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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00310

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Material Information

Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00310


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CHINFO Award Winner Commissary Rewards Card Gets App Page 3 USS Gettysburg Enters Sixth Fleet AOR Page 14 Phil Sea, Roosevelt Participate in Group Sail Pages 4-5 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Measuring Up As A Chief -Photo by MCC William Townsend Chief Select Aviation Structural Mechanic Daniel J. Bue participates in a PFA weigh-in at the ATG Mayport audito rium on Aug. 5, beginning the Phase II CPO 365 training to become a chief petty officer. See the list of NS Mayport Selectees on Page 7. -Photo by Paige Gnann Teedie Tuttle and Mike West of Fluor install a Gold Star Family Reserved parking sign at Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayport. The space is now designated to families of active duty fallen Sailors. New Signs To Honor Families Of Fallen Service Members SouthCOM Kelly Visits USNAVSO By MCC Elizabeth Thompson 4th Fleet Public Affairs The commander of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) vis ited Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F), the maritime compo nent command located at Naval Station Mayport July 30 to engage with fleet Sailors, DoD person nel and discuss future operations. Marine Gen. John Kellys visit to Mayport came after COMUSNAVSO/C4Fs completion of the highspeed vessel Swift (HSV-2) deployment to Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras as part of Southern Partnership Station (SPS). During his visit, Kelly met with Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, com mander, COMUSNAVSO/ C4F, and his staff to look at lessons learned from SPS and ways to improve future mission capabili ties and national partner engagements. It was very impor tant to explain in detail how we have enriched the enduring partner ships we already have in Central America dur ing Southern Partnership Station and how we tested low-cost innovative ideas and technology to con duct future missions in the SOUTHCOM area of operations, Harris said. Kelly addressed COMUSNAVSO/C4F dur ing an all hands call at the headquarters and dis cussed a variety of issues ranging from civilian furloughs to budget cuts effecting USSOUTHCOM component commands. He acknowledged frus tration Sailors and DoD civilians may be experi encing and thanked them for their patience and commitment to duty dur ing the fiscal uncertainty. Thanks for all that you do. You give and your families give like most Americans cant even imagine, said Kelly. Kelly also emphasized the importance of suicide and sexual assault pre vention programs. Its about taking care of each other, stated Kelly during the all hands call. Sexual assault is abominable and we can fix it. Bystander intervention and positive command climate continued to be main topics of discussion at a joint service, enlisted luncheon with Kelly and Harris held at the base galley. Were better than society in general and because of that we are held to a higher stan dard, explained Kelly as he shared a story of how bystander interven tion prevented a sexual assault at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. It real ly starts here, down on the deckplates. Army Staff Sgt. Conrad Carrasco, assigned to Fleet Logistics Command Jacksonville, was one of the 18 service members at the luncheon who con From Staff Drivers around Naval Station Mayport will start noticing new Reserved signs at several parking spaces located throughout the base and at the NEX/Commissary store in an effort to honor those who have given their all in the defense of our country and to those they left behind. In accordance with a direc tive from Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), NS Mayport is implementing the Gold Star program to ensure fam ily members of active duty fallen Sailors have continued access at the Navy installation. Since June 30 Navy installations have begun implementing desig nated parking spaces for Gold Star Family (GSF) members at various locations on base in order to recog nize and honor these families. By providing Gold Star program members designated parking spac es, these Navy family members will be able to access resources and support services without having to obtain an escort onto the base. Gold Star Family members designated parking spots will be available at Fleet Family Service Centers and commissaries, among other locations. Additional park ing spaces may be designated at the discretion of the base command ing officer with consideration for expected use and parking space availability. Additional designated parking may be offered at locations such as military cemeteries, cha pels, memorials and other locations as the base commanding officer deems appropriate. GSF member designated parking spots on instal lations will allow GSF members to attend on base ceremonies and events, memorials, museums, and visit with other Gold Star program members. While the details and issuance of Gold Star access cards is still being finalized, family members of fallen service members can receive the paperwork to register for the pro gram with the Department of the Navys Casualty Assistance Calls Officer (CACO) program. "Its the right thing to do for those who gave so much for their coun try, said NS Mayport Command Master Chief Bob White. They gave their loved ones to us, entrusted them to us and they paid the ulti mate sacrifice. They deserve so much more. And if our doing this, making it more convenient to go to the Clinic or the Exchange, shows a little of our appreciation for their sacrifice then Im glad we can do it. See Gold Star, Page 6 See Southcom, Page 11 Gold Star Reserved spots are located at Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayport, Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange on base and off base, Navy Gateway Inn & Suites, Navy Lodge, PSD, FFSC Building 1, Gym, MWR ITT, Bogeys, Chapel

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, I guess it would be customary to say how sad I am to depart Naval Station Mayport at the end of my Command Tour, as I will be transferring next week. But, there are two reasons why Im not going to do that. The first reason is Capt. Wes McCall (wife, Reyna) is the incoming commanding officer. He is the most professional, skilled and nicest Naval Officer I have had the pleasure to meet. He and Reyna will enjoy the warmth, professionalism and can-do spirit that abounds here at Naval Station Mayport and return it twofold. A career Naval Aviator, Wes has spent an abundance of time at sea and in the desert. He is a combat-proven avia tor, an incredible leader and mentor of Sailors. Reyna is relatively new to the Navy, being newlyweds, and is prob ably the most gracious and friendly women I have ever met. Wes and Reyna are coming to us after a tour in the FDNF as Navigator aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan. There is no need to be sad or sorry with the knowledge that this installation is in such fine and capable hands! Welcome aboard Wes and Reyna and hang on for the ride of your life!!! The second reason is the support that I have enjoyed these past two years and 10 months (whos counting, right?) from every Sailor, Government Service and civilian contractor here at Naval Station Mayport. Together, we made our mark by supporting the Fleet, as well as building leaders on the airfield and on the waterfront every day! Never forget that Global Presence and Power Projection start right here at the wharfs and han gars of Naval Station Mayport. Farewell and Following Seas Team Mayport! Anne and I thank you from the bottom of our hearts for the Ultimate Gift you have given us everyday since October of 2010! May the future shine brightly on Planet Awesome, and God Bless our people, our Installation and the United States Navy!Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSA few weeks ago I wrote an article about taking time to discuss with your child areas for improve ment at schooland how he can achieve success in those problem areas this next school year. But what about improve ments you can implement at home to lessen the stress and also improve school success? Getting Started Right now imple ment your schedule for the coming school year. Depending on the county and whether your child will attend public or pri vate, you have a week or two to get everyone ready for these changes: new dinner time, new bath times, new bed times, new getting up times. The sooner you get this new schedule in place, the easier those first few days of school will be. But dont just spring it on your family. Have a sit down session with every one which could easily be the beginning of your new dinner schedule to explain why this is so important and how it will happen. As a family figure out what time everyone will be getting home from school and from work. Next figure out the bed times for the school year. Some of your children may be moving up to a later bed time while oth ers might actually need an earlier bed time. How effective was last years bed time? Did it work, or were they sleepy, grumpy, hard to get up? Once you have this block of time determined, then figure out who will do homework when, where, and for how long. Are there after-school activities which also have to be factored into this equation? What about free time for television, texting, reading? Will there be a night when the whole family is involved in church or sports or vol unteering? Dont forget baths! Or cat feeding! Or dog walking! Or gerbil cage cleaning! Etc, Etc, Etc. Each family is very different with different jobs and tasks required of its members Next you have to figure out the mornings. Now this can be really crazy. There is usually less time to get everything in: waking up, schedul ing bathroom time, eat ing, dressing, finding homework (unless you put that in your night time schedule), making lunch (unless that, too, is in your night time schedule), and leaving for bus, car, car pool, or walking. Now implement! You will have this weekend, all next week, and the following weekend to make a trial run of your night time and morning plans. Of course, there really wont be homework or actually leaving for school, but it can be fun to put in other activities. Instead of homework, they can log in to www. SoarAtHome.org to find out how much they have retained over the summer. If the organized sports or dance lessons havent started yet, then pile the whole family into the car for a trip to an area park to work out. By really trying out your schedule ahead of time, you can get a real sense of whether it will work. But you might have more trouble trying out the morning schedule. Who wants to roll out of bed while it is still dark when there really isnt any school to get ready for? Maybe reward their efforts with a trip one morning to their favorite breakfast place? But schedules can fall apart. My favorite quote from Captain Cochrane is, No battle plan ever survived first contact with the enemy. Trust me, a new school year is defi nitely the enemy. After a few weeks into the new school year, you may find that adjustments are required. No worries it is natural. Just sit down again with the family and revise. Figure out what is working and what needs fixing. Making the sched ule can be a great learn ing experience. And it will help your children to learn to make similar ones for themselves at home or at school! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article, want a copy of the Un/Underfunded Mandates for Duval Schools, or have con cerns about an edu cational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Back to School . Start Your Engines!Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingHow Much Money Does It Take To Be Rich? That was the headline in a recent About.com article by Joshua Kennon for beginning investors. The author opens with some good financial advice when he writes that you should probably spend less than you make and invest the rest in order to grow your assets. Then he posed the question, Have you ever wondered How much money does it take to be rich? For the answer he turned to a recent CNN Money publication where that question was posed to a group of financial planners. That group seemed to believe that it would take between $2 million and $12 million dollars to be considered rich in todays economy. I guess I know now that I am not in the financially rich category. DARN! I had such high hopes. But, I havent met anyone who joined the Navy to get rich. There were some other interesting tidbits in the article worth mentioning. First, the author points out that most people want to have enough money to pay their taxes, live in a nice house and have enough money left over each month to spend anyway one likes. The annual income to accomplish this very nice sounding feat is estimated to have risen to about $300,000 a year. I bet you and I could probably do it on less. Second, he writes that most people just want to put on their monopoly hat, set up an office to monitor investments, spend all day reading and going out to nice restaurants, giving gen erously to charity, and oh yes, adding yearly to their increased net worth. Know anybody? Third, he insightfully reveals Something deep in most investors psyche seems to be triggered when we pile up treasure at no expense to our lifestyle or giving. It turns out that once you have the granite counter tops, the nice car, designer clothesetcthat spend ing more money doesnt make you any happier. It is no secret then why Holy Scripture wisely tells us that happiness does not consist in the abun dance of our possessions. The wealthiest ruler in the Old Testament was King Solomon. The Book of Ecclesiastes, Chapter 2, describes how he felt about his accumulated wealth in the end. Very revealing. With his riches he built great houses, planted awesome vine yards, created parks and gardens, accumulated great herds and flocks, and amassed much silver and gold. He had it all. And yet King Solomon said, When I surveyed all that my hands had done and achievedit was like chasing the wind. God asks us to measure our lives differently. To live for a higher purpose and calling. Not to spend our lives in constant pur suit of things or stuff. In the end, it proves to be an empty pursuit. In fact, Jesus told the parable of a man who spent his life in pursuit of riches. All he acquired was never enough. He always desired more. Then he died. At that point, what did all his riches gain him? As Jesus said, What good is it to gain the whole world, but lose your own soul? Do we really want to spend our lives chasing the wind? Chap Steve Souder CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHow Much Money Does It Take To Be Rich?

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Senior Chief Damage Controlman Dedrick Walker and Chief Master-at-Arms Dennis Mattingly cook burgers at a CPOA Burger Burn fundraiser on July 31.CPOA Good EatsCommissary Rewards Card Offers Mobile AppDeCA public affairs specialistYour Commissary Rewards Card will cel ebrate its one-year anni versary Aug. 8 by deliver ing a gift to you. A mobile application will be released and avail able from the app store Aug. 8 for customers who use the iPhone or iPad, said Marye Carr, DeCAs Rewards Card program manager. The app will allow you to access your account, select coupons and review clipped, redeemed and expired coupons making it even easier to put your cou pons to work for you. An Android version of the app will become available in the future. Carr said the app also allows shoppers to locate commissaries worldwide and access store infor mation such as phone number and address. These added capabilities enhance the usefulness of the Commissary Rewards Card, which gives cus tomers access to digital coupons redeemable at any commissary. The Commissary Rewards Card provides a great asset to our busy, budget-conscious cus tomers, said Director of Sales Randy Chandler. Our shoppers want to save time, effort and money, plus reduce their reliance on paper coupons that have to be clipped and carried. More than 800,000 cards have been regis tered by shoppers, who have downloaded more than 8 million coupons so far. That means bigger savings for them, on top of the commissarys rou tine savings of 30 percent or more. Its not unusual for the Commissary Rewards Card to offer more than 120 coupons at any given time, said Carr. Check in daily for new coupons. Honestly, if youre not using your card, youre throwing money away. Carr said many customers find it handy to print a list of their coupons to help them keep track of their savings. The card provides another way to save, in addition to your paper coupons, she said. Commissary shoppers love coupons, so this is another way to increase buying power. Using the card is sim ple: Pick up a card at the commissary, visit DeCAs website to register it and then select and load digi tal coupons. Then, when the cashier scans the card, the coupons are matched to items purchased and savings are deducted from the bill automatically. Rewards Card digital coupons disappear from your account when they expire or are redeemed. Like paper coupons, they cant be combined with other coupons on the same item, and they have expiration dates and other redemption terms and conditions. Overseas, digital coupons will not be accepted for up to six months after expiration, as paper coupons are, because the coupons are instantly available to all customers worldwide. That means overseas cus tomers dont need extra time to use the coupons. To learn more about the card or sign up to be noti fied of updates, including new coupon alerts, go to http://www.commissar ies.com/rewards_sub scribe.cfm A customer service hotline can be reached at 855-829-6219 or via email at commis sarysupport@inmar.com About DeCA: The Defense Commissary Agency operates a world wide chain of commissar ies providing groceries to military personnel, retir ees and their families in a safe and secure shopping environment. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5-percent surcharge, which covers the costs of building new commissaries and mod ernizing existing ones. By shopping regularly in the commissary, patrons save an average of 30 per cent or more on their pur chases compared to com mercial prices savings amounting to thousands of dollars annually. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Philippine Sea Completes MISSILX USS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) complet ed a missile exercise (MISSILX), Aug. 4. Philippine Sea, and USS Truxtun (DDG 103) simultaneously launched Navy Standard Missile2s (SM-2) while USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) launched shortly after wards. The MISSILEX required that all three ships fire SM-2s at a remote con trolled, subsonic missile drone, or (BQM). The SM-2 is the U.S Navys primary surface-to-air air defense weapon and a vital element of the Aegis Weapon System (AWS) aboard Ticonderogaclass cruisers and Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, launched from the MK 41 Vertical Launcher System (VLS). During the exercise a BQM was flown out to sea by an aircraft and dropped into mid air. The drone is then reverted back towards the ships requiring them to shoot it out of the sky, said Senior Chief Fire Controlman Jeremy R. Rasnick, com bat systems fire control man leading chief petty officer. After it was dropped, shore command flew the BQM inbound, said Rasnick. Once inbound our mission is to get good telemetry data back to shore command so they can evaluate how the mis sile and its systems pre formed. The missiles fired were not armed with war heads. Instead, each mis sile attempts to approach the BQM as close as pos sible simulating an actual intercept. Each SM-2 has prox imity sensors capable of recording the distance from the BQM as it flies by indicating a hit, said Rasnick. The missiles try to get as close as they can to the drone and instead of it exploding it just con tinues to fly by, said Rasnick. Once recovered they can figure out whose missiles were within the blast radius. The MISSILX simu lates a cruise missile attack scenario that could be encountered by the George H.W. Bush Strike Group (GHWB CSG) on deployment. This missile is specifi cally designed to simulate a C-802 missile which is an anti-ship cruise mis sile, said Rasnick. After two days of mock drills involving Learjet fly-bys simulating a BQM, the Philippine Sea was ready to conduct the MISSILX and learn from the experience of an actu al launch. The rehearsals were very beneficial and went very well, said Master Chief Fire Controlman Craig M. Cotherman, combat systems main tenance manger. But a couple things were a little bit different today, things we cant rehearse and simulate, things we cant prepare for. Cotherman feels the MISSILX provided an invaluable experience. We definitely have some lessons to take away from the experience, said Cotherman. Aside from actually having to fire on a target, this is as real as it gets. The last missile launch aboard the Philippine Sea took place in 2010 mak ing this not just a learning experience, but also a rare and exciting event for the crew. I was standing in the bridge when it happened, said Quartermaster 3rd Class Cameron A.Wheylan. It was cool to see what we can actually do and feel the power of it all, he added. Its definitely something I will never forget. Philippine Sea is par ticipating in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail to improve strike group interoperability and pre pare for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisThe guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), left, the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), center, and the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) are underway in the Atlantic Ocean. Truxtun, Roosevelt and Philippine Sea are participating in the George H.W. Bush group sail to improve strike group interoperability and prepare for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Brian Read CastilloThe guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) launches a Standard Missile (SM-2) during a Group Sail missile exercise. Roosevelt is partici pating in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail to improve strike group interoperability and prepare for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Brian Read CastilloSailors man a fire hose during a flight deck damage control training exercise aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58).-Photo by MC2 Brian Read CastilloSailors heave a line aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) dur ing a replenishment-at-sea.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 5 USS Roosevelt Departs For Group Sail USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Public AffairsThe Arleigh-Burke class destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) departed its homeport of Mayport, Fla., to participate in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail (GHWB GRUSL), July 29. During the approxi mately monthlong at-sea period, Roosevelt will be part of the Group Sail in order to improve interop erability with the other ships in the strike group. This is the first time we will be operating with the George H.W. Bush Strike Group for the upcom ing deployment, said Commanding Officer Cmdr. Frankie J. Clark. We have completed our unit level training, which is specific for our plat form, but now we are joining the other ships in the strike group to com plete group-training exer cises as well as prepare for deployment. Lt. LeAndra Kissinger, the ships operations offi cer, said this at-sea period is the first opportunity for the ships in the strike group to work on becom ing a functional unit. It is an extremely important training phase that will ensure that dur ing the actual assess ment phase, Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), all the ships in the Strike Group can get certified for deployment, said Kissinger. The five ships par ticipating in the GHWB GRUSL are the Nimitzclass aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), the Arleigh-Burke class destroyers USS Truxtun (DDG 103) and USS Roosevelt, and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55). It is our first event working together as a Strike Group so we have a lot of events scheduled for the at-sea period, said Clark. We will mainly be testing all the system operability between the different ships working together as one battle group. It is important that we learn how to work well with each other now so during COMPTUEX we can focus on getting the certification. For the past 90 days, Roosevelt has been in port and the crew looks toward this underway as a time to continue to maintain the proficiency of the crew and equipment. During this at-sea period, we need to make sure that we, as a ship, are operating at the level nec essary to work together as a team with the Strike Group, said Kissinger. We will be deploying as a team and it is impera tive that we are prepared in case something hap pens when we deploy. We train for every possibility in order for it to become a matter of muscle memory in case of an emergency. Clark said this group sail will be the first impression Roosevelt will make on the strike group and he believes the ship and crew will do extreme ly well. I am very excited because Roosevelt has always been a ship with a crew that gets things done and this is our first oppor tunity to show the battle group that we are ready to meet all assigned tasking, said Clark. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeSailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) man the rails as the ship pulls away from the pier. Roosevelt is participating in the George H.W. Bush group sail, further preparing the ship for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeSailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) strike a line below after the ship com pletes a sea and anchor evolution. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeMidshipman 3rd Class Sam Sorenson fires a .50-caliber machine gun during a live-fire training exercise aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeSailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) watch as the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) is fired during a live-fire train ing exercise. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeAn MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter from the Spartans of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 conducts a helicopter in-flight refueling aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80).

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Navy And Marine Corps Achievement Medal ABH2 Nicole Bolden, NS Mayport DC2 Kyle Buck, NS Mayport AC3 Berett Dunn, NS Mayport Good Conduct Medals LS3 Natashdra Mosley, NS Mayport Flag Letter of Commendation CS3 Martavious Bankston, NS Mayport Sailor of the Quarter MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport Letter of Appreciation MA2 Benjiman Iverson, NS Mayport MA2 Sigfredo Santiago, NS Mayport MA3 Robert Marshall, NS Mayport MASN Shuyler Swanton, NS Mayport MA1 Jose Pacheco, NS Mayport MA1 Michael Eno, NS Mayport CS2 Dexter Mims, NS Mayport SH2 Jose Riveratirado, NS Mayport MA2 Sigfredo Santiago, NS Mayport SH2 Adrian Smith, NS Mayport CS2 Mandriecka Wilson, NS Mayport SH2 Myron Doulet, NS Mayport AC3 Brittany Littler, NS Mayport Meritorious Civilian Service Medal John Jones, PSD Milestones Historically, mothers of fallen service members began calling themselves Gold Star Mothers dur ing the First World War. Since 1936, the United States has been observ ing Gold Star Mothers Day on the last Sunday of September to honor these mothers. In 1967, Congress stan dardized the service ban ners and established the Gold Star lapel pins to issue to immediate fam ily members of service members killed in com bat, including those who have committed suicide in theater. The Next of Kin pin signifies a servicerelated death or suicide during active duty other than combat. In 2010, Congress designated Dec. 18 as Gold Star Wives Day. Other parking reserved sites include: Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange on base and off base, Navy Gateway Inn & Suites, Navy Lodge, PSD, FFSC Building 1, Gym, MWR ITT, Bogeys, Chapel.From Page 1Gold Star Employee Of The QuarterRight, NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, presents a plaque to Ashley Vasquez of MWR after she is named Employee of the Quarter for the Third Quarter dur ing an EOQ luncheon at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on July 30. Above, Pickard stands with the nominees Willie Atkins of Housing, Vasquez, Frank Ross of Security and Scott Young of Air Ops.-Photos by ET3 Michelle Maltese 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Sailors should be reviewing their bibs and studying their rate training manuals now for the semi-annual Petty Officer advancement exams in September. Exam dates are: Sept. 5 for PO1; Sept. 12 for PO2, and Sept. 19 for PO3. Check with your Chief or career counselor to verify your eligibility to take the exam.Petty Officer Advancement Tests Approaching CSADD Thanks Skipper Cochrane For His Support-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, seventh from left, is surrounded by members of Naval Station Mayport CSADD members after Command Quarters Thursday at the Chapel. CSADD, Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions, is a peer-to-peer mentorship program used Navy-wide. The program is geared at Sailors 18 to 25 years old, to reinforce our culture of Shipmates helping Shipmates. CSADD Mayport has strived towards this goal through outreach programs, social media and videos. The group thanked Cochrane at Command Quarters for his support during his tenure as commanding officer. Cochrane will be relieved by Capt. Wesley McCall during a change of com mand ceremony on Aug. 8.BMC(Sel) Brandon P Bonin FCC(Sel) Gregory L Bosworth LSC(Sel) Mark A Buchanan AMC(Sel) Daniel J Bue AZC(Sel) Marilyn M Buford ISC(Sel) Angela R Calhoun GSEC(Sel) Arnold B Cambe ENC(Sel) Mario Carbonell FCC(Sel) Christopher D Carr MMC(Sel) Ernesto Castaneda AWRC(Sel) Phillip D Chavers GMC(Sel) Brandon D Clark CSC(Sel) Reshonda Cole CSC(Sel) Linda A Colter GMC(Sel) Anthony J Cooke ITC(Sel) Christopher M Cooper MAC(Sel) Joshua L Cox GSMC(Sel) Franklin Crawford BMC(Sel) Jessica M Curry EMC(Sel) Dave Denton DCC(Sel) Larry Ellington AWRC(Sel) James R Felder RPC(Sel) Hector Feliciano AOC(Sel) Francisco Garcia AEC(Sel) James W Garrett FCC(Sel) Marc Geier AOC(Sel) Michael A Geneux GSMC(Sel) Joe E Gonzales AWRC(Sel) Wesley Goodwin GSMC(Sel) Joseph Grauvogl ENC(Sel) Robert Groves GMC(Sel) Amy L Hamilton AWRC(Sel) Matt Haydu STGC(Sel) Thomas C Hester ITC(Sel) Denisha D Hughes HMC(Sel) Eric W Hurley MMC(Sel) Warren James GSEC(Sel) Yong J Kim GMC(Sel) Lacarlos Knighten HTC(Sel) Nicholas A Lauver ETC(Sel) Michael Lewis AZC(Sel) Crystal L Mack ITC(Sel) Christian Maitland BMC(Sel) Charles Malloy EMC(Sel) Nahemer Morillo ITC(Sel) Rodney A Nutter NCC(Sel) James Obrien ATC(Sel) Jason Parshley MAC(Sel) Jason G Pavlica OSC(Sel)McCajor Quinn AEC(Sel) Geno Ramo OSC(Sel) Tavares D Ricks GSMC(Sel)Johnny Rogers AOC(Sel) Simeon A Santo AEC(Sel) Michael A Sebastian ABFC(Sel) Joseph S Smith DCC(Sel) Henry Tanner STGC(Sel) Bradley W Taylor DCC(Sel) Todd Thomas ADC(Sel) Gustavo Torresguevara EMC(Sel) Clifford Turner GSMC(Sel) Maurice S Waller EODC(Sel) Ryan M Waller ATC(Sel) Stewart Wallin ADC(Sel) Nathan J Whedon HMC(Sel) Devall A Wilson GMC(Sel) Sylvia Wynn AZC(Sel)Jose E ZayasMayport Area FY14 CPO Selects Announced THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 7

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DoD Memo Provides Specifics For Headquarters Spending CutsAmerican Forces Press ServiceDeputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter released a memo yester day that provides more specifics for a 20-percent reduction in Defense Department management headquarters spending over five fiscal years. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced the cuts during a July 16 meeting with employ ees at Naval Air Station Jacksonville in Florida. The cuts, Carter said in the memo, will take place regardless of budget lev els approved by Congress. Such cuts, he said, are designed to streamline DOD management through efficiencies and by eliminating lower-pri ority activities. This memorandum defines the nature of these important reduc tions more specifically, Carter said. Headquarters cuts will apply to all higher head quarters staffs including Office of the Secretary of Defense principal staff assistants and their associated defense agency staffs, the Joint Staff, ser vice secretary staffs, ser vice chief staffs, service four-star major com mands and service com ponent commands, lower-level service staffs down to the level deter mined by service secretar ies and chiefs, and com batant command staffs. Intelligence staffs will be affected, the memo said, primarily militaryintelligence-programfunded intelligence centers and, with the con currence of the director for national intelligence, national-intelligence-pro gram-funded centers. Service secretaries and chiefs will decide the allocation of cuts among organizations within their headquarters staffs, the memo said. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs will make the same allocation for the Joint Staff. Each principal staff assistant and defense agency should achieve a 20-percent reduction, the memo said. If necessary, I will con sider reallocations during program review, Carter wrote in the memo. The 20-percent spending cut applies to the total headquarters budgets, and these include govern ment civilian personnel who work at headquar ters, and associated costs such as contract services, facilities, information technology, and other areas that support head quarters functions. Budgets are those spec ified in the Future Years Defense Program sup porting the presidents budget for fiscal year 2014, extended to fiscal 2019 assuming growth for inflation, according to the memo. The 20-percent spending reduction applies to budget dollars, but orga nizations will strive for a goal of 20-percent reduc tions in authorized gov ernment civilian staff at their headquarters. While military person nel are not part of head quarters budgets, orga nizations will strive for the goal of a 20-percent reduction in military per sonnel billets on head quarters staffs, the memo said. Finally, subordinate headquarters should not grow as a result of reduc tions in higher headquar ters. Carter noted in the memo that hed review proposals to ensure that these various goals are met. I recognize that the [fiscal] 2014 budget reflects past efficiency decisions, some of which affected headquarters. This 20-percent reduction represents an additional cut, which I know will be challenging, Carter said in the memo. However, in this peri od of additional down ward pressure on defense spending, we must con tinue to reduce our headquarters budgets and staffing, he added. Components are encour aged to suggest changes in policies and workload that would help them accommodate these dol lar and staff reductions. Senior managers should ensure that cuts are made aggressively and as soon as possible, both to eliminate uncertainty for DOD employees and contractors and to maxi mize savings, the deputy secretary added. Generally, cuts should be roughly proportional by year with about onefifth of the cuts in fiscal 2015, another fifth in fis cal 2016, and so on up to fiscal 2019, the memo said, and components are free to implement reduc tions more rapidly. To the extent feasible, some cuts should begin in fiscal 2014 to increase savings and reduce cuts required in later years, the memo said. Carter directed that reduction plans be submitted along with Program Objective Memorandum submis sions, which are due Sept. 23. NavySubmit SAVE Awards For Cost-paring IdeasAmerican Forces Press ServiceFederal employees can submit their cost-cutting ideas through the White Houses annual SAVE Awards campaign that kicked-off July 30, admin istration officials said. SAVE stands for Securing Americans Value and Efficiency. The campaign, which runs through Aug. 9, stems from President Barack Obamas belief that federal employees are best poised to gener ate effective and efficient ways to ensure good stewardship of taxpayer dol lars, officials said. The SAVE Award rep resents a key opportunity to identify substantial sav ings in places that tradi tional financial managers may not know to look, explained Elizabeth A. McGrath, the Defense Departments deputy chief management offi cer. Every member of our workforce has deep knowledge and experi ence in their jobs and knows where inefficien cies lay hidden. Federal employees can participate by submitting their ideas for more effec tive and efficient govern ment or by encouraging co-workers to vote on their ideas or to submit their own, she added. The SAVE Award helps to empower these employees to speak up and become proactive change agents by promot ing ways to achieve cost reductions, McGrath said. Since the inaugural SAVE Awards in 2009, fed eral employees have submitted more than 85,000 cost-shrinking ideas, with dozens of the most promising suggestions includ ed in the presidents bud get, specifically in the cuts, consolidations, and savings volume, White House officials said. Creativity counts, they added, encouraging par ticipants to review previ ous submissions on the SAVE Awards website to avoid duplication. Relevant agencies will review all ideas for potential action, includ ing inclusion in the presi dents budget proposals, as more than 80 ideas have been in the past four years. It is always our responsibility as good stew ards of taxpayer dollars to adopt better business practices, and it is even more important in todays constrained fiscal envi ronment to aggressively target opportunities for improvement, McGrath said. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Navy Gives Public Access To Naval MuseumsFrom Naval History and Heritage CommandNational Museum of the United States Navy, Cold War Gallery and Display Ship Barry will be acces sible through a new gate open to the public starting Aug. 1. For the month of August, Naval History and Heritage Command along with the support of Naval District Washington, will offer free public access via the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail to the newly opened Cold War Gallery, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy and Display Ship Barry. The only day the muse ums will not be open is on Mondays, due to the fur lough restrictions. Until this point, it has been a challenge for visitors to access these national treasures due to security requirements. However, a special agree ment was reached to make a family-friendly option for museum goers, located within a 15-min ute walk of the Nationals Park. We are very excited about the possibility of introducing even more of our neighbors to the rich history of the U.S. Navy, said Capt. Jerry Hendrix, the director of the Naval History and Heritage Command, which is responsible for the U.S. Navys museums. There is something for everyone, from young children to our senior vet erans. Signs placed along the Riverwalk will direct visitors to the Washington Navy Yard gate locat ed near the Cold War Gallery. All adult visitors are required to present photo identification to enter. With the exception of Mondays, the museums and display ship will be open to visitors 9 a.m. 5 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. 5 p.m. on week ends. Located at the Washington Navy Yard, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy dis plays art and artifacts from the Revolutionary War, Antarctic explora tion, World War I and World War II, as well as submarine innovations. Visitors will enjoy peer ing through a submarine periscope, learning about deep sea exploration and diving, and maneuvering WWII-era artifacts. The Cold War Gallery, opened in October, displays a large submarine section, including a view of living and working conditions, artifacts from Vietnam POWs, displays from the Korean War, as well as an interactive exhibit called the Lions Den. Display Ship Barry is one of only three remaining Forrest Sherman class destroyers. Barry is the third ship to bear the name of the illustri ous Revolutionary War naval hero, Commodore John Barry. She support ed the 1958 Marine and Army airborne unit land ing in Beirut, Lebanon. In 1962, she was a member of the task force that quar antined Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis in response to evidence that Soviet missiles had been installed on the island. In 1979, Barry joined the Middle East Force for Persian Gulf service dur ing the very tense period that accompanied the Iranian Revolution. In 1981-1982 Barry made her final deployment in that area. USS Barry was decommissioned in 1982 and arrived at the Washington Navy Yard in 1983. For more information, visit the National Museum of the United States Navy website at www.history. navy.mil/branches/org81.htm.Navy Lab Hosts Underwater Robotics CompetitionSpace and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public AffairsThere was plenty of excitement from student teams during the 16th annual International RoboSub Competition, held at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacifics (SSC Pacific) Transducer Evaluation Center (TRANSDEC) pool, July 23-28. RoboSub, co-sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Foundation, hosted 30 national and international collegiate teams, in addi tion to five high school teams and the first middle school team to participate in the competition. The goal of this com petition is to advance the development of autono mous underwater vehi cles (AUVs) by challeng ing a new generation of engineers to perform realistic missions in an underwater environment. The event also fosters ties between young engineers and organizations devel oping AUV technologies. Inspiring and encour aging todays youth to pursue careers in sci ence, technology, engi neering, and math (STEM) is important to us at SSC Pacific, and were happy to host the RoboSub Competition for the twelvth year in a row, said Capt. Joe Beel, SSC Pacific command ing officer. RoboSub is a platform for students around the world to high light their abilities and aptitude, while fostering teamwork, communica tion and creativity, all important attributes for a STEM professional. SSC Pacific has a strong edu cation outreach program in the local community, and RoboSub is a great opportunity for us to invite the public to visit the lab and meet with the students and our engi neers. License to Dive was the theme of this years RoboSub competition and the goal was for an AUV to demonstrate its autonomy by completing an under water License to Dive mission. The requirements for the underwater task were established, and the teams were judged on their ability to complete the mission. Volunteer divers, including Navy div ers stationed at SSC Pacific, launched the AUVs into the water at the TRANSDEC facil ity. The TRANSDEC pool is a one-of-a-kind facil ity that simulates ocean conditions and provides an ideal environment for research. The pool mea sures 300 feet by 200 feet with a depth of 38 feet. To further promote STEM, a SeaPerch Fun Challenge was held July 26 in conjunction with RoboSub. SeaPerch is an innovative underwa ter robotics program that provides middle and high school students the resources to build an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) from a kit of low-cost, eas ily accessible parts. Approximately 20 mid dle and high school teams participated during the SeaPerch Fun Challenge where they interacted with their peers, college students and STEM pro fessionals. Corresponding to the goal of RoboSub, the Daytona Beach Area Homeschoolers team, the first middle school team to compete in RoboSub, had initially started exploring STEM through SeaPerch, and were mentored by college stu dents from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), who were also competing in RoboSub. With guidance from ERAU students, the Daytona Beach Area Homeschoolers team chose to delve deeper into STEM by graduating from an ROV to an AUV. Achieving this objective, the Homeschoolers team entered the competition to have their vehicle com pete against some of the brightest engineering stu dents in the world. Winners of the RoboSub Competition were announced July 28, with first place awarded to Cornell University. Second and third place were awarded to the University of Florida and Far Eastern Federal University, respectively. Special awards were also presented, and the award categories includ ed Best New Entry, which was awarded to National University of Singapore, and Bang for the Buck, which was presented to the Daytona Beach Area Homeschoolers team. The award for outreach was distributed in a threeway tie to North Carolina State, Carl Hayden High School and ERAU. -Photo by MC2 Jumar T. BalacyAn autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) built by students from the University of Florida Machine Intelligence Laboratory navigates an obstacle course at the TRANSDEC Anechoic Pool during RoboSub 2013. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 9

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veyed open dialogue with leadership and enlist ed from other military branches on DoD wide concerns and prevention programs was beneficial to him. I think what the gen eral had to say was very interesting, especially about sexual assault and sexual harassment. Im glad to see the progress that the military is making to combat [this problem], said Carrasco. Air Traffic Controller Airman Apprentice Lauryn Lubenstein, assigned to NS Mayport Air Operations, also attended the lunch and found it inspirational and educational to speak with Kelly. I am new to the Navy, I really dont have any experience, so its good to talk to someone who has a lot more experience, said Lubenstein. Its inspiring, to hear from someone so [high rank ing] and have him come here and talk to us. Kelly wrapped up his visit to Mayport at Helicopter Squadron, 60 (HSL-60) for a demon stration on their involve ment in Africa and how USSOUTHCOM could benefit from their expe riences for counter drug operations. HSL-60 is the first naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats, which contributed to the cap turing of $1 billion in ille gal drugs headed for the United States over deploy ment. Kelly received a firsthand opportunity to wit ness some of the squad rons capabilities with a MH-60R Seahawk heli copter flight. While at HSL-60, he talked with personnel and recognized two Sailors who recent ly earned Enlisted Air Warfare Specialist desig nations. COMUSNAVSO/C4F is currently ramping up to support PANAMAX and UNITAS, both are partnership-building exercises within the USSOUTHCOM area of operation, were the com mand will serve as mari time force commander. Both exercises are sched ule to begin in August and continue through the fall. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Spearhead To Sea-Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonCommander U.S. Southern Command Marine Gen. John Kelly, addresses 4th Fleet sailors during an all hands call on Naval Station Mayport FL. Kelly was visiting 4th Fleet to con duct office calls with the Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris. From Page 1Southcom -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonThe Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) departs Naval Station Mayport in the early morning, after a brief stop to take on fuel and parts. The new class of high speed vessels are capable of transporting approximately 600 tons of equipment and military personnel 1,200 miles at an average speed of 35 knots. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 11

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Auto Skills Center August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Aug. 16: 80s Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. 80s Costume Contest, 80s music and trivia, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Aug. 21: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Legoland Florida Special. All active duty military receive one FREE Water Park Combo Ticket. Free ticket can be redeemed at the front gate. Family members can purchase discounted tickets at ITT. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering ban ner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale NOW Purchase your tick ets for the 2013 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70.00. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in August: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $13. Aug. 10: Jacksonville Roller Girls Roller Derby. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 11: Adventure Landing Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 12: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 14: Laser Tag. 6-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. FREE Aug. 16: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $5; sign up by Aug. 14. Aug. 18: A Day at the Beach: Huguenot Park. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 19: Nerf Sniper. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Aug. 10. Aug. 22: Hooters Dinner Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 24: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 26: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 10: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 2. 270-5451 Aug. 13: Go the Distance 10K/5K Run 8 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 13: Intramural Flag Football Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451 Aug. 20: 3v3 Fall Soccer Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins Aug. 26; end Oct. 21. 270-5451 Aug. 26-28: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 19. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWR Sports/Fitness 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Aug. 9: Outdoor MoviesThe Croods (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 16: Outdoor MoviesThe Goonies (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Aug. 23: Outdoor MoviesBrave (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Furloughed Civilians Urged To Tap ProgramsAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith furloughs now in full swing and many Defense Department civilian employees finding themselves with more time on their hands but less money in their pock ets, morale, welfare and recreation officials are encouraging them to check out some of the programs offered right where they work. Every military service provides fitness, recre ational and education al services, often at no charge or for significantly less than one might pay just outside an instal lations gates, Ed Miles, DODs MWR policy direc tor, told American Forces Press Service. The underlying goal of the MWR program is to give military members and their families, as well as military retirees, a safe, affordable out let to reduce stress and build physical, mental and emotional strength and resilience, Miles explained. We have a direct impact on the readiness and retention and resilience of the troops, he said. Without a healthy and fit force, there could be national security implications. So whenever possible, the services extend their morale, welfare and recre ational offerings to DOD civilian employees, whom they recognize as essen tial contributors to their missions, Miles said. Wherever we have capacity to accommo date them, we encourage civilians to use these pro grams, he said. Thats not only during seques tration. We welcome them all the time. Its too soon to tell if the civilian workforce is tak ing greater advantage of MWR facilities and pro grams since sequestration kicked in, but Miles said hes expecting an uptick. It wouldnt surprise me to see usage go up not just because the rates are lower, but because making use of these facili ties is so convenient, he said. A common access card gives DOD civilian employees access to free or low-cost use of base fit ness centers, swimming pools, libraries, movie theaters, bowling alleys, clubs, arts-and-craft cen ters, auto repair shops, golf courses, camp grounds, shooting ranges, beaches and marinas. Depending on the loca tion, DOD civilians also can rent camping, boat ing, snorkeling, skiing and other outdoor gear at their base outdoor rec reation office. They can visit the installation tick ets and tours office to buy discount tickets to civilian theaters, theme parks and travel and tour packages. Some civilian employ ees may not realize theyre also qualified to rent the recreational campgrounds, cabins, cottages, trailers and trailer or recreational vehi cle parks with hook-ups found on many military installations. For the most part, a civilian or military iden tification card provides access to services and programs not just where the member works, but also at other installations, even those of another ser vice, Miles said. That extends to the crown jewels of the MWR program: Armed Forces Recreation Center resorts at popular vacation spots. All run by the Army but open to military and civil ian employees from every service, these include Shades of Green on the grounds of Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla.; the Hale Koa in Honolulu; the Edelweiss Lodge and Resort in Garmisch, Germany; and the Dragon Hill Lodge in Seoul, South Korea. The Navy runs a simi lar resort-type facility, the New Sanno Hotel, in Tokyo. In addition, the Air Force has a partnership with Keystone Resort, Colo., to offer discounts at Rocky Mountain Blue, with a variety of lodging options and recreational discounts. Like everything across the Defense Department, morale, welfare and rec reation programs are getting close scrutiny as officials look for ways to cut costs. While officials strive to preserve the services offered, Miles acknowledged that in the future, costs could go up, hours could be reduced and programs not directly linked to military readi ness could even fall by the wayside. But in the meantime, he is encouraging civil ian employees to make the most of the furlough situation by tapping the morale, welfare and recre ation program. MWR is here for them, he said. Theres no better time than now to check out whats available. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 13

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USS Gettysburg Enters 6th FleetBy Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs OfficeShips and embarked squadrons from Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) entered U.S. 6th Fleets area of responsibility (AOR), July 26 and 29th. Guided-missile cruis er USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and guidedmissile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), entered July 26, followed by strike group flagship and aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) July 29. This is the first time HST CSG has entered the 6th Fleet AOR since its last deployment in 2010. In addition to the five ships, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group also includes embarked Carrier Air Wing 3 and its squadrons; Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312 Checkerboards; Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 Seahawks; Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 Zappers; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 Dusty Dogs; Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes; embarked 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron staff and Military Sealift Command, fast combat ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8). While in the east ern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, HST CSG will be supporting maritime security opera tions (MSO) and theater security cooperation efforts. MSO are set conditions for security and stability in the maritime environ ment and complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of regional nations. -Photo by MC3 Taylor DiMartinoThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) passes the Rock of Gibraltar while transiting the Mediterranean Sea. Gettysburg, part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Haraz N. GhanbariThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) transits the Atlantic Ocean as an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Sea Knights of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22 approaches the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a vertical replenishment. Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Donald R. White Jr.Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) practice breaking down an M-16 assault rifle. -Photo by MC3 Jamie CosbyThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), left, and the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) transit the Strait of Gibraltar en route to the Mediterranean Sea. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Navy Conducts Exercise With US Air ForceUSS Nimitz Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), with embarked HSL-48 Detachment Five conducted an air oper ations for maritime surface warfare exer cise in the Arabian Gulf, July 17. The exercise was a joint operation between Monterey and aircraft from U.S. Air Force, Central Command. This was an excellent opportunity for Monterey to improve interoperabil ity with U.S. Air Force assets deployed to the Central Command area of responsi bility, said Lt. Cmdr. Robert Watts, the ships operations officer. It also allowed Monterey to practice joint tactics, tech niques, and procedures in the dynamic maritime environment. Monterey launched two rigid-hull inflatable boats to simulate small boat threats that were detected by an Air Force E-8 Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft. Two U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle aircraft were then directed to investi gate, identify, target, and destroy the tar gets. Monterey and the JSTARS aircraft took turns controlling and directing the Strike Eagles while practicing joint pro cedures to defend Monterey from small craft attack. It was a very successful exercise, said Watts. Both Monterey and U.S. Air Force participants met or exceed ed all training objectives. This exercise improves our ability to operate more effectively and efficiently with joint part ners in the region. The two-hour exercise concluded with a fly-by of Monterey after the F-15E Strike Eagles had eliminated all simulat ed targets during multiple inbound runs. Monterey is currently deployed in sup port of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Sammy B. In Port-Photo by Paul FarleyThe guided missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) arrives for a scheduled port visit in Souda Bay, Greece. Sameul B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Fla., is deployed to the U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa area of responsibility supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Daniel Riley, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, performs maintenance on the engine of an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter in the hangar bay aboard USS Monterey (CG 61). -Photos by MC3 Billy HoAviation Electrician's Mate 1st Class Brett Clayton, left, and Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Jordan Cramer, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, perform overhaul on the engine of an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter in the hangar bay aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 15

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FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFFSC Schedule Set From FFSC The following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 8, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 8, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Aug. 12, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Aug. 12, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 12-13, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Higher Education FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 14, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will par ticipate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. Aug. 14, 11 a.m.-noon, Money and the Move FFSC Building 1 Room 719 Aug. 15, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 15-16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Family Readiness Group FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 15, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 15, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 15, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Aug. 19-23, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 21, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 21, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 22,, 1-3 p.m., Troops to Teachers FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 22, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 22, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 22, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Aug. 26-30, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 26, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Aug. 27, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an addi tional motivator for end ing the violence and seek ing intervention. Aug. 28, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Thursday, Aug. 8 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a workshop on Gardening Tips for Hot Weather plus Managing Pest Problems from 6:30 8:30 pm at the Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd. This is a free program. Come learn gar dening tips for the summer heat and what to do with those pests in your landscape. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Friday, Aug. 9 The Ladies Auxillary FRA Unit 290, 390 Mayport Rd., will hold a smothered pork chop dinner from 5-8 p.m. Donation is $8. Take out orders welcome. Open to the public. Call 246-6855 for more information. Saturday, Aug. 10 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Christ United Methodist Church invites the community to an oldfashioned fish fry, hosted by the United Methodist Men. Dinners will include fish, hush puppies and all the trimmings, all for only $7 for adults and $4 for children. Meet us in Wilson Hall of the church at 5: p.m. at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach to reel yours in! Need info? Call the church at 2495370. Well see you there. Tuesday, Aug. 13 Some 850 delegates from VVA chapters across the country are expected to join several hundred other Vietnam veterans and guests in Jacksonville. Former Congressman David Bonior, who spoke at VVAs Founding Convention in 1983, will deliver the Keynote Address at the Opening Ceremonies on Aug. 14 starting at 9 a.m. Other Convention special guests include singer/songwrit er Arlo Guthrie, who will receive the Presidents Award for Excellence in the Arts at the Saturday night Awards Banquet. Aug. 13 at 2:30 p.m., there will be a wreath laying at the Vietnam Monument (corner Market and Bay Street). Friday, August 16, 7 7:30 a.m., POW/MIA Remembrance, front of downtown Hyatt. Wreath ceremony at St. Johns River. All are welcome to attend our conven tion to see what the VVA is about.This is to be the largest convention in the 33 years of VVA existence. Thursday, Aug.15 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a free workshop on Do it Yourself Irrigation Repairs to Save Money at S. Mandarin Branch Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, Fl. The time is 6:30 8:30 p.m. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Learn handson ideas. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Aug. 16 & 17 The Englewood High School Class of 1973 has finalized plans for their 40 year High School Reunion in Jacksonville, FL on the Southbank of the St Johns River. Dont miss out on this great event! Mail your check today for $75 per person to EHS Jay Kauffman, 8058 Newton Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32216 (Jay 904.982.2701). Please prepay your Saturday night reservation to insure there is enough food for everyone. Questions? Jay 904-982-2701, Amy 904-629-9222. More info on Facebook: search Englewood High School Class of 1973. www.face book.com/groups/26228 1106060/10151708392646 061/?notif_t=group_activ ity Saturday, Aug. 17 Ever dreamed of getting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photogra pher at 11 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn tech niques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Please bring your own camera and pho tography supplies, sturdy shoes, bug spray, sun screen and water. Space is limited on this program to 10 participants. Please RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Reservations are required and the pro gram is free. Join one of our knowl edgeable park rangers at 2 p.m. for an informative talk on the natural his tory of sea islands and their important role in coastal ecology. The top ics addressed will include beach erosion, island migration, island forma tion and the natural communities present on such barrier islands today. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Aug. 24th at 2:00 p.m. Want to find out how to lawn bowl or play cro quet? Join a ranger on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Monday, Aug. 19 The Friends of the Beaches Branch Library Community Room will host an informational meeting to discuss repair and construction plans at the library at 6-7 p.m. Attendees will include City Council President Bill Gulliford, City Council Member At-Large Group 2 John Crescimbeni, rep resentatives of the City of Jacksonville Public Works Department and the Jacksonville Public Library, and an archi tect from VRL Architects, who will give an overview of the plans and answer questions. Reservations are not required. The library is closed on Mondays but the doors will be opened at 5:30 p.m. for anyone who wants to attend the meet ing. A Canning Workshop making Salsa come learn to make and take home some of the prod uct made at Duval County Canning Center, both classes are from 9 a.m.noon only. Cost is $20 with limited space; with pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Saturday, Aug. 24 Duval County Extension Office will hold the workshop, Start Your Own Vegetables from Seed and Introduction to Seed Saving from 9 a.m.1:30 p.m. Learn principals in germinating & saving seeds; as well as taking home your own planted tray. Class is at the Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32254. Cost is $15. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Please bring a bag lunch. Checks should be made payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Mayport Security Sweats It Out Back To School Drive Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is collecting school supplies for our deserving junior families to help get their children ready for school this year. If you can help, please bring your donated school supplies to either Mayport or NAS Jax USO centers between now and Aug. 9. We are asking for any school necessities such as pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, back packs, glue/sticks, two pocket three-prong folders, rulers, lunch boxes, etc. No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner from 5-7 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 12. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. The wonderful staff and volunteers will Shepards pie, salad, and dessert 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registration forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, over all prize payouts, a chal lenged athletes division, and medals to all finish ers. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game sea son. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWSPhotos by Paige GnannAbove left, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Brad Hayes does extended sit ups as other members of Mayport Security perform Burpies at a second exercise station on April 1. The depart ment PT was also done in remembrance of a local MA who died as the result of a motorcycle accident. Above right, Security Command Fitness Leader Master-at-Arms Michael Eno carries a wooden block as he runs during the PT. Eno coordinated the workout for the command. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 17

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CHINFO Award Winner Commissary RewardsCard Gets App Page 3 USS GettysburgEnters Sixth Fleet AOR Page 14 Phil Sea, RooseveltParticipate in Group Sail Pages 4-5 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Measuring Up As A Chief-Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Select Aviation Structural Mechanic Daniel J. Bue participates in a PFA weigh-in at the ATG Mayport audito rium on Aug. 5, beginning the Phase II CPO 365 training to become a chief petty officer. See the list of NS Mayport Selectees on Page 7. -Photo by Paige Gnann Teedie Tuttle and Mike West of Fluor install a Gold Star Family Reserved parking sign at Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayport. The space is now designated to families of active duty fallen Sailors.New Signs To Honor Families Of Fallen Service MembersSouthCOM Kelly Visits USNAVSOBy MCC Elizabeth Thompson4th Fleet Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) vis ited Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F), the maritime compo nent command located at Naval Station Mayport July 30 to engage with fleet Sailors, DoD person nel and discuss future operations. Marine Gen. John Kellys visit to Mayport came after COMUSNAVSO/C4Fs completion of the highspeed vessel Swift (HSV-2) deployment to Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras as part of Southern Partnership Station (SPS). During his visit, Kelly met with Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, com mander, COMUSNAVSO/ C4F, and his staff to look at lessons learned from SPS and ways to improve future mission capabili ties and national partner engagements. It was very impor tant to explain in detail how we have enriched the enduring partner ships we already have in Central America during Southern Partnership Station and how we tested low-cost innovative ideas and technology to con duct future missions in the SOUTHCOM area of operations, Harris said. Kelly addressed COMUSNAVSO/C4F dur ing an all hands call at the headquarters and dis cussed a variety of issues ranging from civilian furloughs to budget cuts effecting USSOUTHCOM component commands. He acknowledged frus tration Sailors and DoD civilians may be experi encing and thanked them for their patience and commitment to duty dur ing the fiscal uncertainty. Thanks for all that you do. You give and your families give like most Americans cant even imagine, said Kelly. Kelly also emphasized the importance of suicide and sexual assault pre vention programs. Its about taking care of each other, stated Kelly during the all hands call. Sexual assault is abominable and we can fix it. Bystander intervention and positive command climate continued to be main topics of discussion at a joint service, enlisted luncheon with Kelly and Harris held at the base galley. Were better than society in general and because of that we are held to a higher stan dard, explained Kelly as he shared a story of how bystander interven tion prevented a sexual assault at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. It real ly starts here, down on the deckplates. Army Staff Sgt. Conrad Carrasco, assigned to Fleet Logistics Command Jacksonville, was one of the 18 service members at the luncheon who con -From StaffDrivers around Naval Station Mayport will start noticing new Reserved signs at several parking spaces located throughout the base and at the NEX/Commissary store in an effort to honor those who have given their all in the defense of our country and to those they left behind. In accordance with a direc tive from Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), NS Mayport is implementing the Gold Star program to ensure fam ily members of active duty fallen Sailors have continued access at the Navy installation. Since June 30 Navy installations have begun implementing desig nated parking spaces for Gold Star Family (GSF) members at various locations on base in order to recog nize and honor these families. By providing Gold Star program members designated parking spac es, these Navy family members will be able to access resources and support services without having to obtain an escort onto the base. Gold Star Family members designated parking spots will be available at Fleet Family Service Centers and commissaries, among other locations. Additional park ing spaces may be designated at the discretion of the base command ing officer with consideration for expected use and parking space availability. Additional designated parking may be offered at locations such as military cemeteries, cha pels, memorials and other locations as the base commanding officer deems appropriate. GSF member designated parking spots on instal lations will allow GSF members to attend on base ceremonies and events, memorials, museums, and visit with other Gold Star program members. While the details and issuance of Gold Star access cards is still being finalized, family members of fallen service members can receive the paperwork to register for the pro gram with the Department of the Navys Casualty Assistance Calls Officer (CACO) program. "Its the right thing to do for those who gave so much for their coun try, said NS Mayport Command Master Chief Bob White. They gave their loved ones to us, entrusted them to us and they paid the ulti mate sacrifice. They deserve so much more. And if our doing this, making it more convenient to go to the Clinic or the Exchange, shows a little of our appreciation for their sacrifice then Im glad we can do it. See Gold Star, Page 6 See Southcom, Page 11Gold Star Reserved spots are located at Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayport, Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange on base and off base, Navy Gateway Inn & Suites, Navy Lodge, PSD, FFSC Building 1, Gym, MWR ITT, Bogeys, Chapel

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, I guess it would be customary to say how sad I am to depart Naval Station Mayport at the end of my Command Tour, as I will be transferring next week. But, there are two reasons why Im not going to do that. The first reason is Capt. Wes McCall (wife, Reyna) is the incoming commanding officer. He is the most professional, skilled and nicest Naval Officer I have had the pleasure to meet. He and Reyna will enjoy the warmth, professionalism and can-do spirit that abounds here at Naval Station Mayport and return it twofold. A career Naval Aviator, Wes has spent an abundance of time at sea and in the desert. He is a combat-proven avia tor, an incredible leader and mentor of Sailors. Reyna is relatively new to the Navy, being newlyweds, and is prob ably the most gracious and friendly women I have ever met. Wes and Reyna are coming to us after a tour in the FDNF as Navigator aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan. There is no need to be sad or sorry with the knowledge that this installation is in such fine and capable hands! Welcome aboard Wes and Reyna and hang on for the ride of your life!!! The second reason is the support that I have enjoyed these past two years and 10 months (whos counting, right?) from every Sailor, Government Service and civilian contractor here at Naval Station Mayport. Together, we made our mark by supporting the Fleet, as well as building leaders on the airfield and on the waterfront every day! Never forget that Global Presence and Power Projection start right here at the wharfs and han gars of Naval Station Mayport. Farewell and Following Seas Team Mayport! Anne and I thank you from the bottom of our hearts for the Ultimate Gift you have given us everyday since October of 2010! May the future shine brightly on Planet Awesome, and God Bless our people, our Installation and the United States Navy!Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSA few weeks ago I wrote an article about taking time to discuss with your child areas for improve ment at schooland how he can achieve success in those problem areas this next school year. But what about improve ments you can implement at home to lessen the stress and also improve school success? Getting Started Right now imple ment your schedule for the coming school year. Depending on the county and whether your child will attend public or pri vate, you have a week or two to get everyone ready for these changes: new dinner time, new bath times, new bed times, new getting up times. The sooner you get this new schedule in place, the easier those first few days of school will be. But dont just spring it on your family. Have a sit down session with every one which could easily be the beginning of your new dinner schedule to explain why this is so important and how it will happen. As a family figure out what time everyone will be getting home from school and from work. Next figure out the bed times for the school year. Some of your children may be moving up to a later bed time while oth ers might actually need an earlier bed time. How effective was last years bed time? Did it work, or were they sleepy, grumpy, hard to get up? Once you have this block of time determined, then figure out who will do homework when, where, and for how long. Are there after-school activities which also have to be factored into this equation? What about free time for television, texting, reading? Will there be a night when the whole family is involved in church or sports or volunteering? Dont forget baths! Or cat feeding! Or dog walking! Or gerbil cage cleaning! Etc, Etc, Etc. Each family is very different with different jobs and tasks required of its members Next you have to figure out the mornings. Now this can be really crazy. There is usually less time to get everything in: waking up, schedul ing bathroom time, eat ing, dressing, finding homework (unless you put that in your night time schedule), making lunch (unless that, too, is in your night time schedule), and leaving for bus, car, carpool, or walking. Now implement! You will have this weekend, all next week, and the following weekend to make a trial run of your night time and morning plans. Of course, there really wont be homework or actually leaving for school, but it can be fun to put in other activities. Instead of homework, they can log in to www. SoarAtHome.org to find out how much they have retained over the summer. If the organized sports or dance lessons havent started yet, then pile the whole family into the car for a trip to an area park to work out. By really trying out your schedule ahead of time, you can get a real sense of whether it will work. But you might have more trouble trying out the morning schedule. Who wants to roll out of bed while it is still dark when there really isnt any school to get ready for? Maybe reward their efforts with a trip one morning to their favorite breakfast place? But schedules can fall apart. My favorite quote from Captain Cochrane is, No battle plan ever survived first contact with the enemy. Trust me, a new school year is defi nitely the enemy. After a few weeks into the new school year, you may find that adjustments are required. No worries it is natural. Just sit down again with the family and revise. Figure out what is working and what needs fixing. Making the schedule can be a great learn ing experience. And it will help your children to learn to make similar ones for themselves at home or at school! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article, want a copy of the Un/Underfunded Mandates for Duval Schools, or have con cerns about an edu cational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Back to School . Start Your Engines!Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingHow Much Money Does It Take To Be Rich? That was the headline in a recent About.com article by Joshua Kennon for beginning investors. The author opens with some good financial advice when he writes that you should probably spend less than you make and invest the rest in order to grow your assets. Then he posed the question, Have you ever wondered How much money does it take to be rich? For the answer he turned to a recent CNN Money publication where that question was posed to a group of financial planners. That group seemed to believe that it would take between $2 million and $12 million dollars to be considered rich in todays economy. I guess I know now that I am not in the financially rich category. DARN! I had such high hopes. But, I havent met anyone who joined the Navy to get rich. There were some other interesting tidbits in the article worth mentioning. First, the author points out that most people want to have enough money to pay their taxes, live in a nice house and have enough money left over each month to spend anyway one likes. The annual income to accomplish this very nice sounding feat is estimated to have risen to about $300,000 a year. I bet you and I could probably do it on less. Second, he writes that most people just want to put on their monopoly hat, set up an office to monitor investments, spend all day reading and going out to nice restaurants, giving gen erously to charity, and oh yes, adding yearly to their increased net worth. Know anybody? Third, he insightfully reveals Something deep in most investors psyche seems to be triggered when we pile up treasure at no expense to our lifestyle or giving. It turns out that once you have the granite counter tops, the nice car, designer clothesetcthat spend ing more money doesnt make you any happier. It is no secret then why Holy Scripture wisely tells us that happiness does not consist in the abun dance of our possessions. The wealthiest ruler in the Old Testament was King Solomon. The Book of Ecclesiastes, Chapter 2, describes how he felt about his accumulated wealth in the end. Very revealing. With his riches he built great houses, planted awesome vine yards, created parks and gardens, accumulated great herds and flocks, and amassed much silver and gold. He had it all. And yet King Solomon said, When I surveyed all that my hands had done and achievedit was like chasing the wind. God asks us to measure our lives differently. To live for a higher purpose and calling. Not to spend our lives in constant pur suit of things or stuff. In the end, it proves to be an empty pursuit. In fact, Jesus told the parable of a man who spent his life in pursuit of riches. All he acquired was never enough. He always desired more. Then he died. At that point, what did all his riches gain him? As Jesus said, What good is it to gain the whole world, but lose your own soul? Do we really want to spend our lives chasing the wind? Chap Steve Souder CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHow Much Money Does It Take To Be Rich?

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Senior Chief Damage Controlman Dedrick Walker and Chief Master-at-Arms Dennis Mattingly cook burgers at a CPOA Burger Burn fundraiser on July 31.CPOA Good EatsCommissary Rewards Card Offers Mobile AppDeCA public affairs specialistYour Commissary Rewards Card will cel ebrate its one-year anni versary Aug. 8 by deliver ing a gift to you. A mobile application will be released and available from the app store Aug. 8 for customers who use the iPhone or iPad, said Marye Carr, DeCAs Rewards Card program manager. The app will allow you to access your account, select coupons and review clipped, redeemed and expired coupons making it even easier to put your cou pons to work for you. An Android version of the app will become available in the future. Carr said the app also allows shoppers to locate commissaries worldwide and access store infor mation such as phone number and address. These added capabilities enhance the usefulness of the Commissary Rewards Card, which gives cus tomers access to digital coupons redeemable at any commissary. The Commissary Rewards Card provides a great asset to our busy, budget-conscious cus tomers, said Director of Sales Randy Chandler. Our shoppers want to save time, effort and money, plus reduce their reliance on paper coupons that have to be clipped and carried. More than 800,000 cards have been regis tered by shoppers, who have downloaded more than 8 million coupons so far. That means bigger savings for them, on top of the commissarys rou tine savings of 30 percent or more. Its not unusual for the Commissary Rewards Card to offer more than 120 coupons at any given time, said Carr. Check in daily for new coupons. Honestly, if youre not using your card, youre throwing money away. Carr said many customers find it handy to print a list of their coupons to help them keep track of their savings. The card provides another way to save, in addition to your paper coupons, she said. Commissary shoppers love coupons, so this is another way to increase buying power. Using the card is sim ple: Pick up a card at the commissary, visit DeCAs website to register it and then select and load digi tal coupons. Then, when the cashier scans the card, the coupons are matched to items purchased and savings are deducted from the bill automatically. Rewards Card digital coupons disappear from your account when they expire or are redeemed. Like paper coupons, they cant be combined with other coupons on the same item, and they have expiration dates and other redemption terms and conditions. Overseas, digital coupons will not be accepted for up to six months after expiration, as paper coupons are, because the coupons are instantly available to all customers worldwide. That means overseas customers dont need extra time to use the coupons. To learn more about the card or sign up to be notified of updates, including new coupon alerts, go to http://www.commissar ies.com/rewards_sub scribe.cfm. A customer service hotline can be reached at 855-829-6219 or via email at commis sarysupport@inmar.com. About DeCA: The Defense Commissary Agency operates a world wide chain of commissaries providing groceries to military personnel, retir ees and their families in a safe and secure shopping environment. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5-percent surcharge, which covers the costs of building new commissaries and mod ernizing existing ones. By shopping regularly in the commissary, patrons save an average of 30 percent or more on their purchases compared to commercial prices savings amounting to thousands of dollars annually. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Philippine Sea Completes MISSILX USS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) complet ed a missile exercise (MISSILX), Aug. 4. Philippine Sea, and USS Truxtun (DDG 103) simultaneously launched Navy Standard Missile2s (SM-2) while USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) launched shortly after wards. The MISSILEX required that all three ships fire SM-2s at a remote con trolled, subsonic missile drone, or (BQM). The SM-2 is the U.S Navys primary surface-to-air air defense weapon and a vital element of the Aegis Weapon System (AWS) aboard Ticonderogaclass cruisers and Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, launched from the MK 41 Vertical Launcher System (VLS). During the exercise a BQM was flown out to sea by an aircraft and dropped into mid air. The drone is then reverted back towards the ships requiring them to shoot it out of the sky, said Senior Chief Fire Controlman Jeremy R. Rasnick, com bat systems fire control man leading chief petty officer. After it was dropped, shore command flew the BQM inbound, said Rasnick. Once inbound our mission is to get good telemetry data back to shore command so they can evaluate how the missile and its systems pre formed. The missiles fired were not armed with war heads. Instead, each mis sile attempts to approach the BQM as close as pos sible simulating an actual intercept. Each SM-2 has prox imity sensors capable of recording the distance from the BQM as it flies by indicating a hit, said Rasnick. The missiles try to get as close as they can to the drone and instead of it exploding it just con tinues to fly by, said Rasnick. Once recovered they can figure out whose missiles were within the blast radius. The MISSILX simu lates a cruise missile attack scenario that could be encountered by the George H.W. Bush Strike Group (GHWB CSG) on deployment. This missile is specifi cally designed to simulate a C-802 missile which is an anti-ship cruise mis sile, said Rasnick. After two days of mock drills involving Learjet fly-bys simulating a BQM, the Philippine Sea was ready to conduct the MISSILX and learn from the experience of an actual launch. The rehearsals were very beneficial and went very well, said Master Chief Fire Controlman Craig M. Cotherman, combat systems main tenance manger. But a couple things were a little bit different today, things we cant rehearse and simulate, things we cant prepare for. Cotherman feels the MISSILX provided an invaluable experience. We definitely have some lessons to take away from the experience, said Cotherman. Aside from actually having to fire on a target, this is as real as it gets. The last missile launch aboard the Philippine Sea took place in 2010 mak ing this not just a learning experience, but also a rare and exciting event for the crew. I was standing in the bridge when it happened, said Quartermaster 3rd Class Cameron A.Wheylan. It was cool to see what we can actually do and feel the power of it all, he added. Its definitely something I will never forget. Philippine Sea is par ticipating in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail to improve strike group interoperability and pre pare for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisThe guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), left, the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), center, and the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) are underway in the Atlantic Ocean. Truxtun, Roosevelt and Philippine Sea are participating in the George H.W. Bush group sail to improve strike group interoperability and prepare for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Brian Read CastilloThe guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) launches a Standard Missile (SM-2) during a Group Sail missile exercise. Roosevelt is participating in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail to improve strike group interoperability and prepare for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Brian Read CastilloSailors man a fire hose during a flight deck damage control training exercise aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58).-Photo by MC2 Brian Read CastilloSailors heave a line aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) during a replenishment-at-sea.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 5 USS Roosevelt Departs For Group Sail USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Public AffairsThe Arleigh-Burke class destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) departed its homeport of Mayport, Fla., to participate in the George H.W. Bush Group Sail (GHWB GRUSL), July 29. During the approxi mately monthlong at-sea period, Roosevelt will be part of the Group Sail in order to improve interoperability with the other ships in the strike group. This is the first time we will be operating with the George H.W. Bush Strike Group for the upcom ing deployment, said Commanding Officer Cmdr. Frankie J. Clark. We have completed our unit level training, which is specific for our plat form, but now we are joining the other ships in the strike group to com plete group-training exer cises as well as prepare for deployment. Lt. LeAndra Kissinger, the ships operations offi cer, said this at-sea period is the first opportunity for the ships in the strike group to work on becoming a functional unit. It is an extremely important training phase that will ensure that dur ing the actual assess ment phase, Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), all the ships in the Strike Group can get certified for deployment, said Kissinger. The five ships par ticipating in the GHWB GRUSL are the Nimitzclass aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), the Arleigh-Burke class destroyers USS Truxtun (DDG 103) and USS Roosevelt, and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55). It is our first event working together as a Strike Group so we have a lot of events scheduled for the at-sea period, said Clark. We will mainly be testing all the system operability between the different ships working together as one battle group. It is important that we learn how to work well with each other now so during COMPTUEX we can focus on getting the certification. For the past 90 days, Roosevelt has been in port and the crew looks toward this underway as a time to continue to maintain the proficiency of the crew and equipment. During this at-sea period, we need to make sure that we, as a ship, are operating at the level necessary to work together as a team with the Strike Group, said Kissinger. We will be deploying as a team and it is impera tive that we are prepared in case something hap pens when we deploy. We train for every possibility in order for it to become a matter of muscle memory in case of an emergency. Clark said this group sail will be the first impression Roosevelt will make on the strike group and he believes the ship and crew will do extremely well. I am very excited because Roosevelt has always been a ship with a crew that gets things done and this is our first opportunity to show the battle group that we are ready to meet all assigned tasking, said Clark. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeSailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) man the rails as the ship pulls away from the pier. Roosevelt is participating in the George H.W. Bush group sail, further preparing the ship for an upcoming deployment. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeSailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) strike a line below after the ship completes a sea and anchor evolution. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeMidshipman 3rd Class Sam Sorenson fires a .50-caliber machine gun during a live-fire training exercise aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeSailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) watch as the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) is fired during a live-fire training exercise. -Photo by MC2 Samantha ThorpeAn MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter from the Spartans of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 conducts a helicopter in-flight refueling aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80).

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Navy And Marine Corps Achievement Medal ABH2 Nicole Bolden, NS Mayport DC2 Kyle Buck, NS Mayport AC3 Berett Dunn, NS Mayport Good Conduct Medals LS3 Natashdra Mosley, NS Mayport Flag Letter of Commendation CS3 Martavious Bankston, NS Mayport Sailor of the Quarter MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport Letter of Appreciation MA2 Benjiman Iverson, NS Mayport MA2 Sigfredo Santiago, NS Mayport MA3 Robert Marshall, NS Mayport MASN Shuyler Swanton, NS Mayport MA1 Jose Pacheco, NS Mayport MA1 Michael Eno, NS Mayport CS2 Dexter Mims, NS Mayport SH2 Jose Riveratirado, NS Mayport MA2 Sigfredo Santiago, NS Mayport SH2 Adrian Smith, NS Mayport CS2 Mandriecka Wilson, NS Mayport SH2 Myron Doulet, NS Mayport AC3 Brittany Littler, NS Mayport Meritorious Civilian Service Medal John Jones, PSD Milestones Historically, mothers of fallen service members began calling themselves Gold Star Mothers dur ing the First World War. Since 1936, the United States has been observ ing Gold Star Mothers Day on the last Sunday of September to honor these mothers. In 1967, Congress stan dardized the service ban ners and established the Gold Star lapel pins to issue to immediate fam ily members of service members killed in com bat, including those who have committed suicide in theater. The Next of Kin pin signifies a servicerelated death or suicide during active duty other than combat. In 2010, Congress designated Dec. 18 as Gold Star Wives Day. Other parking reserved sites include: Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange on base and off base, Navy Gateway Inn & Suites, Navy Lodge, PSD, FFSC Building 1, Gym, MWR ITT, Bogeys, Chapel.From Page 1Gold Star Employee Of The QuarterRight, NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, presents a plaque to Ashley Vasquez of MWR after she is named Employee of the Quarter for the Third Quarter during an EOQ luncheon at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on July 30. Above, Pickard stands with the nominees Willie Atkins of Housing, Vasquez, Frank Ross of Security and Scott Young of Air Ops.-Photos by ET3 Michelle Maltese 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Sailors should be reviewing their bibs and studying their rate training manuals now for the semi-annual Petty Officer advancement exams in September. Exam dates are: Sept. 5 for PO1; Sept. 12 for PO2, and Sept. 19 for PO3. Check with your Chief or career counselor to verify your eligibility to take the exam.Petty Officer Advancement Tests Approaching CSADD Thanks Skipper Cochrane For His Support-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, seventh from left, is surrounded by members of Naval Station Mayport CSADD members after Command Quarters Thursday at the Chapel. CSADD, Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions, is a peer-to-peer mentorship program used Navy-wide. The program is geared at Sailors 18 to 25 years old, to reinforce our culture of Shipmates helping Shipmates. CSADD Mayport has strived towards this goal through outreach programs, social media and videos. The group thanked Cochrane at Command Quarters for his support during his tenure as commanding officer. Cochrane will be relieved by Capt. Wesley McCall during a change of command ceremony on Aug. 8.BMC(Sel) Brandon P Bonin FCC(Sel) Gregory L Bosworth LSC(Sel) Mark A Buchanan AMC(Sel) Daniel J Bue AZC(Sel) Marilyn M Buford ISC(Sel) Angela R Calhoun GSEC(Sel) Arnold B Cambe ENC(Sel) Mario Carbonell FCC(Sel) Christopher D Carr MMC(Sel) Ernesto Castaneda AWRC(Sel) Phillip D Chavers GMC(Sel) Brandon D Clark CSC(Sel) Reshonda Cole CSC(Sel) Linda A Colter GMC(Sel) Anthony J Cooke ITC(Sel) Christopher M Cooper MAC(Sel) Joshua L Cox GSMC(Sel) Franklin Crawford BMC(Sel) Jessica M Curry EMC(Sel) Dave Denton DCC(Sel) Larry Ellington AWRC(Sel) James R Felder RPC(Sel) Hector Feliciano AOC(Sel) Francisco Garcia AEC(Sel) James W Garrett FCC(Sel) Marc Geier AOC(Sel) Michael A Geneux GSMC(Sel) Joe E Gonzales AWRC(Sel) Wesley Goodwin GSMC(Sel) Joseph Grauvogl ENC(Sel) Robert Groves GMC(Sel) Amy L Hamilton AWRC(Sel) Matt Haydu STGC(Sel) Thomas C Hester ITC(Sel) Denisha D Hughes HMC(Sel) Eric W Hurley MMC(Sel) Warren James GSEC(Sel) Yong J Kim GMC(Sel) Lacarlos Knighten HTC(Sel) Nicholas A Lauver ETC(Sel) Michael Lewis AZC(Sel) Crystal L Mack ITC(Sel) Christian Maitland BMC(Sel) Charles Malloy EMC(Sel) Nahemer Morillo ITC(Sel) Rodney A Nutter NCC(Sel) James Obrien ATC(Sel) Jason Parshley MAC(Sel) Jason G Pavlica OSC(Sel)McCajor Quinn AEC(Sel) Geno Ramo OSC(Sel) Tavares D Ricks GSMC(Sel)Johnny Rogers AOC(Sel) Simeon A Santo AEC(Sel) Michael A Sebastian ABFC(Sel) Joseph S Smith DCC(Sel) Henry Tanner STGC(Sel) Bradley W Taylor DCC(Sel) Todd Thomas ADC(Sel) Gustavo Torresguevara EMC(Sel) Clifford Turner GSMC(Sel) Maurice S Waller EODC(Sel) Ryan M Waller ATC(Sel) Stewart Wallin ADC(Sel) Nathan J Whedon HMC(Sel) Devall A Wilson GMC(Sel) Sylvia Wynn AZC(Sel)Jose E ZayasMayport Area FY14 CPO Selects Announced THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 7

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DoD Memo Provides Specifics For Headquarters Spending CutsAmerican Forces Press ServiceDeputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter released a memo yester day that provides more specifics for a 20-percent reduction in Defense Department management headquarters spending over five fiscal years. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced the cuts during a July 16 meeting with employ ees at Naval Air Station Jacksonville in Florida. The cuts, Carter said in the memo, will take place regardless of budget lev els approved by Congress. Such cuts, he said, are designed to streamline DOD management through efficiencies and by eliminating lower-pri ority activities. This memorandum defines the nature of these important reduc tions more specifically, Carter said. Headquarters cuts will apply to all higher head quarters staffs including Office of the Secretary of Defense principal staff assistants and their associated defense agency staffs, the Joint Staff, ser vice secretary staffs, ser vice chief staffs, service four-star major com mands and service com ponent commands, lower-level service staffs down to the level deter mined by service secretaries and chiefs, and com batant command staffs. Intelligence staffs will be affected, the memo said, primarily militaryintelligence-programfunded intelligence centers and, with the con currence of the director for national intelligence, national-intelligence-pro gram-funded centers. Service secretaries and chiefs will decide the allocation of cuts among organizations within their headquarters staffs, the memo said. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs will make the same allocation for the Joint Staff. Each principal staff assistant and defense agency should achieve a 20-percent reduction, the memo said. If necessary, I will consider reallocations during program review, Carter wrote in the memo. The 20-percent spending cut applies to the total headquarters budgets, and these include government civilian personnel who work at headquar ters, and associated costs such as contract services, facilities, information technology, and other areas that support head quarters functions. Budgets are those specified in the Future Years Defense Program sup porting the presidents budget for fiscal year 2014, extended to fiscal 2019 assuming growth for inflation, according to the memo. The 20-percent spending reduction applies to budget dollars, but orga nizations will strive for a goal of 20-percent reduc tions in authorized gov ernment civilian staff at their headquarters. While military person nel are not part of head quarters budgets, orga nizations will strive for the goal of a 20-percent reduction in military per sonnel billets on head quarters staffs, the memo said. Finally, subordinate headquarters should not grow as a result of reduc tions in higher headquar ters. Carter noted in the memo that hed review proposals to ensure that these various goals are met. I recognize that the [fiscal] 2014 budget reflects past efficiency decisions, some of which affected headquarters. This 20-percent reduction represents an additional cut, which I know will be challenging, Carter said in the memo. However, in this peri od of additional down ward pressure on defense spending, we must con tinue to reduce our headquarters budgets and staffing, he added. Components are encouraged to suggest changes in policies and workload that would help them accommodate these dol lar and staff reductions. Senior managers should ensure that cuts are made aggressively and as soon as possible, both to eliminate uncertainty for DOD employees and contractors and to maxi mize savings, the deputy secretary added. Generally, cuts should be roughly proportional by year with about onefifth of the cuts in fiscal 2015, another fifth in fis cal 2016, and so on up to fiscal 2019, the memo said, and components are free to implement reduc tions more rapidly. To the extent feasible, some cuts should begin in fiscal 2014 to increase savings and reduce cuts required in later years, the memo said. Carter directed that reduction plans be submitted along with Program Objective Memorandum submis sions, which are due Sept. 23. NavySubmit SAVE Awards For Cost-paring IdeasAmerican Forces Press ServiceFederal employees can submit their cost-cutting ideas through the White Houses annual SAVE Awards campaign that kicked-off July 30, administration officials said. SAVE stands for Securing Americans Value and Efficiency. The campaign, which runs through Aug. 9, stems from President Barack Obamas belief that federal employees are best poised to gener ate effective and efficient ways to ensure good stewardship of taxpayer dol lars, officials said. The SAVE Award rep resents a key opportunity to identify substantial savings in places that tradi tional financial managers may not know to look, explained Elizabeth A. McGrath, the Defense Departments deputy chief management offi cer. Every member of our workforce has deep knowledge and experi ence in their jobs and knows where inefficien cies lay hidden. Federal employees can participate by submitting their ideas for more effective and efficient govern ment or by encouraging co-workers to vote on their ideas or to submit their own, she added. The SAVE Award helps to empower these employees to speak up and become proactive change agents by promoting ways to achieve cost reductions, McGrath said. Since the inaugural SAVE Awards in 2009, federal employees have submitted more than 85,000 cost-shrinking ideas, with dozens of the most promising suggestions includ ed in the presidents budget, specifically in the cuts, consolidations, and savings volume, White House officials said. Creativity counts, they added, encouraging par ticipants to review previ ous submissions on the SAVE Awards website to avoid duplication. Relevant agencies will review all ideas for potential action, includ ing inclusion in the presidents budget proposals, as more than 80 ideas have been in the past four years. It is always our responsibility as good stew ards of taxpayer dollars to adopt better business practices, and it is even more important in todays constrained fiscal envi ronment to aggressively target opportunities for improvement, McGrath said. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Navy Gives Public Access To Naval MuseumsFrom Naval History and Heritage CommandNational Museum of the United States Navy, Cold War Gallery and Display Ship Barry will be acces sible through a new gate open to the public starting Aug. 1. For the month of August, Naval History and Heritage Command along with the support of Naval District Washington, will offer free public access via the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail to the newly opened Cold War Gallery, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy and Display Ship Barry. The only day the museums will not be open is on Mondays, due to the fur lough restrictions. Until this point, it has been a challenge for visitors to access these national treasures due to security requirements. However, a special agree ment was reached to make a family-friendly option for museum goers, located within a 15-min ute walk of the Nationals Park. We are very excited about the possibility of introducing even more of our neighbors to the rich history of the U.S. Navy, said Capt. Jerry Hendrix, the director of the Naval History and Heritage Command, which is responsible for the U.S. Navys museums. There is something for everyone, from young children to our senior veterans. Signs placed along the Riverwalk will direct visitors to the Washington Navy Yard gate locat ed near the Cold War Gallery. All adult visitors are required to present photo identification to enter. With the exception of Mondays, the museums and display ship will be open to visitors 9 a.m. 5 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. 5 p.m. on week ends. Located at the Washington Navy Yard, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy dis plays art and artifacts from the Revolutionary War, Antarctic explora tion, World War I and World War II, as well as submarine innovations. Visitors will enjoy peer ing through a submarine periscope, learning about deep sea exploration and diving, and maneuvering WWII-era artifacts. The Cold War Gallery, opened in October, displays a large submarine section, including a view of living and working conditions, artifacts from Vietnam POWs, displays from the Korean War, as well as an interactive exhibit called the Lions Den. Display Ship Barry is one of only three remaining Forrest Sherman class destroyers. Barry is the third ship to bear the name of the illustri ous Revolutionary War naval hero, Commodore John Barry. She support ed the 1958 Marine and Army airborne unit land ing in Beirut, Lebanon. In 1962, she was a member of the task force that quarantined Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis in response to evidence that Soviet missiles had been installed on the island. In 1979, Barry joined the Middle East Force for Persian Gulf service dur ing the very tense period that accompanied the Iranian Revolution. In 1981-1982 Barry made her final deployment in that area. USS Barry was decommissioned in 1982 and arrived at the Washington Navy Yard in 1983. For more information, visit the National Museum of the United States Navy website at www.history. navy.mil/branches/org81.htm.Navy Lab Hosts Underwater Robotics CompetitionSpace and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public AffairsThere was plenty of excitement from student teams during the 16th annual International RoboSub Competition, held at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacifics (SSC Pacific) Transducer Evaluation Center (TRANSDEC) pool, July 23-28. RoboSub, co-sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Foundation, hosted 30 national and international collegiate teams, in addi tion to five high school teams and the first middle school team to participate in the competition. The goal of this com petition is to advance the development of autono mous underwater vehi cles (AUVs) by challeng ing a new generation of engineers to perform realistic missions in an underwater environment. The event also fosters ties between young engineers and organizations devel oping AUV technologies. Inspiring and encour aging todays youth to pursue careers in sci ence, technology, engi neering, and math (STEM) is important to us at SSC Pacific, and were happy to host the RoboSub Competition for the twelvth year in a row, said Capt. Joe Beel, SSC Pacific command ing officer. RoboSub is a platform for students around the world to highlight their abilities and aptitude, while fostering teamwork, communica tion and creativity, all important attributes for a STEM professional. SSC Pacific has a strong edu cation outreach program in the local community, and RoboSub is a great opportunity for us to invite the public to visit the lab and meet with the students and our engi neers. License to Dive was the theme of this years RoboSub competition and the goal was for an AUV to demonstrate its autonomy by completing an under water License to Dive mission. The requirements for the underwater task were established, and the teams were judged on their ability to complete the mission. Volunteer divers, including Navy div ers stationed at SSC Pacific, launched the AUVs into the water at the TRANSDEC facil ity. The TRANSDEC pool is a one-of-a-kind facil ity that simulates ocean conditions and provides an ideal environment for research. The pool mea sures 300 feet by 200 feet with a depth of 38 feet. To further promote STEM, a SeaPerch Fun Challenge was held July 26 in conjunction with RoboSub. SeaPerch is an innovative underwa ter robotics program that provides middle and high school students the resources to build an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) from a kit of low-cost, easily accessible parts. Approximately 20 mid dle and high school teams participated during the SeaPerch Fun Challenge where they interacted with their peers, college students and STEM pro fessionals. Corresponding to the goal of RoboSub, the Daytona Beach Area Homeschoolers team, the first middle school team to compete in RoboSub, had initially started exploring STEM through SeaPerch, and were mentored by college stu dents from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), who were also competing in RoboSub. With guidance from ERAU students, the Daytona Beach Area Homeschoolers team chose to delve deeper into STEM by graduating from an ROV to an AUV. Achieving this objective, the Homeschoolers team entered the competition to have their vehicle compete against some of the brightest engineering students in the world. Winners of the RoboSub Competition were announced July 28, with first place awarded to Cornell University. Second and third place were awarded to the University of Florida and Far Eastern Federal University, respectively. Special awards were also presented, and the award categories includ ed Best New Entry, which was awarded to National University of Singapore, and Bang for the Buck, which was presented to the Daytona Beach Area Homeschoolers team. The award for outreach was distributed in a threeway tie to North Carolina State, Carl Hayden High School and ERAU. -Photo by MC2 Jumar T. BalacyAn autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) built by students from the University of Florida Machine Intelligence Laboratory navigates an obstacle course at the TRANSDEC Anechoic Pool during RoboSub 2013. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 9

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veyed open dialogue with leadership and enlist ed from other military branches on DoD wide concerns and prevention programs was beneficial to him. I think what the gen eral had to say was very interesting, especially about sexual assault and sexual harassment. Im glad to see the progress that the military is making to combat [this problem], said Carrasco. Air Traffic Controller Airman Apprentice Lauryn Lubenstein, assigned to NS Mayport Air Operations, also attended the lunch and found it inspirational and educational to speak with Kelly. I am new to the Navy, I really dont have any experience, so its good to talk to someone who has a lot more experience, said Lubenstein. Its inspiring, to hear from someone so [high rank ing] and have him come here and talk to us. Kelly wrapped up his visit to Mayport at Helicopter Squadron, 60 (HSL-60) for a demon stration on their involve ment in Africa and how USSOUTHCOM could benefit from their expe riences for counter drug operations. HSL-60 is the first naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats, which contributed to the cap turing of $1 billion in illegal drugs headed for the United States over deployment. Kelly received a firsthand opportunity to wit ness some of the squad rons capabilities with a MH-60R Seahawk heli copter flight. While at HSL-60, he talked with personnel and recognized two Sailors who recent ly earned Enlisted Air Warfare Specialist desig nations. COMUSNAVSO/C4F is currently ramping up to support PANAMAX and UNITAS, both are partnership-building exercises within the USSOUTHCOM area of operation, were the com mand will serve as mari time force commander. Both exercises are sched ule to begin in August and continue through the fall. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Spearhead To Sea-Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonCommander U.S. Southern Command Marine Gen. John Kelly, addresses 4th Fleet sailors during an all hands call on Naval Station Mayport FL. Kelly was visiting 4th Fleet to conduct office calls with the Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris. From Page 1Southcom -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonThe Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) departs Naval Station Mayport in the early morning, after a brief stop to take on fuel and parts. The new class of high speed vessels are capable of transporting approximately 600 tons of equipment and military personnel 1,200 miles at an average speed of 35 knots. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 11

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Auto Skills Center August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Aug. 16: 80s Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. 80s Costume Contest, 80s music and trivia, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Aug. 21: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Legoland Florida Special. All active duty military receive one FREE Water Park Combo Ticket. Free ticket can be redeemed at the front gate. Family members can purchase discounted tickets at ITT. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering banner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale NOW Purchase your tick ets for the 2013 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70.00. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in August: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $13. Aug. 10: Jacksonville Roller Girls Roller Derby. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 11: Adventure Landing Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 12: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 14: Laser Tag. 6-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. FREE Aug. 16: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $5; sign up by Aug. 14. Aug. 18: A Day at the Beach: Huguenot Park. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 19: Nerf Sniper. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Aug. 10. Aug. 22: Hooters Dinner Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 24: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 26: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 10: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 2. 270-5451 Aug. 13: Go the Distance 10K/5K Run 8 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 13: Intramural Flag Football Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451 Aug. 20: 3v3 Fall Soccer Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins Aug. 26; end Oct. 21. 270-5451 Aug. 26-28: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 19. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWR Sports/Fitness 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Aug. 9: Outdoor MoviesThe Croods (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 16: Outdoor MoviesThe Goonies (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Aug. 23: Outdoor MoviesBrave (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Furloughed Civilians Urged To Tap ProgramsAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith furloughs now in full swing and many Defense Department civilian employees finding themselves with more time on their hands but less money in their pock ets, morale, welfare and recreation officials are encouraging them to check out some of the programs offered right where they work. Every military service provides fitness, recre ational and education al services, often at no charge or for significantly less than one might pay just outside an instal lations gates, Ed Miles, DODs MWR policy director, told American Forces Press Service. The underlying goal of the MWR program is to give military members and their families, as well as military retirees, a safe, affordable out let to reduce stress and build physical, mental and emotional strength and resilience, Miles explained. We have a direct impact on the readiness and retention and resilience of the troops, he said. Without a healthy and fit force, there could be national security implications. So whenever possible, the services extend their morale, welfare and recreational offerings to DOD civilian employees, whom they recognize as essen tial contributors to their missions, Miles said. Wherever we have capacity to accommo date them, we encourage civilians to use these programs, he said. Thats not only during seques tration. We welcome them all the time. Its too soon to tell if the civilian workforce is tak ing greater advantage of MWR facilities and pro grams since sequestration kicked in, but Miles said hes expecting an uptick. It wouldnt surprise me to see usage go up not just because the rates are lower, but because making use of these facilities is so convenient, he said. A common access card gives DOD civilian employees access to free or low-cost use of base fitness centers, swimming pools, libraries, movie theaters, bowling alleys, clubs, arts-and-craft cen ters, auto repair shops, golf courses, camp grounds, shooting ranges, beaches and marinas. Depending on the location, DOD civilians also can rent camping, boat ing, snorkeling, skiing and other outdoor gear at their base outdoor rec reation office. They can visit the installation tick ets and tours office to buy discount tickets to civilian theaters, theme parks and travel and tour packages. Some civilian employ ees may not realize theyre also qualified to rent the recreational campgrounds, cabins, cottages, trailers and trailer or recreational vehi cle parks with hook-ups found on many military installations. For the most part, a civilian or military iden tification card provides access to services and programs not just where the member works, but also at other installations, even those of another service, Miles said. That extends to the crown jewels of the MWR program: Armed Forces Recreation Center resorts at popular vacation spots. All run by the Army but open to military and civilian employees from every service, these include Shades of Green on the grounds of Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla.; the Hale Koa in Honolulu; the Edelweiss Lodge and Resort in Garmisch, Germany; and the Dragon Hill Lodge in Seoul, South Korea. The Navy runs a simi lar resort-type facility, the New Sanno Hotel, in Tokyo. In addition, the Air Force has a partnership with Keystone Resort, Colo., to offer discounts at Rocky Mountain Blue, with a variety of lodging options and recreational discounts. Like everything across the Defense Department, morale, welfare and rec reation programs are getting close scrutiny as officials look for ways to cut costs. While officials strive to preserve the services offered, Miles acknowledged that in the future, costs could go up, hours could be reduced and programs not directly linked to military readi ness could even fall by the wayside. But in the meantime, he is encouraging civil ian employees to make the most of the furlough situation by tapping the morale, welfare and recreation program. MWR is here for them, he said. Theres no better time than now to check out whats available. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 13

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USS Gettysburg Enters 6th FleetBy Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs OfficeShips and embarked squadrons from Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) entered U.S. 6th Fleets area of responsibility (AOR), July 26 and 29th. Guided-missile cruis er USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and guidedmissile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), entered July 26, followed by strike group flagship and aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) July 29. This is the first time HST CSG has entered the 6th Fleet AOR since its last deployment in 2010. In addition to the five ships, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group also includes embarked Carrier Air Wing 3 and its squadrons; Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312 Checkerboards; Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 Seahawks; Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 Zappers; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 Dusty Dogs; Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes; embarked 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron staff and Military Sealift Command, fast combat ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8). While in the east ern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, HST CSG will be supporting maritime security opera tions (MSO) and theater security cooperation efforts. MSO are set conditions for security and stability in the maritime environ ment and complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of regional nations. -Photo by MC3 Taylor DiMartinoThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) passes the Rock of Gibraltar while transiting the Mediterranean Sea. Gettysburg, part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Haraz N. GhanbariThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) transits the Atlantic Ocean as an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Sea Knights of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22 approaches the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a vertical replenishment. Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Donald R. White Jr.Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) practice breaking down an M-16 assault rifle. -Photo by MC3 Jamie CosbyThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), left, and the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) transit the Strait of Gibraltar en route to the Mediterranean Sea. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Navy Conducts Exercise With US Air ForceUSS Nimitz Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), with embarked HSL-48 Detachment Five conducted an air operations for maritime surface warfare exercise in the Arabian Gulf, July 17. The exercise was a joint operation between Monterey and aircraft from U.S. Air Force, Central Command. This was an excellent opportunity for Monterey to improve interoperability with U.S. Air Force assets deployed to the Central Command area of responsibility, said Lt. Cmdr. Robert Watts, the ships operations officer. It also allowed Monterey to practice joint tactics, techniques, and procedures in the dynamic maritime environment. Monterey launched two rigid-hull inflatable boats to simulate small boat threats that were detected by an Air Force E-8 Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft. Two U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle aircraft were then directed to investi gate, identify, target, and destroy the targets. Monterey and the JSTARS aircraft took turns controlling and directing the Strike Eagles while practicing joint pro cedures to defend Monterey from small craft attack. It was a very successful exercise, said Watts. Both Monterey and U.S. Air Force participants met or exceed ed all training objectives. This exercise improves our ability to operate more effectively and efficiently with joint partners in the region. The two-hour exercise concluded with a fly-by of Monterey after the F-15E Strike Eagles had eliminated all simulated targets during multiple inbound runs. Monterey is currently deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Sammy B. In Port-Photo by Paul FarleyThe guided missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) arrives for a scheduled port visit in Souda Bay, Greece. Sameul B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Fla., is deployed to the U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Daniel Riley, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, performs maintenance on the engine of an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter in the hangar bay aboard USS Monterey (CG 61). -Photos by MC3 Billy HoAviation Electrician's Mate 1st Class Brett Clayton, left, and Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Jordan Cramer, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, perform overhaul on the engine of an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter in the hangar bay aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 15

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FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFFSC Schedule Set From FFSC The following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 8, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 8, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Aug. 12, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Aug. 12, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 12-13, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Higher Education FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 14, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. Aug. 14, 11 a.m.-noon, Money and the Move FFSC Building 1 Room 719 Aug. 15, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 15-16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Family Readiness Group FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 15, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 15, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 15, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Aug. 19-23, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 21, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 21, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 22,, 1-3 p.m., Troops to Teachers FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 22, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 22, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 22, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Aug. 26-30, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 26, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Aug. 27, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. Aug. 28, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Thursday, Aug. 8 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a workshop on Gardening Tips for Hot Weather plus Managing Pest Problems from 6:30 8:30 pm at the Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd. This is a free program. Come learn gardening tips for the summer heat and what to do with those pests in your landscape. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Friday, Aug. 9 The Ladies Auxillary FRA Unit 290, 390 Mayport Rd., will hold a smothered pork chop dinner from 5-8 p.m. Donation is $8. Take out orders welcome. Open to the public. Call 246-6855 for more information. Saturday, Aug. 10 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Christ United Methodist Church invites the community to an oldfashioned fish fry, hosted by the United Methodist Men. Dinners will include fish, hush puppies and all the trimmings, all for only $7 for adults and $4 for children. Meet us in Wilson Hall of the church at 5: p.m. at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach to reel yours in! Need info? Call the church at 2495370. Well see you there. Tuesday, Aug. 13 Some 850 delegates from VVA chapters across the country are expected to join several hundred other Vietnam veterans and guests in Jacksonville. Former Congressman David Bonior, who spoke at VVAs Founding Convention in 1983, w ill deliver the Keynote Address at the Opening Ceremonies on Aug. 14 starting at 9 a.m. Other Convention special guests include singer/songwrit er Arlo Guthrie, who will receive the Presidents Award for Excellence in the Arts at the Saturday night Awards Banquet. Aug. 13 at 2:30 p.m., there will be a wreath laying at the Vietnam Monument (corner Market and Bay Street). Friday, August 16, 7 7:30 a.m., POW/MIA Remembrance, front of downtown Hyatt. Wreath ceremony at St. Johns River. All are welcome to attend our conven tion to see what the VVA is about.This is to be the largest convention in the 33 years of VVA existence. Thursday, Aug.15 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a free workshop on Do it Yourself Irrigation Repairs to Save Money at S. Mandarin Branch Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, Fl. The time is 6:30 8:30 p.m. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Learn handson ideas. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Aug. 16 & 17 The Englewood High School Class of 1973 has finalized plans for their 40 year High School Reunion in Jacksonville, FL on the Southbank of the St Johns River. Dont miss out on this great event! Mail your check today for $75 per person to EHS Jay Kauffman, 8058 Newton Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32216 (Jay 904.982.2701). Please prepay your Saturday night reservation to insure there is enough food for everyone. Questions? Jay 904-982-2701, Amy 904-629-9222. More info on Facebook: search Englewood High School Class of 1973. www.face book.com/groups/26228 1106060/10151708392646 061/?notif_t=group_activ ity Saturday, Aug. 17 Ever dreamed of getting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photogra pher at 11 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn tech niques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Please bring your own camera and pho tography supplies, sturdy shoes, bug spray, sun screen and water. Space is limited on this program to 10 participants. Please RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Reservations are required and the pro gram is free. Join one of our knowl edgeable park rangers at 2 p.m. for an informative talk on the natural his tory of sea islands and their important role in coastal ecology. The top ics addressed will include beach erosion, island migration, island forma tion and the natural communities present on such barrier islands today. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Aug. 24th at 2:00 p.m. Want to find out how to lawn bowl or play cro quet? Join a ranger on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Monday, Aug. 19 The Friends of the Beaches Branch Library Community Room will host an informational meeting to discuss repair and construction plans at the library at 6-7 p.m. Attendees will include City Council President Bill Gulliford, City Council Member At-Large Group 2 John Crescimbeni, rep resentatives of the City of Jacksonville Public Works Department and the Jacksonville Public Library, and an archi tect from VRL Architects, who will give an overview of the plans and answer questions. Reservations are not required. The library is closed on Mondays but the doors will be opened at 5:30 p.m. for anyone who wants to attend the meeting. A Canning Workshop making Salsa come learn to make and take home some of the prod uct made at Duval County Canning Center, both classes are from 9 a.m.noon only. Cost is $20 with limited space; with pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Saturday, Aug. 24 Duval County Extension Office will hold the workshop, Start Your Own Vegetables from Seed and Introduction to Seed Saving from 9 a.m.1:30 p.m. Learn principals in germinating & saving seeds; as well as taking home your own planted tray. Class is at the Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32254. Cost is $15. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Please bring a bag lunch. Checks should be made payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Mayport Security Sweats It Out Back To School Drive Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is collecting school supplies for our deserving junior families to help get their children ready for school this year. If you can help, please bring your donated school supplies to either Mayport or NAS Jax USO centers between now and Aug. 9. We are asking for any school necessities such as pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, back packs, glue/sticks, two pocket three-prong folders, rulers, lunch boxes, etc. No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner from 5-7 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 12. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. The wonderful staff and volunteers will Shepards pie, salad, and dessert 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registration forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, over all prize payouts, a chal lenged athletes division, and medals to all finish ers. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game sea son. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWSPhotos by Paige GnannAbove left, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Brad Hayes does extended sit ups as other members of Mayport Security perform Burpies at a second exercise station on April 1. The department PT was also done in remembrance of a local MA who died as the result of a motorcycle accident. Above right, Security Command Fitness Leader Master-at-Arms Michael Eno carries a wooden block as he runs during the PT. Eno coordinated the workout for the command. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 8, 2013 17

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