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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00313

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Material Information

Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00313


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Heading To The Game-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyChief petty officer selectees assigned to Naval Station Mayport carry American flags as they run onto the field during Jacksonville Jaguars pregame events at Everbank Stadium. Current CPO selectees are going through CPO 365 Phase II training as they prepare to become chiefs. See more Chief Select photos, Page 9. -Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayports Nearly New Thift Shop has extra storage space in back thanks to the Mayport Area CPOA.Thrift Shop Gets Extra Space From Mayport CPOANavy Public Affairs Support Element Detachment SoutheastNaval Station Mayports Thrift Shop recently under went a face lift when the Mayport Area Chief Petty Officer Association (CPOA) completed an enclosed porch project which allotted the thrift shop a dry indoor storage area. The CPOA completed the enclosure at no cost to the thrift shop. All of the materials needed to complete the enclosed porch were provided through the CPOAs vig orous fundraising efforts. We asked if they (CPOA) needed us to buy anything and they said no, said Jackie Cannon, President of the Mayport Navy wives club. They said that they were going to get everything donated and they did. It looks really good and they did a great job! The porch, which was at the mercy of the elements, is now a multipurpose indoor storage unit that the thrift shop can use however it desires. The thrift shop used the porch as a screened in storage space before, said Senior Chief Electronics Technician Greg Davis. Every time it rained everything TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery Makes It Easy To Fill PrescriptionsNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterTRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers a safe, affordable and convenient method of getting prescriptions delivered to patients doors, by way of the U.S. Postal Service. Home Delivery includes gener ics at no-cost; a 90-day supply for most medications; refills by mail, phone or online; and an automatic refill option. Active duty have no co-pays, while other patients have no co-pay for generics, $13 for brand-name formulary and $43 for non-formulary. For brand-name and non-formulary medications, the co-pays for a 90-day supply are about the same as a 30-day supply from a retail pharmacya savings of up to 65 percent. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery is the least expen sive option when not using our branch health clinic pharmacy, said Cmdr. Michael Service, Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport officer in charge. And its the easiest option. By converting your current retail medications to Home Delivery, patients reduce out-of-pocket costs and gain con venient delivery. According to TRICARE, more than one million prescriptions are filled each month through Home Delivery, which is administered by Express Scripts, Inc. According to TRICARE, more than one million prescriptions are filled each month through Home Delivery, which is administered by Express Scripts, Inc. Home Delivery is best suited for maintenance medicationsthose taken on a regular basis. Benefits of Home Delivery include free generic medications, refill remind ers, help with renewing expired prescriptions, and a review of pre scription history to help prevent harmful drug interactions. One of the most popular features is the automatic refill option, which ensures that patients dont run out of their medications. Patients can also refill their prescriptions man ually by phone, mail or online. -Photo by Jacob SippelA Sailor receives prescription medications directly to his home via TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. Home Delivery offers a safe, affordable and convenient method of getting prescriptions delivered to patients doors, by way of the U.S. Postal Service. See Thrift Shop, Page 13 See TRICARE, Page 13

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, I want to thank everyone for the truly heartwarming welcome that Reyna and I have received since coming to Naval Station Mayport. For the last 23 years, Ive heard Mayport was the homeport of choice for the Navy and Im quickly learning why. From the moment we arrived, people have welcomed us with open arms. The secret to what makes Mayport the most wanted duty station in the Navy is the people. I thought I would start off this months column with my specific goals for this installation. First, it is important for everyone to understand that this instal lation exists solely to support the warf ighters who take our ships and aircraft over the horizon to do our nations busi ness. It is our responsibility to do our absolute best to sustain and enhance their operational readiness. Second, we must ensure that our hard working Sailors and civilians are given every opportunity to succeed both per sonally and professional. Speaking of which, advancement exams are quickly approaching and if you havent already been studying now is the time to start preparing. E-6 exams will be held on Sept. 5, followed soon after by E-5 exams on Sept. 12 and E-4 exams on Sept. 19. We will do everything we can to give you the tools to succeed, but its up to you to take advantage of them. For our civil ian shipmates, I know theres a sense of uncertainty concerning an impend ing Reduction in Force. I understand your concern and ask that each of you maintain faith in our leadership as they make critical decisions that ultimately affect our workforce. Andplease never forget that each of you are a vital part in the engine that keeps team Mayport steaming forward and without your critical skills and expertise, things just wouldnt operate the same. Thank you for what you do for this installation, for our Sailors and for our country each and every day. And third, but certainly not least, we must take care of our great families who ultimately enable us to serve. We have a lot of great support systems already in place here at Mayport, including Fleet and Family Support Center, MWR Youth Services and Child Development Center and the School Liaison Officer. I look forward to working with our local schools, including Finegan Elementary, Mayport Elementary and Mayport Middle in continuing their top-notch support. I know you have noticed the school buses out picking up the kids since school started back last week. Please make sure to slow it down and watch for our children as they head to and from school. Im excited about the challenges ahead and also about Naval Station Mayports exciting future. Over the next few years, Naval Station Mayport is going to be a completely different place. Im looking forward to starting it off with the arrival of three coastal patrol craft, USS Shamal (PC 13), USS Zephyr (PC 8) and USS Tornado (PC 14). Shamal will shift homeport to Mayport in September, followed by Zephyr and Tornado in November. All three ships are relocating from Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek and bringing approxi mately 90 crewmembers along with them. And, obviously, everybodys look ing forward to the arrival of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group. USS New York (LPD 21) will be the first to arrive in December followed closely by USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in the summer of 2014. Having these ships homeported at Naval Station Mayport is a big win for our installa tion, the city of Jacksonville, the Beaches Community, and for their Sailors and families who get to live and work in this incredible community. I am thrilled to be a part of the team in these extraordinarily challenging and exciting times and I look forward to working with all of you in the years to come. Please continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy. mil.Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSMost parents under stand the importance of being actively involved in their childrens educa tion. But as children get older, parents frequently become less and less involved in their schools. However, research indi cates that children are more likely to have a suc cessful school year if the parents are involved in their childrens school. One way to ensure that is to make a connection with the school by attend ing Open House. Area schools began their schedule of Open Houses as early as August 9th. (For local schools, see box.) And far from one more useless activity in an already over-sched uled life, Open House can actually provide a wealth of information for parents. This is a great opportu nity for parents to meet their childrens teachers, the school counselor, the principal, and other staff. Whether your child has one teacher or several, it is an ideal opportunity to meet the teacher(s) in one fell swoop. In middle and high schools youll follow your childrens sched ule by actually going to all of their classes. In all grade levels youll find out important dates, includ ing field trips and major class assignments; home work and test schedules; and most importantly how to contact the teach er. Open House IS NOT the time to try to have a private conference with your childs teacher. How could it be private with several parents in line behind you also wanting a chance to say a few words about their children to the teacher? As someone who taught 27 years, let me assure you that what parents share with the teacher on Open House night other than a quick Hello or Im Sarahs mom rarely sticks in the teachers mind. A high school teacher, for example, may have over 100 parents in attendance and, that is, if they teach the core. Pity the poor physical educa tion teachers who teach many more students than that. Open House IS the night to listen to what the teacher wants to share with you about the struc ture of the curriculum, how the class will be orga nized, the texts which will be used, frequency of homework, test sched ules, make-up policies, and, most importantly, how to get in touch with the teacher. Write this down! Many teachers now have they own email account or Facebook page. Any way you can get the informa tion will make it much easier to remind your child of an upcoming deadline or the need to study for those weekly spelling tests. Now that you know the regimen, youll be better prepared to talk privately with the teacher about your concerns about your child. And because you have the teachers pre ferred method for contact, it will be much easier for you to set up a parentteacher conference. Active parenting takes time, but the time you spend at an Open House will help your children be personally and academi cally successful. Your positive involvement and time, your childs time, and your childs teachers time are all directly relat ed to helping your child become tomorrows suc cessful adult. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for Local Schools Host Open House For ParentsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingI found a brand new pair of running shoes the other day. They werent at a sports store or a shopping mall; they were in my closet. I bought them almost two years ago and forgot about them. I found them in a suitcase while I was cleaning out my clos ets this week. Ironically, my closets were full of clothes, but they were all in luggage; everything from sea bags, garment bags, gym bags, back packs, you name the bag and I have it. Since 2008, Ive PCSed twice and deployed four times, so I have basically been living out of suit cases. For the past two weeks, Ive been unpack ing all my bags, and dur ing this evolution Ive dis covered two things; first, all of my clothes have shrunk! OK, maybe Ive grown out of them; and second, I discovered that I am not good at traveling light. Pastor and author Max Lucado, in his Upwords devotion, said it this way, You cant enjoy a jour ney carrying so much stuffso much lug gage. And the odds are, somewhere this morn ing between the first step on the floor and the last step out the door, you grabbed some lug gage. Dont remember? Probably because you did it without thinking. Thats because the bags we grab arent made of leather, they are made of burdens. The suitcase of guilt. A duffel bag of weariness, a hanging bag of grief. A backpack of doubt, an overnight bag of fear. We all have unneces sary baggage and we take those bags with us every where we go, especially our relationships; mar riages, friendships, our relationships with our children, work. Have you noticed that lugging lug gage is exhausting and can cause a lot of prob lems? Ultimately, we all have a very hard time Chaplain Karen Rector NS Mayport Chapel CHAPLAINSLet God Help You Unpack Your Luggage DATE TIME SCHOOL GRADE(S) Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Abess Park ES Pre K-2/CSS Sept. 19 6:30 p.m. Abess Park ES 3-5 Sept. 5 6:30 p.m. Alimacani ES K, 2, 4 Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Alimacani ES Pre-K, 1,3,5 Sept. 19 6 p.m. Atlantic Beach ES All grades Sept. 26 6 p.m. Atlantic Beach ES All grades Sept. 9 6 p.m. Atlantic Coast HS All grades Sept. 12 6:15 p.m. Axson, J. Allen ES K-3 Sept. 19 6:15 p.m. Axson, J. Allen ES 4-5 Sept. 26 6 p.m. Finegan, Joseph ES All grades Sept. 10 6 p.m. Fletcher Middle School All grades Sept. 3 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville Beach ES K, 2, 4 Sept. 4 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville Beach ES 1, 3, 5 Sept. 10 6 p.m. Kernan Middle School All grades Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Kernan Trail ES K 2 Sept. 19 6:30 p.m. Kernan Trail ES 3 5 Sept. 26 6:30 p.m. Mayport ES All grades Sept. 12 6 p.m. Neptune Beach ES All grades Aug. 29 7:30 p.m. Sabal Palm ES Aug. 29 6 p.m. San Pablo ES All grades Sept. 9 5:30 p.m. Sandalwood All grades Sept. 5 6:30 p.m. Seabreeze ES K-2 Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Seabreeze ES 3-5 Sept. 19 6 p.m. Waterleaf ES PK-2 Sept. 26 6 p.m. Waterleaf ES 3-52013 Open House Scheduleemptying out our suitcas es. God, on the other hand is telling us to let this stuff go; just set it all down, or throw it away, even. God is telling us that most of that stuff is unimport ant and is dragging us down, making us ill, upset, angry, emotionally drained, and to a large extent, separated from Him. Jesus says in Matthew 11:28, Come to me all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Are you ready to lay those burdens down? Whats stopping you; pride, fear, or despair. Perhaps youve set those bags down in the past only to go and pick them back up again. Or maybe you just dont know who to give that luggage to. Give them to God; He knows exactly what to do with them. As the hymnist reminds us, What a friend we have in Jesus, All our sins and griefs to bear! What a privilege to carry every thing to God in Prayer. Are we weak and heavy laden, Cumbered with a load of care? Precious Savior, STILL our ref ugeTake it to the Lord in prayer. Give it to God and enjoy the journey. Amen. See School, Page 6

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 Making The Shot CountMayport Security Conducts Joint Live-Fire Exercise Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment Detachment SoutheastMaster-at-Arms assigned to Naval Station Mayport security depart ment conducted a livefire training exercise aboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach. The exercise was the first time Mayports secu rity department ever held a live-fire shoot aboard a Coast Guard vessel. Weve always want ed to collaborate with the Coast Guard, said Lawrence Morton, Mayport Security Training Division instructor. Theyre right across the street from us, and theyve conducted these types of underway shoots before; so it was a lot simpler to reach out to them. They provided the platform, and have taken care of us one hundred percent. Basically, all we had to show up with our ammo and they took care of the rest. It was great experi ence working with our brothers in uniform, said Coast Guard Machinery Technician 3rd Class Travis McMichael. The ship may say Coast Guard but we are all defending the same thing, which is this country. The two-day exercise provided Sailors designat ed to shore command the rare opportunity to con duct a gun shoot under way. The training for our command up until this A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport prepares to load his ammo during a livefire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport conduct a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport fires the M-240B medium machine gun during a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. The exercise was the first time Mayport's security department ever held a live-fire gun shoot aboard a Coast Guard vessel. A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport fires the M-240B medium machine gun during a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medi um response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport holds on to the M240B medium machine gun. Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Cristina Bruni shoots the M-240B machine gun. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport go through a safety briefing before con ducting live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. See Training, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 5 point has been land based training, said Morton. For us, underway train ing is more realistic. This opportunity increases our readiness posture as a whole, because nine times out of ten if we have to engage a target it will be on the water. Over the two-day exer cise more than 40 Sailors got a chance to shoot the M-240B light machine gun. Ive been at this com mand for almost four years, and Ive been in the Navy for eight years and I finally got the opportu nity to shoot the M-240B underway, said Master-atArms 2nd Class Benjamin Iverson. Not only am Im excited, but Im happy for the rest of my department too. A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport gets ready to shoot the M240B short range machine gun during a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Cristina Bruni shoots the M-240B machine gun during a livefire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Cristina Bruni gives a safety brief to Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport prior to a live-fire exercise exercise aboard a Coast Guard medium response boat. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport go through a safety briefing before conducting live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport get set to con duct a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. From Page 4Training

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NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle, concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, or the date and time of an Open House not listed here, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. For a complete listing of Duval County Public School Open House dates/times, go to www. duvalschools.org. Search Open House Schedule 2013. Clay County Public Schools do not have a specific calendar with Open House dates/times, so go to this link: http:// www.clay.k12.fl.us/ schools.htm. Then go to the individual school sites and look for announce ment or calendars.From Page 2SchoolVicksburg Takes Their Kids To School USS Vicksburg PAOVicksburg allowed a late liberty expiration last Monday to allow Sailors in Duval County to take their kids to their first day of school. It was awesome to see my daughter get ready for the first day of school; she was so happy to begin school again and have me drive her there, said QM2 (SW) Harry Warner. Recently Vicksburg has started the workday as early as 0500 to sup port training and mainte nance. It was a rare and cherished occasion to see the children off to school that morning. Taking my daughter to school is something I love doing but dont get to do often, it was a great morn ing, said FC2 (SW) Kevin Carroll. Vicksburg is proud of her Sailors and families, and want to enhance the family experience when ever possible. Vicksburg Sailors are now ready to handle the challenges of an extended CMAV.OSCS (SW/AW) Rob Laird walks hand in hand to school with his son. -Photos courtesy of USS VicksburgEMC (SW) Tim Knapp takes his son to school on the first day of pre-k. CTR2 (SW) Shomari Moultry and his son on the first day of first grade. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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ATG Helps Stuff The Bus For School Kids Afloat Training Group Mayport PAOThe Salvation Army of Northeast Florida hosted a Stuff the Bus event on Aug. 9 to provide needy children with school sup plies for the 2013/2014 school year and Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport was there to help. ATG Sailors volunteered to help sort and package donated supplies, and to assist with distributing supplies. The work was com pleted at the Towers Social Services Center Warehouse at 900 W. Adams Street in down town Jacksonville. Nearly 3,000 needy students will get school supply assistance for the upcoming school year because of the Stuff the Bus campaign. Supplies collected during Stuff the Bus will also benefit teachers through the Full Service Schools initiative. The Full Service Schools Resource Center sup ports 80 schools in Duval County. Teachers have access to these much-needed supplies for their students. The neighborhoods served are Arlington, Westside, Northside, Springfield, Sandalwood, Paxon, Englewood and the Beaches area. Salvation Army does a lot of great things for the community, said Lt. Sam Lopez. To be a part of making sure that families have everything they need as their children start school gives you a good feeling. Chief Ships Serviceman Bernard Jones was the lead for the ATG staff on this project. Given the opportunity to participate as volunteer in Stuff the Bus was very meaningful, Jones said. Its good to know that thousands of kids will go to school prepared, not feeling left out and full of confidence. Also being able to share this expe rience with my fellow Sailors and my daughters made it just that much more rewarding. Giving back never hurt anyone. The Salvation Armys school supply drive is offered as a service to low-income families, explained Calanthea Hires, a Salvation Army Area Command Volunteer Recruiter. We want to help you send your child back to school with the supplies he or she needs to enter their new grade level. To be eligible you must meet income requirements and be car ing for children who are school age. There is an intake process to deter mine eligibility to receive this service. Growing up in Bronx, NY, my family didnt have much as we grew up so I empathize with families that struggle to provide for their children, Lopez added. Education is the vehicle that allowed me to go from growing up in a poorer neighborhood to becoming a naval officer in the U.S. Navy. These kids are being given the basic tools so now they can focus on doing great all the way through and get better opportunities in life.Chief Ships Serviceman Bernard Jones sorts supplies in a box at the Stuff the Bus event. Jones helped coordinate the community relations project for the command. -Photos courtesy of ATGChief Damage Controlman Jack Yelder of ATG holds a black composite book that needs to be sorted into a box at the Salvation Army of Northeast Florida Stuff the Bus event to provide school supplies to needy children. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 7

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USS The Sullivans Conducts MSO PatrolsFrom USS The SullivansSailors from the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) have conducted over 80 approach and assist visits (AAV) since arriving to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations (AOO). These visits are an ele ment of maritime secu rity operations (MSO) which help generate support and awareness amongst vessels in the region to ensure a safe and secure maritime environment. The members of The Sullivans VBSS team approach fishing Dhows in the region and engage in conversations that often result in invita tions from the crews and masters for the VBSS team to board the Dhows and continue to talk. Their efforts result in the build ing of trust between local fishermen and coalition forces operating through out the Persian Gulf. The goal of AAVs is presence, said Lt.j.g. Steven Lapid, The Sullivans lead board ing officer. You know an impact is being made when mariners recog nize us; and because of our ongoing efforts, they report feeling safer as they conduct their day-to-day business. AAVs provide coalition forces face-to-face inter action with local mariners and valuable information on patterns of life within the region. Developing communications through AAVs also supports coali tion goals of security and stability in the AOO. The Sullivans VBSS team efforts have made significant contributions to MSO throughout the U.S. 5th Fleet. Upon arriv ing in theater, the teams were effective in patrol ling suspected pirate and smuggling routes in the Southern and Central Arabian Gulf. The ship also conducted opera tions in the North Arabian Gulf by sweeping Dhows in the formerly US Navy protected areas of Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal (KAAOT) and Al Basrah Oil Terminal (ABOT) areas. It is a challeng ing role and a phenom enal learning experience for the team to do these operations, said Sonar Technician 2nd Class Rusty Howe, a Sullivans VBSS team member. Working closely with the other coalition navies, as well as the U.S. Coast Guard, really showed the importance maritime security operations have in the area. The Sullivans VBSS team members and boat crew Sailors look forward to continued success during the rest of their deployment. The boarding process starts every day at rev eille and ends after the completion of multiple visits, usually later in the afternoon. I am inspired by the perseverance and dedication my boarding team members show day in and day out as they are soaked from traveling in the ships small boat and exhausted from working in the hot sun. They get up every day with a posi tive attitude and they are ready to go out and exe cute the mission. said Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, Commanding Officer of USS The Sullivans. They are doing a great job. USS The Sullivans is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet AOO to conduct MSO in addition to their normal Independent Deployer responsibilities. MSO help develop secu rity in the maritime environment. From security arises stability that results in global economic pros perity. MSO complements the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to dis rupt violent extremists use of the maritime envi ronment as a venue for attack or to transport per sonnel, weapons or other material. -Photo by MC3 Billy HoSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) return passing honors to the guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68). Monterey is deployed in sup port of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Chiefs In Training -Photos by MCCS Eric Powell -Photo by Paige GnannTop left, Chief Select Master-at-Arms Josh Cox holds up a sign to entice hungry commuters to the a cook out spon sored by the selectees. Top right, Naval Station Mayport area chief (selects) and chief petty officers perform pushups during an early morning physical training event for CPO 365 Phase II. CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Right, Naval Station Mayport area chief petty officers run on the beach with their chief (selects) during a physical training event for CPO 365 Phase II. CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Above, Chief Boatswain Mate (select) Jessica Curry washes a car during a CPO 365 Phase II fundraising event. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 9

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Aug. 30: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept 6: Freedom FridayMovie Madness. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Auto Skills Center August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and depen dents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be noti fied Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 6: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Over $43,000 in payouts. Only 225 packages available; mul tiple packages may be pur chased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 5: NFL Regular Season Kick Off Party. 8:30 pm kickoff Baltimore vs. Denver. Drink specials, free food, cornhole tournament and more. 2707205 Sept. 7: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and oppor tunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Sept. 4: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Sept. 18: Game Night. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 1: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 4: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 6: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Kansas City Chiefs. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Sept. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5:15 p.m. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 14: Car, Truck and Automobile Show. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. FREE. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 15: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 16: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sept. 10: Freedom 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Mayport Bowling Center Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowling for active duty when they bring a nonactive duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight $10 include 2 hours of black light bowl ing, shoe rental. Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. Cost is $10 per person and includes choice of hamburger or hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl MWR Sports/Fitness 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Bogeys Specials Thursday, Sept. 5 Buffalo Chicken Wrap with a Side, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Shrimp on Mixed Greens, $9.95 Soup: Shrimp Tomato Basil Friday, Sept. 6 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich with a side, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, Sept. 9 BBQ Pork Panini with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Spicy Chicken Tortilla Tuesday, Sept. 10 Balck and Blue Burger with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Taco Salad, $7.95 Soup: White Chicken Chili Wednesday, Sept. 11 8 Oz NY Strip Steak Teriyaki with Fried Rice and Stir Fried Vegetables, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Soup: Broccoli and Cheese Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, pickles, onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Chicken, Walnut & Fruit Salad, $8.50 Grilled or fried chicken breast served on a bed of mixed baby greens with caramelized walnuts, mandarin orange segments, sundried cranber ries, sliced cucumbers, carrots and your choice of dressing Filipino-Style Lumpia, $7 Seasoned ground beef with diced carrots & celery, deep fried to a golden crisp, served with sweet & sour sauce Turkey or Ham Club, $8 Smoked turkey or ham served on a French baguette w/ sliced tomato and arugula, drizzled with pesto, served with French fries Midwest Burger, $8 All-beef patty topped w/ seasoned pork and homemade coleslaw, served with crispy French Fries Summer Time Dogs (each), $7.50 sauerkraut and English mustard, served with French Fries chili and melted cheese, served with French Fries topped with pickles, diced tomatoes and onions, served with French Fries French Dip, $8.50 New York-Style roast beef, thin-sliced, grilled and topped with provolone cheese, piled high on a rustic roll and served with crispy French fries Whats MWR Offers Boat RentalsNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment Detachment SoutheastThe Naval Station Mayport Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office provides Sailors the opportunity to rent a wide variety of outdoor equip ment including boats at a discounted rate. Being stationed in the Sunshine State at Naval Station Mayport comes with its advantages. You can take a day trip to Orlando, Fla. and find delight at the magical world of Disney or meet some wild amphibians while walking on the wild side at one of the many alligator farms placed throughout the state. However if youre look ing to relax nearby you may want to spend the day soaking up the sun or fishing off the coast, and Mayports MWR office is helping by offering Sailors the opportunity to rent boats at a price that is said to be unmatched. We guarantee we have the best rates around for what we offer, said Ron Thrasher, MWR outdoor adventures representa tive. We have a fourteenfoot boat with eight horse power for inland lake fish ing that holds up to three people. We offer a 15-foot boat with 15 horsepower for inner coastal fishing that holds up to five peo ple. We also offer a 17-foot boat for inner coastal fishing with 70 horses that holds five people as well. You can go look around, even Naval Air Station Jacksonville cant beat our deals. Thrasher, a retired Navy master chief, says hes no stranger to the fish ing waters of Florida and vows he can point Sailors in the right direction. You can come here (MWR office) any time, Ill tell you where to fish, exclaimed Thrasher. Ive been here since eightyeight, I know exactly where to go. With Thrashers help catching the fish might not be a problem for a Sailor, but getting a boat before they are all rented might be the bigger chal lenge. The boats go fast, said Thrasher. You can take these anywhere except the ocean, as long as you have a vehicle to tow them. To rent the MWR boats you need the Florida Boater Education Card, which is offered for free at boatus.org. This is an opportunity for local Sailors to have a great weekend on the water, at a low rate. For more information go to: http://www.cnic. navy.mil/regions/cnrse/ installations/ns_mayport. html THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 11

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Navy Dental Corps Celebrates 101 YearsNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville celebrated the 101st anniversary of the U.S. Navy Dental Corps during a golf tour nament and cake cutting ceremony at Naval Station Mayport. Navy dentists are dif ferent than civilian den tists, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer and Navy dental officer. Navy dentists operate in a vari ety of environments rang ing from a typical military installation dental office, to U.S. Navy warships, to the sands of combat zones abroad. They are deployed throughout the world working with uni formed service members, military dependents and even U.S. allies when conducting disaster response and humanitarian mis sions. For 101 years strong, our Dental Corps has served in times of peace and war to ensure dental readiness and act as advocates for oral health. The Dental Corps origi nated on August 22, 1912, when then-President Taft signed into law the act passed by the 62th Congress, establishing the Navy Dental Corps. Two months later, in October 1912, Emory Bryant and William Cogan were the first two dental officers to enter active duty in the Navy. The number of Navy dentists continued to increase with 107 active duty den tists in 1921. In 1923, the U.S. Naval Dental School opened as the Dental Department of the United States Naval Medical School, Washington, D.C. Its two-fold purpose was the postgraduate instruc tion of officers of the Navy Dental Corps and the training of hospital corpsmen to perform as dental assistants. By June 1945, dental clinic ships were recommended by Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet and on April 2, 1948 the dental technician rat ing was established. Today more than1,200 active-duty and reserve Dental Corps Officers support the Navy and the Marine Corps team and their families throughout the world. They maintain high operational readi ness in support of all who deploy, focus heavily on disease prevention and were one of the first units to deploy self-contained mobile treatment units a practice common today at many fleet sup port areas. In addition, the Naval Postgraduate Dental School is recognized as one of the best in the world. NH Jacksonville per forms approximately 78,000 dental procedures annually at its hospital and branch health clinics. Its priority since founded in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clin ics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. Visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax Photo by Paige GnannFrom left, Lt. Alexandra Bravoco, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Gayle Shaffer and retired Rear Adm. Richard Vinci cut a cake celebrating the 101st anniversary of the Navy Dental Corps. Today more than1,200 active-duty and reserve Dental Corps officers support the Navy and Marine Corps team and their families throughout the world. NH Jacksonville performs approximately 78,000 dental procedures annually at its hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Are You Ready For A Hurricane?From Commander, Navy Instal lations Command Ready Navy ProgramWith hurricane sea son underway and National Preparedness Month approaching in September, Commander, Navy Installations Commands Ready Navy Program asks Sailors and their families, Are you ready? Many Sailors and fami lies will reply that they are ready, but when asked further about the steps they and their family have taken to prepare, they quickly realize they may not be as prepared as they thought they were. Steps such as learn ing the alternate evacua tion routes for their area, making a family plan that everyone in the family is familiar with, and build ing an emergency supply kit that is centrally locat ed and portable enough to carry if evacuated are a few things they did not account for. Most Navy families have the best of intentions, taken some steps to prepare, and are fur ther motivated to prepare when danger is approach ing. Unfortunately, not every danger gives us advanced warning. Even if we do have advance warning, the outcome is often unpredictable. True emergency pre paredness is a diligent and constant cycle that consists of: 1. Being informed of potential hazards in your area and what to do before, during, and after that hazard, 2. Making and prac ticing a family plan that includes an inand outofneighborhood meet ing location, a designated out-of-town contact, and all family members in the planning process so that each is ready to execute that plan should the need arise, 3. Building and renew ing an emergency supply kit that contains enough basic and family specific supplies for every fam ily member to survive at least three days with no assistance and is portable if advised to relocate to a shelter or safe haven, 4. Staying informed through the emergency and after by registering personal contact infor mation in the Navys Wide Area Alert Network (WAAN), the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System, and downloading government emergency alert mobile apps, so that you have the most up-to-date informa tion and know when to return home or to work. So we pose the question to you...Are you ready or not ready? Go to www.ready.navy. mil to take the quiz found on the home page, and find out just how ready you and your family are. There you will also find additional information and tools to help you be better prepared year round. Be Ready Navy! We are. Are you? Ready Navy is a CNICsponsored emergency preparedness program. For more information on how to prepare for any disaster, visit http://www. ready.navy.mil. Prescriptions can be delivered to any address in the U.S. and its territories, including temporary addresses and APO/FPO addresses. Patients living outside the U.S. and its territories who dont have an APO/FPO address can have medications shipped to their U.S. embassy. Refrigerated medications cant be mailed to APO/ FPO addresses. To enroll at no-cost, therere three options: online at www.tricare. mil/homedelivery, by telephone at (877) 363-1303, or by mail ing a registration form to Express Scripts Inc., P.O. Box 52150, Phoenix, AZ 85072-9954. NBHC Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient pop ulationabout 163,000 active and retired Sailors, soldiers, Marines, air men, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manag er at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax .From Page 1TRICARE From TRICARENo matter the season, TRICARE beneficiaries across the United States and around the world need to be ready for the possibility of severe weather. Whether its winter blizzards, spring tornadoes or summer hurricanes, especially now as the Atlantic hurricane season has already sent a tropical storm up the East Coast, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to dealing with dangerous weather. With the Atlantic hur ricane season underway, TRICARE created statespecific e-alerts for ben eficiaries who want the latest information about how TRICARE has been affected during and after severe weather in their area. To sign up for statespecific TRICARE severe weather e-alerts, go to www.tricare.mil/sub scriptions. Hurricane season in the Atlantic began June 1 and ends Nov. 30; in the Eastern Pacific it started May 15 and ends Nov. 30. In its 2013 hurri cane season outlook, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center is forecasting an active or extremely active sea son this year. There is a 70 percent likelihood of 13 to 20 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher). Of these storms, 7 to 11 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), includ ing 3 to 6 major hurri canes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These num bers are higher than the seasonal average of 12 named storms, 6 hurri canes and 3 major hur ricanes. Many people think hurricanes are only dangerous in areas on or near the coast, but destruction from floods and high winds can stretch hundreds of miles inland. Hurricanes over land can also spawn tornadoes. For more information about hurricane hazards and how to prepare for them, go to NOAAs website at www.nhc.noaa.gov/ prepare/hazards.php. To learn more about how NOAA classifies hurricanes, and the important difference between a hurricane watch and a hurri cane warning, check out this video from NOAA: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=x3V3HZBs1Y4. Beneficiaries can sign up for e-alerts atwww. tricare.mil/subscriptions and link to TRICARE social media sites for the latest in TRICARE information. For storm and disaster informa tion, be sure to check local media channels and websites for updates on storm watches and storm warnings.Hazardous Weather Leads To State-Specific TRICARE e-AlertsVA Grants Up To One Year Of Retroactive Veterans BenefitsFrom a Department of Veterans Affairs News ReleaseThe Department of Veterans Affairs announced yesterday that veterans filing an original fully developed claim for service-connected dis ability compensation may be entitled to up to oneyear of retroactive disabil ity benefits. The retroactive ben efits, which are in effect Aug. 6, 2013, through Aug. 5, 2015, are a result of a comprehensive legisla tive package passed by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama last year. VA strongly encour ages veterans to work with veterans service organizations to file fully developed claims and participate in this ini tiative, since it means more money in eligible veterans pockets sim ply by providing VA the information it needs up front, said Allison A. Hickey, Undersecretary for Benefits. At the same time, it helps reduce the inventory of pending claims by speeding the process. Filing an FDC is typically the fastest way for veterans to receive a decision on their claims because fully developed claims require veterans to provide all supporting evidence in their posses sion when they submit their claims. Often, this is evidence that VA legally must attempt to collect on the veterans behalf, which is already in the veterans possession, or is evidence the veteran could easily obtain, like private treatment records. When veterans submit such evidence with their claims, it significantly reduces the amount of time VA spends gathering evidence from them or other sources -often the longest part of the claims process. While VA will still make efforts to obtain federal records on the vet erans behalf, the submit tal of non-federal records [and any federal records the veteran may have] with the claim allows VA to issue a decision to the veteran more quickly. Typically, VA processes FDCs in half the time it takes for a traditionally filed claim. FDCs can be filed digi tally through the joint, DOD-VA online portal, eBenefits. VA encourages veterans who cannot file online to work with an accredited veterans ser vice organization that can file claims digitally on vet erans behalf. While sub mitting an FDC provides a faster decision for any compensation or pension claim, only veterans who are submitting their very first compensation claim as an FDC are potentially eligible for up to one year of retroactive disability benefits under the newly implemented law. FDCs help elimi nate VAs claims backlog because they increase production of claims deci sions and decrease wait ing times. Also, VA assigns FDCs a higher priority than other claims which means veterans receive decisions to their claim faster than traditional claims. VA continues to priori tize other specific catego ries of claims, including those of seriously wound ed, terminally ill, Medal of Honor recipients, for mer prisoners of war, the homeless and those expe riencing extreme finan cial hardship. As part of its drive to eliminate the claims backlog in 2015, VA also gives a priority to claims more than a year old. In May, VA announced a new partnership with veterans service organizations and others known as the Community of Practice, an effort that seeks to reduce the com pensation claims backlog for veterans by increas ing the number of FDCs filed by veterans and their advocates. VA is continuing to implement several ini tiatives to meet the Departments goal to eliminate the claims backlog in 2015. In May, VA announced that it was mandating overtime for claims processors in its 56 regional benefits offices to increase production of compensation claims decisions through the end of fiscal year 2013. In April, VA launched an initiative to expedite disabil ity compensation claims decisions for veterans who have a waited a year or longer. As a result of these ini tiatives, VAs total claims inventory remains at lower levels not seen since August 2011. The number of claims in the VA backlog claims pend ing over 125 days has been reduced by 17 per cent compared to the highest point in March 2013. Shipshape Start DateFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Sept. 10 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty person nel, adult dependents, and retirees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calories, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more information, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-2705251 ext. 16. was covered in dirt. Now theyre able to store what ever they need indoors away from the elements. The thrift shop, whose mission is supporting local Sailors and their families, received a tre mendous upgrade. Weve had a thrift shop on this base since 1960. The Navy has really been good to us, so we try to give back to military members and their fami lies, said Diana Bower, Chairman of Mayport Thrift Shop. From Page 1Thrift Shop THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 13

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14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 DC-3 Survey Plane Makes Stop At 4th Fleet U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsA DC-3 coastal sur vey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters Aug. 20 for a capabilities demonstration prior to a scheduled deployment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a ver ity of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The DC-3 is replacing a King Air 200, which will provide a wider range to be able to conduct sur vey missions. The cur rent collection system on the airplane is called the Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar sys tem. It is used to evolve airborne coastal mapping sensors that collect data important to coastal engi neers, planners and nau tical charting authorities. We are very excit ed to have this aircraft deploy for the first time in the Caribbean Sea and Central America to work with regional part ner nations to accurately map coastlines and shal low waters to update nautical charts in sup port our multinational counter transnational organized crime opera tions, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. Harris also mentioned that the survey airplane can be used after natural disasters such as earth quakes, hurricanes and tsunamis to map coastal areas which could have changed and poses a threat to navigation and relief operations. Michael Bendzlowicz, oceanographer, Naval Oceanographic Office, gave Harris a tour of the DC-3 and discussed with him the significance of the aircraft used to sup port counter transnation al organized crime mis sions. With the equipment this DC-3 is outfitted with, it is not only able to sur vey coastal areas, but can also detect surface con tacts as well as under water contacts as well, Bendzlowics said. This aircraft and its unique capabilities is a perfect match for our cur rent and future operations in 4th Fleet, Harris said. We are ready to have it on station and put to work. This particular DC-3 conducted its first test flight Dec. 17, 1935, where it was implemented into the American Airlines fleet. During World War II, many civilian DC-3s were drafted for the war effort and just over 10,000 US military versions of the DC-3 were built, under the designations C-47, C-53, R4D, and Dakota. Peak production was reached in 1944, with 4,853 being delivered. The armed forces of many countries used the DC-3 and its military variants for the transport of troops, cargo, and wounded. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerCommander, U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris is interviewed by Action News Jacksonville about a Naval Oceanographic Office DC-3 coastal survey airplane during a visit to here for a capabilities demonstration prior to deploying to the 4th Fleet area of operations. Getting A Lift-Photo by Paige GnannNew Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, talks with with Fire fighter Andy Penski. after getting a lift in the base Fire & Emergency Services department ladder truck.Midshipmen Depart DDG 80 USS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsTwenty-three midshipmen departed from guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) after almost three weeks aboard the ship Aug. 10. While on board, these aspiring officers, who came from the U.S. Naval Academy and various Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) units throughout the U.S., were exposed to various operations on board the ship. The Midshipmen were here to get an idea about what the surface warfare community is like and what we do on ships, said Lt. j.g. Dustin Ellis, the midshipmen liaison. They also followed their running mates, an enlist ed Sailor, around to get an idea of what enlisted per sonnel do in the everyday life. While the Midshipmen were on board they had the opportunity to shoot a weapon, take part in an underway replenish ment and serve an ice cream social along with completing the day-today duties of an enlisted Sailor. I was really nervous at first and I was unsure of what to expect, said Midshipman 1st Class Christian Strong, an ROTC student at North Carolina State. During my time here I stood watch on the bridge, watched the missile exer cise, rode in a rigid hull inflatable boat and drove the ship during an under way replenishment. Over all, I had a fantastic time on the ship; it was more than I ever could have thought it would be. Midshipman 3rd Class Samuel Sorenson, a stu dent of the U.S. Naval Academy, had similar feelings about his time on board. I had a really good time here, said Sorenson. I didnt think it was going to be as fun as it was, especially since we were going to be out to sea for so long but it turned out great. Ellis said the Midshipmen were able to see the difficulties of ship board life while under way. I think they got a great experience while out to sea, said Ellis. They got a true encounter of what people do on ships; we didnt cater to them or try to give them a fake experi ence so I think they got a really unique and honest experience and my hope is that they value that. Roosevelt is partici pating in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail to improve strike group interoperability and pre pare for an upcoming deployment. It Pays To Survey-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall stands with the winners of the Balfour Beatty resident survey drawing after their receive prizes for participating in the survey. Balfour Beatty gave away a TV, $100 gift card, a grill and a free month rent to the lucky families. Pictured from left is NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Fire Controlman 3rd Class Amy Race of NS Mayport, Marshall Race, Miriam Cordero and Jasmine, 4, Aviation Strctural Mechanic 2nd Class (AW) Eduardo Cordero of HSM-40, McCall, Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Jan Nicholson of USS Vicksburg holding Jaxon, 1, Jamie Nicholson and Annie, 3, Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Chris Strange Amanda Strange and Meyli,3, and CMDCM Bob White.Continue To Serve Through ConversionNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsConversion programs allow Sailors from all walks of life to make a major job change and continue their Navy careers, officials said Aug. 21. Several Continuum of Service (CoS) conversion pro grams that apply to eligible officer and enlisted Sailors who are currently serving on active duty or in the Reserves are outlined in NAVADMIN 198/13. To date, thousands of Sailors have converted to dif ferent ratings, allowing the Navy to keep Sailors who are committed to a career in the Navy. According to a new conversion status report on the Active Duty Conversions Web Page on www.npc.navy. mil, more than half of active duty conversion requests in 2013 have already been approved. Applications for conversion can be submitted by detailers, command career counselors (CCCs) or any one with prior access to Fleet-RIDE through the new Career Waypoint (C-WAY) information technology sys tem. A NAVPERS 5239/8 (SAAR Addendum) is required to access C-WAY. Active-duty enlisted Sailors, in conjunction with reenlistment applications submitted via the C-WAYReenlistment process, can voluntarily request to change ratings. Reserve Sailors, working with their CCC, can view and apply for a rating conversion through C-WAYConversion. Active-duty and Reserve officers interested in con version can request a voluntary designator change. Requests for Reserve designator changes are consid ered continuously, while requests for AC designator changes are decided by a lateral transfer board twice a year. Per MILPERSMAN 1440-010, requests for conversion into ratings that are properly manned, will only be con sidered on a case-by-case basis and requests for con version to overmanned ratings will not be considered.Is An Unmanned Carrier Next ?From Naval Air Systems CommandThe Navy announced Aug. 14 that four Preliminary Design Review (PDR) contracts were awarded for the Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) air vehicle segment. The four $15 million firm-fixed price contracts were awarded to Boeing Co., General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., Lockheed Martin Corp. and Northrop Grumman Systems Corp. The period of performance for the contracting efforts is approximately nine months. The PDRs are intended to inform the Navy of technical risk, cost and design maturity of the Air Segment (AS), and allows the industry teams to better understand the programs requirements across the entire UCLASS system to expeditiously deliver the unmanned car rier-based system to the fleet, said Charlie Nava, UCLASS program manager. UCLASS will be the first deployed carrier-based unmanned air system. It will provide persis tent, unmanned, semi-autono mous, carrier-based Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Targeting (ISR &T) with precision strike capability to support 24/7 carrier operational coverage.

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Heading To The Game-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyChief petty officer selectees assigned to Naval Station Mayport carry American flags as they run onto the field during Jacksonville Jaguars pregame events at Everbank Stadium. Current CPO selectees are going through CPO 365 Phase II training as they prepare to become chiefs. See more Chief Select photos, Page 9. -Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayports Nearly New Thift Shop has extra storage space in back thanks to the Mayport Area CPOA.Thrift Shop Gets Extra Space From Mayport CPOANavy Public Affairs Support Element Detachment SoutheastNaval Station Mayports Thrift Shop recently under went a face lift when the Mayport Area Chief Petty Officer Association (CPOA) completed an enclosed porch project which allotted the thrift shop a dry indoor storage area. The CPOA completed the enclosure at no cost to the thrift shop. All of the materials needed to complete the enclosed porch were provided through the CPOAs vigorous fundraising efforts. We asked if they (CPOA) needed us to buy anything and they said no, said Jackie Cannon, President of the Mayport Navy wives club. They said that they were going to get everything donated and they did. It looks really good and they did a great job! The porch, which was at the mercy of the elements, is now a multipurpose indoor storage unit that the thrift shop can use however it desires. The thrift shop used the porch as a screened in storage space before, said Senior Chief Electronics Technician Greg Davis. Every time it rained everything TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery Makes It Easy To Fill PrescriptionsNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterTRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers a safe, affordable and convenient method of getting prescriptions delivered to patients doors, by way of the U.S. Postal Service. Home Delivery includes gener ics at no-cost; a 90-day supply for most medications; refills by mail, phone or online; and an automatic refill option. Active duty have no co-pays, while other patients have no co-pay for generics, $13 for brand-name formulary and $43 for non-formulary. For brand-name and non-formulary medications, the co-pays for a 90-day supply are about the same as a 30-day supply from a retail pharmacya savings of up to 65 percent. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery is the least expen sive option when not using our branch health clinic pharmacy, said Cmdr. Michael Service, Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport officer in charge. And its the easiest option. By converting your current retail medications to Home Delivery, patients reduce out-of-pocket costs and gain con venient delivery. According to TRICARE, more than one million prescriptions are filled each month through Home Delivery, which is administered by Express Scripts, Inc. According to TRICARE, more than one million prescriptions are filled each month through Home Delivery, which is administered by Express Scripts, Inc. Home Delivery is best suited for maintenance medicationsthose taken on a regular basis. Benefits of Home Delivery include free generic medications, refill reminders, help with renewing expired prescriptions, and a review of prescription history to help prevent harmful drug interactions. One of the most popular features is the automatic refill option, which ensures that patients dont run out of their medications. Patients can also refill their prescriptions man ually by phone, mail or online. -Photo by Jacob SippelA Sailor receives prescription medications directly to his home via TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. Home Delivery offers a safe, affordable and convenient method of getting prescriptions delivered to patients doors, by way of the U.S. Postal Service. See Thrift Shop, Page 13 See TRICARE, Page 13

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, I want to thank everyone for the truly heartwarming welcome that Reyna and I have received since coming to Naval Station Mayport. For the last 23 years, Ive heard Mayport was the homeport of choice for the Navy and Im quickly learning why. From the moment we arrived, people have welcomed us with open arms. The secret to what makes Mayport the most wanted duty station in the Navy is the people. I thought I would start off this months column with my specific goals for this installation. First, it is important for everyone to understand that this instal lation exists solely to support the warf ighters who take our ships and aircraft over the horizon to do our nations business. It is our responsibility to do our absolute best to sustain and enhance their operational readiness. Second, we must ensure that our hard working Sailors and civilians are given every opportunity to succeed both per sonally and professional. Speaking of which, advancement exams are quickly approaching and if you havent already been studying now is the time to start preparing. E-6 exams will be held on Sept. 5, followed soon after by E-5 exams on Sept. 12 and E-4 exams on Sept. 19. We will do everything we can to give you the tools to succeed, but its up to you to take advantage of them. For our civil ian shipmates, I know theres a sense of uncertainty concerning an impend ing Reduction in Force. I understand your concern and ask that each of you maintain faith in our leadership as they make critical decisions that ultimately affect our workforce. Andplease never forget that each of you are a vital part in the engine that keeps team Mayport steaming forward and without your critical skills and expertise, things just wouldnt operate the same. Thank you for what you do for this installation, for our Sailors and for our country each and every day. And third, but certainly not least, we must take care of our great families who ultimately enable us to serve. We have a lot of great support systems already in place here at Mayport, including Fleet and Family Support Center, MWR Youth Services and Child Development Center and the School Liaison Officer. I look forward to working with our local schools, including Finegan Elementary, Mayport Elementary and Mayport Middle in continuing their top-notch support. I know you have noticed the school buses out picking up the kids since school started back last week. Please make sure to slow it down and watch for our children as they head to and from school. Im excited about the challenges ahead and also about Naval Station Mayports exciting future. Over the next few years, Naval Station Mayport is going to be a completely different place. Im looking forward to starting it off with the arrival of three coastal patrol craft, USS Shamal (PC 13), USS Zephyr (PC 8) and USS Tornado (PC 14). Shamal will shift homeport to Mayport in September, followed by Zephyr and Tornado in November. All three ships are relocating from Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek and bringing approxi mately 90 crewmembers along with them. And, obviously, everybodys looking forward to the arrival of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group. USS New York (LPD 21) will be the first to arrive in December followed closely by USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in the summer of 2014. Having these ships homeported at Naval Station Mayport is a big win for our installa tion, the city of Jacksonville, the Beaches Community, and for their Sailors and families who get to live and work in this incredible community. I am thrilled to be a part of the team in these extraordinarily challenging and exciting times and I look forward to working with all of you in the years to come. Please continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy. mil.Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSMost parents under stand the importance of being actively involved in their childrens educa tion. But as children get older, parents frequently become less and less involved in their schools. However, research indi cates that children are more likely to have a successful school year if the parents are involved in their childrens school. One way to ensure that is to make a connection with the school by attending Open House. Area schools began their schedule of Open Houses as early as August 9th. (For local schools, see box.) And far from one more useless activity in an already over-sched uled life, Open House can actually provide a wealth of information for parents. This is a great opportu nity for parents to meet their childrens teachers, the school counselor, the principal, and other staff. Whether your child has one teacher or several, it is an ideal opportunity to meet the teacher(s) in one fell swoop. In middle and high schools youll follow your childrens sched ule by actually going to all of their classes. In all grade levels youll find out important dates, includ ing field trips and major class assignments; homework and test schedules; and most importantly how to contact the teacher. Open House IS NOT the time to try to have a private conference with your childs teacher. How could it be private with several parents in line behind you also wanting a chance to say a few words about their children to the teacher? As someone who taught 27 years, let me assure you that what parents share with the teacher on Open House night other than a quick Hello or Im Sarahs mom rarely sticks in the teachers mind. A high school teacher, for example, may have over 100 parents in attendance and, that is, if they teach the core. Pity the poor physical educa tion teachers who teach many more students than that. Open House IS the night to listen to what the teacher wants to share with you about the struc ture of the curriculum, how the class will be organized, the texts which will be used, frequency of homework, test sched ules, make-up policies, and, most importantly, how to get in touch with the teacher. Write this down! Many teachers now have they own email account or Facebook page. Any way you can get the informa tion will make it much easier to remind your child of an upcoming deadline or the need to study for those weekly spelling tests. Now that you know the regimen, youll be better prepared to talk privately with the teacher about your concerns about your child. And because you have the teachers pre ferred method for contact, it will be much easier for you to set up a parentteacher conference. Active parenting takes time, but the time you spend at an Open House will help your children be personally and academi cally successful. Your positive involvement and time, your childs time, and your childs teachers time are all directly relat ed to helping your child become tomorrows suc cessful adult. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for Local Schools Host Open House For ParentsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingI found a brand new pair of running shoes the other day. They werent at a sports store or a shopping mall; they were in my closet. I bought them almost two years ago and forgot about them. I found them in a suitcase while I was cleaning out my clos ets this week. Ironically, my closets were full of clothes, but they were all in luggage; everything from sea bags, garment bags, gym bags, back packs, you name the bag and I have it. Since 2008, Ive PCSed twice and deployed four times, so I have basically been living out of suit cases. For the past two weeks, Ive been unpack ing all my bags, and dur ing this evolution Ive discovered two things; first, all of my clothes have shrunk! OK, maybe Ive grown out of them; and second, I discovered that I am not good at traveling light. Pastor and author Max Lucado, in his Upwords devotion, said it this way, You cant enjoy a jour ney carrying so much stuffso much lug gage. And the odds are, somewhere this morn ing between the first step on the floor and the last step out the door, you grabbed some lug gage. Dont remember? Probably because you did it without thinking. Thats because the bags we grab arent made of leather, they are made of burdens. The suitcase of guilt. A duffel bag of weariness, a hanging bag of grief. A backpack of doubt, an overnight bag of fear. We all have unneces sary baggage and we take those bags with us every where we go, especially our relationships; mar riages, friendships, our relationships with our children, work. Have you noticed that lugging lug gage is exhausting and can cause a lot of prob lems? Ultimately, we all have a very hard time Chaplain Karen Rector NS Mayport Chapel CHAPLAINSLet God Help You Unpack Your Luggage DATE TIME SCHOOL GRADE(S) Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Abess Park ES Pre K-2/CSS Sept. 19 6:30 p.m. Abess Park ES 3-5 Sept. 5 6:30 p.m. Alimacani ES K, 2, 4 Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Alimacani ES Pre-K, 1,3,5 Sept. 19 6 p.m. Atlantic Beach ES All grades Sept. 26 6 p.m. Atlantic Beach ES All grades Sept. 9 6 p.m. Atlantic Coast HS All grades Sept. 12 6:15 p.m. Axson, J. Allen ES K-3 Sept. 19 6:15 p.m. Axson, J. Allen ES 4-5 Sept. 26 6 p.m. Finegan, Joseph ES All grades Sept. 10 6 p.m. Fletcher Middle School All grades Sept. 3 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville Beach ES K, 2, 4 Sept. 4 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville Beach ES 1, 3, 5 Sept. 10 6 p.m. Kernan Middle School All grades Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Kernan Trail ES K 2 Sept. 19 6:30 p.m. Kernan Trail ES 3 5 Sept. 26 6:30 p.m. Mayport ES All grades Sept. 12 6 p.m. Neptune Beach ES All grades Aug. 29 7:30 p.m. Sabal Palm ES Aug. 29 6 p.m. San Pablo ES All grades Sept. 9 5:30 p.m. Sandalwood All grades Sept. 5 6:30 p.m. Seabreeze ES K-2 Sept. 12 6:30 p.m. Seabreeze ES 3-5 Sept. 19 6 p.m. Waterleaf ES PK-2 Sept. 26 6 p.m. Waterleaf ES 3-52013 Open House Scheduleemptying out our suitcases. God, on the other hand is telling us to let this stuff go; just set it all down, or throw it away, even. God is telling us that most of that stuff is unimport ant and is dragging us down, making us ill, upset, angry, emotionally drained, and to a large extent, separated from Him. Jesus says in Matthew 11:28, Come to me all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Are you ready to lay those burdens down? Whats stopping you; pride, fear, or despair. Perhaps youve set those bags down in the past only to go and pick them back up again. Or maybe you just dont know who to give that luggage to. Give them to God; He knows exactly what to do with them. As the hymnist reminds us, What a friend we have in Jesus, All our sins and griefs to bear! What a privilege to carry everything to God in Prayer. Are we weak and heavy laden, Cumbered with a load of care? Precious Savior, STILL our ref ugeTake it to the Lord in prayer. Give it to God and enjoy the journey. Amen. See School, Page 6

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 Making The Shot CountMayport Security Conducts Joint Live-Fire Exercise Navy Public Affairs Support Element Detachment SoutheastMaster-at-Arms assigned to Naval Station Mayport security depart ment conducted a livefire training exercise aboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach. The exercise was the first time Mayports secu rity department ever held a live-fire shoot aboard a Coast Guard vessel. Weve always want ed to collaborate with the Coast Guard, said Lawrence Morton, Mayport Security Training Division instructor. Theyre right across the street from us, and theyve conducted these types of underway shoots before; so it was a lot simpler to reach out to them. They provided the platform, and have taken care of us one hundred percent. Basically, all we had to show up with our ammo and they took care of the rest. It was great experi ence working with our brothers in uniform, said Coast Guard Machinery Technician 3rd Class Travis McMichael. The ship may say Coast Guard but we are all defending the same thing, which is this country. The two-day exercise provided Sailors designated to shore command the rare opportunity to con duct a gun shoot under way. The training for our command up until this A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport prepares to load his ammo during a livefire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport conduct a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport fires the M-240B medium machine gun during a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. The exercise was the first time Mayport's security department ever held a live-fire gun shoot aboard a Coast Guard vessel. A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport fires the M-240B medium machine gun during a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport holds on to the M240B medium machine gun. Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Cristina Bruni shoots the M-240B machine gun. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport go through a safety briefing before conducting live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. See Training, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 5 point has been land based training, said Morton. For us, underway train ing is more realistic. This opportunity increases our readiness posture as a whole, because nine times out of ten if we have to engage a target it will be on the water. Over the two-day exer cise more than 40 Sailors got a chance to shoot the M-240B light machine gun. Ive been at this com mand for almost four years, and Ive been in the Navy for eight years and I finally got the opportu nity to shoot the M-240B underway, said Master-atArms 2nd Class Benjamin Iverson. Not only am Im excited, but Im happy for the rest of my department too. A Sailor assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport gets ready to shoot the M240B short range machine gun during a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Cristina Bruni shoots the M-240B machine gun during a livefire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Cristina Bruni gives a safety brief to Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport prior to a live-fire exercise exercise aboard a Coast Guard medium response boat. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport go through a safety briefing before conducting live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Sailors assigned to the Security Department at Naval Station Mayport get set to conduct a live-fire exercise onboard a Coast Guard medium response boat off the coast of Jacksonville Beach, Fla. From Page 4Training

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NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle, concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, or the date and time of an Open House not listed here, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. For a complete listing of Duval County Public School Open House dates/times, go to www. duvalschools.org. Search Open House Schedule 2013. Clay County Public Schools do not have a specific calendar with Open House dates/times, so go to this link: http:// www.clay.k12.fl.us/ schools.htm. Then go to the individual school sites and look for announce ment or calendars.From Page 2SchoolVicksburg Takes Their Kids To School USS Vicksburg PAOVicksburg allowed a late liberty expiration last Monday to allow Sailors in Duval County to take their kids to their first day of school. It was awesome to see my daughter get ready for the first day of school; she was so happy to begin school again and have me drive her there, said QM2 (SW) Harry Warner. Recently Vicksburg has started the workday as early as 0500 to sup port training and maintenance. It was a rare and cherished occasion to see the children off to school that morning. Taking my daughter to school is something I love doing but dont get to do often, it was a great morning, said FC2 (SW) Kevin Carroll. Vicksburg is proud of her Sailors and families, and want to enhance the family experience when ever possible. Vicksburg Sailors are now ready to handle the challenges of an extended CMAV.OSCS (SW/AW) Rob Laird walks hand in hand to school with his son. -Photos courtesy of USS VicksburgEMC (SW) Tim Knapp takes his son to school on the first day of pre-k. CTR2 (SW) Shomari Moultry and his son on the first day of first grade. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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ATG Helps Stuff The Bus For School Kids Afloat Training Group Mayport PAOThe Salvation Army of Northeast Florida hosted a Stuff the Bus event on Aug. 9 to provide needy children with school sup plies for the 2013/2014 school year and Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport was there to help. ATG Sailors volunteered to help sort and package donated supplies, and to assist with distributing supplies. The work was com pleted at the Towers Social Services Center Warehouse at 900 W. Adams Street in down town Jacksonville. Nearly 3,000 needy students will get school supply assistance for the upcoming school year because of the Stuff the Bus campaign. Supplies collected during Stuff the Bus will also benefit teachers through the Full Service Schools initiative. The Full Service Schools Resource Center sup ports 80 schools in Duval County. Teachers have access to these much-needed supplies for their students. The neighborhoods served are Arlington, Westside, Northside, Springfield, Sandalwood, Paxon, Englewood and the Beaches area. Salvation Army does a lot of great things for the community, said Lt. Sam Lopez. To be a part of making sure that families have everything they need as their children start school gives you a good feeling. Chief Ships Serviceman Bernard Jones was the lead for the ATG staff on this project. Given the opportunity to participate as volunteer in Stuff the Bus was very meaningful, Jones said. Its good to know that thousands of kids will go to school prepared, not feeling left out and full of confidence. Also being able to share this expe rience with my fellow Sailors and my daughters made it just that much more rewarding. Giving back never hurt anyone. The Salvation Armys school supply drive is offered as a service to low-income families, explained Calanthea Hires, a Salvation Army Area Command Volunteer Recruiter. We want to help you send your child back to school with the supplies he or she needs to enter their new grade level. To be eligible you must meet income requirements and be car ing for children who are school age. There is an intake process to deter mine eligibility to receive this service. Growing up in Bronx, NY, my family didnt have much as we grew up so I empathize with families that struggle to provide for their children, Lopez added. Education is the vehicle that allowed me to go from growing up in a poorer neighborhood to becoming a naval officer in the U.S. Navy. These kids are being given the basic tools so now they can focus on doing great all the way through and get better opportunities in life.Chief Ships Serviceman Bernard Jones sorts supplies in a box at the Stuff the Bus event. Jones helped coordinate the community relations project for the command. -Photos courtesy of ATGChief Damage Controlman Jack Yelder of ATG holds a black composite book that needs to be sorted into a box at the Salvation Army of Northeast Florida Stuff the Bus event to provide school supplies to needy children. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 7

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USS The Sullivans Conducts MSO PatrolsFrom USS The SullivansSailors from the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) have conducted over 80 approach and assist visits (AAV) since arriving to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations (AOO). These visits are an ele ment of maritime secu rity operations (MSO) which help generate support and awareness amongst vessels in the region to ensure a safe and secure maritime environment. The members of The Sullivans VBSS team approach fishing Dhows in the region and engage in conversations that often result in invitations from the crews and masters for the VBSS team to board the Dhows and continue to talk. Their efforts result in the building of trust between local fishermen and coalition forces operating through out the Persian Gulf. The goal of AAVs is presence, said Lt.j.g. Steven Lapid, The Sullivans lead board ing officer. You know an impact is being made when mariners recog nize us; and because of our ongoing efforts, they report feeling safer as they conduct their day-to-day business. AAVs provide coalition forces face-to-face inter action with local mariners and valuable information on patterns of life within the region. Developing communications through AAVs also supports coali tion goals of security and stability in the AOO. The Sullivans VBSS team efforts have made significant contributions to MSO throughout the U.S. 5th Fleet. Upon arriving in theater, the teams were effective in patrol ling suspected pirate and smuggling routes in the Southern and Central Arabian Gulf. The ship also conducted opera tions in the North Arabian Gulf by sweeping Dhows in the formerly US Navy protected areas of Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal (KAAOT) and Al Basrah Oil Terminal (ABOT) areas. It is a challeng ing role and a phenom enal learning experience for the team to do these operations, said Sonar Technician 2nd Class Rusty Howe, a Sullivans VBSS team member. Working closely with the other coalition navies, as well as the U.S. Coast Guard, really showed the importance maritime security operations have in the area. The Sullivans VBSS team members and boat crew Sailors look forward to continued success during the rest of their deployment. The boarding process starts every day at rev eille and ends after the completion of multiple visits, usually later in the afternoon. I am inspired by the perseverance and dedication my boarding team members show day in and day out as they are soaked from traveling in the ships small boat and exhausted from working in the hot sun. They get up every day with a posi tive attitude and they are ready to go out and exe cute the mission. said Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, Commanding Officer of USS The Sullivans. They are doing a great job. USS The Sullivans is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet AOO to conduct MSO in addition to their normal Independent Deployer responsibilities. MSO help develop secu rity in the maritime environment. From security arises stability that results in global economic pros perity. MSO complements the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to dis rupt violent extremists use of the maritime envi ronment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material. -Photo by MC3 Billy HoSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) return passing honors to the guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Chiefs In Training -Photos by MCCS Eric Powell -Photo by Paige GnannTop left, Chief Select Master-at-Arms Josh Cox holds up a sign to entice hungry commuters to the a cook out sponsored by the selectees. Top right, Naval Station Mayport area chief (selects) and chief petty officers perform pushups during an early morning physical training event for CPO 365 Phase II. CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Right, Naval Station Mayport area chief petty officers run on the beach with their chief (selects) during a physical training event for CPO 365 Phase II. CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Above, Chief Boatswain Mate (select) Jessica Curry washes a car during a CPO 365 Phase II fundraising event. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 9

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Aug. 30: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept 6: Freedom FridayMovie Madness. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Auto Skills Center August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and dependents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be notified Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 6: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Over $43,000 in payouts. Only 225 packages available; mul tiple packages may be pur chased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 5: NFL Regular Season Kick Off Party. 8:30 pm kickoff Baltimore vs. Denver. Drink specials, free food, cornhole tournament and more. 2707205 Sept. 7: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and opportunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Sept. 4: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Sept. 18: Game Night. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 1: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 4: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 6: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Kansas City Chiefs. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Sept. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5:15 p.m. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 14: Car, Truck and Automobile Show. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. FREE. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 15: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 16: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sept. 10: Freedom 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Mayport Bowling Center Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowling for active duty when they bring a nonactive duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental. Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. Cost is $10 per person and includes choice of hamburger or hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl MWR Sports/Fitness 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Bogeys Specials Thursday, Sept. 5 Buffalo Chicken Wrap with a Side, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Shrimp on Mixed Greens, $9.95 Soup: Shrimp Tomato Basil Friday, Sept. 6 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich with a side, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, Sept. 9 BBQ Pork Panini with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a Side, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a Side, $6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Spicy Chicken Tortilla Tuesday, Sept. 10 Balck and Blue Burger with a Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.50 Taco Salad, $7.95 Soup: White Chicken Chili Wednesday, Sept. 11 8 Oz NY Strip Steak Teriyaki with Fried Rice and Stir Fried Vegetables, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips or Slaw, $ 6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Soup: Broccoli and Cheese Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, pickles, onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Chicken, Walnut & Fruit Salad, $8.50 Grilled or fried chicken breast served on a bed of mixed baby greens with caramelized walnuts, mandarin orange segments, sundried cranber ries, sliced cucumbers, carrots and your choice of dressing Filipino-Style Lumpia, $7 Seasoned ground beef with diced carrots & celery, deep fried to a golden crisp, served with sweet & sour sauce Turkey or Ham Club, $8 Smoked turkey or ham served on a French baguette w/ sliced tomato and arugula, drizzled with pesto, served with French fries Midwest Burger, $8 All-beef patty topped w/ seasoned pork and homemade coleslaw, served with crispy French Fries Summer Time Dogs (each), $7.50 sauerkraut and English mustard, served with French Fries chili and melted cheese, served with French Fries topped with pickles, diced tomatoes and onions, served with French Fries French Dip, $8.50 New York-Style roast beef, thin-sliced, grilled and topped with provolone cheese, piled high on a rustic roll and served with crispy French fries Whats MWR Offers Boat RentalsNavy Public Affairs Support Element Detachment SoutheastThe Naval Station Mayport Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office provides Sailors the opportunity to rent a wide variety of outdoor equip ment including boats at a discounted rate. Being stationed in the Sunshine State at Naval Station Mayport comes with its advantages. You can take a day trip to Orlando, Fla. and find delight at the magical world of Disney or meet some wild amphibians while walking on the wild side at one of the many alligator farms placed throughout the state. However if youre look ing to relax nearby you may want to spend the day soaking up the sun or fishing off the coast, and Mayports MWR office is helping by offering Sailors the opportunity to rent boats at a price that is said to be unmatched. We guarantee we have the best rates around for what we offer, said Ron Thrasher, MWR outdoor adventures representa tive. We have a fourteenfoot boat with eight horsepower for inland lake fishing that holds up to three people. We offer a 15-foot boat with 15 horsepower for inner coastal fishing that holds up to five peo ple. We also offer a 17-foot boat for inner coastal fishing with 70 horses that holds five people as well. You can go look around, even Naval Air Station Jacksonville cant beat our deals. Thrasher, a retired Navy master chief, says hes no stranger to the fish ing waters of Florida and vows he can point Sailors in the right direction. You can come here (MWR office) any time, Ill tell you where to fish, exclaimed Thrasher. Ive been here since eightyeight, I know exactly where to go. With Thrashers help catching the fish might not be a problem for a Sailor, but getting a boat before they are all rented might be the bigger challenge. The boats go fast, said Thrasher. You can take these anywhere except the ocean, as long as you have a vehicle to tow them. To rent the MWR boats you need the Florida Boater Education Card, which is offered for free at boatus.org. This is an opportunity for local Sailors to have a great weekend on the water, at a low rate. For more information go to: http://www.cnic. navy.mil/regions/cnrse/ installations/ns_mayport. html THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 11

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Navy Dental Corps Celebrates 101 YearsNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville celebrated the 101st anniversary of the U.S. Navy Dental Corps during a golf tour nament and cake cutting ceremony at Naval Station Mayport. Navy dentists are dif ferent than civilian den tists, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer and Navy dental officer. Navy dentists operate in a variety of environments ranging from a typical military installation dental office, to U.S. Navy warships, to the sands of combat zones abroad. They are deployed throughout the world working with uni formed service members, military dependents and even U.S. allies when conducting disaster response and humanitarian mis sions. For 101 years strong, our Dental Corps has served in times of peace and war to ensure dental readiness and act as advocates for oral health. The Dental Corps originated on August 22, 1912, when then-President Taft signed into law the act passed by the 62th Congress, establishing the Navy Dental Corps. Two months later, in October 1912, Emory Bryant and William Cogan were the first two dental officers to enter active duty in the Navy. The number of Navy dentists continued to increase with 107 active duty den tists in 1921. In 1923, the U.S. Naval Dental School opened as the Dental Department of the United States Naval Medical School, Washington, D.C. Its two-fold purpose was the postgraduate instruc tion of officers of the Navy Dental Corps and the training of hospital corpsmen to perform as dental assistants. By June 1945, dental clinic ships were recommended by Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet and on April 2, 1948 the dental technician rat ing was established. Today more than1,200 active-duty and reserve Dental Corps Officers support the Navy and the Marine Corps team and their families throughout the world. They maintain high operational readi ness in support of all who deploy, focus heavily on disease prevention and were one of the first units to deploy self-contained mobile treatment units a practice common today at many fleet sup port areas. In addition, the Naval Postgraduate Dental School is recognized as one of the best in the world. NH Jacksonville per forms approximately 78,000 dental procedures annually at its hospital and branch health clinics. Its priority since founded in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clin ics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. Visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Photo by Paige GnannFrom left, Lt. Alexandra Bravoco, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Gayle Shaffer and retired Rear Adm. Richard Vinci cut a cake celebrating the 101st anniversary of the Navy Dental Corps. Today more than1,200 active-duty and reserve Dental Corps officers support the Navy and Marine Corps team and their families throughout the world. NH Jacksonville performs approximately 78,000 dental procedures annually at its hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Are You Ready For A Hurricane?From Commander, Navy Installations Command Ready Navy ProgramWith hurricane sea son underway and National Preparedness Month approaching in September, Commander, Navy Installations Commands Ready Navy Program asks Sailors and their families, Are you ready? Many Sailors and families will reply that they are ready, but when asked further about the steps they and their family have taken to prepare, they quickly realize they may not be as prepared as they thought they were. Steps such as learn ing the alternate evacua tion routes for their area, making a family plan that everyone in the family is familiar with, and build ing an emergency supply kit that is centrally locat ed and portable enough to carry if evacuated are a few things they did not account for. Most Navy families have the best of intentions, taken some steps to prepare, and are fur ther motivated to prepare when danger is approaching. Unfortunately, not every danger gives us advanced warning. Even if we do have advance warning, the outcome is often unpredictable. True emergency pre paredness is a diligent and constant cycle that consists of: 1. Being informed of potential hazards in your area and what to do before, during, and after that hazard, 2. Making and prac ticing a family plan that includes an inand outofneighborhood meet ing location, a designated out-of-town contact, and all family members in the planning process so that each is ready to execute that plan should the need arise, 3. Building and renew ing an emergency supply kit that contains enough basic and family specific supplies for every fam ily member to survive at least three days with no assistance and is portable if advised to relocate to a shelter or safe haven, 4. Staying informed through the emergency and after by registering personal contact infor mation in the Navys Wide Area Alert Network (WAAN), the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System, and downloading government emergency alert mobile apps, so that you have the most up-to-date informa tion and know when to return home or to work. So we pose the question to you...Are you ready or not ready? Go to www.ready.navy. mil to take the quiz found on the home page, and find out just how ready you and your family are. There you will also find additional information and tools to help you be better prepared year round. Be Ready Navy! We are. Are you? Ready Navy is a CNICsponsored emergency preparedness program. For more information on how to prepare for any disaster, visit http://www. ready.navy.mil. Prescriptions can be delivered to any address in the U.S. and its territories, including temporary addresses and APO/FPO addresses. Patients living outside the U.S. and its territories who dont have an APO/FPO address can have medications shipped to their U.S. embassy. Refrigerated medications cant be mailed to APO/ FPO addresses. To enroll at no-cost, therere three options: online at www.tricare. mil/homedelivery, by telephone at (877) 363-1303, or by mail ing a registration form to Express Scripts Inc., P.O. Box 52150, Phoenix, AZ 85072-9954. NBHC Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired Sailors, soldiers, Marines, air men, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manag er at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax.From Page 1TRICARE From TRICARENo matter the season, TRICARE beneficiaries across the United States and around the world need to be ready for the possibility of severe weather. Whether its winter blizzards, spring tornadoes or summer hurricanes, especially now as the Atlantic hurricane season has already sent a tropical storm up the East Coast, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to dealing with dangerous weather. With the Atlantic hur ricane season underway, TRICARE created statespecific e-alerts for ben eficiaries who want the latest information about how TRICARE has been affected during and after severe weather in their area. To sign up for statespecific TRICARE severe weather e-alerts, go to www.tricare.mil/sub scriptions. Hurricane season in the Atlantic began June 1 and ends Nov. 30; in the Eastern Pacific it started May 15 and ends Nov. 30. In its 2013 hurri cane season outlook, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center is forecasting an active or extremely active sea son this year. There is a 70 percent likelihood of 13 to 20 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher). Of these storms, 7 to 11 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), includ ing 3 to 6 major hurri canes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These num bers are higher than the seasonal average of 12 named storms, 6 hurri canes and 3 major hur ricanes. Many people think hurricanes are only dangerous in areas on or near the coast, but destruction from floods and high winds can stretch hundreds of miles inland. Hurricanes over land can also spawn tornadoes. For more information about hurricane hazards and how to prepare for them, go to NOAAs website at www.nhc.noaa.gov/ prepare/hazards.php. To learn more about how NOAA classifies hurricanes, and the important difference between a hurricane watch and a hurri cane warning, check out this video from NOAA: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=x3V3HZBs1Y4. Beneficiaries can sign up for e-alerts atwww. tricare.mil/subscriptions and link to TRICARE social media sites for the latest in TRICARE information. For storm and disaster informa tion, be sure to check local media channels and websites for updates on storm watches and storm warnings.Hazardous Weather Leads To State-Specific TRICARE e-AlertsVA Grants Up To One Year Of Retroactive Veterans BenefitsFrom a Department of Veterans Affairs News ReleaseThe Department of Veterans Affairs announced yesterday that veterans filing an original fully developed claim for service-connected dis ability compensation may be entitled to up to oneyear of retroactive disability benefits. The retroactive ben efits, which are in effect Aug. 6, 2013, through Aug. 5, 2015, are a result of a comprehensive legisla tive package passed by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama last year. VA strongly encour ages veterans to work with veterans service organizations to file fully developed claims and participate in this ini tiative, since it means more money in eligible veterans pockets sim ply by providing VA the information it needs up front, said Allison A. Hickey, Undersecretary for Benefits. At the same time, it helps reduce the inventory of pending claims by speeding the process. Filing an FDC is typically the fastest way for veterans to receive a decision on their claims because fully developed claims require veterans to provide all supporting evidence in their posses sion when they submit their claims. Often, this is evidence that VA legally must attempt to collect on the veterans behalf, which is already in the veterans possession, or is evidence the veteran could easily obtain, like private treatment records. When veterans submit such evidence with their claims, it significantly reduces the amount of time VA spends gathering evidence from them or other sources -often the longest part of the claims process. While VA will still make efforts to obtain federal records on the veterans behalf, the submittal of non-federal records [and any federal records the veteran may have] with the claim allows VA to issue a decision to the veteran more quickly. Typically, VA processes FDCs in half the time it takes for a traditionally filed claim. FDCs can be filed digi tally through the joint, DOD-VA online portal, eBenefits. VA encourages veterans who cannot file online to work with an accredited veterans ser vice organization that can file claims digitally on veterans behalf. While sub mitting an FDC provides a faster decision for any compensation or pension claim, only veterans who are submitting their very first compensation claim as an FDC are potentially eligible for up to one year of retroactive disability benefits under the newly implemented law. FDCs help elimi nate VAs claims backlog because they increase production of claims decisions and decrease wait ing times. Also, VA assigns FDCs a higher priority than other claims which means veterans receive decisions to their claim faster than traditional claims. VA continues to priori tize other specific categories of claims, including those of seriously wounded, terminally ill, Medal of Honor recipients, for mer prisoners of war, the homeless and those experiencing extreme finan cial hardship. As part of its drive to eliminate the claims backlog in 2015, VA also gives a priority to claims more than a year old. In May, VA announced a new partnership with veterans service organizations and others known as the Community of Practice, an effort that seeks to reduce the com pensation claims backlog for veterans by increas ing the number of FDCs filed by veterans and their advocates. VA is continuing to implement several ini tiatives to meet the Departments goal to eliminate the claims backlog in 2015. In May, VA announced that it was mandating overtime for claims processors in its 56 regional benefits offices to increase production of compensation claims decisions through the end of fiscal year 2013. In April, VA launched an initiative to expedite disability compensation claims decisions for veterans who have a waited a year or longer. As a result of these ini tiatives, VAs total claims inventory remains at lower levels not seen since August 2011. The number of claims in the VA backlog claims pending over 125 days has been reduced by 17 per cent compared to the highest point in March 2013. Shipshape Start DateFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Sept. 10 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty personnel, adult dependents, and retirees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calories, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more information, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-2705251 ext. 16. was covered in dirt. Now theyre able to store whatever they need indoors away from the elements. The thrift shop, whose mission is supporting local Sailors and their families, received a tre mendous upgrade. Weve had a thrift shop on this base since 1960. The Navy has really been good to us, so we try to give back to military members and their fami lies, said Diana Bower, Chairman of Mayport Thrift Shop. From Page 1Thrift Shop THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 13

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14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013 DC-3 Survey Plane Makes Stop At 4th Fleet U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsA DC-3 coastal sur vey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters Aug. 20 for a capabilities demonstration prior to a scheduled deployment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a ver ity of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The DC-3 is replacing a King Air 200, which will provide a wider range to be able to conduct sur vey missions. The cur rent collection system on the airplane is called the Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar sys tem. It is used to evolve airborne coastal mapping sensors that collect data important to coastal engineers, planners and nau tical charting authorities. We are very excit ed to have this aircraft deploy for the first time in the Caribbean Sea and Central America to work with regional part ner nations to accurately map coastlines and shal low waters to update nautical charts in sup port our multinational counter transnational organized crime opera tions, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. Harris also mentioned that the survey airplane can be used after natural disasters such as earth quakes, hurricanes and tsunamis to map coastal areas which could have changed and poses a threat to navigation and relief operations. Michael Bendzlowicz, oceanographer, Naval Oceanographic Office, gave Harris a tour of the DC-3 and discussed with him the significance of the aircraft used to sup port counter transnation al organized crime mis sions. With the equipment this DC-3 is outfitted with, it is not only able to sur vey coastal areas, but can also detect surface con tacts as well as under water contacts as well, Bendzlowics said. This aircraft and its unique capabilities is a perfect match for our current and future operations in 4th Fleet, Harris said. We are ready to have it on station and put to work. This particular DC-3 conducted its first test flight Dec. 17, 1935, where it was implemented into the American Airlines fleet. During World War II, many civilian DC-3s were drafted for the war effort and just over 10,000 US military versions of the DC-3 were built, under the designations C-47, C-53, R4D, and Dakota. Peak production was reached in 1944, with 4,853 being delivered. The armed forces of many countries used the DC-3 and its military variants for the transport of troops, cargo, and wounded. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerCommander, U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris is interviewed by Action News Jacksonville about a Naval Oceanographic Office DC-3 coastal survey airplane during a visit to here for a capabilities demonstration prior to deploying to the 4th Fleet area of operations. Getting A Lift-Photo by Paige GnannNew Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, talks with with Fire fighter Andy Penski. after getting a lift in the base Fire & Emergency Services department ladder truck.Midshipmen Depart DDG 80 USS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsTwenty-three midshipmen departed from guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) after almost three weeks aboard the ship Aug. 10. While on board, these aspiring officers, who came from the U.S. Naval Academy and various Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) units throughout the U.S., were exposed to various operations on board the ship. The Midshipmen were here to get an idea about what the surface warfare community is like and what we do on ships, said Lt. j.g. Dustin Ellis, the midshipmen liaison. They also followed their running mates, an enlist ed Sailor, around to get an idea of what enlisted personnel do in the everyday life. While the Midshipmen were on board they had the opportunity to shoot a weapon, take part in an underway replenish ment and serve an ice cream social along with completing the day-today duties of an enlisted Sailor. I was really nervous at first and I was unsure of what to expect, said Midshipman 1st Class Christian Strong, an ROTC student at North Carolina State. During my time here I stood watch on the bridge, watched the missile exer cise, rode in a rigid hull inflatable boat and drove the ship during an underway replenishment. Over all, I had a fantastic time on the ship; it was more than I ever could have thought it would be. Midshipman 3rd Class Samuel Sorenson, a stu dent of the U.S. Naval Academy, had similar feelings about his time on board. I had a really good time here, said Sorenson. I didnt think it was going to be as fun as it was, especially since we were going to be out to sea for so long but it turned out great. Ellis said the Midshipmen were able to see the difficulties of shipboard life while under way. I think they got a great experience while out to sea, said Ellis. They got a true encounter of what people do on ships; we didnt cater to them or try to give them a fake experience so I think they got a really unique and honest experience and my hope is that they value that. Roosevelt is partici pating in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail to improve strike group interoperability and pre pare for an upcoming deployment. It Pays To Survey-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall stands with the winners of the Balfour Beatty resident survey drawing after their receive prizes for participating in the survey. Balfour Beatty gave away a TV, $100 gift card, a grill and a free month rent to the lucky families. Pictured from left is NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Fire Controlman 3rd Class Amy Race of NS Mayport, Marshall Race, Miriam Cordero and Jasmine, 4, Aviation Strctural Mechanic 2nd Class (AW) Eduardo Cordero of HSM-40, McCall, Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Jan Nicholson of USS Vicksburg holding Jaxon, 1, Jamie Nicholson and Annie, 3, Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Chris Strange Amanda Strange and Meyli,3, and CMDCM Bob White.Continue To Serve Through ConversionNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsConversion programs allow Sailors from all walks of life to make a major job change and continue their Navy careers, officials said Aug. 21. Several Continuum of Service (CoS) conversion programs that apply to eligible officer and enlisted Sailors who are currently serving on active duty or in the Reserves are outlined in NAVADMIN 198/13. To date, thousands of Sailors have converted to dif ferent ratings, allowing the Navy to keep Sailors who are committed to a career in the Navy. According to a new conversion status report on the Active Duty Conversions Web Page on www.npc.navy. mil, more than half of active duty conversion requests in 2013 have already been approved. Applications for conversion can be submitted by detailers, command career counselors (CCCs) or anyone with prior access to Fleet-RIDE through the new Career Waypoint (C-WAY) information technology system. A NAVPERS 5239/8 (SAAR Addendum) is required to access C-WAY. Active-duty enlisted Sailors, in conjunction with reenlistment applications submitted via the C-WAYReenlistment process, can voluntarily request to change ratings. Reserve Sailors, working with their CCC, can view and apply for a rating conversion through C-WAYConversion. Active-duty and Reserve officers interested in con version can request a voluntary designator change. Requests for Reserve designator changes are consid ered continuously, while requests for AC designator changes are decided by a lateral transfer board twice a year. Per MILPERSMAN 1440-010, requests for conversion into ratings that are properly manned, will only be considered on a case-by-case basis and requests for con version to overmanned ratings will not be considered.Is An Unmanned Carrier Next ?From Naval Air Systems CommandThe Navy announced Aug. 14 that four Preliminary Design Review (PDR) contracts were awarded for the Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) air vehicle segment. The four $15 million firm-fixed price contracts were awarded to Boeing Co., General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., Lockheed Martin Corp. and Northrop Grumman Systems Corp. The period of performance for the contracting efforts is approximately nine months. The PDRs are intended to inform the Navy of technical risk, cost and design maturity of the Air Segment (AS), and allows the industry teams to better understand the programs requirements across the entire UCLASS system to expeditiously deliver the unmanned carrier-based system to the fleet, said Charlie Nava, UCLASS program manager. UCLASS will be the first deployed carrier-based unmanned air system. It will provide persis tent, unmanned, semi-autono mous, carrier-based Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Targeting (ISR &T) with precision strike capability to support 24/7 carrier operational coverage.

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 29, 2013