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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

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Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
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Jacksonville, FL
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March 11, 2013
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University of Florida
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Material Information

Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00308


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com CNO Updates Status Of The Navy Defense Media Activity NavyChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert dis cussed the status of the fleet, readiness impact due to sequestration, and modifications to Navy policies at a press conference July 19 at the Pentagon. Presence remains our mandate, Greenert said. This is what we are mostly about, and its an essential element of our defense strategic guid ance. Greenert pointed out that the Navy has about 95 ships deployed and about 3,700 operational aircraft. The current ship count in the Mediterranean has been higher than it has been through the years. USS Kearsarge and USS San Antonio are posi tioned in the Red Sea and stand ready with a range of missions and opera tions if required. USS Nimitz is deployed to the North Arabian Sea sup porting ground opera tions in Afghanistan with close air support, and piracy in the region is slowly increasing and is becoming more of a con cern. In the Pacific theater, Talisman Saber Exercise, started July 14, off the coast of Australia and in the Coral Sea. TS13 is an ongoing biennial train ing exercise with Australia and currently has George Washington Carrier Strike Group and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group assets par ticipating. In the Southern Command, sequestration has caused the reduction to zero combat ships in the region. There are other naval forces in the region, Greenert said. Noncombatant ships and other forces. The Navys first spear head class joint high speed vessel will deploy to the Southern Command area of operation in FY 14. Presence forward, assuring our allies and deterring potential adver saries is our primary func tion, Greenert said. I think we are out there at the, what I call, the mari time crossroads where it matters, when it matters. CNO addressed the readiness impact of sequestration for FY 13 and FY 14. There is one carrier strike group (CSG) and one amphibious ready group (ARG) deployed to the each of the Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific theaters. However, the surge force is a concern, Greenert said. Currently, there is only CSG and one ARG ready to surge if needed. A year ago, the Navy had three Presence Remains Our Mandate-CNO Greenert Meteorologist Keeps Watch On Weather 4th Fleet public affairsWith Hurricane season in full swing Commander, U.S. Naval Southern Command/ U.S. Fourth Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris relies on Meteorologist and Oceanography (METOC) specialists to keep U.S. 4th Fleet updated on current weather situations both in Mayport and downrange. The C4F METOC division produces thresholdbased daily forecasts to keep commanders informed of significant weather in South and Central America and the Caribbean Sea and its expected effects on mari time assets operating there. The forecasts sup port daily briefs and is amended or supplement ed by the METOC staff when short-term changes in weather occur. Like all num bered fleets, 4th Fleet is assigned its own weather staff to support the plan ning process for future missions and to keep the Admiral informed of emergent weather con ditions affecting current naval activities in the U.S. Southern Command operating area, Lt. Cmdr. Russell Ingersoll, 4th Fleet METOC officer, said. Our Meteorological team at 4th Fleet is abso lutely essential in sup porting our mission and lines of operations; conducting security coopera tion activities, maritime security and contingency operations, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. Marine weather fore casting is vital to 4th Fleet operations and to the safety of the fleet. 4th Fleet METOC works with other agencies to continuously create weather models and pre dictions. There is continu ous coordination with the Southern weather office about significant weather in the AOR and how it may affect mis sions. With respect to hurricanes approach ing the Caribbean and/ or Florida, where our headquarters is located, the C4F METOC divi sion communicates with the National Hurricane Center in Miami and Fleet Weather Center Norfolk in order to coordinate hur ricane track forecasts and the anticipated effects those storms may have on naval facilities and afloat Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonMeteorologist/Oceanographer Officers Lt. Cmdr. Russel Ingersol and Lt. Kirsten Paulaitis brief Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet, about poten tial tracks of tropical storm Chantal in the Atlantic Ocean as the storm began to break up as it passed over the island of Hispanola. 4th Fleet is responsible for evacuating ships in Mayport in case of bad weather as the Senior Officer Present Afloat (SOPA).Gettysburg Sets Sail With Ike CSG USS Gettysburg PAOGuided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) departed Naval Station Mayport Monday to join the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on a scheduled deployment to the 6th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility. Gettysburg has been actively preparing for this deployment with Carrier Strike Group 10 assets, participating in sev eral exercises to prepare the ship and Sailors for deployment overseas. Our Sailors have con tinued to push themselves through these past few months, achieving incredible levels of success and competency with their systems, said Lt. Scott Jones, Gettysburgs com bat systems officer. With a modern AEGIS weapon system and embarked Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) 74, Det. 2, Gettysburgs training has developed a unique diversity of capa bilities for the upcoming deployment. This deployment will give us the opportunity to use the skills weve trained to develop, said Ensign William OQuinn, anti-submarine warfare officer. The crew has partici pated in several exercises and looks forward to the port visits and operational experience, OQuinn added. This will be my first deployment and, like hundreds of my ship mates, I am ready and eager to go. While the Sailors are deployed, families and friends of Gettysburg will continue their support at home. Partnered with the Daytona Navy League, the Navy Wounded Warrior/ Safe Harbor Office, Operation Gratitude, United Through Reading and several other orga nizations, members of the Gettysburg Family Readiness Group (FRG) will continue to provide support and service. Gettysburg, named for the Civil War battle, will join aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56), and guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84). -Photo by Stefanie SandersThe Sailors of USS Gettysburg man the rails as the ship sails past the Jetties heading out to meet the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on July 22. Gettysburg will be deployed for nine months to the 6th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility. See more on Gettysburg, Page 11.See CNO, Page 9 See Weather, Page 9

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Wouldnt it be nice if your job required you to sit on a beach every day sipping some exotic drink while relaxing in the sun? Keep dreaming! You probably have to work long stressful hours to compensate for man ning shortages and con stant pushes to do more with less. You also likely have to deal with the frus tration of working in a bureaucracy, with all the red tape and inefficiency. For most of us, the dream of a stress free life will probably stay as just a dream for a long time. Stress is a normal part of life. A little is good for us, but often we deal with more than is healthy. Unfortunately it is sometimes difficult to reduce stressors in our lives. As a result we may just try to tough it out and carry the extra load. The problem is that if you carry your load (even if it is not over whelming) for too long without some sort of rest, eventually you will begin to break down emotion ally. Whether the stress comes from difficult life events (such as relation ship problems, death of a loved one, or work related issues), burnout (from persistent stress in the daily routine), or from compassion fatigue (from constantly pouring your self into others emotion ally), it can have negative effects and diminish your level of functioning. Many people deal with stress by distract ing themselves from it. It is common for people to turn to alcohol, drugs, gambling, sexual diver sions, unhealthy eating habits, or other damag ing behavior to cope with stress. Unfortunately these do not alleviate stress. They simply post pone it and may actually increase the stress. While there are many healthy and effective ways to deal with stress in the moment when it hits hardest, it is much more effective to start dealing with stress before it hits. Since you can plan on stress being part of your life, why not adjust your lifestyle to prepare for stress? In much the same way that physical train ing helps you to prepare physically for running a marathon, it is also pos sible to get yourself in shape emotionally to increase mental endur ance and emotional stamina. Here are four evidence based lifestyle changes you can make to increase your stress resil ience: Health Everyone knows that exercising can help reduce stress, but it also can increase your capacity to carry stress and still feel good. In addition to exercise, other healthy practices such as a nutritious diet, good sleep hygiene, and avoidance of addictive chemicals can improve physical and psychologi cal endurance, and gener ate a feeling of wellbeing. We all know the things we should be doing to be healthier. The challenge is getting the motivation to do them. You can start by making simple goals that can increase your momentum such as Eat breakfast, or Take the stairs instead of the eleva tor. As you see success with your small goals, gradually make them bigger. HumorSometimes laughter really is the best medicine. Studies have shown that laughter can boost the immune and circulatory sys tems, improve digestion, stimulate the release of endorphins, relax mus cles, relieve pain, bal ance blood pressure, and improve mental functioning. It also relieves stress, improves sleep, uplifts your attitude, strengthens relationships, and makes you feel good. Smiling has many of the same effects as laughter, and they both work even if you are faking it! Increase the amount of laughter in your day and your abil ity to deal with stress will improve. SpiritualityStudies show that people who have strong spiritual ity are healthier, happier, more confident, do bet ter in school and work, and are more resilient to stress. Spirituality is not necessarily the same as religion. Religion can be a great source of spiritu ality, but there are other ways to be a spiritual per son. Spirituality helps you find meaning and direction in life. It creates a sense of awe and appreciation in life and connec tion to something greater than yourself. In a world where we are surrounded by noise, it is vital to take time to quiet your mind so that you can focus on what is important. Self CareUsed here, self care simply means intentionally making time to take care of yourself emotionally. This may include prayer/medita tion, yoga, guided relax ation, or other types of therapeutic relaxation. Or it may be something as simple as taking walks, stargazing, or spending time in nature. The important thing is that you create rituals that will help you recharge and refocus. Make them a regular part of your life style, and you will build your stress resilience. Chap Justin Top CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHealth, Humor, Faith To Combat StressWith so many com mands deployed or about to be deployed at this time, the emotional effects may be impacting your child. While most military dependents are able to deal well with a deployment of a parent, other children may exhib it behavioral changes. While a military parent may understand a childs reactions to deployment and have learned to spot these reactions, the par ent may not know how to address them. First and foremost you need to seek help for the child. While emotional responses vary from child to child, there are some similarities in how chil dren feel when their lives are impacted by a deploy ment, especially to a war zone. Some common responses include the following: Limiting exposure to media coverage of the war will help the child feel encouraged and safe at a time when the world seems a dangerous place. If the child is exhibit ing these responses and seems to need help beyond what you can provide or the school, there are resources available to the military family to pro vide help for your child and you. Take advantage of exist ing supports which are provided by a number of organizations. The Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) offer various programs which range from crisis and information, to stress management and par enting workshops. Each center has professional counselors available for individual and fam ily consultations. It is part of the Fleet and Family Support Centers mission to ensure that Navy fami lies have the support they need to deal with a childs response to deployment. Contact the FFSC at NS Mayport by calling 904270-6600. Military OneSource provides access to faceto-face counseling; shortterm solution-focused telephone consultation; and online consultation for Active Duty, Guard, Reserve (regardless of activation status), and their families. Contact Military OneSource 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-800-342-9647 or www.militaryonesource. com. The Military and Family Life Consultant Program also provides short-term, situational, problem-solving coun seling services to Active Duty, Guard, Reserve, and their families. This pro gram addresses the mili tarys impact on children, and their services can be provided on or off military installations. Contact Dr. Mia Wilson, Child and Youth Specialist MFLC, at 904-741-7842. Extra support, con sistency, empathy, and patience will help your child to return to his/ her more usual behav ior patterns. And while it is difficult to do during the summer, try to keep to an existing sched ule. Children of all ages thrive on routine, but this is especially important during times of change. Bedtimes, mealtimes, and required chores should remain predictable. But while you are pro viding extra help to your child, dont forget to take time for yourself. You, too, are dealing with your own reactions to the situation. The organizations indicated above will also provide assistance to you in dealing with not only your childs reactions but yours too. Self care is one of the most important and often the most forgot ten things you can do as a parent who is carrying the load while a spouse is deployed. When your needs are taken care of, your child will benefit as well. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingResources For Family Deployment IssuesMom! Can you help me?! I hear that phrase throughout the day, invariably bellowed from some other room in the house while Im trying to cook, clean, answer emails, put away grocer ies, fold laundry, take a shower, write my column, or watch a DVRed episode of The Bachelorette while savoring an afternoon cup of microwaved coffee. Summertime exacer bates this annoying phe nomenon, because I cant drop my kids off at school to get them out of my hair for a few cotton-picking minutes. Ironically, the two teens, while claiming complete autonomy, seem particularly depen dent on me to wake them, feed them, entertain them, stop them from frying their brains in front of the television, and remind them to shower. Theres no doubt about it: my husband works very hard to support our fam ily. However, he tends to add to my burden at home by being endless ly hungry, inordinately hairy, and pretty much clueless when it comes to using the remote. To make matters a tad [read: a gazillion times] worse, we just moved from Florida to Rhode Island a few weeks ago. It is our ninth military move, so youd think wed have it down pat by now. However, here it is, nearly three weeks after the movers dropped off all of our worldly pos sessions, and were still eating off of paper plates because no one has vol unteered to unpack the dish box. Were drying ourselves with wash clothes because no one has found the towels. Weve even resorted to writing down Googled information on some thing called a piece of paper, with something called a pencil, because no ones hooked up the printer yet. Sure, it will all get sorted out, assembled, installed, and put away. It always does. But it will Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesIndispensable Me Can Be Highly Overratedtake many weeks longer than I thought it would, because everyone relies on me to figure it all out. You see, my family lives under the false premise that I am the manager, the foreman, the safety net, the principal engi neer, the scullery maid, and the Grand Pubah of all things tedious, arduous and annoying. Despite the considerable respon sibility of my multifaceted position; there are no benefits of which to speak, unless being needed can be perceived as advantageous. If you ask me, its highly overrated. But I cannot protest too much, because this unfor tunate set of circumstanc es is my own doing. Back when the kids were mere munchkins and my hus bands hairline had not begun to recede, I reveled in my Supermom status. I was younger, stronger, more energetic, less for getful, and significantly less dependent on caf feine to keep me awake during the day. I consid ered mothering an excit ing challenge to conquer, and I did so with fierce determination. I planned and cooked balance meals, I whipped up Halloween costumes from felt and pipe clean ers, I landscaped the yard with a baby wrapped around my midsection, I orchestrated elaborate birthday parties with See Molinari, Page 3

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goodie bags that would rival infamously indulgent Oscar party swag, I taught myself how to install ceiling fans and sink faucets, I jig sawed my sons Soap Box Derby car, I endured long deployments without so much as a whiff of antidepressants. I did it all. But little did I know, my family would come to expect it. Fast-forward a decade or two, and sudden ly, Im to motherhood what Peyton Manning is to football. What Vicki Gunvalson is to The Real Housewives. What Courtney Love is to the band Hole. What Carrot Top is to comedy. What James Carville and Mary Matalin are to political commentary. Our minions have come to depend on us to carry the team/show/industry/debate, but were all getting too tired/injured/pathetic/ strung out/disfigured by plastic surgery to do it all. So, to all you younger stay-at-home moms, let this rant serve as a warning: Dispense with any fantasies of becoming a Supermom now, or later, your family may decide that youve become indispensable. Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www.themeatand potatoesoflife.comFrom Page 2MolinariHagel Talks Budget with Sailors, CiviliansJax Air NewsDuring his first visit to Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville July 16, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called on Congress to work with DoD to avoid sequestration in fiscal 2014. Otherwise, DoD will be forced to cut $52 billion from its budget that only could be accomplished by putting together an extremely severe package of military and civilian personnel actions. With U.S. Reps. Corrine Brown, Ander Crenshaw and Ted Yoho joining the audience at a town hall meeting with civilians and Sailors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard base, Hagel called on Congress to work with DoD to avoid sequestra tion in fiscal 2014. If the cuts continue, the department will have to make sharp reductions with far-reaching conse quences including lim ited combat power and reduced readiness that will undermine our countrys national security interests, Hagel told the audience. Hagel remarked that if sequestration remains in effect, the size, readiness and technological superi ority of Americas armed forces will begin a down ward spiral that will be costly to reverse. If Congress cant find a way to avoid sequestra tion in 2014 DoD will have to consider involun tary reductions in force to reduce civilian personnel costs, said Hagel. Hiring freezes will continue and facilities maintenance funds will further erode. He added that DoD could meet further reduc tions only through a severe package of military personnel actions, includ ing halting all accessions, ending all permanentchange-of-station moves, stopping discretionary bonuses and freezing promotions. This was a great opportunity for SECDEF to learn about our avia tion maintenance mis sion and to gain a bet ter understanding of our numerous contributions to the warfighter, said FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Caldwell. At the town hall meet ing attended by our civil ian federal employees, the secretary said, You cant buy back readi ness, and that is so true. What we do here and in the field is very important to Sailors and Marines operating forward. Mr. Hagels message was clear we can expect another round of budget cuts. The FRCSE team has been cost-conscious for a very long time, but what the SECDEF said only rein forces our resolve to con tinue finding innovative and cost-effective solu tions to better meet warfighter demands, added Caldwell. Hagel recently called on Congress to work with DoD to approve the presi dents defense budget request. The presidents budget request slows military pay raises and raises fees for some military retirees health care. It also looks to retire older Air Force and Navy assets, as well as calling for a new base realignment and closure program. He said, Uncertainty is a tremendous enemy when military families live in a state of uncertainty, it impacts their concentration and that impacts their job. Ultimately, it can create a loss of skill sets that are vital to our national security and our readiness. Hagel, an Army com bat veteran in Vietnam and a former member of the U.S. Senate, stressed that service members do more than just put on a uniform, and civilians do more than just show up for work. Everyone connect ed with DoD is part of something bigger than themselves. Were help ing build a new world a more free and fair world because tolerance, respect and dignity still anchor the human condition, said Hagel. In addition to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Hagels tour of NAS Jacksonville includ ed: a luncheon with regional business and civic leaders; a media roundtable; a commissary tour; a P-8A Integrated Training Center tour; and a flight line tour of a VP-30 P-8A Poseidon aircraft. At the NAS Jacksonville Commissary, store man ager Larry Bentley wel comed the secretary of defense to the ninth-larg est (in sales volume) store in the world. It was an honor to take Mr. Hagel on a tour he was greeting patrons as we walked the aisles. Active duty and retired shoppers were pleasantly surprised to meet him, said Bentley. According to Bentley, the secretary was very impressed with the store and the warm wel come from the staff. Photo by MC2 Salton CebeCapt. Robert B. Caldwell, commanding officer of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast leads Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel on a tour of the center at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Hagel toured Naval Air Station Jacksonville and addressed concerns over sequestration within the Department of Defense. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 USS The Sullivans On PatrolUSS The Sullivans PAOOnly one month into deployment, USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) has fulfilled a plethora of special evolutions and port visits in the 6th and 5th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. First stop while tran siting the Atlantic Ocean was in Reykjavik, Iceland. While in port, The Sullivans had the distinct privilege of send ing 28 Midshipmen from the United States Naval Academy to a tour of the Icelandic Coast Guards vessel Thor. In addi tion to this tour, ships company, including Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, Executive Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Blakeslee, along with Department heads and Second Tour Division Officers, met with Embassy personnel for a formal get togeth er at the recently built Reykjavik Opera House. Tours were given on board USS The Sullivans by the commanding offi cer and executive officer to local dignitaries and embassy personnel in the days prior to departing for the Mediterranean, and eventually, 5th Fleet. Before transiting through the Straights of Gibraltar, The Sullivans made a brief port visit in Rota, Spain to receive fuel and allow ships company some leisure time before beginning the busy days ahead. Rota will homeport four Ballistic Missile Destroyers of the same Arleigh Burke Class as USS The Sullivans in the coming two years as a part of the phased adap tive approach. While in port, the crew said good bye to the 28 Midshipmen on board for summer training. Shortly after depart ing from Rota, Spain, The Sullivans made tran sit through the Straights of Gibraltar. Traffic was light, and many of the new personnel on board had the oppor tunity to see the unique passage with breathtak ing views of Africa and Europe on either side, in addition to the Rock of Gibraltar. After a roughly two hour transit through the Straights of Gibraltar, the crew shift ed their sights on inten sive Damage Control and Anti-Terrorism Force Protection training to pre pare for the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. In the moonlight hours of July 18, The Sullivans drifted in the vicinity of Port Said, patiently wait ing her turn to enter the Suez Canal. At roughly 4:30 a.m. local time, they made their approach to the Canal and began the 14-hour transit. During this transit, they hosted four different pilots, and saw a myriad of Egyptian sites. The safe transit was slow and steady, allowing for beautiful views and another new experience for many of the Officers and Enlisted personnel. USS The Sullivans will continue her mission in the 6th Fleet and 5th Fleet operational areas as part of her six-month deploy ment. -Photo taken by Midshipmen 1st Class Micala MignealtA Midshipmen from the US Naval Academy on Summer Cruise takes aim on the .50 Caliber machine gun under the instruction of Crew Serve Weapons Instructor STG2 Rusty Howe. -Photo taken by IS1 Ryan Taylor Above, USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) close up the Battle Ensign and 5 Star Ensign while getting underway on deployment from Mayport, Florida on June 24, 2013. Left, Crew of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) mans the rails while coming alongside USNS Leroy Grumman during Replenishment at Sea. -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeExecutive Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Blakeslee, Gunners Mate 2nd Class Rosario, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Warren, and Fire Controlman 3rd Class Welch take part in a Burial at Sea Ceremony while underway en route to the Mediterranean.-Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeLt. Erin Connor, Ensign Elizabeth Decker and Lt.j.g. Kevin Garlington stand bridge watch during Sea and Anchor detail of entering Reykjavik, Iceland.-Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul Moe

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 5 -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeUSS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departs Naval Station Rota, Spain. -Photo taken by Midshipmen 1st Class Micala MignealtView of a waterfall during an MWR tour outside of Reykjavik, Iceland. -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeMidshipmen and Crew of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) take part in damage control and firefighting drills on the flight deck. Training conducted by Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Vernon Brown (Left) and Damage Controlman 1st Class Hakim Ahmed (right).-Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeAbove, Newly appointed Senior Chiefs, Senior Chief Fire Controlman Dave Fowler and Senior Chief Masterat-Arms Danny Moreaux, are pinned by Senior Chief Fire Controlman Michael Poole, Chief Navy Counselor Melissa Cyr and Chief Operations Specialist Jorge Martinez while underway en route to the Mediterranean. Left, Midshipmen onboard USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) take turns driving the ship from After Steering under the instruction of Ships Serviceman 2nd Class David Jackson, Lt.j.g. Paul Moe, and Ensign Christina Gatti. -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeLt.j.g. Rachel Warren (Nozzleman) leads a group of Midshipmen alongside Damage Controlman 1st Class Hakim Ahmed and Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Vernon Brown during firefighting and damage control drills while underway en route to the Mediterranean.-Photo taken by Midshipmen 1st Class Micala Mignealt -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeDamage Control Assistant, Lt.j.g. Kevin Garlington, takes time to train Midshipmen and crew members onboard USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) while underway en route to the Mediterranean.

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Navy Unveils New Initiatives In Battle Against Sexual AssaultsFrom Navy News ServiceNavy leaders have announced their newest sexual assault prevention initiatives in a message and a policy letter designed to continue the services battle against this crime. Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, chief of naval operations, out lined additional fleet initia tives from the San Diego fleet concentration area, and Fleet Training Center Great Lakes, Ill., and directed the rest of the fleet to implement some of the best practices proven to help in combating sexual assault in the Navy. Greenert named Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck, director of the 21st Century Sailor Office, to direct the Navywide implementation of effort. Everyone, from [seaman recruit to admiral], must take responsibility for promoting a climate of dignity and respect and an environment that does not demean individuals or tol erate sexist behavior, sexual harassment or sexual assault, Buck said. The execution of the sexual assault prevention and response initiatives across the fleet is an imperative that I believe will have an impact on reducing, with the goal of eliminating, the crime of sexual assault from our Navy. The new initiatives are part of the Navys ongoing efforts to provide for the safety and secu rity of every sailor, the admiral said. We also are emphasiz ing other programs like Keep What You Earn and Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions to help our people understand the negative impact that alcohol can have on their lives and how they can support and help their shipmates make good decisions, he added. While the programs and ini tiatives are primarily focused on prevention, they also serve as a deterrent and reinforce com manders responsibility for vic tim support, Buck noted. Commanders have the responsibility for ensuring vic tims of sexual assault are sup ported, provided options in accordance with Department of Defense guidance, he said, and that the allegations will be independently investigated and offenders held appropriately accountable. The initiatives, to be imple mented by Oct. 1, include increasing leadership visibility with roving barracks patrols led by chief petty officers or experienced officers, and augmented with first class petty officers to deter behavior that may lead to sexual assault or misconduct. Also the Navy will assign ded icated sexual assault prevention and response officers lieuten ant commander or above to U.S. Fleet Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. Naval Forces Europe, Naval Surface Forces, Naval Submarine Forces, Naval Air Forces, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Naval Expeditionary Combat Command, the Navys four systems commands and U.S. Fleet Cyber Command who will report directly to their respective commander. In addition, the Navy will deploy resilience counselors to CVN and LHD/LHA commands by the end of fiscal year 2014. These counselors will be dedi cated civilian professionals with sexual assault response coor dinator training, certification and credentials, and they will be able to take restricted and unrestricted reports of sexual assault. The counselors will deploy with carrier strike groups, expe ditionary strike groups and amphibious ready groups to provide services, support and coordination for sexual assault prevention and response and continuity of care for suicide prevention, stress reduction and other situations. Additionally, the latest initia tives include implementing best practices from fleet concentra tion areas throughout the fleet and revising alcohol sales poli cies at Navy exchanges world wide. Changes in liquor sales will be implemented over the next 90 days. Liquor will be sold only at main exchanges or at dedi cated package stores, and the footprint of alcohol displays and merchandise in stores other than package stores will be no more than 10 percent of the retail floor space. NEX facilities also will make single-use alcohol detection devices avail able to customers. The new initiatives also direct commands to ensure all sail ors residing in barracks attend indoctrination training within 30 days of occupancy. To reduce vulnerability of sailors while walking on base, commanders will survey facilities to identify areas that require better lighting, visibility or other safety improvements. Each Navy installation and fleet concentration area will have a senior flag officer des ignated to lead the area sex ual assault prevention and response program. This flag officer will establish routine coordination meetings with installation, local command representatives and local community and civic leaders to review program efforts. Duties also will include ensuring a community outreach and engagement plan is part of each areas program. The plan must include base and region commander cooperation, coor dination and consultation with local law enforcement, hospi tals and hotels. Ensuring a command cli mate of respect, trust and pro fessionalism is critical to com bating sexual assault, Buck said. To this end, he added, commands must review their compliance with command climate surveys, ensuring one is conducted within 90 days of a new commanding officer assuming command and every 12 months thereafter. Also, commanders must ensure they have briefed their immediate superior on their most recent command cli mate assessment using the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute Organizational Climate Survey, including a plan of action and milestones for corrective actions. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Auxiliary Member Reunited With Woman He Saved, Awarded For Heroic Action U.S. Coast Guard Public AffairsA Jacksonville, Fla.,man and member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary was awarded a Coast Guard Auxiliary Commendation Medal Saturday morning for saving a womans life during a St. Patricks Day parade in St. Augustine, Fla. Before the ceremony, David Hensel was reunit ed with Sherry Hartman, of St. Augustine, for the first time since he per formed CPR on her March 9, 2013, after she experi enced complete heart failure, pneumonia symptoms and blood poison ing. Hensel was with three other Auxiliary mem bers who were preparing to represent the Coast Guard in the parade when he noticed Hartman had collapsed so he leapt into action and began performing CPR on her while instructing others to get help. He performed CPR for more than 13 minutes before EMTs arrived. Hartman was taken to a local hospital for treatment, where she remained in a coma for the next six days before recovering. During the ceremony, Hartman said with teary eyes she couldnt find the words to express her grati tude for what Hensel did for her, but she would be eternally grateful. Aside from needing a pacemaker now, she is otherwise healthy. The hospital staff said Davids swift response is what kept Hartman alive. A firefighter paramedic with the Seminole County Fire Department for 20 years before retiring in 2006, Hartman said she never expected to be on the receiving end of EMT care. She added that she hopes her story will show others the importance of knowing how to perform CPR. The Coast Guard Auxiliary is the services volunteer component, and its members assist with safety and secu rity patrols, search and rescue, mass casualty and disasters, pollution response and patrols, homeland security, rec reational boating safety, commercial fishing and vessel exams, platforms for boarding parties and recruiting, among other duties. -Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Lauren Jorgensen Sherry Hartman (center) embraces the man who saved her life, Coast Guard Auxiliary member David Hensel, before an award presentation for Hensel in St. Augustine, Fla., Saturday, July 20, 2013. Since Hartman was uncon scious when Hensel performed CPR on her March 9, 2013, this was her first time meeting him. Valiant Effort Welcoming Families To Mayport -Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony L. SotoAbove left, Cmdr. Steven Burdian, commanding officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant, addresses his crew and their families at a Coast Guard Cutter Valiant family welcoming event at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Tuesday, July 2, 2013. The event was held to welcome the spouses and dependents of crewmembers to the Jacksonville area and to inform them of the various programs, amenities and activities available to them. Above right, Seaman Scott Crawford, green shirt, a crewmember stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant, plays a game of horseshoes with several of his shipmates. Petty Officer 3rd Class Christian Stevenson, a food service specialist stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant, prepares hamburgers and hot dogs for attendees at a family welcoming event. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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CSGs and ARGs ready to surge. Despite reduced operations and mainte nance spending in FY 13, Greenert said the Navys focus is to keep sea com mands ready for deploy ments scheduled for FY 14. For FY 14, seques tration could reduce each account by 10 per cent. The Navy possibly faces deeper cuts for FY 14, because FY 13 used money available from previous years to help pad the effects of sequestration, Greenert explained. CNOs goal is to preserve shipbuilding and aviation contracts through this process. Furlough impacts to the civilian force continue to be a challenge. Regrettably, were enduring furloughs, Greneert said. Its an impact, I felt it last week. I feel it this week. It hurts our readiness and it hurts our productivity as well. CNO addressed sexual assault organizational changes and a revision to the Navy Exchange alco hol sales policy by fur ther discussing the Navys newest changes that are taking place fleet-wide. Greenert said with more than half of all sexual assaults involving alcohol, the Navy had to look more critically at the atmo sphere and climate of its bases. Greenert said after a review of Navy Exchange alcohol sales trends at base stores the data showed a high volume of sales occurring late into the night and early morn ing and were not in line with mainstream retailers. assets, Ingersoll said. This years hurricane season is predicted to be busy and the C4F METOC officers are working hard to keep 4th Fleet leader ship up to date about the possibility of hurricanes and current predictions. Pre-season predic tions for each hurricane season are generated by organizations such as the National Hurricane Center or supporting professional entities in the weather community. This spring, anomalously warm sea surface tem peratures in the tropical Atlantic, along with vari ous other factors, were the basis of predictions for an above-average season in 2013, Ingersoll said. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. SERMC Fun Zone-Photo by Christopher TuckerMarcus Miree and Richard Araujo, get ready to enter the First Class Petty Officers Association Fun Zone at SERMCs annual command picnic held at the Sea Otter Pavilion on July 17.From Page 1WeatherFrom Page 1CNO THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 9

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USS Gettysburg Families Connect With Several National Organizations USS Gettysburg PAO As a ship prepares for its deployment, families and friends are left to manage the households of the Sailors who depart to serve the nation. In a consolidated effort to support these incred ible families, guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg was joined by several national organizations as it took a unique spin on the normal predeployment information al meeting. United through Reading, Families Helping Families, Navy Wounded Warrior, Operation Gratitude, and the Navy League joined Friends and family of the crew of Gettysburg to celebrate the summer season and share important informa tion by the beach at Naval Station Mayport. In a unique event, fami lies were able to make connections with their Family Readiness Group and Ombudsman while collecting important information concerning the cruisers upcoming deployment. Several organiza tions that Gettysburg has worked closely with were present, offering their support to the crew and their families. Know that there are so many people in Daytona who care about you, who care about your fami lies. All you have to do is call, said Ted Turowski, President of the Daytona Navy League. The Daytona Navy League has been an active part of Gettsyburg. They have continuously recognized exceptional Sailors aboard and will host sev eral of those Sailors at a race this month. The heart of this event was the Family Readiness Group (FRG) and making connections with the fam ilies of the crew. It was amazing to meet a lot of new families and for everyone to get excit ed about our work during deployment, says FRG President Erin Daniels. We gave out as much information as we could so that we could be as prepared as possible. Im looking forward to every thing we will do with the families during deploy ment The command Fun Fest brought together the entire command for a cook out, games, and sunshine as the sailors prepared their families for the upcoming deploy ment. Gettysburg is a part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. With the ship deployed, the families remaining in the area need vital con tact information and specific connections to the resources available around the base. This event provided a fun alternative to normal deployment briefings for families, as their children played games, friendly competition was waged, and families met mem bers of their chain of com mand. The best part of the Fun Fest was getting the Gettysburg fam ily together and getting to know everyone, says Intelligence Specialist Chief Jessica Zackery, who will remain aboard for the entire deployment. The command Fun Fest provided well deserved relaxation following two very successful sustain ment exercises in prepa ration for Gettysburgs upcoming deployment. The organizations pres ent will continue a rela tionship and partnership with the families once the ship deploys. The family readiness group is spearhead con certed volunteer efforts with each of the organizations, providing support consistently every month until the crew returns. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Command Master Chief Daniel Hacker of guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg, braves the dunk tank at the cruisers command picnic and pre-deployment Fun Fest. Gettysburg is part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Lt. Chet Frith of Navy Wounded Warrior-Safe Harbor introduces his PTSD support dog to children at guid ed missile cruiser USS Gettysburgs command picnic. Gettysburg and Navy Wounded Warrior-Safe Harbor recently announced a committed partnership of organized volunteer efforts. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Members of the crew of guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg hand out battalion bud dies to their children. Every child in the command received a bear dressed in the Navy Working Uniform to keep near until their parents return from deployment. Gettysburg is a part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 11

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Aquatics Aug. 5: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug. 2 & 3 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Intramural Sports Aug. 10: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 2. 270-5451 Aug. 13: Go the Distance 10K/5K Run 8 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 13: Intramural Flag Football Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451 Aug. 20: 3v3 Fall Soccer Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins Aug. 26; end Oct. 21. 270-5451 Aug. 26-28: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 19. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWR Sports/FitnessJuly 26: Outdoor MoviesThe Lorax (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 2: Outdoor MoviesOz the Great and Powerful (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 5: Missoula Childrens Theatre Snow White & The Seven Dwarves Auditions. 10 am-12 pm at the Youth Center. Rehearsals will run Aug 5-9 12:30-2:30 pm; Showtimes August 9 at 3:30 pm and 6 pm. 2705680 Aug. 9: Outdoor MoviesThe Croods (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 16: Outdoor MoviesThe Goonies (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 23: Outdoor MoviesBrave (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 CO-ED Softball League and Playoffs -Photos courtesy of MWRUSS Philippean Sea pulled out the big guns and put them on the CO-ED Softball field for the 2013 season. The team finished with a 12-1 record for the league and continued their win streak eliminating everyone in their path during the playoffs. The next Softball season begins July 22. For more information on how to get your team involved call 904270-5451. HSM-40 Airwolves fall just shy of winning the season taking the Runner-up position for both the League and Playoffs. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Auto Skills Center July Special: 10 percent off all vehicle lifts plus free vehicle diagnostic for most vehicles. 270-5392 August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rota tion and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rota tion on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Aug. 3: UFC 163-Aldo vs. Korean Zombie. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 4: NFL PreSeason Kick Off Party. 8 pm kick-off Miami vs. Dallas. Drink Specials and free prize pool. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale Purchase tickets for the 2013 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in August: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 26: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. July 27: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 28: Ichnetucknee Springs Tubing Trip. Cost $5. Sign up by July 24. Van departs Liberty Center 7 a.m. July 29: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. July 30: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 31: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 2: Thrift Shop Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. Aug. 4: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 5: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 7: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Aug. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $13. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com CNO Updates Status Of The Navy Defense Media Activity NavyChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert dis cussed the status of the fleet, readiness impact due to sequestration, and modifications to Navy policies at a press conference July 19 at the Pentagon. Presence remains our mandate, Greenert said. This is what we are mostly about, and its an essential element of our defense strategic guid ance. Greenert pointed out that the Navy has about 95 ships deployed and about 3,700 operational aircraft. The current ship count in the Mediterranean has been higher than it has been through the years. USS Kearsarge and USS San Antonio are posi tioned in the Red Sea and stand ready with a range of missions and opera tions if required. USS Nimitz is deployed to the North Arabian Sea sup porting ground opera tions in Afghanistan with close air support, and piracy in the region is slowly increasing and is becoming more of a con cern. In the Pacific theater, Talisman Saber Exercise, started July 14, off the coast of Australia and in the Coral Sea. TS13 is an ongoing biennial train ing exercise with Australia and currently has George Washington Carrier Strike Group and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group assets par ticipating. In the Southern Command, sequestration has caused the reduction to zero combat ships in the region. There are other naval forces in the region, Greenert said. Noncombatant ships and other forces. The Navys first spear head class joint high speed vessel will deploy to the Southern Command area of operation in FY 14. Presence forward, assuring our allies and deterring potential adversaries is our primary function, Greenert said. I think we are out there at the, what I call, the mari time crossroads where it matters, when it matters. CNO addressed the readiness impact of sequestration for FY 13 and FY 14. There is one carrier strike group (CSG) and one amphibious ready group (ARG) deployed to the each of the Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific theaters. However, the surge force is a concern, Greenert said. Currently, there is only CSG and one ARG ready to surge if needed. A year ago, the Navy had three Presence Remains Our Mandate-CNO Greenert Meteorologist Keeps Watch On Weather 4th Fleet public affairsWith Hurricane season in full swing Commander, U.S. Naval Southern Command/ U.S. Fourth Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris relies on Meteorologist and Oceanography (METOC) specialists to keep U.S. 4th Fleet updated on current weather situations both in Mayport and downrange. The C4F METOC division produces thresholdbased daily forecasts to keep commanders informed of significant weather in South and Central America and the Caribbean Sea and its expected effects on mari time assets operating there. The forecasts sup port daily briefs and is amended or supplemented by the METOC staff when short-term changes in weather occur. Like all num bered fleets, 4th Fleet is assigned its own weather staff to support the plan ning process for future missions and to keep the Admiral informed of emergent weather con ditions affecting current naval activities in the U.S. Southern Command operating area, Lt. Cmdr. Russell Ingersoll, 4th Fleet METOC officer, said. Our Meteorological team at 4th Fleet is abso lutely essential in sup porting our mission and lines of operations; conducting security cooperation activities, maritime security and contingency operations, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. Marine weather fore casting is vital to 4th Fleet operations and to the safety of the fleet. 4th Fleet METOC works with other agencies to continuously create weather models and pre dictions. There is continu ous coordination with the Southern weather office about significant weather in the AOR and how it may affect mis sions. With respect to hurricanes approach ing the Caribbean and/ or Florida, where our headquarters is located, the C4F METOC divi sion communicates with the National Hurricane Center in Miami and Fleet Weather Center Norfolk in order to coordinate hur ricane track forecasts and the anticipated effects those storms may have on naval facilities and afloat Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonMeteorologist/Oceanographer Officers Lt. Cmdr. Russel Ingersol and Lt. Kirsten Paulaitis brief Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet, about potential tracks of tropical storm Chantal in the Atlantic Ocean as the storm began to break up as it passed over the island of Hispanola. 4th Fleet is responsible for evacuating ships in Mayport in case of bad weather as the Senior Officer Present Afloat (SOPA).Gettysburg Sets Sail With Ike CSG USS Gettysburg PAOGuided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) departed Naval Station Mayport Monday to join the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on a scheduled deployment to the 6th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility. Gettysburg has been actively preparing for this deployment with Carrier Strike Group 10 assets, participating in sev eral exercises to prepare the ship and Sailors for deployment overseas. Our Sailors have con tinued to push themselves through these past few months, achieving incredible levels of success and competency with their systems, said Lt. Scott Jones, Gettysburgs com bat systems officer. With a modern AEGIS weapon system and embarked Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) 74, Det. 2, Gettysburgs training has developed a unique diversity of capa bilities for the upcoming deployment. This deployment will give us the opportunity to use the skills weve trained to develop, said Ensign William OQuinn, anti-submarine warfare officer. The crew has partici pated in several exercises and looks forward to the port visits and operational experience, OQuinn added. This will be my first deployment and, like hundreds of my ship mates, I am ready and eager to go. While the Sailors are deployed, families and friends of Gettysburg will continue their support at home. Partnered with the Daytona Navy League, the Navy Wounded Warrior/ Safe Harbor Office, Operation Gratitude, United Through Reading and several other orga nizations, members of the Gettysburg Family Readiness Group (FRG) will continue to provide support and service. Gettysburg, named for the Civil War battle, will join aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56), and guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84). -Photo by Stefanie SandersThe Sailors of USS Gettysburg man the rails as the ship sails past the Jetties heading out to meet the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on July 22. Gettysburg will be deployed for nine months to the 6th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility. See more on Gettysburg, Page 11.See CNO, Page 9 See Weather, Page 9

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Wouldnt it be nice if your job required you to sit on a beach every day sipping some exotic drink while relaxing in the sun? Keep dreaming! You probably have to work long stressful hours to compensate for man ning shortages and con stant pushes to do more with less. You also likely have to deal with the frustration of working in a bureaucracy, with all the red tape and inefficiency. For most of us, the dream of a stress free life will probably stay as just a dream for a long time. Stress is a normal part of life. A little is good for us, but often we deal with more than is healthy. Unfortunately it is sometimes difficult to reduce stressors in our lives. As a result we may just try to tough it out and carry the extra load. The problem is that if you carry your load (even if it is not overwhelming) for too long without some sort of rest, eventually you will begin to break down emotion ally. Whether the stress comes from difficult life events (such as relation ship problems, death of a loved one, or work related issues), burnout (from persistent stress in the daily routine), or from compassion fatigue (from constantly pouring your self into others emotion ally), it can have negative effects and diminish your level of functioning. Many people deal with stress by distract ing themselves from it. It is common for people to turn to alcohol, drugs, gambling, sexual diver sions, unhealthy eating habits, or other damag ing behavior to cope with stress. Unfortunately these do not alleviate stress. They simply post pone it and may actually increase the stress. While there are many healthy and effective ways to deal with stress in the moment when it hits hardest, it is much more effective to start dealing with stress before it hits. Since you can plan on stress being part of your life, why not adjust your lifestyle to prepare for stress? In much the same way that physical train ing helps you to prepare physically for running a marathon, it is also pos sible to get yourself in shape emotionally to increase mental endur ance and emotional stamina. Here are four evidence based lifestyle changes you can make to increase your stress resil ience: Health Everyone knows that exercising can help reduce stress, but it also can increase your capacity to carry stress and still feel good. In addition to exercise, other healthy practices such as a nutritious diet, good sleep hygiene, and avoidance of addictive chemicals can improve physical and psychologi cal endurance, and generate a feeling of wellbeing. We all know the things we should be doing to be healthier. The challenge is getting the motivation to do them. You can start by making simple goals that can increase your momentum such as Eat breakfast, or Take the stairs instead of the elevator. As you see success with your small goals, gradually make them bigger. HumorSometimes laughter really is the best medicine. Studies have shown that laughter can boost the immune and circulatory sys tems, improve digestion, stimulate the release of endorphins, relax mus cles, relieve pain, bal ance blood pressure, and improve mental functioning. It also relieves stress, improves sleep, uplifts your attitude, strengthens relationships, and makes you feel good. Smiling has many of the same effects as laughter, and they both work even if you are faking it! Increase the amount of laughter in your day and your abil ity to deal with stress will improve. SpiritualityStudies show that people who have strong spiritual ity are healthier, happier, more confident, do bet ter in school and work, and are more resilient to stress. Spirituality is not necessarily the same as religion. Religion can be a great source of spiritu ality, but there are other ways to be a spiritual person. Spirituality helps you find meaning and direction in life. It creates a sense of awe and appreciation in life and connection to something greater than yourself. In a world where we are surrounded by noise, it is vital to take time to quiet your mind so that you can focus on what is important. Self CareUsed here, self care simply means intentionally making time to take care of yourself emotionally. This may include prayer/medita tion, yoga, guided relax ation, or other types of therapeutic relaxation. Or it may be something as simple as taking walks, stargazing, or spending time in nature. The important thing is that you create rituals that will help you recharge and refocus. Make them a regular part of your lifestyle, and you will build your stress resilience. Chap Justin Top CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHealth, Humor, Faith To Combat StressWith so many com mands deployed or about to be deployed at this time, the emotional effects may be impacting your child. While most military dependents are able to deal well with a deployment of a parent, other children may exhibit behavioral changes. While a military parent may understand a childs reactions to deployment and have learned to spot these reactions, the par ent may not know how to address them. First and foremost you need to seek help for the child. While emotional responses vary from child to child, there are some similarities in how chil dren feel when their lives are impacted by a deployment, especially to a war zone. Some common responses include the following: Limiting exposure to media coverage of the war will help the child feel encouraged and safe at a time when the world seems a dangerous place. If the child is exhibit ing these responses and seems to need help beyond what you can provide or the school, there are resources available to the military family to provide help for your child and you. Take advantage of existing supports which are provided by a number of organizations. The Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) offer various programs which range from crisis and information, to stress management and par enting workshops. Each center has professional counselors available for individual and fam ily consultations. It is part of the Fleet and Family Support Centers mission to ensure that Navy fami lies have the support they need to deal with a childs response to deployment. Contact the FFSC at NS Mayport by calling 904270-6600. Military OneSource provides access to faceto-face counseling; shortterm solution-focused telephone consultation; and online consultation for Active Duty, Guard, Reserve (regardless of activation status), and their families. Contact Military OneSource 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-800-342-9647 or www.militaryonesource. com. The Military and Family Life Consultant Program also provides short-term, situational, problem-solving coun seling services to Active Duty, Guard, Reserve, and their families. This pro gram addresses the mili tarys impact on children, and their services can be provided on or off military installations. Contact Dr. Mia Wilson, Child and Youth Specialist MFLC, at 904-741-7842. Extra support, con sistency, empathy, and patience will help your child to return to his/ her more usual behav ior patterns. And while it is difficult to do during the summer, try to keep to an existing sched ule. Children of all ages thrive on routine, but this is especially important during times of change. Bedtimes, mealtimes, and required chores should remain predictable. But while you are pro viding extra help to your child, dont forget to take time for yourself. You, too, are dealing with your own reactions to the situation. The organizations indicated above will also provide assistance to you in dealing with not only your childs reactions but yours too. Self care is one of the most important and often the most forgotten things you can do as a parent who is carrying the load while a spouse is deployed. When your needs are taken care of, your child will benefit as well. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingResources For Family Deployment IssuesMom! Can you help me?! I hear that phrase throughout the day, invariably bellowed from some other room in the house while Im trying to cook, clean, answer emails, put away grocer ies, fold laundry, take a shower, write my column, or watch a DVRed episode of The Bachelorette while savoring an afternoon cup of microwaved coffee. Summertime exacer bates this annoying phe nomenon, because I cant drop my kids off at school to get them out of my hair for a few cotton-picking minutes. Ironically, the two teens, while claiming complete autonomy, seem particularly depen dent on me to wake them, feed them, entertain them, stop them from frying their brains in front of the television, and remind them to shower. Theres no doubt about it: my husband works very hard to support our fam ily. However, he tends to add to my burden at home by being endless ly hungry, inordinately hairy, and pretty much clueless when it comes to using the remote. To make matters a tad [read: a gazillion times] worse, we just moved from Florida to Rhode Island a few weeks ago. It is our ninth military move, so youd think wed have it down pat by now. However, here it is, nearly three weeks after the movers dropped off all of our worldly pos sessions, and were still eating off of paper plates because no one has vol unteered to unpack the dish box. Were drying ourselves with wash clothes because no one has found the towels. Weve even resorted to writing down Googled information on some thing called a piece of paper, with something called a pencil, because no ones hooked up the printer yet. Sure, it will all get sorted out, assembled, installed, and put away. It always does. But it will Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesIndispensable Me Can Be Highly Overratedtake many weeks longer than I thought it would, because everyone relies on me to figure it all out. You see, my family lives under the false premise that I am the manager, the foreman, the safety net, the principal engi neer, the scullery maid, and the Grand Pubah of all things tedious, arduous and annoying. Despite the considerable respon sibility of my multifaceted position; there are no benefits of which to speak, unless being needed can be perceived as advantageous. If you ask me, its highly overrated. But I cannot protest too much, because this unfortunate set of circumstances is my own doing. Back when the kids were mere munchkins and my hus bands hairline had not begun to recede, I reveled in my Supermom status. I was younger, stronger, more energetic, less for getful, and significantly less dependent on caf feine to keep me awake during the day. I consid ered mothering an excit ing challenge to conquer, and I did so with fierce determination. I planned and cooked balance meals, I whipped up Halloween costumes from felt and pipe clean ers, I landscaped the yard with a baby wrapped around my midsection, I orchestrated elaborate birthday parties with See Molinari, Page 3

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goodie bags that would rival infamously indulgent Oscar party swag, I taught myself how to install ceiling fans and sink faucets, I jig sawed my sons Soap Box Derby car, I endured long deployments without so much as a whiff of antidepressants. I did it all. But little did I know, my family would come to expect it. Fast-forward a decade or two, and suddenly, Im to motherhood what Peyton Manning is to football. What Vicki Gunvalson is to The Real Housewives. What Courtney Love is to the band Hole. What Carrot Top is to comedy. What James Carville and Mary Matalin are to political commentary. Our minions have come to depend on us to carry the team/show/industry/debate, but were all getting too tired/injured/pathetic/ strung out/disfigured by plastic surgery to do it all. So, to all you younger stay-at-home moms, let this rant serve as a warning: Dispense with any fantasies of becoming a Supermom now, or later, your family may decide that youve become indispensable. Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www.themeatandpotatoesoflife.comFrom Page 2MolinariHagel Talks Budget with Sailors, CiviliansJax Air NewsDuring his first visit to Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville July 16, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called on Congress to work with DoD to avoid sequestration in fiscal 2014. Otherwise, DoD will be forced to cut $52 billion from its budget that only could be accomplished by putting together an extremely severe package of military and civilian personnel actions. With U.S. Reps. Corrine Brown, Ander Crenshaw and Ted Yoho joining the audience at a town hall meeting with civilians and Sailors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard base, Hagel called on Congress to work with DoD to avoid sequestra tion in fiscal 2014. If the cuts continue, the department will have to make sharp reductions with far-reaching conse quences including lim ited combat power and reduced readiness that will undermine our countrys national security interests, Hagel told the audience. Hagel remarked that if sequestration remains in effect, the size, readiness and technological superi ority of Americas armed forces will begin a down ward spiral that will be costly to reverse. If Congress cant find a way to avoid sequestra tion in 2014 DoD will have to consider involun tary reductions in force to reduce civilian personnel costs, said Hagel. Hiring freezes will continue and facilities maintenance funds will further erode. He added that DoD could meet further reductions only through a severe package of military personnel actions, including halting all accessions, ending all permanentchange-of-station moves, stopping discretionary bonuses and freezing promotions. This was a great opportunity for SECDEF to learn about our avia tion maintenance mis sion and to gain a bet ter understanding of our numerous contributions to the warfighter, said FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Caldwell. At the town hall meet ing attended by our civil ian federal employees, the secretary said, You cant buy back readi ness, and that is so true. What we do here and in the field is very important to Sailors and Marines operating forward. Mr. Hagels message was clear we can expect another round of budget cuts. The FRCSE team has been cost-conscious for a very long time, but what the SECDEF said only rein forces our resolve to continue finding innovative and cost-effective solu tions to better meet warfighter demands, added Caldwell. Hagel recently called on Congress to work with DoD to approve the presidents defense budget request. The presidents budget request slows military pay raises and raises fees for some military retirees health care. It also looks to retire older Air Force and Navy assets, as well as calling for a new base realignment and closure program. He said, Uncertainty is a tremendous enemy when military families live in a state of uncertainty, it impacts their concentration and that impacts their job. Ultimately, it can create a loss of skill sets that are vital to our national security and our readiness. Hagel, an Army com bat veteran in Vietnam and a former member of the U.S. Senate, stressed that service members do more than just put on a uniform, and civilians do more than just show up for work. Everyone connect ed with DoD is part of something bigger than themselves. Were help ing build a new world a more free and fair world because tolerance, respect and dignity still anchor the human condition, said Hagel. In addition to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Hagels tour of NAS Jacksonville includ ed: a luncheon with regional business and civic leaders; a media roundtable; a commissary tour; a P-8A Integrated Training Center tour; and a flight line tour of a VP-30 P-8A Poseidon aircraft. At the NAS Jacksonville Commissary, store man ager Larry Bentley wel comed the secretary of defense to the ninth-larg est (in sales volume) store in the world. It was an honor to take Mr. Hagel on a tour he was greeting patrons as we walked the aisles. Active duty and retired shoppers were pleasantly surprised to meet him, said Bentley. According to Bentley, the secretary was very impressed with the store and the warm wel come from the staff. Photo by MC2 Salton CebeCapt. Robert B. Caldwell, commanding officer of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast leads Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel on a tour of the center at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Hagel toured Naval Air Station Jacksonville and addressed concerns over sequestration within the Department of Defense. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 USS The Sullivans On PatrolUSS The Sullivans PAOOnly one month into deployment, USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) has fulfilled a plethora of special evolutions and port visits in the 6th and 5th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. First stop while tran siting the Atlantic Ocean was in Reykjavik, Iceland. While in port, The Sullivans had the distinct privilege of send ing 28 Midshipmen from the United States Naval Academy to a tour of the Icelandic Coast Guards vessel Thor. In addi tion to this tour, ships company, including Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, Executive Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Blakeslee, along with Department heads and Second Tour Division Officers, met with Embassy personnel for a formal get togeth er at the recently built Reykjavik Opera House. Tours were given on board USS The Sullivans by the commanding offi cer and executive officer to local dignitaries and embassy personnel in the days prior to departing for the Mediterranean, and eventually, 5th Fleet. Before transiting through the Straights of Gibraltar, The Sullivans made a brief port visit in Rota, Spain to receive fuel and allow ships company some leisure time before beginning the busy days ahead. Rota will homeport four Ballistic Missile Destroyers of the same Arleigh Burke Class as USS The Sullivans in the coming two years as a part of the phased adap tive approach. While in port, the crew said good bye to the 28 Midshipmen on board for summer training. Shortly after depart ing from Rota, Spain, The Sullivans made tran sit through the Straights of Gibraltar. Traffic was light, and many of the new personnel on board had the oppor tunity to see the unique passage with breathtak ing views of Africa and Europe on either side, in addition to the Rock of Gibraltar. After a roughly two hour transit through the Straights of Gibraltar, the crew shift ed their sights on inten sive Damage Control and Anti-Terrorism Force Protection training to prepare for the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. In the moonlight hours of July 18, The Sullivans drifted in the vicinity of Port Said, patiently wait ing her turn to enter the Suez Canal. At roughly 4:30 a.m. local time, they made their approach to the Canal and began the 14-hour transit. During this transit, they hosted four different pilots, and saw a myriad of Egyptian sites. The safe transit was slow and steady, allowing for beautiful views and another new experience for many of the Officers and Enlisted personnel. USS The Sullivans will continue her mission in the 6th Fleet and 5th Fleet operational areas as part of her six-month deploy ment. -Photo taken by Midshipmen 1st Class Micala MignealtA Midshipmen from the US Naval Academy on Summer Cruise takes aim on the .50 Caliber machine gun under the instruction of Crew Serve Weapons Instructor STG2 Rusty Howe. -Photo taken by IS1 Ryan Taylor Above, USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) close up the Battle Ensign and 5 Star Ensign while getting underway on deployment from Mayport, Florida on June 24, 2013. Left, Crew of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) mans the rails while coming alongside USNS Leroy Grumman during Replenishment at Sea. -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeExecutive Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Blakeslee, Gunners Mate 2nd Class Rosario, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Warren, and Fire Controlman 3rd Class Welch take part in a Burial at Sea Ceremony while underway en route to the Mediterranean.-Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeLt. Erin Connor, Ensign Elizabeth Decker and Lt.j.g. Kevin Garlington stand bridge watch during Sea and Anchor detail of entering Reykjavik, Iceland.-Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul Moe

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 5 -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeUSS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departs Naval Station Rota, Spain. -Photo taken by Midshipmen 1st Class Micala MignealtView of a waterfall during an MWR tour outside of Reykjavik, Iceland. -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeMidshipmen and Crew of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) take part in damage control and firefighting drills on the flight deck. Training conducted by Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Vernon Brown (Left) and Damage Controlman 1st Class Hakim Ahmed (right).-Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeAbove, Newly appointed Senior Chiefs, Senior Chief Fire Controlman Dave Fowler and Senior Chief Masterat-Arms Danny Moreaux, are pinned by Senior Chief Fire Controlman Michael Poole, Chief Navy Counselor Melissa Cyr and Chief Operations Specialist Jorge Martinez while underway en route to the Mediterranean. Left, Midshipmen onboard USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) take turns driving the ship from After Steering under the instruction of Ships Serviceman 2nd Class David Jackson, Lt.j.g. Paul Moe, and Ensign Christina Gatti. -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeLt.j.g. Rachel Warren (Nozzleman) leads a group of Midshipmen alongside Damage Controlman 1st Class Hakim Ahmed and Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Vernon Brown during firefighting and damage control drills while underway en route to the Mediterranean.-Photo taken by Midshipmen 1st Class Micala Mignealt -Photo taken by Lt.j.g. Paul MoeDamage Control Assistant, Lt.j.g. Kevin Garlington, takes time to train Midshipmen and crew members onboard USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) while underway en route to the Mediterranean.

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Navy Unveils New Initiatives In Battle Against Sexual AssaultsFrom Navy News ServiceNavy leaders have announced their newest sexual assault prevention initiatives in a message and a policy letter designed to continue the services battle against this crime. Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, chief of naval operations, out lined additional fleet initia tives from the San Diego fleet concentration area, and Fleet Training Center Great Lakes, Ill., and directed the rest of the fleet to implement some of the best practices proven to help in combating sexual assault in the Navy. Greenert named Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck, director of the 21st Century Sailor Office, to direct the Navywide implementation of effort. Everyone, from [seaman recruit to admiral], must take responsibility for promoting a climate of dignity and respect and an environment that does not demean individuals or tol erate sexist behavior, sexual harassment or sexual assault, Buck said. The execution of the sexual assault prevention and response initiatives across the fleet is an imperative that I believe will have an impact on reducing, with the goal of eliminating, the crime of sexual assault from our Navy. The new initiatives are part of the Navys ongoing efforts to provide for the safety and security of every sailor, the admiral said. We also are emphasiz ing other programs like Keep What You Earn and Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions to help our people understand the negative impact that alcohol can have on their lives and how they can support and help their shipmates make good decisions, he added. While the programs and ini tiatives are primarily focused on prevention, they also serve as a deterrent and reinforce com manders responsibility for vic tim support, Buck noted. Commanders have the responsibility for ensuring vic tims of sexual assault are sup ported, provided options in accordance with Department of Defense guidance, he said, and that the allegations will be independently investigated and offenders held appropriately accountable. The initiatives, to be imple mented by Oct. 1, include increasing leadership visibility with roving barracks patrols led by chief petty officers or experienced officers, and augmented with first class petty officers to deter behavior that may lead to sexual assault or misconduct. Also the Navy will assign dedicated sexual assault prevention and response officers lieuten ant commander or above to U.S. Fleet Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. Naval Forces Europe, Naval Surface Forces, Naval Submarine Forces, Naval Air Forces, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Naval Expeditionary Combat Command, the Navys four systems commands and U.S. Fleet Cyber Command who will report directly to their respective commander. In addition, the Navy will deploy resilience counselors to CVN and LHD/LHA commands by the end of fiscal year 2014. These counselors will be dedi cated civilian professionals with sexual assault response coor dinator training, certification and credentials, and they will be able to take restricted and unrestricted reports of sexual assault. The counselors will deploy with carrier strike groups, expeditionary strike groups and amphibious ready groups to provide services, support and coordination for sexual assault prevention and response and continuity of care for suicide prevention, stress reduction and other situations. Additionally, the latest initia tives include implementing best practices from fleet concentra tion areas throughout the fleet and revising alcohol sales poli cies at Navy exchanges world wide. Changes in liquor sales will be implemented over the next 90 days. Liquor will be sold only at main exchanges or at dedi cated package stores, and the footprint of alcohol displays and merchandise in stores other than package stores will be no more than 10 percent of the retail floor space. NEX facilities also will make single-use alcohol detection devices available to customers. The new initiatives also direct commands to ensure all sail ors residing in barracks attend indoctrination training within 30 days of occupancy. To reduce vulnerability of sailors while walking on base, commanders will survey facilities to identify areas that require better lighting, visibility or other safety improvements. Each Navy installation and fleet concentration area will have a senior flag officer des ignated to lead the area sex ual assault prevention and response program. This flag officer will establish routine coordination meetings with installation, local command representatives and local community and civic leaders to review program efforts. Duties also will include ensuring a community outreach and engagement plan is part of each areas program. The plan must include base and region commander cooperation, coor dination and consultation with local law enforcement, hospi tals and hotels. Ensuring a command cli mate of respect, trust and pro fessionalism is critical to com bating sexual assault, Buck said. To this end, he added, commands must review their compliance with command climate surveys, ensuring one is conducted within 90 days of a new commanding officer assuming command and every 12 months thereafter. Also, commanders must ensure they have briefed their immediate superior on their most recent command cli mate assessment using the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute Organizational Climate Survey, including a plan of action and milestones for corrective actions. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Auxiliary Member Reunited With Woman He Saved, Awarded For Heroic Action U.S. Coast Guard Public AffairsA Jacksonville, Fla.,man and member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary was awarded a Coast Guard Auxiliary Commendation Medal Saturday morning for saving a womans life during a St. Patricks Day parade in St. Augustine, Fla. Before the ceremony, David Hensel was reunit ed with Sherry Hartman, of St. Augustine, for the first time since he per formed CPR on her March 9, 2013, after she experi enced complete heart failure, pneumonia symptoms and blood poison ing. Hensel was with three other Auxiliary mem bers who were preparing to represent the Coast Guard in the parade when he noticed Hartman had collapsed so he leapt into action and began performing CPR on her while instructing others to get help. He performed CPR for more than 13 minutes before EMTs arrived. Hartman was taken to a local hospital for treatment, where she remained in a coma for the next six days before recovering. During the ceremony, Hartman said with teary eyes she couldnt find the words to express her gratitude for what Hensel did for her, but she would be eternally grateful. Aside from needing a pacemaker now, she is otherwise healthy. The hospital staff said Davids swift response is what kept Hartman alive. A firefighter paramedic with the Seminole County Fire Department for 20 years before retiring in 2006, Hartman said she never expected to be on the receiving end of EMT care. She added that she hopes her story will show others the importance of knowing how to perform CPR. The Coast Guard Auxiliary is the services volunteer component, and its members assist with safety and secu rity patrols, search and rescue, mass casualty and disasters, pollution response and patrols, homeland security, rec reational boating safety, commercial fishing and vessel exams, platforms for boarding parties and recruiting, among other duties. -Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Lauren Jorgensen Sherry Hartman (center) embraces the man who saved her life, Coast Guard Auxiliary member David Hensel, before an award presentation for Hensel in St. Augustine, Fla., Saturday, July 20, 2013. Since Hartman was unconscious when Hensel performed CPR on her March 9, 2013, this was her first time meeting him. Valiant Effort Welcoming Families To Mayport -Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony L. SotoAbove left, Cmdr. Steven Burdian, commanding officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant, addresses his crew and their families at a Coast Guard Cutter Valiant family welcoming event at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Tuesday, July 2, 2013. The event was held to welcome the spouses and dependents of crewmembers to the Jacksonville area and to inform them of the various programs, amenities and activities available to them. Above right, Seaman Scott Crawford, green shirt, a crewmember stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant, plays a game of horseshoes with several of his shipmates. Petty Officer 3rd Class Christian Stevenson, a food service specialist stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant, prepares hamburgers and hot dogs for attendees at a family welcoming event. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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CSGs and ARGs ready to surge. Despite reduced operations and mainte nance spending in FY 13, Greenert said the Navys focus is to keep sea com mands ready for deploy ments scheduled for FY 14. For FY 14, seques tration could reduce each account by 10 per cent. The Navy possibly faces deeper cuts for FY 14, because FY 13 used money available from previous years to help pad the effects of sequestration, Greenert explained. CNOs goal is to preserve shipbuilding and aviation contracts through this process. Furlough impacts to the civilian force continue to be a challenge. Regrettably, were enduring furloughs, Greneert said. Its an impact, I felt it last week. I feel it this week. It hurts our readiness and it hurts our productivity as well. CNO addressed sexual assault organizational changes and a revision to the Navy Exchange alco hol sales policy by fur ther discussing the Navys newest changes that are taking place fleet-wide. Greenert said with more than half of all sexual assaults involving alcohol, the Navy had to look more critically at the atmo sphere and climate of its bases. Greenert said after a review of Navy Exchange alcohol sales trends at base stores the data showed a high volume of sales occurring late into the night and early morning and were not in line with mainstream retailers. assets, Ingersoll said. This years hurricane season is predicted to be busy and the C4F METOC officers are working hard to keep 4th Fleet leader ship up to date about the possibility of hurricanes and current predictions. Pre-season predic tions for each hurricane season are generated by organizations such as the National Hurricane Center or supporting professional entities in the weather community. This spring, anomalously warm sea surface tem peratures in the tropical Atlantic, along with vari ous other factors, were the basis of predictions for an above-average season in 2013, Ingersoll said. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. SERMC Fun Zone-Photo by Christopher TuckerMarcus Miree and Richard Araujo, get ready to enter the First Class Petty Officers Association Fun Zone at SERMCs annual command picnic held at the Sea Otter Pavilion on July 17.From Page 1WeatherFrom Page 1CNO THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 9

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USS Gettysburg Families Connect With Several National Organizations USS Gettysburg PAO As a ship prepares for its deployment, families and friends are left to manage the households of the Sailors who depart to serve the nation. In a consolidated effort to support these incred ible families, guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg was joined by several national organizations as it took a unique spin on the normal predeployment information al meeting. United through Reading, Families Helping Families, Navy Wounded Warrior, Operation Gratitude, and the Navy League joined Friends and family of the crew of Gettysburg to celebrate the summer season and share important informa tion by the beach at Naval Station Mayport. In a unique event, families were able to make connections with their Family Readiness Group and Ombudsman while collecting important information concerning the cruisers upcoming deployment. Several organiza tions that Gettysburg has worked closely with were present, offering their support to the crew and their families. Know that there are so many people in Daytona who care about you, who care about your fami lies. All you have to do is call, said Ted Turowski, President of the Daytona Navy League. The Daytona Navy League has been an active part of Gettsyburg. They have continuously recognized exceptional Sailors aboard and will host sev eral of those Sailors at a race this month. The heart of this event was the Family Readiness Group (FRG) and making connections with the families of the crew. It was amazing to meet a lot of new families and for everyone to get excit ed about our work during deployment, says FRG President Erin Daniels. We gave out as much information as we could so that we could be as prepared as possible. Im looking forward to every thing we will do with the families during deploy ment The command Fun Fest brought together the entire command for a cook out, games, and sunshine as the sailors prepared their families for the upcoming deploy ment. Gettysburg is a part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. With the ship deployed, the families remaining in the area need vital con tact information and specific connections to the resources available around the base. This event provided a fun alternative to normal deployment briefings for families, as their children played games, friendly competition was waged, and families met mem bers of their chain of command. The best part of the Fun Fest was getting the Gettysburg fam ily together and getting to know everyone, says Intelligence Specialist Chief Jessica Zackery, who will remain aboard for the entire deployment. The command Fun Fest provided well deserved relaxation following two very successful sustain ment exercises in prepa ration for Gettysburgs upcoming deployment. The organizations pres ent will continue a rela tionship and partnership with the families once the ship deploys. The family readiness group is spearhead con certed volunteer efforts with each of the organizations, providing support consistently every month until the crew returns. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Command Master Chief Daniel Hacker of guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg, braves the dunk tank at the cruisers command picnic and pre-deployment Fun Fest. Gettysburg is part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Lt. Chet Frith of Navy Wounded Warrior-Safe Harbor introduces his PTSD support dog to children at guid ed missile cruiser USS Gettysburgs command picnic. Gettysburg and Navy Wounded Warrior-Safe Harbor recently announced a committed partnership of organized volunteer efforts. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Members of the crew of guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg hand out battalion buddies to their children. Every child in the command received a bear dressed in the Navy Working Uniform to keep near until their parents return from deployment. Gettysburg is a part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 11

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Aquatics Aug. 5: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug. 2 & 3 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Intramural Sports Aug. 10: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 2. 270-5451 Aug. 13: Go the Distance 10K/5K Run 8 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 13: Intramural Flag Football Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451 Aug. 20: 3v3 Fall Soccer Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins Aug. 26; end Oct. 21. 270-5451 Aug. 26-28: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 19. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWR Sports/FitnessJuly 26: Outdoor MoviesThe Lorax (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 2: Outdoor MoviesOz the Great and Powerful (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 5: Missoula Childrens Theatre Snow White & The Seven Dwarves Auditions. 10 am-12 pm at the Youth Center. Rehearsals will run Aug 5-9 12:30-2:30 pm; Showtimes August 9 at 3:30 pm and 6 pm. 2705680 Aug. 9: Outdoor MoviesThe Croods (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 16: Outdoor MoviesThe Goonies (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 23: Outdoor MoviesBrave (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 CO-ED Softball League and Playoffs -Photos courtesy of MWRUSS Philippean Sea pulled out the big guns and put them on the CO-ED Softball field for the 2013 season. The team finished with a 12-1 record for the league and continued their win streak eliminating everyone in their path during the playoffs. The next Softball season begins July 22. For more information on how to get your team involved call 904270-5451. HSM-40 Airwolves fall just shy of winning the season taking the Runner-up position for both the League and Playoffs. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Auto Skills Center July Special: 10 percent off all vehicle lifts plus free vehicle diagnostic for most vehicles. 270-5392 August Special: $2 off brake rotor turning and $225 for a 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rota tion and balance (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Aug. 3: UFC 163-Aldo vs. Korean Zombie. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 4: NFL PreSeason Kick Off Party. 8 pm kick-off Miami vs. Dallas. Drink Specials and free prize pool. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale Purchase tickets for the 2013 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in August: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 26: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. July 27: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 28: Ichnetucknee Springs Tubing Trip. Cost $5. Sign up by July 24. Van departs Liberty Center 7 a.m. July 29: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. July 30: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 31: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 2: Thrift Shop Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. Aug. 4: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 5: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 7: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Aug. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins. Van Departs 5:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $13. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 25, 2013 13

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