Navy due to a proven ability to drive change and the offices position within the departments organi zation. His (Hickss) leader ship as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy and his entire career have proven Mr. Hickss inno vative vision and capac ity to drive organizational change, exactly the cre dentials and mission for the DUSN/DCMO, said Mabus. Hicks looks forward to the task ahead. We need to look at this as an opportunity to become the most efficient organization we can be in order to accomplish the mission when were called upon, said Hicks. Fiscal challenges put a strain on, for example, how, where and when we train. Thats something we have to make sure doesnt happen again and, through this effort, I think we can ensure that it doesnt, Hicks said. What this means for Sailors and Marines is that they will be able to do more of what weve actually asked them to do. Mabus directed the DUSN/DCMO to focus on the Secretary of the Navy priorities of people, plat forms, power and part nerships in accomplish ing several specific tasks including: Developing and implementing a vision for large-scale Department of the Navy transforma tion to include clear goals and performance assess ments. Resolving the Department of the Navys most pressing and com plex business challenges. Identifying opportu nities to shape and posi tion the Department of the Navy to meet future budget and resource challenges. An initial business transformation plan, an assessment of the Departments biggest challenges, and a plan of action and milestones to include a plan for reshaping the Department of the Navy as part of a 20-per cent headquarters man power reduction are due to the Secretary of the Navy within 90 days. While Hicks will head this drive to improve the Department of the Navys business practices, the initiative will require the efforts of the entire orga nization. My goal is to do this in a way that it is a collab orative effort across the Department of the Navy to identify opportunities for efficiencies, financial savings and staff savings, said Hicks. This is a proactive chance for us to be able to position ourselves to be able to conduct the Departments missions in the future. Shipshape Start DateFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Sept. 10 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty personnel, adult dependents, and retirees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calories, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more information, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-2705251 ext. 16. Sept. 6 and 7 Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach will be hosting our annual Fall Rummage Sale 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Church at 400 Penman Road. Furniture, clothing, linens and lots of unique items are waiting for you along with biscuits and gravy for breakfast and sandwiches, soups and baked goods for sale each day. For informa tion, call 249-5370. Saturday, Sept. 7 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is host ing a one-day only used art book sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The com munity to browse the beautiful art history and gardening books avail able for purchase this day only. All funds from the book sale will support the Museums ongoing mission of engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural commu nities. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Tuesday, Sept. 10 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a Fall Gardening Workshop from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Road. The cost is $5 to attend. Topics include Garden Recyclables, Tips for Fall Edibles, and Gardening in Raised Beds. To pre-reg ister, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. The Jacksonville Public Library, 303 Laura St. N., is partnering with local organizations to host a free Community Resource and Career Fair featuring 17 compa nies looking for potential employees and 10 agen cies with resources avail able to help job seekers from 9 a.m. Noon. In addition, free workshops covering How to Write a Winning Resume, 7 Ways to Stand Out From the Crowd, and Personal BrandingInterview Techniques, will be offered. Saturday, Sept. 14 An Eating and Growing Seasonally Workshop; Learning how to grow cool-season veg etables, Composting, and Food sampling using seasonal produce at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9 a.m.1 p.m.. Cost is $10 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Volunteers needed for Childrens Tumor Foundation NF WALK at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens. Checkin is 7:30a.m. walk and 5k fun run at 8:30 a.m. Register your team at WWW.NFWalk.org/ jacksonville2013. Fees: Adults $25 and Children $15. Questions contact Chrissie Connors at cconnors@ctf.org or 904-6195130 Trish (leave mes sage.) Come celebrate five centuries of Spanish influence in Florida with an informative talk at 2 p.m. about the San Juan del Puerto Mission on Ft. George Island. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Friday, Sept 20 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Make-and-take Rain Barrel Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-noon. The workshop will be located at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. The cost is $45 per person to make a rain barrel, $5 for attendance only (no rain bar rel) For questions, call 904-255-7450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013

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Scorby, who was awarded the Legion of Merit during the ceremony, had commanded CNRSE since August 2011. Under his leadership, instal lations throughout the region made significant reductions in energy costs through an active region al energy council that exceeded the fiscal year 2013 energy usage reduc tion goal of 24 percent. He was also instrumental in the Navys pursuit of compatible land-use strategies, which includ ed the Navys installation wind turbine impact analysis study that developed a nationally support ed legislative outreach effort and ensured safer air operation areas and mutual co-existence. At the end of the day, its been one team, mili tary and civilian, and you proved it day after day, Scorby said. The personal award that I received today belongs to all of you and I will think of each and every one of you each time I pin it on. Scorby will assume command of Navy Region Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia in October. Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), and Main Propulsion Assistant on USS JOHN KING (DDG 3). Floods shore tours include Financial Branch Head for the Surface Warfare Directorate, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV N86); Finance Officer of the Surface Warfare Enterprise; Executive Assistant to the Director, Office of Program Appraisal, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV OPA). Additionally, he has served in the Programming Division of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV N80), and as a Type Desk officer on the staff of the Commander, Naval Surface Forces, Atlantic. Tillotson was born in Pocatello, Idaho and received his commission through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program at the University of Washington. After attending the Surface Warfare Officers School Division Officer course in San Diego, California, he served in USS Dubuque (LPD 8) as Ordnance Officer, Administrative Officer and Navigator, then home ported in Sasebo, Japan. Following his tour in USS Dubuque, Tillotson attended the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, California, earning a Masters of Science in Operations Analysis. Upon gradua tion from NPS he served as Combat Systems Officer in USS John A. Moore (FFG 19), and C4I Officer in USS Peleliu (LHA 5) both home ported in San Diego, California. Other sea duty assignments include serving as executive officer in USS De Wert (FFG 45) and USS OBannon (DD 987) in Mayport. Tillotson commanded USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) also home ported in Mayport. During his command tour the ship deployed to the Second, Fourth, Sixth, Fifth, and Seventh Fleets. Tillotson s shore duty assignments include the Ballistic Missile Defense Division Chief for Commander, United States Northern Command within the Directorate of Operations (USNORTHCOM J31). He also served in the Surface Warfare Directorate of the Chief of Naval Operations Staff (N96), where he was responsible for various current and advanced Land Attack Warfare and Naval Surface Fires Support Programs. He was the Lieutenant Commander Detailer and Deputy Director for Surface Warfare Officer Distribution (PERS 41), Naval Personnel Command, Millington, Tennessee. He is also a graduate of the National War College with a Masters of Science Degree in National Security Strategy. Most recently, Tillotson served as the Future Operations Director on the staff of United States Naval Forces Central Command in Manama Bahrain. He has been the Deputy Commodore of Destroyer Squadron 14 since October 2012. From Page 1DESRON 14From Page 1CNRSE Ask the docBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Question: How concerned should I be with melanoma? Answer: One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of their lifetime. Although melanoma accounts for less than five percent of skin cancer cases, it causes the major ity of skin cancer deaths. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun and indoor tan ning are major risk fac tors. Check your skin regu larly, preferably once a month, looking for any unusual mole, sore, lump, blemish, mark ing or change in skin appearance. Watch for ABCDE warning signs: Asymmetry (half of a mole or birthmark doesnt match the other), Border (the edges are irregu lar, ragged, notched, or blurred), Color (the color is not the same all over), Diameter (the spot is larger than 6 millime ters across), or Evolving (the mole is changing in size, shape, or color). If you find any of these, get it checked by your health care provider immedi ately. And remember that some melanomas dont fit these rules. Its important to tell your doctor about any changes or new spots on the skin, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles. Find our more from the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optom etrist, please send it to kwaskthedoc@med.navy. mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 13

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14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013 of the Organizational Clothing Working Group. We made the decision to supply flame-resistant coveralls to all Sailors assigned to ships as an added safety precau tion, said Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Sailors at sea operate in an environment with inherent risks. We are always looking for ways to mitigate those risks. The FRV coverall will com bine the existing blue utility coverall design with the flameresistant fabric of the repair locker coverall. In January, the Organizational Clothing Working Group began review ing all the clothing require ments and flame resistant qualities of fleet organizational clothing being worn at sea on ships, submarines and in expe ditionary units. We reviewed all fire-related mishap reports and major ship conflagrations over the past 30 years. We looked at personnel injuries sustained as a result of explosive blast, electric arc flash, flame and smoke, said Capt. Bruce Brosch, team lead for the Organizational Clothing Working Group. We found the highest risk of severe injury from flame would be from a major conflagration a fire or explosion large enough to go beyond the control of repair parties and threaten ship sur vival. The Navy has averaged one to two major conflagrations per year over the past thirty years. Flame resistant organiza tional clothing had previously been limited to Sailors work ing in engineering departments, on flight decks and in other high-risk areas, but the working group ultimately decided every Sailor afloat should be outfitted with the additional protection. The bottom line was simple. Any Sailor at sea could be on the end of a hose fighting a fire with little or no notice. The Navy will initially issue two pairs of FRV coveralls to each Sailor serving on board surface ships and aircraft carri ers. Type commanders will pri oritize the distribution. The coverall is expected to maintain performance proper ties, durability and appearance for typical deployments of six to nine months, with an opti mal wear life of 18-24 months. Like other organizational clothing, the FRV coveralls will be replaced by each ship over time based on normal wear and tear. Materials that make the cov eralls flame-resistant are incor porated into the fabric fibers. Wear life is dependent on many factors, including wear and cleaning frequency, clean ing method and environmental exposure. Research by the Organizational Clothing Working Group revealed numerous different organi zational clothing styles and types being used throughout the fleet. In order to standard ize fleet coverall usage, a lon ger-term solution is also being researched. The goal is to eventually combine the flame-resistant properties of the existing engineering/damage control coveralls with the arc flash protection of the existing electrical coverall and submarine low-lint specifications. The new coverall design will be modeled after the existing poly-cotton utility cov erall issued in the sea-bag. The Navy is using avail able fleet funding to pay for this organizational clothing. Currently, the estimated perunit cost for the FRV coverall is $50.24. The cost to research and issue the new FRV coverall is approximately $12 million. The Organizational Clothing Working Group findings were passed to a second group, the Shipboard Clothing Working Group, which is tasked to determine the requirements for all at-sea clothing. Findings from the Shipboard Clothing Working Group are expected later this year.From Page 1CoverallsKeep Your Family Safe From Mosquito-born IllnessesFrom Mayport EnvironmentalMosquito season is rampant at Naval Station Mayport with all the rainfall over the past month. With the discovery of one case of West Nile Virus transmitted by mosquitos, residents are urged to take precautions against bites. There are a number of measures that people can take to help reduce the likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes, and the chance of contracting a mosquito-borne disease. A variety of mosqui to species inhabit the Station. While all mos quito larvae develop in water, each species favors a different type of water in which to breed. A number of mosquito species prefer man-made containers, such as tires, discarded cans, buckets, pools, and containment areas. Still others prefer to breed in stagnant water, while some species breed pri marily in swamps and marshes, some in fresh water, and others in salt water. Development from egg to adult can be completed in as little as 6-7 days in the summer. Residents and workers on the Station should be on the look-out for potential mosquito breeding con tainers and drain them, remove them, or store them so they cannot hold water. Standing or stag nant water issues should be reported to the Public Works Department. The best ways to avoid mosquito bites are to avoid infested areas, wear protective clothing, and wear insect repellent. While avoiding infested areas isnt practical in many areas of the Station due to the large amount of surrounding wetland, proper clothing and insect repellents can go a long way to reduce mosquito bites. There are several effective insect repellents on the market for personal use, however only those registered by the US Environmental Protection Agency should be used. At certain times, mosquito populations become so large that even with personnel tak ing personal measures to prevent exposure, they become such a nuisance that they interfere with the mission or prevent enjoyment of the out doors. There are several mosquito light traps locations on the Station that monitor mosquito popu lations. Personnel from Preventive Medicine at the Branch Health Clinic evaluate the number and type of mosquitoes caught in the traps to determine when mosquito control treatments are necessary. Another important component of track ing mosquito popula tions and determining the need for treatment is mosquito bite complaints from individuals. To report issues with mos quito populations that are interfering with the mis sion of your organization or quality of life, contact Preventive Medicine at: mayport.prevmed@med. navy.mil. Preventive Medicine will confirm the problem and arrange for appropriate control measures to be applied through the Public Works Department. Its Your Duty! Make Sure To Pick It UpStation Water Quality ManagerNaval Station Mayports ongoing commitment to being the solution to stormwater pollu tion results in a vari ety of initiatives. One of these initiatives that may seem minor is actu ally an important part of keeping our river clean and safe to use. Pet waste stations have been installed at both RV Parks on base and at the entrances to a number of the beach dune cross overs. Additional pet waste stations have been placed in strategic loca tions throughout Family Housing including at the Bark Park dog park. Dog waste left on park grass, the beach, and along trails is a common problem that generates many complaints. While the majority of dog own ers act responsibly by picking up after their pets, the few who dont cause a very significant problem. Besides being smelly, visually unappealing, and messy to step in, pet waste is also an envi ronmental and health issue. Pet waste isone of theleading causes of bacterial contamination of waterways in Duval County. Pet waste can also contribute to prob lems of excess nitrogen in the St Johns River. Roundworms, E. coli and Giardia are a fewof the harmful microorganisms that can pollute surface waters and possibly be transmitted in pet waste to humans or even other pets. Microorganisms from pet waste left on the ground dont just go away. They may stay viable in the environment for sev eral months. Children who play outdoors and adults who work in their gardens are at the great est risk for contacting pet waste and contracting infection. Surface waters with bacterial contamination may become unus able for such activities as fishing, shellfish harvest ing, and swimming. Naval Station Mayport partners with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the City of Jacksonville, JEA, and the beach communities on a management plan to reduce bacterial contamination in Sherman Creek, a tributary of the St. Johns River which runs through the Station. Provision of the pet waste stations is one of the projects initi ated to support that plan. Prior to the installa tion of the stations, many pet owners were already bringing their own plas tic bags with them when they walked their dogs. There are times, howev er, when the pets would do their business unex pectedly and the owners would be caught without something to pick up the waste. The pet waste stations are provided in rec reational areas to make it easier for pet owners to clean up after their dogs by having bags available where they are most likely to be needed. Dumpsters were already located in these areas so that after use, the bags would only have to be carried a short distance for disposal. The key to success for this program is for pet owners to actually use and properly dispose of the bags. Many posi tive comments have been received from pet owners and large quanti ties of the bags are being used, especially at the RV Parks. Still, not everyone is cooperating with the program. Even with the installation of pet waste stations, a few pet own ers still resist cleaning up after their dogs. Dog piles have been observed within just a few feet of the stations. Station residents who own pets can also con tribute to the effort to reduce bacterial pollution in local surface waters such as Sherman Creek by properly disposing of their pets waste. Proper disposal consists of col lection and placement of pet waste in the trash. Dog waste is acceptable in household trash as long as its bagged and in a trash can. Pet wastes may never be placed down a storm drain and shouldnt be tossed into the bushes. The solution to pol lution from pet waste is easy: Scoop the poop, bag it, and place it in the trash. For fur ther information, con tact the Station Water Quality Manager, Scott Dombrosky, at 270-6781.-Photo SubmittedMosquitos cover the pants of a pedestrian out for a morning walk. A case of West Nile Virus was confirmed in Duval County last week. Residents should take precau tions against the disease carrying insects. Conservation Pays Back-Photo by Jessica EnnisPictured from left, Finegan Elementary Assistant Principal, Jeff Collins; Community Manager, Heather Sanders; Assistant Community Manager, Victoria Dietzel. The money was earned by the base housing community reaching a 50 percent participation goal in the Switch 4 Good program. From the office of Congressman Ander CrenshawCongressman Ander Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, will hold his 2013 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor veterans and active duty members who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm in November. The application deadline for those who have not previously been recognized with Special Recognition Certificate is Oct. 4. Through the years, Congressman Crenshaw has recognized thousands of veterans who served from the 1940s through Desert Storm. However, some vet erans who served dur ing this time period may not have been hon ored because Federal Congressional district lines were redrawn at the beginning of 2013 and eligible veterans did not previously live in the Fourth Congressional District. Veterans who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm, live in the Fourth Congressional District, and would like to participate are encouraged to contact Congressman Crenshaws District Office in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481 or go to his official web site at Crenshaw. house.gov to obtain an application. Click on Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly on the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the application. Completed applica tions and proof of eligi bility should be mailed to the following address: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibil ity for the certificate, vet erans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Active duty members who wear the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify.Ceremony To Honor Vets From Desert Shield/Storm

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 5, 2013