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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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UF00098614:00309

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Material Information

Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00309


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Gombas Relieves Cook As SERMC COSERMC PAOCapt. Dave Gombas relieved Capt. Ron Cook as commanding officer of Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) July 26 in a cer emony on Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla. Capt. Gombas reports to SERMC from his previ ous assignment as com manding officer, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Ship Systems Engineering Station in Philadelphia. Gombas is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and holds a masters degree in mechani cal engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. His prior assignments include tours aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as well as numerous tours at ship repair facilities including his prior service at SERMC as the water front operations officer from March 2007 until October 2009. Capt. Thomas J. Kearney, vice command er of Naval Sea Systems Command, who served as the ceremonys keynote speaker, lauded Gombas experience and training saying that his educational background and training in engineering fields, coupled with expe rience at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center and especially as the waterfront operations officer at SERMC have prepared you well for this challenging position. Following the change of command, Kearney presented Cook with a Legion of Merit medal for his accomplishments since assuming command of SERMC in September 2010. Re-introducing the intermediate level main tenance at SERMC and training sailors to return to the waterfront capable of maintain ing and repairing ships is a tremendous legacy that Ron has not only left at SERMC, but also the entire Navy, said Kearney. Cook will report to Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet as the assistant chief of staff for maintenance and engi neering. My 25 year journey to command was excit ing and challenging, but these last three years at SERMC have been the pinnacle of my naval career. It was easy to lead such a fantastic organi zation, said Cook. The attitude and drive is what makes every per son here so special, they are unique and I and any other commanding officer are extremely fortunate to have them on the team. A field activity of NAVSEA, SERMC manag es and executes all repair, industrial engineering and technical support services for surface ships in the southeast region, including procurement and administration of contracts for ship main tenance and moderniza tion. SERMC also pro vides training to Sailors in the maintenance and repair of shipboard sys tems and components. SBR Hold Change Of Command In Souda Bay USS Samuel B. Roberts Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) held a change of command ceremony dur ing a port visit to Souda Bay, Greece, July 24-26. During the ceremony, Cmdr. Erica L. Hoffmann relieved Cmdr. Robert R. Williams as commanding officer of the Samuel B. Roberts on the flight deck with the crew, family and friends in attendance. Cmdr. Williams led Sammy B. through the ships training cycle and workups prior to deploy ing to the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. In my fourteen years of service I have never been more challenged, grown more as a Sailor, or experienced the rewards of serving under a com manding officer, than I have on the Samuel B. Roberts under Cmdr. Williams, said Masterat-Arms 1st Class Drew Koehler. I have never met a CO who takes such pride in the accomplish ments of his Sailors or cares more about their well-being than him. I can only hope to meet anoth er commanding officer with the same attributes. Hoffmann said wel comed the challenge. When I received my orders, everyone through out the pipeline asked me if I was happy, said Hoffmann. I told them I got exactly what I wanted, a frigate out of Mayport. I want to thank Cmdr. Williams and my parents, and I look forward to con tinuing the proud Sammy B. tradition as the com manding officer. Samuel B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Florida is currently on a scheduled deployment in support of maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. -Photo by USS Samuel B. RobertsCmdr. Erica Hoffman, addresses the crew during a change of command ceremony in which she relieved Cmdr. Robert R. Williams, middle, as commanding officer of USS Samuel B. Roberts during a port visit to Souda Bay, Greece. Also pictured is Chaplain Calvin Gardner.-Photo courtesy of SERMC MayportCapt. Dave Gombas (right) relieved Capt. Ron Cook (center) as commanding officer of Southeast Regional Maintenance Center on July 26 onboard Naval Station Mayport, Fl. Rear Adm. (Select) Thomas Kearney (left), vice commander of Naval Sea Systems Command, served as the ceremonys keynote speaker.Mayport Says No To ZebrasNavy Public Affairs Support Element SoutheastMore than 400 Sailors from Naval Station Mayport attended a unique No Zebras, No Excuses training ses sion on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR), July 24. The No Zebras, No Excuses pro gram, features Steve Thompson, an educator from Central Michigan University and is sponsored by the Department of the Navys SAPR Office. The program featured skits designed to raise awareness and show service members how they can help prevent sexual assaults. The zebra represents a bystander, said Thompson. This all came about by accident one day while I See Zebras, Page 6 -Photo by MC2 Salton CebeSteve Thompson, an educator from Central Michigan University, speaks to Sailors during the 'No Zebras, No Excuses' Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program at Naval Station Mayport. The program is sponsored by the Department of the Navy's SAPR Office and features skits designed to raise awareness and show Sailors how they can help prevent sexual assault. Gate 5 Hours Readjust Effective Immediately To 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Enrollment is the first step on the journey. Its the beginning of an excit ing time for the family. Preparation is the key to making enrollment suc cessful. Florida laws for educating children are very specific. All children must attend school until they reach the age of 16. This is Florida law. If your children will be enrolling in a Florida public school, all of the infor mation youll need for enrollment can be found on the districts website. For www. duvalschools.org www. stjohns.k12.fl.us www.clay. k12.fl.us www. edline.net/pages/Nassau_ County_School_District The following is a sum mary of the timely infor mation available on their sites which includes everything from lunch menus to school sched ules to up-to-date enroll ment information. SCHOOL SITE LOCATOR: A students street address deter mines the school of atten dance, unless the student has exercised a school choice option. Every residential address has a School Feeder Pattern, which assigns students to an Elementary School (Kindergarten through Grade 5) Middle School (Grades 6-8) and High School (Grades 9-12). For most of these districts, the locator is on the sites homepage. ENROLLMENT INFORMATION: cal (school-entry health exam) performed within one year of the date of enrollment. If the child had the exam in another state, the base clinic can transfer this info to a Florida card. Duval requires 2 proofs. immunizations (Florida certification of immu nization, DH Form 690) or an exemption. Again, if the child had the exam in another state, the base clinic can transfer this info to a Florida card. Grade Students: certified birth record. Acceptable birth records include the following: -original certified birth record; -duly attested Certificate of Baptism; -insurance policy on the childs life that has been in force for at least two years; -affidavit of age sworn by parent and signed by a public health official; -passport or certificate of arrival in the United States indicating the age of the child; or -academic transcript with record of age in the childs school, stating the DOB. ACADEMIC RECORDS: When a child has been enrolled in another school district, parents are asked to provide the latest report card from that district and tran script if applicable. Most schools will accept an unofficial record (a handcarried report card, for example) for registration, but the school will then request official records from the previous school. OPTIONAL: a Social Security number. Federal law does NOT allow schools to require a social security number for school enrollment. BUS INFORMATION: State law requires bus transportation for students who live two miles or more from the schools they currently attend. The school district also pro vides special bus services for students in certain Exceptional Education programs, regardless of distance under spe cific guidelines. For more information, con tact the Transportation Department at 7810 MILITARY DEPENDENT CHOICE OPTION: Florida Statutes provide that dependent children of active duty military personnel who otherwise meet the eli gibility criteria for spe cial academic programs shall be given first preference for admission to such programs even if the program is being offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned. However, the district will follow class size restric tions, as detailed in the Class Size Amendment to the Florida Constitution, in the placement of eli gible military dependent students. No students will be placed in a school or program that causes a class to exceed class size for that grade thus placing that school out of compli ance with state law. For changes to Duvals eligi bility requirements, go to www.duvalchoice.com JOHN M. MCKAY SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM: This is a statewide program for students with disabili ties who are not mak ing adequate progress in the current school. A public or private school may be selected, and the State will provide funding for a private school. The student must have been classified as an ESE stu dent (not gifted) with a current IEP or a 504 Plan for the 2012-2013 school though not necessarily in a Florida public school. If you have addition al questions concern ing enrollment, school choice, special needs, or any other educational issue, please contact me at the email or phone numbers below. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or ques tions about enrolling in another local school dis trict, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingEnrolling In A Florida Public School CORRECTIONDue to an editing error, the July 25 edition of The Mirror published a headline that incorrectly identified USS Gettysburg as joining the Ike Carrier Strike Group. USS Gettysburg joined the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused. Additional Information On School And Sports Physicals And ImmunizationsNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayports Immunizations Clinic is cur rently conducting back to school physicals for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year, allowing parents to beat the rush with early scheduling and additional clinic days in August. Florida law requires all school children have the appropriate health exam and immunization documentation. The physical examination must be performed by a health care provider licensed to perform physical exams and must be com pleted within the past 12 months (this is not an annual exam). The school entry health exam (form DH 3040) is a requirement for students in grades kindergar ten through 12th grade who are making their initial entry into a Florida school. A new entrant is a child entering a school in Florida for the first time or entering after having been absent from a school for more than 12 months or one school year. You have up to one year prior to entering the Florida school system in which to obtain the school entry health exam. For students transferring to a Florida school, a comparable form from another state would be acceptable, if completed within one year. A certificate of immunization (form DH 680) is also a requirement for all chil dren in grades kindergarten through 12th grade), for entry and attendance in Florida schools. The form is valid until the child enters seventh grade, at which time a new form will be issued when additional immunization requirements are met. If the child will be 11-years-old while attending sixth grade there is no need to wait until entering seventh grade to receive the additional required immuniza tions. Once the required immunizations are met, a new certificate of immuni zation will be issued and will remain effective until graduation from high school. TRICARE Prime covers school physicals for children ages 5-11 if required in connection with school enrollment. However, annual sport physicals are not covered by TRICARE network providers. NBHC Immunization Clinic is a walk-in clinic, however, children through age five must see their primary care provider first. Parents should bring all immu nization records during the clinic visit. NBHC Mayports Immunization Clinic hours of operation are Monday through Friday, form 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Contact the appointment line to schedule your children for school or sport physicals with a NBHC Mayport provider at (904) 542-4677. For additional immunization questions, please call (904) 270-4305. Additionally, for your scheduling convenience NBHC Mayport will have a special clinic on Saturdays during August. Contact Family Practice for any questions or concerns at (904) 270-4220. To Our Military fami lies: The Beaches Branch Library is one of six scheduled for closure if the City Council approves Mayor Browns budget with no adjustments. I and many others have been collecting petitions to seek another source of funding by letting thevot ers of Duval County decide by straw ballot if they want an independent tax district for the librar ies. We have collected sig natures at the Beaches Library on Tuesdays and Saturdays and have met several Navy families. They bring their children to story hour, activities and to check out books. The library is also a source of media such as CDs and DVDs. If the Beach Branch is closed, the personnel from the Base will have to travel quite a few miles to the closest library.Teachers at Mayport Middle School state it would be loss to them and the Mayport students. Mayor Alvin Brown, who states that he wants Jacksonville to be the most military friendly city in America,has cut the budget so dramati cally for three years that it leaves us in this situation. His budget is now in the City Council and will be approved in August. We are trying to fight to stay open to serve the Beaches area and Mayport. I have left petitions to sign at the USO and have collected them at Fleet Landing. To sign this petition, you must be a registered Duval County voter; how ever emails or calls to the Mayor are critical at this time. Let the City Council know that Jacksonville needs to provide for the men and women who serve us. To learn more visit: www.savejaxlibraries.com and www.beacheswatch. comand express your thoughts to; Mayor Alvin Brown:(904) 630-1776, mayorbrown@coj.net Sybil Ansbacher Friends of Beaches Branch Library Member Board of Library Trustees sybil@ansbacher.net LETTER

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Mayport Chapel Hosts Vacation Bible School-Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Vacation Bible School volunteer Ashley Blount, 17, places a crown on a young boys head during arts and crafts time at the Mayport Chapel. Above right, a young girl raises her hand during the morning welcome program. Below right, children sing during the morning program. Fourth and sixth grade students talk about the hazards of bullying. Above, second and third graders play Knight Tag during outside play. Above right, a volunteer talks to children about Queen Esthers story in the Bible. Below right, Four and five year olds Kelsey and Adalyn make crowns during arts and crafts time.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 5 Chief Religious Programs Specialist Sevron Bascom tells four and five year old a Bible story during Mayport Chapel Vacation Bible School held June 22-26.Confidentiality with Chaplains: Sailors Hold Key Chief of Chaplains Public AffairsIn a recent poll on Navy Personnel Commands website, 63 percent of 5,049 respondents did not believe that what they say to a chaplain is confi dential, and 65 percent of 2,895 respondents believe that Navy chaplains are required to report certain matters to the command. In light of these results and other anecdotal evi dence, Chief of Chaplains Rear Adm. Mark L. Tidd saw an opportunity to roll out an official campaign to help educate service members, leadership and families across the Navy and Marine Corps on SECNAV Instruction 1730.9: Confidential Communications to Chaplains. This policy was estab lished on Feb. 7, 2008 to protect the sacred trust between an individual and a chaplain. Per Navy policy, ser vice members and fami lies have the right and privilege to confidential communication with a Navy chaplain; Chaplains have the obligation and responsibility to pro tect and guard the con fidential communica tions disclosed to them; and commanders honor and support the unique, confidential relationship between an individual and a chaplain. Chaplains cannot be compelled by the com mand, medical profes sionals or others to dis close what a service member or family member shares in confidence. What you say to us stays between us, unless you decide differentlyYou hold the key, said Tidd. That being said, chaplains will always assist in guiding an indi vidual to the appropriate resources and will not leave an individual alone when the individual or others are at risk, Tidd added. Chaplains serve as advocates to help indi viduals get the support needed to overcome the challenges they face before matters escalate. This unique relation ship between an indi vidual and a chaplain can serve as a valuable safety valve to the commander to facilitate increased morale and mission read iness, said Tidd. Given the continu ing stigma service mem bers associate with seek ing help, chaplains offer Sailors, Marines and their families a safe place to talk, without fear or judg ment. Confidentiality can be particularly impor tant when a Sailor or Marine may feel they have nowhere to turn dur ing a personal crisis, or if theyre concerned about command involvement or an impact on their career, said Tidd. In addition to a Message to the Fleet on confidentiality, the Chaplain Corps has estab lished a resource page devoted to confidentiality on its website: www.chaplain.navy.mil. This page includes frequently asked questions, a fact sheet, a flyer, as well as a link to the policy. The Chaplain Corps is committed to caring for all with dignity, respect and compassion, regard less of an individuals beliefs, if any. One of the ways we do this is through confidentiality, Tidd said. Contact your command chaplain today! Dont know who your chaplain is? Contact Navy 311 for support in your area: 1-855-NAVY-311 or text to: Navy311@navy.mil.> Visit www.chaplain. navy.mil to learn more about Navy chaplains and confidentiality and to review the complete SECNAV Instruction 1730.9 on confidential communications to chap lains. For more news from Chaplain Corps, visit www.navy.mil/local/crb/. You may not have noticed it this week, but the NFL began the prep arations for the 2013 Season with the open ing of Training Camps across the country. Although the shoulder pads and full-contact drills wont begin until next week, there is some thing special about this time and about being in an NFL Community. Legendary Green Bay Packers Coach Vince Lombardi said, Football is like life -it requires perseverance, self-denial, hard work, sacrifice, dedication and respect for authority. Lombardis words also ring true for our Soldiers, Sailors, Airman, Marines, and Coastguardsman today. Earlier this year, the Packers released archived footage of Vince Lombardis first train ing camp. His start ing quarterback, Bart Starr recalled his coach looking the team in the eye and saying, Gentlemen, we are going to RELENTLESSLY chase perfection, know ing full well that we will not catch it because noth ing is perfect, but we will RELENTLESSLY chase it, because in the process we will catch excellence. I am not remotely interested in just being good. Do we relentlessly pur sue excellence in our daily work or are we content to just be good at what we do? Some are quick to remind me that Lombardi is credited with the say ing Winning isnt every thing; its the only thing. I believe that one of his earlier quotes is closer to the mark, Winning isnt everything; but the WILL to win is. The will to put in the hard work is the catalyst to creating a stan dard of excellence. Others might say, Chaps, how does this apply to my ship, or my work center? All that I hear is Do more with less? Lombardi had an interesting perspective on that as well. The mea sure of who we are is what we do with what we have It is not whether you get knocked down; its whether you get back up The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will. It may even be surpris ing but Coach Lombardi understood how his relentless pursuit of per fection would impact his players families: Once you agree upon the price you and your family must pay for success, it enables you to ignore the minor hurts, the opponents pressure, and the tempo rary failures speaks to the need for resiliency in our daily lives whether step ping onto the gridiron or waving goodbye to a deploying family member from the pier. As a new football season unfolds, there are some headlines that will grab our attention and others that will make us shake our heads. Football can be a useful metaphor for life when we listen to the wisdom echoed from its past and provide inspiration for genera tions to come. What it was, was football. (If you have never heard that, it is worth a google search.) Chap Tom Bingol CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSLife and Football Require Perseverance Karen LaClaire introduces a new favorite character at Vacation Bible School. This years theme was Kingdom Rock. Children ages 4-12 got a chance to learn about the Bible with buddies like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant t he Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children socialize during Vacation Bible School.

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CSADD Hosts Flag Football TournamentNavy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment Southeast Naval Station Mayports Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decision (CSADD) is hosting its first annu al Flag Football tournament on August 3rd from 10001440 at Naval Station Mayports base Softball field #7. NS Mayport CSADD promotes fun events to help with the morale and welfare for all service members, said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Juan Serret, CSADD President. We are holding this event to help build camaraderie and promote physical fitness between all the branches of the military. There will be teams from the Navy, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Army reserves, and Air National Guard. The uniform for this event will be service PT gear or command shirt with shorts. We are asking everyone to come out and enjoy the tournament and have a good time with all of us here on Naval Station Mayport, said Serret. For more information Contact ET3 Juan Serret at Juan.serret@navy.mil or MC3 Damian Berg at damian. berg@navy.mil -Photo by MCSN Damian BergShip's Servicemen 2nd Class Jose Rivera and Electronics Technician 3rd Class Juan Serret (yellow suit) perform a skit for Naval Station Mayport's Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD). CSADD is a peer-to-peer mentorship program used Navy-wide that is geared at Sailors 18 to 25 years old and reinforce the Navy's culture of Shipmates helping Shipmates. was watching television. There was a lion chas ing a herd of zebras. After the lion took one of the zebras down, just in the background was the rest of the zebra herd acting as if nothing had happened. Thompson said the next day that another zebra was brought down and he noticed the zebras were still just standing there. If I was one of those zebras, Id kick some lion butt, Thompson said. The skits showed how many sexual assaults occur when the victim is comfortable with the predator who is usually someone they trust. They also showed how alcohol or drugs could be used to take advantage of another individual. During the program, Sailors were asked to close their eyes and visu alize four women they care about, and think about how they would feel if one of them was sexually assaulted. When he said to think about four females that you know, that actually struck a cord with me, said Electricians Mate 1st Class Marlon Santiago. I have four females that are really close to me. Thompson was talking about how his daughter got raped but she was scared to tell him about it. That really got to me because it could have been one of my daughters who is too scared to tell anybody. Sailors who attended the event said they felt empowered by the infor mation they gained dur ing the program. The problem is, nobody wants to get involved when someone is getting sexual assault ed, said Boatswains Mate2nd Class Ruben Benders. People just walk away or look the other way. If we can stop doing that if we can stop it from happening by get ting involved there will be less incidents. From Page 1ZebrasCSS Looking For Subject Matter Expert Sailors Center for Service Support Public AffairsCenter for Service Support (CSS) announced they are actively looking for high-quali ty senior Sailors to enhance its already dynamic team July 23. CSS and its learning sites pro vide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and fac ulty work hand-in-hand with the Fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities. During a three-year tour, a subject matter expert (SME) would attend the Navy Instructor Training Course, granting them the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9502, work closely with learning sites, compile questions for rating advancement exams and also have the opportunity to earn the prestigious Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. Command Master Chief (SW/SCW/AW) Reinaldo Rosado said that a SMEs influ ence doesnt just extend to the Sailors, but to the commands they serve in, all over the globe. Sailors we train often serve in diverse assignments, said Rosado. Many of our former students have served every where from the front lines of Afghanistan to the decks of our carriers. They report to their commands trained and ready to go to work immediately. Capt. Mark S. Murphy, CSS commanding officer said the commands expectations and goals are high but very obtain able. Work hard: be brilliant on the basics and take care of our people, said Murphy. Work, study and learn at the job youve been given. Be ready when opportunity knocks. Work smart: mission first, safety always. Push decision making to the lowest level. Communicate up and down the chain. Have fun: Keep a bal ance, keep a sense of humor and test your ideas. We want the best to train the Navys future. CSS was established Feb. 7, 2003, in response to Naval Education and Trainings (NETC) initiative to address challenges in Fleet training and to improve Sailors profession al development products and processes. In streamlining the business of delivering training, NETC charged 15 learning cen ters like CSS with specific areas of naval training. NETC orga nized the centers around their functional areas and appro priately aligned schools and respective training sites to each center. Sailors who are eligible for shore duty and in their trans fer window are encouraged to contact their command career counselors and detailers. For available billet opportunities, visit https://www.cmsid. navy.mil/. For more news from Center for Service Support, visit www. navy.mil/local/cssCPO Selectees Can Save 5% For Uniform PurchasesFrom NEXCOM Pulic AffairsChief Petty Officer (CPO) selectees can pay for newly required Navy uniforms using the MILITARY STAR Card. In addition, CPO select ees will receive a five percent credit on their next MILITARY STAR Card statement show ing the purchase of CPO uniforms. The special offer good at any NEX Uniform Shop worldwide, but not for uniform pur chases made online or toll free phone calls to the Uniform Support Center. Using the MILITARY STAR Card lets CPO selectees charge their new uniforms like anything else in the NEX, said Cmdr. Marcia Coleman, Director, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Uniform Program Management Office. Its quick, easy and the new CPO select ee receives a five percent credit on their MILITARY STAR Card. Customers who open a MILITARY STAR Card account will receive 10 percent off their first days purchases, including a uniform purchase. The 10 percent discount is also applied to the customers MILITARY STAR Card statement. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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CNO Greenert Defends LCS Program CNO Public Affairs OfficeThe Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program was under a microscope this week after news of an electrical problem resulted in a brief loss of power for USS Freedom (LCS 1) over the week end and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a criti cal, 72-page report today scrutinizing the cost of the program. However, top Navy leadership including the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert view the perfor mance problems as com mon for any first-in-class platform--especially in an innovative platform such as the LCS with its interchangeable modular payload design enabling the ship to conform to its battle space. Greenert spoke about the GAO report that was leaked days in advance during a Pentagon press brief held July 19 to dis cuss the status of the Navy with the Pentagon Press Corps. In his comments Greenert compared the LCS with debuts of pre vious firstin-class ships and said there was initial skepticism with those platforms too. My view is, what we are finding is not that sig nificantly different from the Perry class of the 60s and 70s, the Spruance class of the 70s, nor even the Arleigh Burke class when it comes to the size and the impact on it, Greenert said defending the initial hiccups of the LCS. Not one for excuses and understanding of our nations budget con straints Greenert added, But we need to be vigi lant, we need to follow up, and we have work to do. For CNO, that work continued July 24 less than a week after the Pentagon press brief as he toured the Marinette Marine Corporation ship yard July 24 to observe the progress of several Freedom-class variants of the LCS currently under construction. During his tour, Greenert walked through several of the $74 mil lion improved Marinette Marine shipbuilding facilities to see first hand future LCSs: (LCS 5) Milwaukee, (LCS 7) Detroit, (LCS 9) Little Rock, and (LCS 11) Sioux City not only being built, but being built better with integrated feedback from industry and Sailors in the fleet. President and CEO of Marinette Marine Chuck Goddard said efficiencies in the building process resulting from upgrades to the shipyard will drive down costs per unit of the LCS over time while the fleet s feedback is result ing in a more superior product for our Sailors charged with protecting the worlds sea lanes. I m very impressed, Greenert told a group of Marinette reporters fol lowing his tour of the shipyard. Greenert was equally impressed by the communication between the LCS industry and Sailors in the fleet who s valuable feedback is enabling Marinette Marine to change designs and man ufacturing processes as necessary to fix issues with current LCS models and prevent them from being integrated into future LCSs. We have a team effort, Greenert said about the Sailors who operate the ships and the shipbuild ers in Marinette Marine. Their feedback and connection with what Freedom is undergoing, with what Fort Worth is undergoing back into the design is impressive and it turns quickly into the shipyard. Greenert reiterated to the Marinette report ers that historically, its not uncommon to have to modify a first-in-class ships design once it becomes operational despite best efforts to fix and find all of the bugs during the testing period. It really isnt about the quality of the workman ship, I think the question is what decisions the Navy has made to build this type of ship, the decisions we collectively made as to how we were going to build them in sequence, design and changes, thats not unusual, Greenert said. We need to take them deliberately and seriously and we are in as much of a partnership as we can with the General Accounting Office. Ultimately, the Navy is committed to the LCS Greenert said. This class of ship is so important to us, for its modularity, its speed, its volume, Greenert said. I came here to see how are the changes coming around, what is the rela tionship more long term, Greenert said to report ers at the conclusion of his confidence visit and tour of Marinette Marine. Were only in the start ing pieces of this long program. -Photo by MC1 Peter D. LawlorChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert tours the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard to view the construction progress of multiple Freedom-class variants of the littoral combat ship (LCS) in various stages of completion. While touring the facilities, Greenert also observed improvements made to the shipyard's manufacturing facilities, which has resulted in the more efficient production of future LCS models. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 7

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Mayport Gives Blood To Save Lives -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSailors and government employees assigned to Naval Station Mayport donate blood during a American Red Cross blood drive. The American Red Cross prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. Navy Gateway Inns and Suites Partners With Commercial Hotels To Save Travel DollarsFrom Commander, Navy Instal lation Command Navy Lodging Program OfficeThe Navys primary lodging facilities for travelers on official orders (also available to Department of Defense (DoD) travelers), Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS), is expanding lodging opportunities. NGIS is partnering with commercial hotels in close proximity to Navy installations to accommodate guests when on base DoD government lodging is at full occupancy. Currently, DoD travelers on official orders to an installation may encounter an NGIS with no lodg ing availability. Travelers are then required to locate a local commercial hotel on their own after receiving a Certificate of Non-Availability (CNA). NGIS is taking on that responsibility for the trav eler. In certain markets, this can be quite a challenge. First, the traveler must find a commercial prop erty within a short com mute to the base with a rate of per diem or lower, and most importantly; safe to reside in during their temporary duty. The Navy Lodging Program has seen the hurdles trav elers face and has imple mented a solution by partnering with commer cial hotels. Our priority is to maxi mize on-base DoD gov ernment lodging and then also to provide safe, secure hotels that meet our DoD traveler require ments by establishing relationships with com mercial hotel partners in close proximity of the Navy base, said Tamara Davis, Navy Lodging Program manager. Travelers do not have to worry about finding lodging on their own in an area they are not familiar with, or being placed in a hotel that is less than desirable, thats what the Navy Lodging Program mission is to take care of our travelers whether theyre staying on base or off base. The Navy Commercial Lodging Programs hotel partners must meet estab lished criteria. This cri terion involves passing an annual inspection to ensure the property meets DOD Lodging Standards and DoD Fire, Safety and Health criteria, with con tracted room rates at per diem or lower, and be within a 30 minute com mute for the traveler. Prior to a TDY traveler receiv ing a CNA for commer cial lodging the following steps will be followed: (1) Check availability at NGIS (On base lodging); (2) if no availability at NGIS, Navy Lodge will be contacted; (3) if no avail ability at Navy Lodge and there is no commercial lodging program, the trav eler will receive a CNA requiring the traveler to locate a hotel within per diem. The Navy Commercial Lodging Program intro duces multiple ben efits for travelers: conve nience, safety, travel sav ings and mission accom plishment. This program has proven very suc cessful in markets such as Guam; Washington, D.C.; Bethesda, Md.; Fort Worth, Texas; Jacksonville and Mayport, Fla.; Seal Beach and San Diego, Calif. As the Navy Commercial Lodging Program continues to expand to new mar kets/locations, travelers will be assured of lodg ing accommodations to meet their travel needs with one phone call to 1-877-NAVY-BED. NGIS Commercial Lodging Partnership Program also generates revenue which supports the NGIS lodging pro grams at headquarters and at the installation. For NGIS reservations and locations, visit http:// ngis.dodlodging.net/. For more news from Commander, Navy Installations Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/ cni 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Navy Satellite Launch Boosts Satellite CommunicationsSpace and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public AffairsThe Navys second Mobile User Objective System satellite was launched today at 9:00 a.m. EDT from Space Launch Complex 41. The successful launch repre sents a key step in providing enhanced satellite communications for the Navy and Department of Defense (DoD). MUOS is a next-gener ation narrowband tactical satellite communications system designed to signif icantly improve beyondline-of-sight communica tions for U.S. forces on the move. MUOS will provide military users 10 times more communications capacity over the exist ing system by leveraging 3G mobile technology, including simultaneous voice and data capability. The MUOS-2 launch is an especially significant event for the program because not only are we launching the second satellite, but the ground system, the networking software and the wave form are all aligning at the same time, explained Navy Cmdr. Matt Bohlin, the MUOS principal assis tant program manager. With MUOS-2 on-orbit this fall, well be testing the full system with all the new capabilities that it brings to the warfighter. The first MUOS satel lite, launched in February 2012 and accepted for operational use by U.S. Strategic Command in November, has been pro viding high quality voice communications for users. The Navy plays a key role in national space efforts by providing nar rowband satellite com munications for the DoD and other government agencies. MUOS satellite communications capabil ity is designed for mobile users who require highspeed mission data with higher data rates and improved operational availability. Bohlin says users requiring these essential services will soon see sig nificantly improved ben efits when the full system suite comes on-line. Users are going to notice more bandwidth that is accessible on demand as opposed to preplanned channels, better voice quality and better connectivity while not being impacted by remote regions, urban environments or inclem ent weather. he said. It will be a revolutionary leap for satellite commu nications for DoD. With current capability, tactical users have limit ed access to narrowband satellite communications, and channels must be preplanned and allocated. Additionally, dismounted users had to be stationary to acquire the satellite. With MUOS, users will have access on demand and be able to use the ser vice while on the move and in all environments and weather to talk to beyond-line-of-sight recipients, whether they are on the other side of a mountain or the other side of the world. Services will also be available for platforms such as ships, aircraft and vehicles. Over the next sev eral days, the satellite, which functions much like a cell tower in space, will transition to its geo synchronous orbit loca tion 22,000 miles above the earth. Its solar arrays and mesh antennas will then be deployed and onorbit testing will begin for eventual commissioning into service. The constellation of four satellites and one on-orbit spare will extend narrowband communica tions availability well past 2025. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, the Navys Program Executive Office for Space Systems, Chantilly, Va., and its Communications Satellite Program Office, San Diego, are responsible for the MUOS program. Additional imagery, videos and launch cover age can be found at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command web site link here www.public. navy.mil/spawar/Press/ Pages/MUOS-2.aspx.nav-Photo courtesy of NASA by Patrick H. Corkery An Atlas V rocket launches the Navys Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) 2 satellite from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. MUOS is a next-generation narrow band tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyond-line-of-sight communications for U.S. forces on the move. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 9

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Aquatics Aug. 5: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug. 2 & 3 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Intramural Sports Aug. 10: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 2. 270-5451 Aug. 13: Go the Distance 10K/5K Run 8 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 13: Intramural Flag Football Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451 Aug. 20: 3v3 Fall Soccer Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins Aug. 26; end Oct. 21. 270-5451 Aug. 26-28: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. MWR Sports/FitnessAug. 2: Outdoor MoviesOz the Great and Powerful (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 5: Missoula Childrens Theatre Snow White & The Seven Dwarves Auditions Aug. 9: Outdoor MoviesThe Croods (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 16: Outdoor MoviesThe Goonies (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Aug. 23: Outdoor MoviesBrave (PG). Intramural Soccer Match -Photos courtesy of MWRTeam America from COMNAVSOU/4F faced off against the Coast Guard team in the Intramural Championship Soccer Match on Friday, July 26. Coast Guard won 9-1 to win both the league regular season and the tournament championship. Team America took second place in both. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Auto Skills Center July Special: 10 percent off all vehicle lifts plus free vehicle diagnostic for most vehicles. 270-5392 August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rota tion and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rota tion on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Aug. 3: UFC 163-Aldo vs. Korean Zombie. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 4: NFL PreSeason Kick Off Party. 8 pm kick-off Miami vs. Dallas. Drink Specials and free prize pool. 270-7205 Aug. 7: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 Aug. 16: 80s Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. 80s Costume Contest, 80s music and trivia, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Aug. 21: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Legoland Florida Special. All active duty military receive one FREE Water Park Combo Ticket. Free ticket can be redeemed at the front gate. Family members can purchase discounted tickets at ITT. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you pur chase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes pre ferred seating, Knights Cheering banner, com memorative program and more! 270-5145 Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale NOW Purchase your tickets for the 2013 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in August: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 26: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. July 27: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 28: Ichnetucknee Springs Tubing Trip. Cost $5. Sign up by July 24. Van departs Liberty Center 7 a.m. July 29: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. July 30: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 31: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 2: Thrift Shop Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. Aug. 4: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 5: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 7: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! Aug. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $13. Aug. 10: Jacksonville Roller Girls Roller Derby. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 11: Adventure Landing Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 12: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 14: Laser Tag. 6-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. FREE Aug. 16: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $5; sign up by Aug. 14. Aug. 18: A Day at the Beach: Huguenot Park. Van departs 9 a.m. Aug. 19: Nerf Sniper. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Aug. 10. Aug. 22: Hooters Dinner Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 24: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 26: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 11

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Military Spouse Vendor Show Come out to the Mayport USO on Aug. 3 and check out a variety of vendors and support your local military spouses and their small businesses. There will be $1 raffles drawn every half hour and food available for purchase from the USO. Check out all the fabulous items available. For more information, contact mil wivesbusinessesande vents@gmail.com. Back To School Drive Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is collecting school supplies for our deserving junior families to help get their children ready for school this year. If you can help, please bring your donated school supplies to either Mayport or NAS Jax USO centers between now and Aug. 9. We are asking for any school necessities such as pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, back packs, glue/sticks, two pocket three-prong folders, rulers, lunch boxes, etc. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game sea son. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOCrenshaw Recognition Ceremony To Honor Vets Through Operation Desert Shield/StormFrom the office of Congressman Ander CrenshawApplications available for veterans not previous ly honored Congressman Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced on July 12 that his 2013 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor veterans and active duty members who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The application deadline for those who have not previously been recognized with Special Recognition Certificate is Oct. 4. The ceremony will be held in November at a date to be announced later this summer. The Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony is one of the highlights of my year and provides a welcome opportunity to honor those servicemen and women who put their lives on the line to protect our freedom and democ racy, said Crenshaw. The annual event shows our appreciation for those who answered the call of duty, and I encourage all who think they may be eligible to fill out an appli cation. Through the years, Congressman Crenshaw has recognized thousands of veterans who served from the 1940s through Desert Storm. However, some vet erans who served dur ing this time period may not have been hon ored because Federal Congressional district lines were redrawn at the beginning of 2013 and eli gible veterans did not pre viously live in the Fourth Congressional District. Veterans who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm, live in the Fourth Congressional District, and would like to participate are encouraged to contact Congressman Crenshaws District Office in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481 or go to his official web site at Crenshaw. house.gov to obtain an application. Click on Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly on the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applica tions and proof of eligi bility should be mailed to the following address: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. The application deadline is Oct. 4. To determine eligibil ity for the certificate, vet erans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Active duty members who wear the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.Children Of Fallen Patriots Seeks Community Involvement To Find Deserving FamiliesDirector of Strategic Partnerships Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation is an organization that provides college scholar ships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. We need the help of local communities to help us find and support the families that have lost a loved one during active duty. One of the challenges CFPF face is finding the children who deserve our Grants and Scholarship. *Due to privacy laws it is very difficult for military aid orga nizations to find families who have lost a loved one. *Because no central directory of help exists, it is difficult for families to find our organization *Finally, most surviving fami lies have young children when their loved one is killed and move back home and away from the military support net work. Thus thousands of deserving children are slipping through the cracks. Our experience has proven that even when families are able to find aid, there is a persistent gap between funding and college costs. Our objec tive is to streamline this very complicated, burdensome and insufficient process for our families. CFPF is an organization that provides college scholarships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. Our vision is that every such child can have a debt-free col lege education. Im sure you would agree that these families have given the ultimate sacrifice by losing their Mother or Father while they protect our freedoms. Sometimes, these families are soon forgotten and we want to make sure that this is NEVER the case! One of the most fan tastic tidbits about CFPF is that 100 percent, yes 100 per cent of all donations goes to the programs. Our generous board, which includes General Petraeuss Wife, pays for ALL administrative costs! This is very unique in the nonprofit sector. We have a staff of seven, which includes two graduates and recipients of Children of Fallen Patriots grants. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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4th Fleet Team Helping Honduran Hospital U.S. 4th Fleet public affairsMilitary members from various medical com mands came together to conduct a five-day Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE) and water purification system installation with assis tance from the WaterStep company at Hospital de Area de Puerto Cortes. The exchange was a great success. We accom plished on a micro scale, exactly what we hoped to do on a macro scale with USNS Comfort, Capt, Kevin Knoop, Commanding Officer of the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) said. COMFORT was sched uled to deploy to the region this summer to work with partner nations as party of Continuing Promise 2013 to provide medical services and mutual training but was cancelled due federal budget cuts. A reduced team of medical professionals went to Honduras to provide medical support as much as possible. We had precious little time and a small team, but somehow man aged to assess the medical capabilities, identify areas that future mis sions could assist the hospital with, built rela tionships with the local health care community, consult on patient care alongside local providers, and catalyze the forma tion of relationships with the WaterStep program. The next event can pick up where our trailblazing team left off and take it to the next level, Knoop said. The medical team identified proper treatment procedures for patients and implemented chang es immediately. The hospital redesigned the emergency department creating a trauma bay and expanding space for minor emergencies and improving flow and effi ciency. Along with that, they also provided train ing to nurses on triage and proper patient flow. I am very pleased to be able to facilitate sending service mem bers to the public hos pital in Puerto Cortes, Honduras. Conducting exchanges like this is the least we can do with the USNS Comfort not able to deploy this year for Continuing Promise due to federal budget cuts. We are still committed to our partners in the region and engaging with them as much as possible to foster that very commitment. The Navy doctors were very respectful and made suggestions very dip lomatic in reference to patient management, Dr. Guillermo Saenz, Liaison Medical Officer Medical Element, JTF-Bravo, Honduras said. The team helped train students to assist with dental procedures expanding capacity in their dental clinic also assisting with Orthopedic and OB/GYN surgeries. The Navy sent a mul tidisciplinary team of medical professionals composed of a dietician, nurse, dental hygien ist, preventive medicine techs, industrial hygienist, Obstetrician, orthopedic traumatologist and emer gency medicine special ists to exchange experi ences and information and to build partnerships. This is what the mission is all about, and we were highly successful! I was proud to be a part of this amazing and diverse team on this mission, Knoop said. Along with the mili tary doctors two Hospital Corpsmen assisted the company WaterStep with the installation of a water purification sys tem. WaterStep is a NonGovernment Organization (NGO) that works world wide to help bring people water purification sys tems. The water created by the system at the hos pital will be used to help not only treat patients but also give them something safe to drink. -Photos by MC2 Adam HendersonNavy Captain Kevin Knoop, commanding officer of hos pital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20), and medical student Shellsea Portillo examine a patient that was brought into the emergency room for treatment. Knoop was at the local hospital conducting a U.S. 4th Fleet medical Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE) with Honduran medical professionals. U.S. Navy nurse Lt. Cmdr. Rosa Abbott discusses proper handling and caring for patient's with nurses from the public hospital in Puerto Cortes. Clinic Awarded For Care Of German SailorNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport was recent ly recognized for coordinating and managing the transporta tion and care of a German sailor aboard the research vessel WFS Planet, who became critically ill during German sea maneuvers off the Atlantic coast. During a small ceremo ny May 24 at Naval Station Mayport, aboard the German fleet auxiliary ship FGS Main, Cmdr. Michael Service, NBHC Mayport officer in charge, was presented a plaque in rec ognition of NBHC Mayports exceptional medical manage ment of the ill German sailor. The plaque was presented by the 1st German Submarine Squadron Commanding Officer, Commander (Senior Grade) Sascha Rackwitz. On April 16 the German sail or developed an urgent lifethreatening medical condition and through the coordination by the NBHC team, was mede vaced from his ship to Shands Jacksonville Medical Center by an SH-60B helicopter assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) Squadron 46. Answering the call to sup port the warfighter is our pri mary mission and displays the diversity of Navy Medicine, said Service. Our first con cerns were the health and logistics of the sailor involved. Coordinating medical assis tance was our next concern. Timely and effective medical evacuation of the sailor, from his assigned ship to a treatment facility, was essential for ensur ing the best practical outcome for the sailor. The NBHC Mayport team assumed direct lead of the sailors case management throughout his entire illness and recovery, with Service assuming duties as clinical provider and primary medical liaison between the U.S. Navy, the German fleet and German embassy, in regards to the sail ors diagnosis, treatment and progress. Upon the sailors discharge from Shands, NBHC Mayport, along with Commander U.S. 4th Fleet surgeon, collaborated with their German medical counter parts, to ensure the sailors safe return to Germany. In a second ceremony, NBHC Mayport also received recog nition from Capt. Ross Ferris, commanding officer of the Royal Fleet auxiliary ship RFA Wave Night, for supporting the medical needs of Wave Nights crew during their visit to NS Mayport. German vessels WFS Planet, submarine U 32 and their sup port ship FGS Main departed their homeport of Eckernfrde, a small north Germany port city, in mid-February to participate in exercises and maneu vers with U.S. Armed Forces, and is expected to return to Eckernfrde by the end of August. NBHC Mayport is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient popula tionabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guards men and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax.Protect Your Skin Against Cancer This Summer SeasonFrom TRICARESpending time out doors is a great way to enjoy the warmer weath er and get exercise. Blue skies and high tempera tures bring people out to parks, pools and beaches wearing summer clothing and exposing more skin. Enjoying the sunshine is nice, but too much can be a bad thing. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) skin cancer is the most common form of cancer overall in the United States. Melanoma is not the most common form of skin cancer, but it is the most dangerous and accounts for the most skin cancer-related deaths. It can advance rapidly and spread to other parts of the body, making it hard er to treat, but is prevent able and can be treated effectively if detected early. The leading cause of melanoma is over-expo sure to sunlight, spe cifically ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. UV rays damage the skins abil ity to heal and produce healthy, new cells. The damaged cells mutate and grow into tumors, visible as dark spots, lesions or moles on the skin. Anyone who notices any change on their skin, including changes to already existing moles and lesions, should talk with their doctor. Remember the American Cancer Societys ABCs when noticing a mole: A stands for Asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half. B for Border irregular ity: The edges of the mole are irregular, ragged, blurred, or notched. C for Color: The color over the mole is not the same all over. There may be shades of tan, brown, or black. D is for Diameter: The mole is larger than about one-quarter inch about the size of a pencil eraser; although it is possible for melanomas to be smaller. Its a common miscon ception that people with darker complexions are not susceptible to skin cancers. Although skin cancer is more common in people with fairer skin and features, anyone can develop skin cancer. While some forms of skin cancer develop because of genetics, most other forms can be pre vented. Start sun pro tective measures early because a majority of sun exposure occurs dur ing childhood and early adulthood and exposure to sunlight is the lead ing cause of skin cancer. Just one severe sun burn increases the risk of developing skin cancer. CDC recommends cov ering exposed skin with loose fitting clothing, wearing a hat and sun glasses, and using sun screen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 during any out side activity. Sun expo sure is the most hazard ous between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when UV rays are the strongest. Getting into the shade during these peak hours is another effective way to prevent skin cancer. One of the preventive services TRICARE covers is skin cancer screenings for beneficiaries with a family or personal history of skin cancer, increased occupational or recreational exposure to sun light or clinical evidence of precursor lesions. For more information about preventive skin cancer screenings, visit www.tri care.mil/preventiveser vices and select skin cancer exams. However, anyone can have a suspicious lesion evaluated, no matter their family, occu pational or recreational history. Following CDC recom mendations for avoiding sun exposure is an easy way to prevent skin can cer. Be sure to look for signs of skin cancer and report any changes to a doctor. For more infor mation about skin cancer and prevention go to www.cdc.gov/cancer/ skin. Branch Health Clinic Appointments542-4677 Going to be late? Call to re-schedule. Quality Ctrl Digital QC Proofreader Art Director CopyWriter Creative Dir Acct Exec Print Prod Print/Export Time: 11/7/05 1:29 PM Print Scale: 100% User Name: carl.ellis Proof #: 3 PM: Peter Fay InDesign Version: CS Document Name: IG_N05AC001_110_Lost.indd Document Path: Retouching:-Work In Progess:Ad Council:IG_N05AC001_110_AdCouncil:IG_N05AC001_110_Lost.indd Font Family: Helvetica (Medium Condensed; Type 1) Ink Name: Process Cyan, Process Magenta, Process Yellow, Process BlackLink Name: IG_Ad_Council_Spare_gray.tif (Up to Date; 11.7MB; Gray; 474 ppi), AdCouncil.org_white.eps (Up to Date; 270KB) Client: Ad Council (AC) Product: General (GEN) Job #: N05AC001 Ad #: 110 Headline: Lost...Spare Tire Visual: Poster w/stomach Space/Color: Fractional B/W Non-Bleed Publication: Various 2005 Bleed: 0 in x 0 in Trim: 3.75 in x 7 in Live: 0 in x 0 in Gutter: None AD: T. Dillingham CW: N/A CD: N/A AP: A. Kaye PP: M. Daoust Created by Interface Graphics, a division of McCann Erickson www.smallstep.gov T: 3.75 in T: 7 in THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 13

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14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 1, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 1, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 1, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 1, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 5, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Aug. 5-9, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 7, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 7, 11 a.m.-noon, Banking and Financial Services FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 7, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Aug. 8, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 8, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Aug. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 12, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Aug. 12, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 12-13, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Higher Education FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 14, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 14, 11 a.m.-noon, Money and the Move FFSC Building 1 Room 719 Aug. 15, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 CNRSE Family Readiness Program Conducts Emergency Response ExerciseNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsCommander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness Program hosted phase two of an Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exer cise at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville July 17. The training was an installment of a three-phase exercise designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks following the landfall of a hurricane. Phase I, conducted on May 30, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, as well as installation and training officers and emergency management per sonnel from all three bases. Phase II incorporated a variety of addi tional base organizations, such as the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Navy Legal Service Office, Navy Gateway Inns and Suites, base housing and many others. This training is vital because its not a matter of if one of our installations will be affected by a hurricane, its a matter of when, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. Our ability to bring together multiple organizations and people to work as a cohe sive unit is crucial to our recovery efforts in this kind of scenario, and I think training like this has a huge impact on our ability to respond when the real thing does happen. The EFAC exercise is essential ly a continuation of the regions HURREX 2013, which tested the regions hurricane prepared ness through a scenario involv ing multiple simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. While HURREX focused on prelandfall preparations, the EFAC exercise was designed to focus on the recovery phase of disaster response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to landfall and each base suffered extensive flooding damage as the simulat ed storm passed. FFSC personnel from all three participating bases worked with emergency man agement, training personnel and other installation departments to establish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. Phase II of this exercise had a lot more moving pieces due to the fact that we brought in a variety of additional agencies to participate, said Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness Program work and fam ily life coordinator. To incorpo rate all these different people into this exercise is invaluable because we will be working together in the event of a real disaster and establishing roles, responsibilities and relationships is crucial. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emergency response personnel to provide a wide range of support servic es for affected family members. According to Lucius, much of that support is managed through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment por tion of NFAAS and specify what they need, then our case manag ers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the appropriate resources, she said. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC per sonnel to assess needs after a disaster, people can also come directly to the EFAC for assistance, Lucius added. Circumstances can change very quickly in the days and weeks following a hurricane, so our recovery efforts need to be flexible and our services have to be adjust ed accordingly, Lucius said. Its important for us to identify exactly who we need to have in the EFAC based on what peoples needs are. The EFAC is not staffed with only FFSC personnel, but there are a lot of other organizations involved, such as chaplains, medi cal, legal, housing and a long list of others. Part of this exercise is to establish a clearer picture of what resources we are likely to need in the EFAC at different times in the recovery process. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agen cies and local officials in order to get people the help they need. Lucius said most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world scenario occurs. The nature of an emergency or crisis event is that of unpre dictability, she said. However, even though things will inevitably happen that we dont necessar ily expect, we still need to have a plan in place so that our people are confident in themselves, confi dent in their leadership and confi dent in the plan. Lucius said training like this is essential for preparing emergen cy management and FFSC per sonnel for an actual event, but it is equally as important for fam ily members and dependents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be con tacted and they know how to con tact somebody for help, she said. While phase II of the exercise included about 30 more partici pants than phase I, phase III of the exercise will expand even further and will include a number of civil ian agencies and organizations, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and govern ment civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily.navy.mil where they can update their con tact information, report their sta tus or submit a needs assessment. For more information about hurricane readiness or NFAAC, contact your local FFSC. Saturday, Aug. 3 First Missionary Baptist Church is doing a UNITY Day from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at 850 Fifth Ave South, Jacksonville Beach, Florida 32250. Free food and school supplies. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a walk on the beach as they explain the importance of unde veloped beach habitat, including many interest ing facts about sea crea tures and common shells found in the area. Bring sunscreen and water. The program will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. Aug. 3-4 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event on Saturday, Aug. 3, 9 a.m. 5 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 4, 9 a.m. noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cook ing and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, fam ily friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Tuesday, Aug. 6 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. Karen Stephenson, who has won many pho tographic competitions will present on the subject of How to prepare and submit for print competi tion. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types welcomed and encour aged to come and learn more about photography. For more information www.beachesphotogra phyclub.org Chabad @ the Beaches is offering a Hebrew Reading Crash Course to all members of the Jewish community. The course is designed to teach those with no basic knowledge of the Hebrew language how to read Hebrew in five easy lessons. Chabad @ the Beaches is offering the course in an effort to assist those in the com munity with a desire to learn to read Hebrew and learn to follow along in the Siddur/Prayer book. The five-week Hebrew Reading Crash Course, will be held on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. The Course begins on Aug. 6 at the Aaron and Blanche Scharf Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Ponte Vedra. The hebrew read ing crash course is geared toward beginners, as well as those who sometimes attend services, but feel left out, unable to fol low or appreciate the lit urgy. For more informa tion about the Hebrew Reading Crash Course call Rabbi Eli at Chabad @ the Beaches at 543.9301. The cost of this five week course is $50 for new comers $25 for returnees, scholarships available call for details, as always nobody will be turned away due to an inability to pay. For more informa tion about the Hebrew Reading Crash Course call Chabad @ the Beaches at 543-9301 or visit www. ChabadBeaches.com/ LearnHebrew Thursday, Aug. 8 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a workshop on Gardening Tips for Hot Weather plus Managing Pest Problems from 6:30 8:30 pm at the Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd. This is a free program. Come learn gar dening tips for the summer heat and what to do with those pests in your landscape. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Saturday, Aug. 10 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Thursday, Aug.15 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a free workshop on Do it Yourself Irrigation Repairs to Save Money at S. Mandarin Branch Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, Fl. The time is 6:30 8:30 p.m. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Learn handson ideas. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Aug. 16 & 17 The Englewood High School Class of 1973 has finalized plans for their 40 year High School Reunion in Jacksonville, FL on the Southbank of the St Johns River. Dont miss out on this great event! Mail your check today for $75 per person to EHS Jay Kauffman, 8058 Newton Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32216 (Jay 904.982.2701). Please prepay your Saturday night reservation to insure there is enough food for everyone. Questions? Jay 904-982-2701, Amy 904-629-9222. More info on Facebook: search Englewood High School Class of 1973. www.face book.com/groups/26228 1106060/10151708392646 061/?notif_t=group_activ ity Saturday, Aug. 17 Ever dreamed of getting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photogra pher at 11 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn tech niques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Please bring your own camera and pho tography supplies, sturdy shoes, bug spray, sun screen and water. Space is limited on this program to 10 participants. Please RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Gombas Relieves Cook As SERMC COSERMC PAOCapt. Dave Gombas relieved Capt. Ron Cook as commanding officer of Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) July 26 in a cer emony on Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla. Capt. Gombas reports to SERMC from his previous assignment as com manding officer, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Ship Systems Engineering Station in Philadelphia. Gombas is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and holds a masters degree in mechani cal engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. His prior assignments include tours aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as well as numerous tours at ship repair facilities including his prior service at SERMC as the water front operations officer from March 2007 until October 2009. Capt. Thomas J. Kearney, vice command er of Naval Sea Systems Command, who served as the ceremonys keynote speaker, lauded Gombas experience and training saying that his educational background and training in engineering fields, coupled with experience at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center and especially as the waterfront operations officer at SERMC have prepared you well for this challenging position. Following the change of command, Kearney presented Cook with a Legion of Merit medal for his accomplishments since assuming command of SERMC in September 2010. Re-introducing the intermediate level main tenance at SERMC and training sailors to return to the waterfront capable of maintain ing and repairing ships is a tremendous legacy that Ron has not only left at SERMC, but also the entire Navy, said Kearney. Cook will report to Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet as the assistant chief of staff for maintenance and engi neering. My 25 year journey to command was excit ing and challenging, but these last three years at SERMC have been the pinnacle of my naval career. It was easy to lead such a fantastic organi zation, said Cook. The attitude and drive is what makes every per son here so special, they are unique and I and any other commanding officer are extremely fortunate to have them on the team. A field activity of NAVSEA, SERMC manag es and executes all repair, industrial engineering and technical support services for surface ships in the southeast region, including procurement and administration of contracts for ship main tenance and moderniza tion. SERMC also pro vides training to Sailors in the maintenance and repair of shipboard sys tems and components. SBR Hold Change Of Command In Souda Bay USS Samuel B. Roberts Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) held a change of command ceremony during a port visit to Souda Bay, Greece, July 24-26. During the ceremony, Cmdr. Erica L. Hoffmann relieved Cmdr. Robert R. Williams as commanding officer of the Samuel B. Roberts on the flight deck with the crew, family and friends in attendance. Cmdr. Williams led Sammy B. through the ships training cycle and workups prior to deploy ing to the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. In my fourteen years of service I have never been more challenged, grown more as a Sailor, or experienced the rewards of serving under a com manding officer, than I have on the Samuel B. Roberts under Cmdr. Williams, said Masterat-Arms 1st Class Drew Koehler. I have never met a CO who takes such pride in the accomplish ments of his Sailors or cares more about their well-being than him. I can only hope to meet another commanding officer with the same attributes. Hoffmann said wel comed the challenge. When I received my orders, everyone throughout the pipeline asked me if I was happy, said Hoffmann. I told them I got exactly what I wanted, a frigate out of Mayport. I want to thank Cmdr. Williams and my parents, and I look forward to continuing the proud Sammy B. tradition as the com manding officer. Samuel B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Florida is currently on a scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. -Photo by USS Samuel B. RobertsCmdr. Erica Hoffman, addresses the crew during a change of command ceremony in which she relieved Cmdr. Robert R. Williams, middle, as commanding officer of USS Samuel B. Roberts during a port visit to Souda Bay, Greece. Also pictured is Chaplain Calvin Gardner.-Photo courtesy of SERMC MayportCapt. Dave Gombas (right) relieved Capt. Ron Cook (center) as commanding officer of Southeast Regional Maintenance Center on July 26 onboard Naval Station Mayport, Fl. Rear Adm. (Select) Thomas Kearney (left), vice commander of Naval Sea Systems Command, served as the ceremonys keynote speaker.Mayport Says No To ZebrasNavy Public Affairs Support Element SoutheastMore than 400 Sailors from Naval Station Mayport attended a unique No Zebras, No Excuses training session on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR), July 24. The No Zebras, No Excuses pro gram, features Steve Thompson, an educator from Central Michigan University and is sponsored by the Department of the Navys SAPR Office. The program featured skits designed to raise awareness and show service members how they can help prevent sexual assaults. The zebra represents a bystander, said Thompson. This all came about by accident one day while I See Zebras, Page 6 -Photo by MC2 Salton CebeSteve Thompson, an educator from Central Michigan University, speaks to Sailors during the 'No Zebras, No Excuses' Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program at Naval Station Mayport. The program is sponsored by the Department of the Navy's SAPR Office and features skits designed to raise awareness and show Sailors how they can help prevent sexual assault. Gate 5 Hours Readjust Effective Immediately To 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Enrollment is the first step on the journey. Its the beginning of an exciting time for the family. Preparation is the key to making enrollment suc cessful. Florida laws for educating children are very specific. All children must attend school until they reach the age of 16. This is Florida law. If your children will be enrolling in a Florida public school, all of the information youll need for enrollment can be found on the districts website. For www. duvalschools.org www. stjohns.k12.fl.us www.clay. k12.fl.us www. edline.net/pages/Nassau_ County_School_District. The following is a sum mary of the timely infor mation available on their sites which includes everything from lunch menus to school sched ules to up-to-date enroll ment information. SCHOOL SITE LOCATOR: A students street address deter mines the school of attendance, unless the student has exercised a school choice option. Every residential address has a School Feeder Pattern, which assigns students to an Elementary School (Kindergarten through Grade 5) Middle School (Grades 6-8) and High School (Grades 9-12). For most of these districts, the locator is on the sites homepage. ENROLLMENT INFORMATION: cal (school-entry health exam) performed within one year of the date of enrollment. If the child had the exam in another state, the base clinic can transfer this info to a Florida card. Duval requires 2 proofs. immunizations (Florida certification of immu nization, DH Form 690) or an exemption. Again, if the child had the exam in another state, the base clinic can transfer this info to a Florida card. Grade Students: certified birth record. Acceptable birth records include the following: -original certified birth record; -duly attested Certificate of Baptism; -insurance policy on the childs life that has been in force for at least two years; -affidavit of age sworn by parent and signed by a public health official; -passport or certificate of arrival in the United States indicating the age of the child; or -academic transcript with record of age in the childs school, stating the DOB. ACADEMIC RECORDS: When a child has been enrolled in another school district, parents are asked to provide the latest report card from that district and tran script if applicable. Most schools will accept an unofficial record (a handcarried report card, for example) for registration, but the school will then request official records from the previous school. OPTIONAL: a Social Security number. Federal law does NOT allow schools to require a social security number for school enrollment. BUS INFORMATION: State law requires bus transportation for students who live two miles or more from the schools they currently attend. The school district also pro vides special bus services for students in certain Exceptional Education programs, regardless of distance under spe cific guidelines. For more information, con tact the Transportation Department at 7810 MILITARY DEPENDENT CHOICE OPTION: Florida Statutes provide that dependent children of active duty military personnel who otherwise meet the eli gibility criteria for spe cial academic programs shall be given first preference for admission to such programs even if the program is being offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned. However, the district will follow class size restric tions, as detailed in the Class Size Amendment to the Florida Constitution, in the placement of eli gible military dependent students. No students will be placed in a school or program that causes a class to exceed class size for that grade thus placing that school out of compliance with state law. For changes to Duvals eligi bility requirements, go to www.duvalchoice.com. JOHN M. MCKAY SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM: This is a statewide program for students with disabili ties who are not mak ing adequate progress in the current school. A public or private school may be selected, and the State will provide funding for a private school. The student must have been classified as an ESE stu dent (not gifted) with a current IEP or a 504 Plan for the 2012-2013 school though not necessarily in a Florida public school. If you have addition al questions concern ing enrollment, school choice, special needs, or any other educational issue, please contact me at the email or phone numbers below. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or questions about enrolling in another local school dis trict, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingEnrolling In A Florida Public School CORRECTIONDue to an editing error, the July 25 edition of The Mirror published a headline that incorrectly identified USS Gettysburg as joining the Ike Carrier Strike Group. USS Gettysburg joined the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused. Additional Information On School And Sports Physicals And ImmunizationsNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayports Immunizations Clinic is cur rently conducting back to school physicals for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year, allowing parents to beat the rush with early scheduling and additional clinic days in August. Florida law requires all school children have the appropriate health exam and immunization documentation. The physical examination must be performed by a health care provider licensed to perform physical exams and must be completed within the past 12 months (this is not an annual exam). The school entry health exam (form DH 3040) is a requirement for students in grades kindergarten through 12th grade who are making their initial entry into a Florida school. A new entrant is a child entering a school in Florida for the first time or entering after having been absent from a school for more than 12 months or one school year. You have up to one year prior to entering the Florida school system in which to obtain the school entry health exam. For students transferring to a Florida school, a comparable form from another state would be acceptable, if completed within one year. A certificate of immunization (form DH 680) is also a requirement for all children in grades kindergarten through 12th grade), for entry and attendance in Florida schools. The form is valid until the child enters seventh grade, at which time a new form will be issued when additional immunization requirements are met. If the child will be 11-years-old while attending sixth grade there is no need to wait until entering seventh grade to receive the additional required immunizations. Once the required immunizations are met, a new certificate of immunization will be issued and will remain effective until graduation from high school. TRICARE Prime covers school physicals for children ages 5-11 if required in connection with school enrollment. However, annual sport physicals are not covered by TRICARE network providers. NBHC Immunization Clinic is a walk-in clinic, however, children through age five must see their primary care provider first. Parents should bring all immunization records during the clinic visit. NBHC Mayports Immunization Clinic hours of operation are Monday through Friday, form 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Contact the appointment line to schedule your children for school or sport physicals with a NBHC Mayport provider at (904) 542-4677. For additional immunization questions, please call (904) 270-4305. Additionally, for your scheduling convenience NBHC Mayport will have a special clinic on Saturdays during August. Contact Family Practice for any questions or concerns at (904) 270-4220. To Our Military fami lies: The Beaches Branch Library is one of six scheduled for closure if the City Council approves Mayor Browns budget with no adjustments. I and many others have been collecting petitions to seek another source of funding by letting thevoters of Duval County decide by straw ballot if they want an independent tax district for the librar ies. We have collected sig natures at the Beaches Library on Tuesdays and Saturdays and have met several Navy families. They bring their children to story hour, activities and to check out books. The library is also a source of media such as CDs and DVDs. If the Beach Branch is closed, the personnel from the Base will have to travel quite a few miles to the closest library.Teachers at Mayport Middle School state it would be loss to them and the Mayport students. Mayor Alvin Brown, who states that he wants Jacksonville to be the most military friendly city in America,has cut the budget so dramati cally for three years that it leaves us in this situation. His budget is now in the City Council and will be approved in August. We are trying to fight to stay open to serve the Beaches area and Mayport. I have left petitions to sign at the USO and have collected them at Fleet Landing. To sign this petition, you must be a registered Duval County voter; however emails or calls to the Mayor are critical at this time. Let the City Council know that Jacksonville needs to provide for the men and women who serve us. To learn more visit: www.savejaxlibraries.com and www.beacheswatch. comand express your thoughts to; Mayor Alvin Brown:(904) 630-1776, mayorbrown@coj.net Sybil Ansbacher Friends of Beaches Branch Library Member Board of Library Trustees sybil@ansbacher.net LETTER

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Mayport Chapel Hosts Vacation Bible School-Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Vacation Bible School volunteer Ashley Blount, 17, places a crown on a young boys head during arts and crafts time at the Mayport Chapel. Above right, a young girl raises her hand during the morning welcome program. Below right, children sing during the morning program. Fourth and sixth grade students talk about the hazards of bullying. Above, second and third graders play Knight Tag during outside play. Above right, a volunteer talks to children about Queen Esthers story in the Bible. Below right, Four and five year olds Kelsey and Adalyn make crowns during arts and crafts time.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 5 Chief Religious Programs Specialist Sevron Bascom tells four and five year old a Bible story during Mayport Chapel Vacation Bible School held June 22-26.Confidentiality with Chaplains: Sailors Hold Key Chief of Chaplains Public AffairsIn a recent poll on Navy Personnel Commands website, 63 percent of 5,049 respondents did not believe that what they say to a chaplain is confidential, and 65 percent of 2,895 respondents believe that Navy chaplains are required to report certain matters to the command. In light of these results and other anecdotal evi dence, Chief of Chaplains Rear Adm. Mark L. Tidd saw an opportunity to roll out an official campaign to help educate service members, leadership and families across the Navy and Marine Corps on SECNAV Instruction 1730.9: Confidential Communications to Chaplains. This policy was estab lished on Feb. 7, 2008 to protect the sacred trust between an individual and a chaplain. Per Navy policy, ser vice members and fami lies have the right and privilege to confidential communication with a Navy chaplain; Chaplains have the obligation and responsibility to pro tect and guard the con fidential communica tions disclosed to them; and commanders honor and support the unique, confidential relationship between an individual and a chaplain. Chaplains cannot be compelled by the com mand, medical profes sionals or others to dis close what a service member or family member shares in confidence. What you say to us stays between us, unless you decide differentlyYou hold the key, said Tidd. That being said, chaplains will always assist in guiding an indi vidual to the appropriate resources and will not leave an individual alone when the individual or others are at risk, Tidd added. Chaplains serve as advocates to help indi viduals get the support needed to overcome the challenges they face before matters escalate. This unique relation ship between an indi vidual and a chaplain can serve as a valuable safety valve to the commander to facilitate increased morale and mission readiness, said Tidd. Given the continu ing stigma service mem bers associate with seek ing help, chaplains offer Sailors, Marines and their families a safe place to talk, without fear or judg ment. Confidentiality can be particularly impor tant when a Sailor or Marine may feel they have nowhere to turn during a personal crisis, or if theyre concerned about command involvement or an impact on their career, said Tidd. In addition to a Message to the Fleet on confidentiality, the Chaplain Corps has established a resource page devoted to confidentiality on its website: www.chaplain.navy.mil. This page includes frequently asked questions, a fact sheet, a flyer, as well as a link to the policy. The Chaplain Corps is committed to caring for all with dignity, respect and compassion, regard less of an individuals beliefs, if any. One of the ways we do this is through confidentiality, Tidd said. Contact your command chaplain today! Dont know who your chaplain is? Contact Navy 311 for support in your area: 1-855-NAVY-311 or text to: Navy311@navy.mil.> Visit www.chaplain. navy.mil to learn more about Navy chaplains and confidentiality and to review the complete SECNAV Instruction 1730.9 on confidential communications to chaplains. For more news from Chaplain Corps, visit www.navy.mil/local/crb/. You may not have noticed it this week, but the NFL began the prep arations for the 2013 Season with the open ing of Training Camps across the country. Although the shoulder pads and full-contact drills wont begin until next week, there is some thing special about this time and about being in an NFL Community. Legendary Green Bay Packers Coach Vince Lombardi said, Football is like life -it requires perseverance, self-denial, hard work, sacrifice, dedication and respect for authority. Lombardis words also ring true for our Soldiers, Sailors, Airman, Marines, and Coastguardsman today. Earlier this year, the Packers released archived footage of Vince Lombardis first train ing camp. His start ing quarterback, Bart Starr recalled his coach looking the team in the eye and saying, Gentlemen, we are going to RELENTLESSLY chase perfection, know ing full well that we will not catch it because nothing is perfect, but we will RELENTLESSLY chase it, because in the process we will catch excellence. I am not remotely interested in just being good. Do we relentlessly pur sue excellence in our daily work or are we content to just be good at what we do? Some are quick to remind me that Lombardi is credited with the say ing Winning isnt every thing; its the only thing. I believe that one of his earlier quotes is closer to the mark, Winning isnt everything; but the WILL to win is. The will to put in the hard work is the catalyst to creating a standard of excellence. Others might say, Chaps, how does this apply to my ship, or my work center? All that I hear is Do more with less? Lombardi had an interesting perspective on that as well. The mea sure of who we are is what we do with what we have It is not whether you get knocked down; its whether you get back up The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will. It may even be surpris ing but Coach Lombardi understood how his relentless pursuit of per fection would impact his players families: Once you agree upon the price you and your family must pay for success, it enables you to ignore the minor hurts, the opponents pressure, and the tempo rary failures speaks to the need for resiliency in our daily lives whether step ping onto the gridiron or waving goodbye to a deploying family member from the pier. As a new football season unfolds, there are some headlines that will grab our attention and others that will make us shake our heads. Football can be a useful metaphor for life when we listen to the wisdom echoed from its past and provide inspiration for genera tions to come. What it was, was football. (If you have never heard that, it is worth a google search.) Chap Tom Bingol CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSLife and Football Require Perseverance Karen LaClaire introduces a new favorite character at Vacation Bible School. This years theme was Kingdom Rock. Children ages 4-12 got a chance to learn about the Bible with buddies like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant t he Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children socialize during Vacation Bible School.

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CSADD Hosts Flag Football TournamentNavy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment Southeast Naval Station Mayports Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decision (CSADD) is hosting its first annual Flag Football tournament on August 3rd from 10001440 at Naval Station Mayports base Softball field #7. NS Mayport CSADD promotes fun events to help with the morale and welfare for all service members, said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Juan Serret, CSADD President. We are holding this event to help build camaraderie and promote physical fitness between all the branches of the military. There will be teams from the Navy, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Army reserves, and Air National Guard. The uniform for this event will be service PT gear or command shirt with shorts. We are asking everyone to come out and enjoy the tournament and have a good time with all of us here on Naval Station Mayport, said Serret. For more information Contact ET3 Juan Serret at Juan.serret@navy.mil or MC3 Damian Berg at damian. berg@navy.mil -Photo by MCSN Damian BergShip's Servicemen 2nd Class Jose Rivera and Electronics Technician 3rd Class Juan Serret (yellow suit) perform a skit for Naval Station Mayport's Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD). CSADD is a peer-to-peer mentorship program used Navy-wide that is geared at Sailors 18 to 25 years old and reinforce the Navy's culture of Shipmates helping Shipmates. was watching television. There was a lion chas ing a herd of zebras. After the lion took one of the zebras down, just in the background was the rest of the zebra herd acting as if nothing had happened. Thompson said the next day that another zebra was brought down and he noticed the zebras were still just standing there. If I was one of those zebras, Id kick some lion butt, Thompson said. The skits showed how many sexual assaults occur when the victim is comfortable with the predator who is usually someone they trust. They also showed how alcohol or drugs could be used to take advantage of another individual. During the program, Sailors were asked to close their eyes and visu alize four women they care about, and think about how they would feel if one of them was sexually assaulted. When he said to think about four females that you know, that actually struck a cord with me, said Electricians Mate 1st Class Marlon Santiago. I have four females that are really close to me. Thompson was talking about how his daughter got raped but she was scared to tell him about it. That really got to me because it could have been one of my daughters who is too scared to tell anybody. Sailors who attended the event said they felt empowered by the infor mation they gained dur ing the program. The problem is, nobody wants to get involved when someone is getting sexual assault ed, said Boatswains Mate2nd Class Ruben Benders. People just walk away or look the other way. If we can stop doing that if we can stop it from happening by get ting involved there will be less incidents. From Page 1ZebrasCSS Looking For Subject Matter Expert Sailors Center for Service Support Public AffairsCenter for Service Support (CSS) announced they are actively looking for high-quali ty senior Sailors to enhance its already dynamic team July 23. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and fac ulty work hand-in-hand with the Fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities. During a three-year tour, a subject matter expert (SME) would attend the Navy Instructor Training Course, granting them the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9502, work closely with learning sites, compile questions for rating advancement exams and also have the opportunity to earn the prestigious Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. Command Master Chief (SW/SCW/AW) Reinaldo Rosado said that a SMEs influ ence doesnt just extend to the Sailors, but to the commands they serve in, all over the globe. Sailors we train often serve in diverse assignments, said Rosado. Many of our former students have served every where from the front lines of Afghanistan to the decks of our carriers. They report to their commands trained and ready to go to work immediately. Capt. Mark S. Murphy, CSS commanding officer said the commands expectations and goals are high but very obtain able. Work hard: be brilliant on the basics and take care of our people, said Murphy. Work, study and learn at the job youve been given. Be ready when opportunity knocks. Work smart: mission first, safety always. Push decision making to the lowest level. Communicate up and down the chain. Have fun: Keep a balance, keep a sense of humor and test your ideas. We want the best to train the Navys future. CSS was established Feb. 7, 2003, in response to Naval Education and Trainings (NETC) initiative to address challenges in Fleet training and to improve Sailors professional development products and processes. In streamlining the business of delivering training, NETC charged 15 learning centers like CSS with specific areas of naval training. NETC orga nized the centers around their functional areas and appro priately aligned schools and respective training sites to each center. Sailors who are eligible for shore duty and in their trans fer window are encouraged to contact their command career counselors and detailers. For available billet opportunities, visit https://www.cmsid. navy.mil/. For more news from Center for Service Support, visit www. navy.mil/local/cssCPO Selectees Can Save 5% For Uniform PurchasesFrom NEXCOM Pulic AffairsChief Petty Officer (CPO) selectees can pay for newly required Navy uniforms using the MILITARY STAR Card. In addition, CPO select ees will receive a five percent credit on their next MILITARY STAR Card statement show ing the purchase of CPO uniforms. The special offer good at any NEX Uniform Shop worldwide, but not for uniform pur chases made online or toll free phone calls to the Uniform Support Center. Using the MILITARY STAR Card lets CPO selectees charge their new uniforms like anything else in the NEX, said Cmdr. Marcia Coleman, Director, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Uniform Program Management Office. Its quick, easy and the new CPO select ee receives a five percent credit on their MILITARY STAR Card. Customers who open a MILITARY STAR Card account will receive 10 percent off their first days purchases, including a uniform purchase. The 10 percent discount is also applied to the customers MILITARY STAR Card statement. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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CNO Greenert Defends LCS Program CNO Public Affairs OfficeThe Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program was under a microscope this week after news of an electrical problem resulted in a brief loss of power for USS Freedom (LCS 1) over the week end and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a criti cal, 72-page report today scrutinizing the cost of the program. However, top Navy leadership including the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert view the perfor mance problems as com mon for any first-in-class platform--especially in an innovative platform such as the LCS with its interchangeable modular payload design enabling the ship to conform to its battle space. Greenert spoke about the GAO report that was leaked days in advance during a Pentagon press brief held July 19 to dis cuss the status of the Navy with the Pentagon Press Corps. In his comments Greenert compared the LCS with debuts of pre vious firstin-class ships and said there was initial skepticism with those platforms too. My view is, what we are finding is not that significantly different from the Perry class of the 60s and 70s, the Spruance class of the 70s, nor even the Arleigh Burke class when it comes to the size and the impact on it, Greenert said defending the initial hiccups of the LCS. Not one for excuses and understanding of our nations budget con straints Greenert added, But we need to be vigi lant, we need to follow up, and we have work to do. For CNO, that work continued July 24 less than a week after the Pentagon press brief as he toured the Marinette Marine Corporation ship yard July 24 to observe the progress of several Freedom-class variants of the LCS currently under construction. During his tour, Greenert walked through several of the $74 mil lion improved Marinette Marine shipbuilding facilities to see first hand future LCSs: (LCS 5) Milwaukee, (LCS 7) Detroit, (LCS 9) Little Rock, and (LCS 11) Sioux City not only being built, but being built better with integrated feedback from industry and Sailors in the fleet. President and CEO of Marinette Marine Chuck Goddard said efficiencies in the building process resulting from upgrades to the shipyard will drive down costs per unit of the LCS over time while the fleet s feedback is result ing in a more superior product for our Sailors charged with protecting the worlds sea lanes. I m very impressed, Greenert told a group of Marinette reporters fol lowing his tour of the shipyard. Greenert was equally impressed by the communication between the LCS industry and Sailors in the fleet who s valuable feedback is enabling Marinette Marine to change designs and manufacturing processes as necessary to fix issues with current LCS models and prevent them from being integrated into future LCSs. We have a team effort, Greenert said about the Sailors who operate the ships and the shipbuild ers in Marinette Marine. Their feedback and connection with what Freedom is undergoing, with what Fort Worth is undergoing back into the design is impressive and it turns quickly into the shipyard. Greenert reiterated to the Marinette report ers that historically, its not uncommon to have to modify a first-in-class ships design once it becomes operational despite best efforts to fix and find all of the bugs during the testing period. It really isnt about the quality of the workman ship, I think the question is what decisions the Navy has made to build this type of ship, the decisions we collectively made as to how we were going to build them in sequence, design and changes, thats not unusual, Greenert said. We need to take them deliberately and seriously and we are in as much of a partnership as we can with the General Accounting Office. Ultimately, the Navy is committed to the LCS Greenert said. This class of ship is so important to us, for its modularity, its speed, its volume, Greenert said. I came here to see how are the changes coming around, what is the rela tionship more long term, Greenert said to report ers at the conclusion of his confidence visit and tour of Marinette Marine. Were only in the start ing pieces of this long program. -Photo by MC1 Peter D. LawlorChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert tours the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard to view the construction progress of multiple Freedom-class variants of the littoral combat ship (LCS) in various stages of completion. While touring the facilities, Greenert also observed improvements made to the shipyard's manufacturing facilities, which has resulted in the more efficient production of future LCS models. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 7

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Mayport Gives Blood To Save Lives -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSailors and government employees assigned to Naval Station Mayport donate blood during a American Red Cross blood drive. The American Red Cross prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. Navy Gateway Inns and Suites Partners With Commercial Hotels To Save Travel DollarsFrom Commander, Navy Installation Command Navy Lodging Program OfficeThe Navys primary lodging facilities for travelers on official orders (also available to Department of Defense (DoD) travelers), Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS), is expanding lodging opportunities. NGIS is partnering with commercial hotels in close proximity to Navy installations to accommodate guests when on base DoD government lodging is at full occupancy. Currently, DoD travelers on official orders to an installation may encounter an NGIS with no lodging availability. Travelers are then required to locate a local commercial hotel on their own after receiving a Certificate of Non-Availability (CNA). NGIS is taking on that responsibility for the traveler. In certain markets, this can be quite a challenge. First, the traveler must find a commercial prop erty within a short com mute to the base with a rate of per diem or lower, and most importantly; safe to reside in during their temporary duty. The Navy Lodging Program has seen the hurdles travelers face and has imple mented a solution by partnering with commer cial hotels. Our priority is to maximize on-base DoD gov ernment lodging and then also to provide safe, secure hotels that meet our DoD traveler requirements by establishing relationships with com mercial hotel partners in close proximity of the Navy base, said Tamara Davis, Navy Lodging Program manager. Travelers do not have to worry about finding lodging on their own in an area they are not familiar with, or being placed in a hotel that is less than desirable, thats what the Navy Lodging Program mission is to take care of our travelers whether theyre staying on base or off base. The Navy Commercial Lodging Programs hotel partners must meet established criteria. This cri terion involves passing an annual inspection to ensure the property meets DOD Lodging Standards and DoD Fire, Safety and Health criteria, with con tracted room rates at per diem or lower, and be within a 30 minute com mute for the traveler. Prior to a TDY traveler receiv ing a CNA for commer cial lodging the following steps will be followed: (1) Check availability at NGIS (On base lodging); (2) if no availability at NGIS, Navy Lodge will be contacted; (3) if no avail ability at Navy Lodge and there is no commercial lodging program, the traveler will receive a CNA requiring the traveler to locate a hotel within per diem. The Navy Commercial Lodging Program intro duces multiple ben efits for travelers: conve nience, safety, travel sav ings and mission accom plishment. This program has proven very suc cessful in markets such as Guam; Washington, D.C.; Bethesda, Md.; Fort Worth, Texas; Jacksonville and Mayport, Fla.; Seal Beach and San Diego, Calif. As the Navy Commercial Lodging Program continues to expand to new mar kets/locations, travelers will be assured of lodg ing accommodations to meet their travel needs with one phone call to 1-877-NAVY-BED. NGIS Commercial Lodging Partnership Program also generates revenue which supports the NGIS lodging pro grams at headquarters and at the installation. For NGIS reservations and locations, visit http:// ngis.dodlodging.net/. For more news from Commander, Navy Installations Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/ cni 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Navy Satellite Launch Boosts Satellite CommunicationsSpace and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public AffairsThe Navys second Mobile User Objective System satellite was launched today at 9:00 a.m. EDT from Space Launch Complex 41. The successful launch repre sents a key step in providing enhanced satellite communications for the Navy and Department of Defense (DoD). MUOS is a next-gener ation narrowband tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyondline-of-sight communica tions for U.S. forces on the move. MUOS will provide military users 10 times more communications capacity over the exist ing system by leveraging 3G mobile technology, including simultaneous voice and data capability. The MUOS-2 launch is an especially significant event for the program because not only are we launching the second satellite, but the ground system, the networking software and the wave form are all aligning at the same time, explained Navy Cmdr. Matt Bohlin, the MUOS principal assistant program manager. With MUOS-2 on-orbit this fall, well be testing the full system with all the new capabilities that it brings to the warfighter. The first MUOS satel lite, launched in February 2012 and accepted for operational use by U.S. Strategic Command in November, has been pro viding high quality voice communications for users. The Navy plays a key role in national space efforts by providing nar rowband satellite com munications for the DoD and other government agencies. MUOS satellite communications capabil ity is designed for mobile users who require highspeed mission data with higher data rates and improved operational availability. Bohlin says users requiring these essential services will soon see significantly improved ben efits when the full system suite comes on-line. Users are going to notice more bandwidth that is accessible on demand as opposed to preplanned channels, better voice quality and better connectivity while not being impacted by remote regions, urban environments or inclem ent weather. he said. It will be a revolutionary leap for satellite commu nications for DoD. With current capability, tactical users have limit ed access to narrowband satellite communications, and channels must be preplanned and allocated. Additionally, dismounted users had to be stationary to acquire the satellite. With MUOS, users will have access on demand and be able to use the service while on the move and in all environments and weather to talk to beyond-line-of-sight recipients, whether they are on the other side of a mountain or the other side of the world. Services will also be available for platforms such as ships, aircraft and vehicles. Over the next sev eral days, the satellite, which functions much like a cell tower in space, will transition to its geo synchronous orbit loca tion 22,000 miles above the earth. Its solar arrays and mesh antennas will then be deployed and onorbit testing will begin for eventual commissioning into service. The constellation of four satellites and one on-orbit spare will extend narrowband communica tions availability well past 2025. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, the Navys Program Executive Office for Space Systems, Chantilly, Va., and its Communications Satellite Program Office, San Diego, are responsible for the MUOS program. Additional imagery, videos and launch cover age can be found at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command web site link here www.public. navy.mil/spawar/Press/ Pages/MUOS-2.aspx.nav-Photo courtesy of NASA by Patrick H. Corkery An Atlas V rocket launches the Navys Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) 2 satellite from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. MUOS is a next-generation narrow band tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyond-line-of-sight communications for U.S. forces on the move. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 9

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Aquatics Aug. 5: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug. 2 & 3 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Intramural Sports Aug. 10: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 2. 270-5451 Aug. 13: Go the Distance 10K/5K Run 8 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 13: Intramural Flag Football Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451 Aug. 20: 3v3 Fall Soccer Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins Aug. 26; end Oct. 21. 270-5451 Aug. 26-28: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. MWR Sports/FitnessAug. 2: Outdoor MoviesOz the Great and Powerful (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 5: Missoula Childrens Theatre Snow White & The Seven Dwarves Auditions Aug. 9: Outdoor MoviesThe Croods (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 16: Outdoor MoviesThe Goonies (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Aug. 23: Outdoor MoviesBrave (PG). Intramural Soccer Match -Photos courtesy of MWRTeam America from COMNAVSOU/4F faced off against the Coast Guard team in the Intramural Championship Soccer Match on Friday, July 26. Coast Guard won 9-1 to win both the league regular season and the tournament championship. Team America took second place in both. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Auto Skills Center July Special: 10 percent off all vehicle lifts plus free vehicle diagnostic for most vehicles. 270-5392 August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rota tion and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Aug. 3: UFC 163-Aldo vs. Korean Zombie. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 4: NFL PreSeason Kick Off Party. 8 pm kick-off Miami vs. Dallas. Drink Specials and free prize pool. 270-7205 Aug. 7: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 Aug. 16: 80s Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. 80s Costume Contest, 80s music and trivia, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Aug. 21: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Legoland Florida Special. All active duty military receive one FREE Water Park Combo Ticket. Free ticket can be redeemed at the front gate. Family members can purchase discounted tickets at ITT. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you pur chase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes pre ferred seating, Knights Cheering banner, com memorative program and more! 270-5145 Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale NOW Purchase your tickets for the 2013 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in August: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 26: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. July 27: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 28: Ichnetucknee Springs Tubing Trip. Cost $5. Sign up by July 24. Van departs Liberty Center 7 a.m. July 29: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. July 30: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 31: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 2: Thrift Shop Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. Aug. 4: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 5: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 7: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! Aug. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $13. Aug. 10: Jacksonville Roller Girls Roller Derby. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 11: Adventure Landing Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 12: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 14: Laser Tag. 6-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. FREE Aug. 16: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $5; sign up by Aug. 14. Aug. 18: A Day at the Beach: Huguenot Park. Van departs 9 a.m. Aug. 19: Nerf Sniper. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Aug. 10. Aug. 22: Hooters Dinner Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Transportation only. Aug. 24: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles. Van Departs 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Aug. 26: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 11

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Military Spouse Vendor Show Come out to the Mayport USO on Aug. 3 and check out a variety of vendors and support your local military spouses and their small businesses. There will be $1 raffles drawn every half hour and food available for purchase from the USO. Check out all the fabulous items available. For more information, contact mil wivesbusinessesande vents@gmail.com. Back To School Drive Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is collecting school supplies for our deserving junior families to help get their children ready for school this year. If you can help, please bring your donated school supplies to either Mayport or NAS Jax USO centers between now and Aug. 9. We are asking for any school necessities such as pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, back packs, glue/sticks, two pocket three-prong folders, rulers, lunch boxes, etc. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game sea son. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOCrenshaw Recognition Ceremony To Honor Vets Through Operation Desert Shield/StormFrom the office of Congressman Ander CrenshawApplications available for veterans not previously honored Congressman Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced on July 12 that his 2013 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor veterans and active duty members who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The application deadline for those who have not previously been recognized with Special Recognition Certificate is Oct. 4. The ceremony will be held in November at a date to be announced later this summer. The Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony is one of the highlights of my year and provides a welcome opportunity to honor those servicemen and women who put their lives on the line to protect our freedom and democ racy, said Crenshaw. The annual event shows our appreciation for those who answered the call of duty, and I encourage all who think they may be eligible to fill out an application. Through the years, Congressman Crenshaw has recognized thousands of veterans who served from the 1940s through Desert Storm. However, some vet erans who served dur ing this time period may not have been hon ored because Federal Congressional district lines were redrawn at the beginning of 2013 and eligible veterans did not previously live in the Fourth Congressional District. Veterans who served from World War II through Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm, live in the Fourth Congressional District, and would like to participate are encouraged to contact Congressman Crenshaws District Office in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481 or go to his official web site at Crenshaw. house.gov to obtain an application. Click on Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly on the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applica tions and proof of eligi bility should be mailed to the following address: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. The application deadline is Oct. 4. To determine eligibil ity for the certificate, vet erans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Active duty members who wear the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.Children Of Fallen Patriots Seeks Community Involvement To Find Deserving FamiliesDirector of Strategic Partnerships Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation is an organization that provides college scholar ships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. We need the help of local communities to help us find and support the families that have lost a loved one during active duty. One of the challenges CFPF face is finding the children who deserve our Grants and Scholarship. *Due to privacy laws it is very difficult for military aid orga nizations to find families who have lost a loved one. *Because no central directory of help exists, it is difficult for families to find our organization *Finally, most surviving families have young children when their loved one is killed and move back home and away from the military support net work. Thus thousands of deserving children are slipping through the cracks. Our experience has proven that even when families are able to find aid, there is a persistent gap between funding and college costs. Our objec tive is to streamline this very complicated, burdensome and insufficient process for our families. CFPF is an organization that provides college scholarships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. Our vision is that every such child can have a debt-free col lege education. Im sure you would agree that these families have given the ultimate sacrifice by losing their Mother or Father while they protect our freedoms. Sometimes, these families are soon forgotten and we want to make sure that this is NEVER the case! One of the most fan tastic tidbits about CFPF is that 100 percent, yes 100 per cent of all donations goes to the programs. Our generous board, which includes General Petraeuss Wife, pays for ALL administrative costs! This is very unique in the nonprofit sector. We have a staff of seven, which includes two graduates and recipients of Children of Fallen Patriots grants. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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4th Fleet Team Helping Honduran Hospital U.S. 4th Fleet public affairsMilitary members from various medical com mands came together to conduct a five-day Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE) and water purification system installation with assis tance from the WaterStep company at Hospital de Area de Puerto Cortes. The exchange was a great success. We accom plished on a micro scale, exactly what we hoped to do on a macro scale with USNS Comfort, Capt, Kevin Knoop, Commanding Officer of the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) said. COMFORT was sched uled to deploy to the region this summer to work with partner nations as party of Continuing Promise 2013 to provide medical services and mutual training but was cancelled due federal budget cuts. A reduced team of medical professionals went to Honduras to provide medical support as much as possible. We had precious little time and a small team, but somehow man aged to assess the medical capabilities, identify areas that future mis sions could assist the hospital with, built rela tionships with the local health care community, consult on patient care alongside local providers, and catalyze the forma tion of relationships with the WaterStep program. The next event can pick up where our trailblazing team left off and take it to the next level, Knoop said. The medical team identified proper treatment procedures for patients and implemented chang es immediately. The hospital redesigned the emergency department creating a trauma bay and expanding space for minor emergencies and improving flow and effi ciency. Along with that, they also provided train ing to nurses on triage and proper patient flow. I am very pleased to be able to facilitate sending service mem bers to the public hos pital in Puerto Cortes, Honduras. Conducting exchanges like this is the least we can do with the USNS Comfort not able to deploy this year for Continuing Promise due to federal budget cuts. We are still committed to our partners in the region and engaging with them as much as possible to foster that very commitment. The Navy doctors were very respectful and made suggestions very dip lomatic in reference to patient management, Dr. Guillermo Saenz, Liaison Medical Officer Medical Element, JTF-Bravo, Honduras said. The team helped train students to assist with dental procedures expanding capacity in their dental clinic also assisting with Orthopedic and OB/GYN surgeries. The Navy sent a mul tidisciplinary team of medical professionals composed of a dietician, nurse, dental hygien ist, preventive medicine techs, industrial hygienist, Obstetrician, orthopedic traumatologist and emer gency medicine special ists to exchange experi ences and information and to build partnerships. This is what the mission is all about, and we were highly successful! I was proud to be a part of this amazing and diverse team on this mission, Knoop said. Along with the mili tary doctors two Hospital Corpsmen assisted the company WaterStep with the installation of a water purification sys tem. WaterStep is a NonGovernment Organization (NGO) that works world wide to help bring people water purification sys tems. The water created by the system at the hos pital will be used to help not only treat patients but also give them something safe to drink. -Photos by MC2 Adam HendersonNavy Captain Kevin Knoop, commanding officer of hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20), and medical student Shellsea Portillo examine a patient that was brought into the emergency room for treatment. Knoop was at the local hospital conducting a U.S. 4th Fleet medical Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE) with Honduran medical professionals. U.S. Navy nurse Lt. Cmdr. Rosa Abbott discusses proper handling and caring for patient's with nurses from the public hospital in Puerto Cortes. Clinic Awarded For Care Of German SailorNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport was recent ly recognized for coordinating and managing the transporta tion and care of a German sailor aboard the research vessel WFS Planet, who became critically ill during German sea maneuvers off the Atlantic coast. During a small ceremo ny May 24 at Naval Station Mayport, aboard the German fleet auxiliary ship FGS Main, Cmdr. Michael Service, NBHC Mayport officer in charge, was presented a plaque in rec ognition of NBHC Mayports exceptional medical manage ment of the ill German sailor. The plaque was presented by the 1st German Submarine Squadron Commanding Officer, Commander (Senior Grade) Sascha Rackwitz. On April 16 the German sail or developed an urgent lifethreatening medical condition and through the coordination by the NBHC team, was mede vaced from his ship to Shands Jacksonville Medical Center by an SH-60B helicopter assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) Squadron 46. Answering the call to sup port the warfighter is our pri mary mission and displays the diversity of Navy Medicine, said Service. Our first con cerns were the health and logistics of the sailor involved. Coordinating medical assis tance was our next concern. Timely and effective medical evacuation of the sailor, from his assigned ship to a treatment facility, was essential for ensuring the best practical outcome for the sailor. The NBHC Mayport team assumed direct lead of the sailors case management throughout his entire illness and recovery, with Service assuming duties as clinical provider and primary medical liaison between the U.S. Navy, the German fleet and German embassy, in regards to the sail ors diagnosis, treatment and progress. Upon the sailors discharge from Shands, NBHC Mayport, along with Commander U.S. 4th Fleet surgeon, collaborated with their German medical counterparts, to ensure the sailors safe return to Germany. In a second ceremony, NBHC Mayport also received recog nition from Capt. Ross Ferris, commanding officer of the Royal Fleet auxiliary ship RFA Wave Night, for supporting the medical needs of Wave Nights crew during their visit to NS Mayport. German vessels WFS Planet, submarine U 32 and their sup port ship FGS Main departed their homeport of Eckernfrde, a small north Germany port city, in mid-February to participate in exercises and maneu vers with U.S. Armed Forces, and is expected to return to Eckernfrde by the end of August. NBHC Mayport is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient popula tionabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guards men and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax.Protect Your Skin Against Cancer This Summer SeasonFrom TRICARESpending time out doors is a great way to enjoy the warmer weath er and get exercise. Blue skies and high tempera tures bring people out to parks, pools and beaches wearing summer clothing and exposing more skin. Enjoying the sunshine is nice, but too much can be a bad thing. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) skin cancer is the most common form of cancer overall in the United States. Melanoma is not the most common form of skin cancer, but it is the most dangerous and accounts for the most skin cancer-related deaths. It can advance rapidly and spread to other parts of the body, making it hard er to treat, but is preventable and can be treated effectively if detected early. The leading cause of melanoma is over-expo sure to sunlight, spe cifically ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. UV rays damage the skins abil ity to heal and produce healthy, new cells. The damaged cells mutate and grow into tumors, visible as dark spots, lesions or moles on the skin. Anyone who notices any change on their skin, including changes to already existing moles and lesions, should talk with their doctor. Remember the American Cancer Societys ABCs when noticing a mole: A stands for Asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half. B for Border irregular ity: The edges of the mole are irregular, ragged, blurred, or notched. C for Color: The color over the mole is not the same all over. There may be shades of tan, brown, or black. D is for Diameter: The mole is larger than about one-quarter inch about the size of a pencil eraser; although it is possible for melanomas to be smaller. Its a common miscon ception that people with darker complexions are not susceptible to skin cancers. Although skin cancer is more common in people with fairer skin and features, anyone can develop skin cancer. While some forms of skin cancer develop because of genetics, most other forms can be pre vented. Start sun pro tective measures early because a majority of sun exposure occurs dur ing childhood and early adulthood and exposure to sunlight is the lead ing cause of skin cancer. Just one severe sun burn increases the risk of developing skin cancer. CDC recommends cov ering exposed skin with loose fitting clothing, wearing a hat and sun glasses, and using sun screen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 during any out side activity. Sun expo sure is the most hazard ous between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when UV rays are the strongest. Getting into the shade during these peak hours is another effective way to prevent skin cancer. One of the preventive services TRICARE covers is skin cancer screenings for beneficiaries with a family or personal history of skin cancer, increased occupational or recreational exposure to sun light or clinical evidence of precursor lesions. For more information about preventive skin cancer screenings, visitwww.tri care.mil/preventiveser vices and select skin cancer exams. However, anyone can have a suspicious lesion evaluated, no matter their family, occupational or recreational history. Following CDC recom mendations for avoiding sun exposure is an easy way to prevent skin can cer. Be sure to look for signs of skin cancer and report any changes to a doctor. For more infor mation about skin cancer and prevention go to www.cdc.gov/cancer/ skin. Branch Health Clinic Appointments542-4677 Going to be late? Call to re-schedule. Quality Ctrl Digital QC Proofreader Art Director CopyWriter Creative Dir Acct Exec Print Prod Print/Export Time: 11/7/05 1:29 PM Print Scale: 100% User Name: carl.ellis Proof #: 3 PM: Peter Fay InDesign Version: CS Document Name: IG_N05AC001_110_Lost.indd Document Path: Retouching:-Work In Progess:Ad Council:IG_N05AC001_110_AdCouncil:IG_N05AC001_110_Lost.indd Font Family: Helvetica (Medium Condensed; Type 1) Ink Name: Process Cyan, Process Magenta, Process Yellow, Process BlackLink Name: IG_Ad_Council_Spare_gray.tif (Up to Date; 11.7MB; Gray; 474 ppi), AdCouncil.org_white.eps (Up to Date; 270KB) Client: Ad Council (AC) Product: General (GEN) Job #: N05AC001 Ad #: 110 Headline: Lost...Spare Tire Visual: Poster w/stomach Space/Color: Fractional B/W Non-Bleed Publication: Various 2005 Bleed: 0 in x 0 in Trim: 3.75 in x 7 in Live: 0 in x 0 in Gutter: None AD: T. Dillingham CW: N/A CD: N/A AP: A. Kaye PP: M. 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14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 1, 2013 FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 1, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 1, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 1, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 1, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 5, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Aug. 5-9, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 7, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 7, 11 a.m.-noon, Banking and Financial Services FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 7, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Aug. 8, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 8, 1-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 8, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Aug. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Aug. 12, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Aug. 12, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, Room 702 Aug. 12-13, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Higher Education FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 14, 9 a.m.noon, Resume Writing Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Aug. 14, 11 a.m.-noon, Money and the Move FFSC Building 1 Room 719 Aug. 15, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 CNRSE Family Readiness Program Conducts Emergency Response ExerciseNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsCommander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness Program hosted phase two of an Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exer cise at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville July 17. The training was an installment of a three-phase exercise designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks following the landfall of a hurricane. Phase I, conducted on May 30, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, as well as installation and training officers and emergency management personnel from all three bases. Phase II incorporated a variety of addi tional base organizations, such as the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Navy Legal Service Office, Navy Gateway Inns and Suites, base housing and many others. This training is vital because its not a matter of if one of our installations will be affected by a hurricane, its a matter of when, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. Our ability to bring together multiple organizations and people to work as a cohe sive unit is crucial to our recovery efforts in this kind of scenario, and I think training like this has a huge impact on our ability to respond when the real thing does happen. The EFAC exercise is essential ly a continuation of the regions HURREX 2013, which tested the regions hurricane prepared ness through a scenario involv ing multiple simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. While HURREX focused on prelandfall preparations, the EFAC exercise was designed to focus on the recovery phase of disaster response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to landfall and each base suffered extensive flooding damage as the simulat ed storm passed. FFSC personnel from all three participating bases worked with emergency man agement, training personnel and other installation departments to establish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. Phase II of this exercise had a lot more moving pieces due to the fact that we brought in a variety of additional agencies to participate, said Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness Program work and family life coordinator. To incorpo rate all these different people into this exercise is invaluable because we will be working together in the event of a real disaster and establishing roles, responsibilities and relationships is crucial. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emergency response personnel to provide a wide range of support servic es for affected family members. According to Lucius, much of that support is managed through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment por tion of NFAAS and specify what they need, then our case manag ers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the appropriate resources, she said. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC per sonnel to assess needs after a disaster, people can also come directly to the EFAC for assistance, Lucius added. Circumstances can change very quickly in the days and weeks following a hurricane, so our recovery efforts need to be flexible and our services have to be adjusted accordingly, Lucius said. Its important for us to identify exactly who we need to have in the EFAC based on what peoples needs are. The EFAC is not staffed with only FFSC personnel, but there are a lot of other organizations involved, such as chaplains, medical, legal, housing and a long list of others. Part of this exercise is to establish a clearer picture of what resources we are likely to need in the EFAC at different times in the recovery process. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agen cies and local officials in order to get people the help they need. Lucius said most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world scenario occurs. The nature of an emergency or crisis event is that of unpre dictability, she said. However, even though things will inevitably happen that we dont necessar ily expect, we still need to have a plan in place so that our people are confident in themselves, confident in their leadership and confident in the plan. Lucius said training like this is essential for preparing emergen cy management and FFSC per sonnel for an actual event, but it is equally as important for fam ily members and dependents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be con tacted and they know how to contact somebody for help, she said. While phase II of the exercise included about 30 more partici pants than phase I, phase III of the exercise will expand even further and will include a number of civilian agencies and organizations, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and government civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily.navy.mil where they can update their con tact information, report their sta tus or submit a needs assessment. For more information about hurricane readiness or NFAAC, contact your local FFSC. Saturday, Aug. 3 First Missionary Baptist Church is doing a UNITY Day from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at 850 Fifth Ave South, Jacksonville Beach, Florida 32250. Free food and school supplies. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a walk on the beach as they explain the importance of unde veloped beach habitat, including many interest ing facts about sea crea tures and common shells found in the area. Bring sunscreen and water. The program will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reservations are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. Aug. 3-4 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event on Saturday, Aug. 3, 9 a.m. 5 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 4, 9 a.m. noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cook ing and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, fam ily friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Tuesday, Aug. 6 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. Karen Stephenson, who has won many pho tographic competitions will present on the subject of How to prepare and submit for print competi tion. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types welcomed and encour aged to come and learn more about photography. For more information www.beachesphotogra phyclub.org Chabad @ the Beaches is offering a Hebrew Reading Crash Course to all members of the Jewish community. The course is designed to teach those with no basic knowledge of the Hebrew language how to read Hebrew in five easy lessons. Chabad @ the Beaches is offering the course in an effort to assist those in the com munity with a desire to learn to read Hebrew and learn to follow along in the Siddur/Prayer book. The five-week Hebrew Reading Crash Course, will be held on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. The Course begins on Aug. 6 at the Aaron and Blanche Scharf Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Ponte Vedra. The hebrew read ing crash course is geared toward beginners, as well as those who sometimes attend services, but feel left out, unable to fol low or appreciate the lit urgy. For more informa tion about the Hebrew Reading Crash Course call Rabbi Eli at Chabad @ the Beaches at 543.9301. The cost of this five week course is $50 for new comers $25 for returnees, scholarships available call for details, as always nobody will be turned away due to an inability to pay. For more information about the Hebrew Reading Crash Course call Chabad @ the Beaches at 543-9301 or visit www. ChabadBeaches.com/ LearnHebrew Thursday, Aug. 8 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a workshop on Gardening Tips for Hot Weather plus Managing Pest Problems from 6:30 8:30 pm at the Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd. This is a free program. Come learn gardening tips for the summer heat and what to do with those pests in your landscape. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Saturday, Aug. 10 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This prog ram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Thursday, Aug.15 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a free workshop on Do it Yourself Irrigation Repairs to Save Money at S. Mandarin Branch Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, Fl. The time is 6:30 8:30 p.m. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Learn handson ideas. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Aug. 16 & 17 The Englewood High School Class of 1973 has finalized plans for their 40 year High School Reunion in Jacksonville, FL on the Southbank of the St Johns River. Dont miss out on this great event! Mail your check today for $75 per person to EHS Jay Kauffman, 8058 Newton Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32216 (Jay 904.982.2701). Please prepay your Saturday night reservation to insure there is enough food for everyone. Questions? Jay 904-982-2701, Amy 904-629-9222. More info on Facebook: search Englewood High School Class of 1973. www.face book.com/groups/26228 1106060/10151708392646 061/?notif_t=group_activ ity Saturday, Aug. 17 Ever dreamed of getting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photogra pher at 11 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn tech niques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Please bring your own camera and pho tography supplies, sturdy shoes, bug spray, sun screen and water. Space is limited on this program to 10 participants. Please RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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