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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147

Material Information

Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 11, 2013
Publication Date: 06-27-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00305

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147

Material Information

Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 11, 2013
Publication Date: 06-27-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00305


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Have A Blast At MayportBy StaffNaval Station Mayport is gearing up for the 2013 Freedom Fest to celebrate Americas Independence on Saturday (June 29) held at Sea Gull Pavilion this year. The Greater Mayport Chief Petty Officer Association is sponsoring this years event with MWR and has planned an afternoon and evening of food, fun and fireworks. Rides, games and water and dry slides are being set up to keep the family entertained while a beach obstacle course and races will be held down in the sand. There will also be a sand cas tle building contest going on through out the afternoon. Plus, clowns will entertain with face painting and bal loon art. A DJ will be set up to keep the tunes jumping from 4-8 p.m. There will be live music by Second Tyme Around and usher in the pyrotechnics at 9 p.m. Food and drinks will be on sale throughout the day. For more information about the event, contact MWR at 270-5228.No Paper For July 4Due to the holiday season, The Mirror will be closed on July 4 and will not publish a July 4 edition. Photos and stories should still be submitted through The Mirror email, mayportmirror@comcast.net, no later than July 5 to be included in the July 11 edition of the paper. Free Fleet Market classified ads can be submitted online at www.mayportmirror.com or by fill ing out the free form in the Classified section and submitting by July 5. For more information, call 270-5226 ext. 1011. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyThe guided missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departs Naval Station Mayport for a scheduled deployment. The Sullivans is the second ship of the Arleigh Burke-class named for the five Sullivan brothers George, Francis, Joseph, Madison, and Albert Sullivan, aged 20 to 27 who lost their lives when their ship, USS Juneau, was sunk by a Japanese submarine in November 1942. The Sullivans Heads EastBy CNSL Public AffairsGuided-missile destroy er USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departed Naval Station Mayport today on a sixmonth Ballistic Missile Defense deployment in sup port of Maritime Security Operations and theater secu rity cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. The ship will deploy first to the European theater as part of the Phased Adaptive Approach, the purpose of which is to protect European allies, partners, U.S. forc es in the region, and the U.S. homeland against cur rent and emerging ballistic threats. The Sullivans returned from their last deployment on May 22, 2012 following completion of a successful seven-month deployment to the Mediterranean Sea. The ship most recently participat ed in 71st Anniversary of the Battle of Midway wreath lay ing ceremony in which Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, com mander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, went aboard and spoke about the impact of the Battle of Midway, which was fought June 4 to 7 in 1942 in North Pacific Ocean. The ship, commanded by Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, has a crew of nearly 300 Sailors and was commissioned in 1997. The Sullivans is an Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer with ballistic missile defense capa bilities and the second ship of the United States Navy to be named after the five Sullivan brothers. The brothers were from Waterloo, Iowa and served together on the USS Juneau (CL-52) during World War II are: George, 28; Francis, 27; Joseph, 24; Madison, 23; and Albert, 20; lost their lives dur ing the Battle of Guadalcanal on November 13, 1942. Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, commanding officer of the guided mis sile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), hugs his wife on the pier at Naval Station Mayport before he and his crew left on a scheduled deployment. Bailey Closes TemporarilyFrom Public Works Department MayportPublic Works Department Mayport will shut down a portion of Bailey Avenue on July 1-3 for crosswalk work New crosswalk stripping and repairs of temporary paving will be installed along the Bailey Avenue, in front of the Base Gym. Detour signs will be in place along Bailey Avenue to help direct traffic flow. Once this activity has been complet ed, the road will be reopened. Working At The Car Wash -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of NEX join NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, and CMDCM Bob White at a ribbon cutting for the newly renovated car wash at the base Gas Station. The NEX is also running a promotion for customers to receive 20 per gallon discount on gas if they purchase a car wash at the pump. Pictured from left is AUTEC representative Sean Forsyth, Gas Station attendants Estrella Baker and Linda Gentry, NEX General Manager Bill Hockenbury, White and Pickard.Register Kids Now For VBSFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold its annual Vacation Bible School from July 22-26 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children ages 4-12. This years theme is Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God. At Kingdom Rock, kids will meet new Bible Buddies, like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children how Gods love, family, friends, prayer and trust can help them stand strong. There is no cost for VBS, but space is limited. Register at the Chapel during normal working hours or call 270-5212.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, First off, let me extend an invitation to all Naval Station Mayport to come out on June 29 to celebrate Americas Independence at the annual Freedom Fest and fireworks show from 4-9 p.m. This years event will be held at the Sea Gull Pavilion, next the CPO Club. I want to thank the Greater Mayport Area CPOA for stepping up and taking care of their own by sponsoring the event after sequestration eliminated funding for the festival. The Chiefs stepped in and made it happen and they have planned a great day with MWR. Its going to be a great time. I hope to see you out there. There will be rides, a sandcastle competition and live music before the fireworks. Im sure the food will also be great, espe cially if the Chiefs Mess decides to make ribs. They beat out my own special reci pe to take home the prize at the second annual Battle of the Ribs competition sponsored by Navy Exchange on June 14. Teams from the CPOA, USS Roosevelt, and Base Security joined me in sweat ing over a hot grill to cook up some of the tastiest competition around. Thanks to judges Commodore Dan Boyles, XO Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Angi Thacker and Joyce Parrish for taking on the daunting task of eating all seven entries even though they didnt pick mine as winner. Again. For the second year. But whos counting. On Tuesday evening, I was invited, along with the COs, XOs and CMCs from Mayports tenant commands, to join our Ombudsmen for their annual picnic. It was a good opportunity for everyone to come together for an evening of fun and information. Representatives from MWR also got a chance to highlight their great summer program options. MWR has so many wonderful, familyfriendly activities going on this summer. One of the best programs MWR spon sors every summer is the outdoor mov ies Friday nights at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sailors and their families can come out, bring their chairs and blankets and enjoys a movie under the stars. Wendy Sawyer was also there to dem onstrate equipment available at Outdoor Adventures. If you havent taken advan tage of Outdoor Adventures, you really should. They have all the camping and outdoor equipment you will need for a fun adventure trip. Dont forget about the pool this summer either. The base pool is open for recreational swim, as well as swim lessons for the whole fam ily. As long as were on the subject of fit ness, I know everyone is looking forward to our beautiful new Fitness Center; and from the looks of it, we wont have to wait too much longer. Talking about summer and the upcoming Independence Day holiday, I want to remind everyone that this is a time of celebration and celebrations are a lot more fun when good decisions are a part of them. The summer months are often a high point of our year as we take a welldeserved vacation and spend time with family and friends. The summer allows for an opportunity to relax and refresh. However, many of the activities we pur sue during our vacation time put us at risk for accidents that have potentially serious consequences. As you drive to and from vacation des tinations, remember that 81 percent of the non-combat fatalities in 2012 total took place over the summer. Last sum mer, 80 service members died in motor vehicle collisions; 27 in 4-wheel vehi cles, 47 while riding motorcycles, 4 were pedestrians, and 2 were bicyclists. These fatalities occurred in spite of state laws and Department of Defense policies requiring the use of seatbelts while in a car and protective gear while riding motorcycles and bicycles. Some of you will enjoy water activities such as swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, or water skiing. Sadly, six ser vice members died while participating in water-related activities last summer. It is important to follow swimming area rules and to be aware of the hidden dangers inherent in participating in water activities. Alcohol is all too often a component in these tragic accidents. Recognize the risks and make good decisions. We all know that alcohol, even in small quantities, impairs our decision-making and is often a significant factor in many accidents. So before taking our first sip, we need to remember never to drink and drive. Plan ahead and always think before acting. We all must do everything we can to be safer this summer. Each of us must do our part to keep everyone around us safe off-duty, as we do on-duty. If you have been walking along Mayports beach over the past few weeks, you may have noticed several areas up on the sand banks cordoned off by orange netting. These are to pro tect the sea turtle nests that are bur ied just under the sand. Naval Station Mayport has long been a preferred nest ing ground for these beautiful endan gered species and it is behooved of us all to take responsibility for these creatures survivability while in our care. There are several things we can do throughout this nesting season. Turn off all unnecessary lights and not use flash lights without a red lenses. Reposition the source of any light fixture so it is not visible from the beach. Use motion detectors on outside lights for security purposes. Place timers on lights so they are off by 10 p.m. Close all Navy Lodge, BOQ and house curtains at sunset that face the beach. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatchling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS Mayport Beach Patrol immediately at 270-5101 for the base beach and Hanna Park. Call the Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol at 613-6081 for all Jacksonville area beaches or the Florida Marine Patrol at 270-2500. Finally, you all have heard a lot over the past year about sexual assault and sexual harassment within the Department Of Defense. This is a sub ject that I take very seriously, and this CRIME will not be tolerated on this Installation. Secretary Mabus told the Senate that he was angry about sexual assault in the Navy and we should all be angry too! We are a team and to achieve Team Victories the single most impor tant tenant is the respect, trust and treat ment of our teammates. Sexual assault tears our moral fabric apart, it negatively impacts our warfighting capability, vio lates our core values and the high stan dards of professionalism and personal discipline we are held accountable to. It takes courage to come forward and say you have been a victim. We have set up several avenues for support and I want to reiterate the fact that I will not toler ate it at this command. Lets continue to work together to eliminate this crime from our Service and eliminate the con ditions that make this crime possible lets stay proactive and get to the left of it! Please continue sending your sugges tions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSIve received many calls and emails this past month from parents who have just moved to the Jacksonville area or who are arriving any day now. While most children and their families get excited about moving to a new community because it is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore different scenery, and maybe get your own bedroom, a move can be filled with anxiety. Children have left friends and will be start ing in a new school. Most of the students in this school have already formed friendships. They may even know the teach er. Your child is wor ried about Who will be my teacher? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common ques tions you are probably going to hear over and over this summer. While you may be concerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a cli mate change, your chil dren are worried about school and right now Who am I going to play or do things with? When can we go to the beach? I am bored what can I do? Roughly 16 mil lion American families move each year. And the adjustment can be hard on kids. One of the keys to making it easier is time. Psychologist Gary Santavicca says, In gen eral, the more prepara tion you have, the easier a transition is. Totally preventing mov ing anxiety may not be possible, but attempts to do so can benefit all in the family not just the children. Consider three key elements: reliability, routine, and relationships. By promoting these three elements, youll expe rience a more positive move for everyone. When parents trust the move, you will send a positive message to children about the good place they have moved to and the good people, and especially, the school here in Jax. Your feeling of reliability will be trans ferred to your children, helping them to feel con fident about the move and the school experi ence. It is easy to distrust the unknown, so reli ability should be devel oped through familiarity and a pattern of helpful response. If you didnt have time before you left your last base, have your chil dren now go online to learn about NS Mayport on Facebook, their new school at www. duvalschools.org, and what has been going on there like athletics, clubs, grade level activi ties. They can also check out the happenings in and around town and the beach at www.coj.net. If Weve Moved! What Now? Whats Next?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingNext month the require ment for Department of Decals to enter Navy installations will go away. These decals have been on the automo biles of service mem bers for several decades. Change. In August, Capt. Doug Cochrane will hand over the mantle of Commanding Officer of Naval Station Mayport to Capt. Wesley McCall. Change. In base housing, almost every day this last week, a moving truck can be easily spotted. Again, change. Change is everywhere. Change is part of life, and in particular part of Navy life. Life is full of events that have beginnings and ends. It is easy to sug gest that the only thing constant in life is change itself. Many people thrive and find change exciting. However, while most peo ple accept it as a simple fact of life, change can also be unsettling. As a Chaplain, I often have the privilege of pro viding counsel to Sailors and their families who often struggle with the changes of their lives. Multiple changes in ones life going on all at once can bring significant pres sure on single and mar ried Sailors alike. When we sit down to talk, they often share their uncer tainties, doubts, and fears about whats next and what the future may hold. Deep down inside, they express a yearning for stability, assurance, and hope. While life goes through its cycles, seasons, ebbs and flows, ups and downs, good times and bad, change gives us the opportunity to draw close and turn to God and grow in our faith and our rela tionship with Him. God is faithful and enduring. Note the fol lowing passages found in the Bible (New King James Version): Malachi 3:6 For I am the LORD, I do not change; Therefore you are not consumed, O sons of Jacob. Hebrews 13:8 Jesus Christ is the same yester day, today, and forever. James 1:17 Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and comes down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow of turning. The Christian scrip tures remind us that in the midst of change, Jesus is a solid rock, a sure foun dation, and an anchor for our lives. While our days are full of change and a con stant pace of go, go, go, I encourage you each eve ning before bed, to take a moment and to pause and offer prayers, praise and thanksgiving to God. One of my favorite prayers is found in the Book of Common Prayer and is used at the close of each day. I encourage you to use these words tonight: Be present, O merci ful God, and protect us through the hours of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and chances of this life may rest in your eternal changelessness; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.Chap Jay Cayangyang NS Mayport Chaplain CHAPLAINSChange Is A Part Of Life In & Out Of NavySee SLO, Page 16

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U.S. 4th Fleet Commander Visits BNS Tapajo At Naval Station Mayport4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Admiral Sinclair Harris, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet visited the Brazilian submarine BNS Tapajo, June 20 at Naval Station Mayport. Tapajo was at Naval Station Mayport after completing a sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX) with the USS Truman (CVN-75). The exercise was a scenario based predeployment exercise in the Atlantic Ocean that began June 3, and fin ished June 17. The 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR) includes South America, Central America, the Caribbean and surround ing waters. The United States has vital national interest in the region of the, strengthening ties, promoting friendships and increasing interoper ability among the naval forces in the Western Hemisphere. Harris talk ed about this during his visit. The Brazilians are a true partner in our Hemisphere, and in the world, this exercise is a great example of the ben efits of working together. The SUSTAINEX was a pre deployment exercise for Truman battle group. The exercise put the ships together for several coordinated evolutions, including maritime secu rity operations and test ing air defense and antisubmarine warfare proficiencies. The exercise also proved very valuable from a command-andcontrol standpoint. Harris discussed the benefits of having a partner nation participate with the U.S. in these types of evolu tions. When we get a chance to operate in a exercise like this the SUSTAINEX it is an outstanding venue for training, where Brazil benefits, as well is the U.S. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and Commander U.S. 4th Fleet, is rendered honors from Brazilian Navy Cmdr. Cartier Horacio, commanding officer, of the Brazilian Navy subma rine BNS Tapajo (S-33). Harris toured the submarine after it completed predeployment work-ups with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group.Navy Installations Plan Reduction In ForceBy Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsCommander, Navy Installations Command announced today a plan to conduct a Reduction in Force action in fiscal year 2013 that will be complet ed in 2014. Over the course of the next seven months, CNIC will eliminate 745 civilian positions throughout its shore enterprise in seven Navy Regions across 20 states, the District of Columbia, the Island of Guam, and in the coun tries of Italy, Greece and Cuba. The actual total number of people directly impact ed by this RIF action will be determined once other workforce shaping mea sures such as Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments, Voluntary Early Retirement Authority and placement into current vacancies have been com pleted. CNIC, along with other Navy commands, has experienced reduced budgets and must imple ment cost-saving mea sures across the entire force. This action is not taken lightly, but is part of a conscious, risk-based approach to future shore capabilities that are aligned with the Navy Mission, said Vice. Adm. William French, CNIC. I am committed to ensur ing that we do all we can to assist those people directly impacted by this action by providing them access to all tools avail able under Reduction in Force rules and assisting them with finding future employment. Career transition ser vices for the employees affected by the RIF action will vary depending on their needs, but servic es available will include skills assessment, resume and cover letter prepa ration, networking and interviewing techniques, counseling, job search assistance, and retraining, if necessary. Reducing these posi tions may have marginal impacts on the services CNIC has provided in the past. However, it will not have any direct impacts to CNICs capability to sup port the mission of pro viding service to the fleet, fighter and family. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 DESRON 40 Lends A Helping Hand DESRON 40 PAOWhen the Sailors at COMDESRON 40 found out their 2013 Humanitarian Assistance mission had been cancelled due to sequestra tion, they put their heads together and decided on lend ing a helping hand to the local community instead. OS1 (SW) Christopher Macias took the lead on the volunteer plan and his first selection was Habitat for Humanity, Jacksonville (HabiJax). We chose to work with HabiJax because it is a great organization that consistent ly reaches out to people in Jacksonville; they are always looking for help and know that it takes all members of the com munity to make a difference. The HabiJax ReStore was the first volunteer stop for the staff. At the ReStore warehouse staff members moved furni ture, measured doors, unloaded trucks, and stocked shelves. Lt. Cmdr. Angela Johnson said, Volunteering at the HabiJax ReStore was a reward ing experience, we were able to give back while getting a great work out. It was a win win! The ReStore warehouse in Jacksonville has lots of great merchandise at a great price. If you havent been by there it is worth checking out. Staff members also devoted time at two different HabiJax constructions sites. Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW) Jermaine Lawton was a part of both builds and said, Habitat homes are especially near and dear to my heart. To have helped establish a new home means you have helped some one establish a new life and the time spent is worthwhile. The DESRON staff has also dedicated over 100 hours of manpower working at the Ronald McDonald house, help ing to beautify the facility inside and out. Some members of the staff weeded and remulched the garden areas around the play ground, while others helped the cleaning crew with everyday tasks such as cleaning windows and blinds and mopping the floors. ITCS (IDW/SW) Jefferies was asked to help with painting. Serving the Ronald McDonald house was a great experience, he said. Anytime you can put a smile on a childs face by showing them you care is satisfying. A little work goes a long way, and shows volumes for not only the command but for the Navy as a whole. Lt. Paolo Camogliano said, It was a great experience meet ing some of the children and knowing that we have made a difference in their lives. I would definitely do it again. Macias said the staff has plans to continue its work as the DESRONs operational sched ule permits. We have contacted many other local nonprofit organiza tions. We hope to carry out our volunteer effort throughout the summer and maybe into the 2013 Holiday Season, he said. -Photos submitted by DESRON 40Volunteers from COMDESRON 40 pose for a group picture outside of the Ronald McDonald House, one of several non-profit organizations the command has helped out in Jacksonville. Lt. Paolo Camogliano blows off the walkway at the Ronald McDonald House. Sailors stack and sort drywall and moulding at the HabiJax ReStore. A DESRON 40 Sailor cleans off a window at a new HabiJax house build. Sailors pour concrete to set a post at a new HabiJax house build.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 5 Lt.j.g. Sherrie Flippin pulls weeds at the Ronald McDonald House garden, Chief Yoeman Townsend cleans a window at the Ronald McDonald House volunteer opportunity sponsored by DESRON 40. A Sailor helps sort home goods at the HabiJax ReStore. Lt. Paolo Camogliano and Lt. Juan Granja play soccer with one of the children staying at the Ronald McDonald House. CS1 (SW) Jermaine Lawton sweeps up leaves in the parking lot at Ronald McDonald House.

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Navy Training Reviewed For College Credit NETC Public Affairs OfficeThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATT) and Center for Information Dominance (CID) are the latest commands to con tinue receiving recom mended college credits for their training. The American Council on Education (ACE) com pleted its review June 20. The courses reviewed were either new or had undergone revisions since the last ACE review. We promise our Sailors a lifetime of career oppor tunities, said Roland Perez, Naval Education and Training Commands (NETC) educational pro gram and management analyst. Sailors have the chance to submit credits they receive from their training towards most colleges and universities. Capt. Katherine Erb, CNATT commanding offi cer, spoke to civilian aca demic professionals from ACE before their review. I think the ACE train ing evaluations are a fab ulous idea. The courses we instruct provide our Sailors and Marines with skills for their military careers; the fact that this training also provides an opportunity to gain civilian college credit is of even more benefit to our personnel, said Erb. This is a great experience for the instructors, as well. It is motivational to teach a military course that you know is equivalent to a college course. We are very appreciative for what ACE continues to do for our military. ACE supports the edu cational goals of the Navys Sailors throughout all learning centers within NETC. By recommend ing academic credits for training course work and/ or occupational experi ence, ACE provides an additional benefit to mili tary. We have a great work ing relationship with ACE. The Navy is leading the way for other mili tary branches in regard to instruction, training courses and number of academic credits recom mended by ACE, says Perez. The life span of credit recommendation is 10 years, after which the par ticular training course or occupation (if still active) must be re-evaluated. Training courses may be recommended for aca demic credits on four levels (vocational-cer tificate, associate/lower division baccalaureate degree, upper division baccalaureate and gradu ate degree). The content of the training courses or service occupations value affects the number of aca demic credits that may be recommended by ACE. Sailors should refer to their Sailor/Marine ACE Registry Transcript (SMART), a complete educational and training history of a member while serving in the Navy, when planning for their education or career, said Perez. ACE credit recom mendations are published online in the ACE Guide. The Navy College Office (NCO) counselors use this guide as a standard refer ence for both active duty personnel and veterans. The results of the ACE review will be announced in the next few months. To learn more about the ACE Military Guide, visit www.acenet.edu/newsroom/Pages/MilitaryGuide-Online.aspx/. Vendors Talk With Purchasers At GSA Expo -Photo by Paige GnannMore than 100 purchasing agents, buyers and credit card holders attended 2013 GSA Expo held at Naval Station Mayport on June 19. MWR hosted more than 75 vendors for this annual event, featuring products from office supplies to heavy equipment for ships. Health Info At Click Of MouseFrom TRICARETRICARE beneficiaries who regularly get their care at military clinics and hospitals can download a summary of their person al health data including lab results, medications, allergies and problem lists from the TOL Secure Department of Defense Patient Portal in a conti nuity of care document (CCD) format. The new CCD is available via the TOL Blue Button at www. tricareonline.com. The CCD is an indus try standard and is easy to share with other health care systems like RelayHealth and Microsoft Health Vault. Patients can download TOL Blue Button data into a CCD and share it with any health care system capable of accepting the file, including non-DoD health care systems. The CCD guarantees the com plete and accurate trans fer of Blue Button health data. Patients can down load CCD data to their computers and upload it to their personal health record. In some cases, it may not be possible to read the actual CCD data on a personal computer because of the file type, but the information can downloaded as a PDF. To take advantage of the CCD, patients need to go towww.tricareonline. com and log in to their accounts. Once there they need to: Download My Data and date range to down; click Save as CCD select Save File, select the location and click OK 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Midshipmen Embark USS Gettysburg For Sustainment Exercise USS Gettysburg Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) is currently hosting 17 Midshipmen from col lege Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs during a June underway to take part in a sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX). Sustainment exercises like this one offer mid shipmen so many oppor tunities to see surface ships, in every possible operation they could par ticipate in, said Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Hagan, Gettysburg senior watch officer. During their time onboard the midshipmen witnessed and participat ed in multiple shipboard evolutions including live fire exercises, small boat operations, watch stand ing, man overboard drills, underway replenish ments, flight operations, navigation, and engineer ing drills. The exercise shows the flexibility and capability of todays modern naval fleet, said Hagan. Junior midshipmen were paired with sailors in order to gain an under standing of the life of the crew. Senior midshipmen were assigned young divi sion officers to give them an understanding of what their job will be in a few short months. My experience onboard has been great. Im even thinking about picking Gettysburg for ship selection, said Midshipman 1st Class Michael Hagan. Everyone is so enthusias tic about their job. Some of the mid shipmen are only a few months from commis sioning. For some of them this opportunity is their last chance to gain expe rience before arriving at their new commands in August. It is very exciting to learn so much information with my upcoming commissioning. Im more than overwhelmed with all of the information, said Midshipman 1st Class Alex Kirkland-El, who commissions in August. I am very eager to learn and Gettysburg has given me that opportunity. The midshipmen will remain onboard for the remainder of the exercise. Gettysburg is currently underway in prepara tion for their upcoming deployment with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. -Photos by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Capt. Brad Cooper welcomes Midshipman 2nd Class Ahmed Kahn to guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg. The Midshipmen will be aboard for a sustainment exercise with the Harry S. Truman Strike Group during the month of June as Gettysburg prepares to deploy. Quarter Master 2nd Class Connie Williams teaches Midshipman 2nd Class James Kempa how to use a stadimeter aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg during a sustainment exercise with the Harry S. Truman Strike Group. Midshipman 1st Class James Wiltshire takes the conn during an underway replenish ment aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg with USNS John Lenthall during a sustainment exercise with Harry S. Truman Strike Group. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 1, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Command Liaison Building 1 Room 104 July 2, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 2, 8 a.m.-noon, Point of Contact Building 1 Room 104 July 2, 1-3 p.m., Data Collection Coordinator, Building 1 Room 104 July 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 8, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO July 8, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Building 1, Room 719 July 8-12, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 9, 9-11 a.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 July 9, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 10, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 10, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center July 11, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 15-19, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training, FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 16, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 22, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 22-26, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 23, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 24, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 July 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 25, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1, Room 1124 July 29, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 July 29, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 29-Aug. 2, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 31, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 31, 10:30-11:30 a.m., How to Survive the Holidays, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Tuesday, July 2 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. John Reed, a noted wildlife and out door photographer will present on the subject of Photographing at the zoo. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types welcomed and encour aged to come and learn more about photography. For more information www.beachesphotogra phyclub.org Wednesday, July 3 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is cel ebrating Independence Day with a Garden Concert featuring The River City Satin Swing Band from 7-9 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. Put on your red, white and blue, grab a blanket or chair and come celebrate Americas birthday in The Cummer Gardens. With the St. Johns River as a backdrop and stars above, the sounds of The River City Satin Swing Band will keep you entertained all evening. The Cummer will be closed during normal business hours on July 4. Guests are wel come to bring blankets, chairs, food and alcohol ic beverages. Tickets are $10 for members, $20 for non-members and $400 for a table, which includes reserved seating and a gourmet picnic basket for 10 people. Children 5 and under enjoy free admis sion. The concert will go on rain or shine. To pur chase tickets, please call (904) 899-6004 or visit www.cummer.org/con certs-cummer. Saturday, July 6 They lived here for 10,000 years. Come learn about the first inhabit ants of the Talbot Islands, the Timucuan. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. to hear stories of their daily lives, epic battles and cultural traditions. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event.Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Riverside Arts Market (RAM) are part nering to host River Ruckus a family festival to celebrate the St. Johns River from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. River Ruckus pro vides an opportunity for the community to come together to celebrate two of our most impor tant local assets the St. Johns River and RAM. The event will showcase the recreational benefits pro vided by the river and the importance of respecting, protecting, and enjoying this tremendous natural resource. Sunday, July 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional informa tion, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 4th Fleet GolfU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet will host a golf tournament on July 10 with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start at Windy Harbor Golf Club. Format will be a four-person scramble (best ball) and cost is $50 per player, including green fees, cart, breakfast prior to play, range balls, non-alcoholic beverages on course and lunch after play. Every player will receive a Fourth Fleet golf ball and golf towel. Prizes will be awarded for closest to the pin and long drive, along with others. For more information, contact Cmdr. Lewis Preddy at 270-4069 or lewis.preddy@navy.mil; QM1 Amos Riley at 270-4120 or amos.riley@navy.mil; or Jon Fine at 270-5380 or jon.fine@navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 11

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HSL-48 Detachment 5 Delivers -Photo by MC3 Billy HoAn SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, carries pallets of supplies to the flight deck of the guidedmissile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) during a vertical replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Joshua Humphreys (T-AO 188). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Navy Implementation Plan Approved, More Positions Open For Women Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy is mov ing forward to open all positions previously closed to the assign ment of women, continu ing in the Department of Defenses rescission of 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule. Navys implemen tation plan, submit ted by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey and acknowledged by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, has now been submitted for Congressional notifi cation. Navys deliberate approach to reducing gender-based barriers to womens service will provide the time neces sary to integrate women into occupational fields so they can succeed and flourish, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, direc tor, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. This is important, and weve taken our time to get it right. Our implementa tion plan has addressed all positions currently closed to the assignment of women, ensuring we maximize professional opportunities for our Sailors. According to the implementation plan, the Navy will have no closed occu pations, very limited number of closed posi tions, and equal profes sional opportunity for females in every officer designator and enlist ed rating in the Navy by January 1, 2016. Following the required 30-day Congressional notification period, over 400 Navy positions in the Coastal Riverine Force will be opened for the assignment of women. The 400 Navy positions in the Coastal Riverine Force small craft include both female officers and enlist ed. More than 5,000 posi tions are currently closed to the assign ment of women in the USMC Ground Combat Element. Navy will follow the USMC Implementation Plan as units are opened. These positions include female Hospital Corpsmen (HM) and Religious Program Specialists (RP) and female medical officers, Chaplains, and surface warfare officers, subma rine officers, and avia tors serving as Naval Gunfire Liaison Officers (NGLO). All Navy person nel assigned to the USMC Ground Combat Element will be required to adhere to USMC occupational standards as applicable. Over 3,000 positions in Naval Special Warfare remain currently closed to the assignment of women. The Navy will follow the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) developed integrated timeline for the poten tial integration of women into Special Forces. According to the time line, Congressional noti fication for Naval Special Warfare integration is scheduled for July 2015. Election for Navy enlist ed boot camp and officer selection is scheduled to begin in October 2015, with the Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) and Special Warfare Combatant Craft Crewmen (SWCC) pipe line opening to females and cadre placement beginning in January 2016. The first opportuni ty for female enlisted per sonnel to attend SEAL/ SWCC training is sched uled for March 2016, with the first opportunity for officers to ship to SEAL/ SWCC training June 2016. USSOCOM is working with all of the Services to tie occupational standards to opera tional requirements. Additionally, USSOCOM will research and analyze social impacts of integra tions on small, elite units operating in austere and remote environments and conduct behavioral science analysis, with all studies scheduled to be complete by July 1, 2014. During the USSOCOM female integration imple mentation process, quar terly progress reports on the elimination of gender-restrictive policies will be made to the Secretary of Defense through the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. Privacy, berthing, and leadership require ments currently restrict approximately 19,000 Navy positions to the assignment of women on both surface ships and submarines. The Navy will decide wheth er to expand assignment opportunity for enlisted women to Frigates, Mine Countermeasure ships, and Patrol Coastal Craft no later than June 2014. Following in-depth analysis of cost, habitabil ity decommissioning and commissioning sched ules, the Navy will decide on the future assignment of female enlisted on submarines no later than March 2015. If restrictions for assign ment will be necessary based on cost prohibi tive privacy and berthing updates, and if equal pro fessional opportunity can not be found elsewhere, the Navy will request an exception to policy by the Secretary of Defense. The Navy supports integrating women into newly opened positions and units as expeditiously as possible, considering good order and judicious use of fiscal resources. The Navys deliberate approach to reducing gender-based barriers to womens service will provide the time neces sary to integrate women into occupational fields so they can succeed and flourish. More information on women in the Navy can be found at the Navy Office of Womens Policy web site at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/organization/ bupers/WomensPolicy/ Pages/default.aspx THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 13

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Running Of The Ditch: The Final Leg USS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsToday, amidst the anticipation of return ing home, the Golden Dragon crew of USS Hu City (CG 66) continued their tradition and ran their third relay around the weather decks as their ship conducted a northbound transit of the Suez Canal. After backto-back deployments into the Arabian Gulf, this was Hu Citys final scheduled transit of the Suez Canal and their last time to participate in the Running of the Ditch for quite some time. The Suez Canal is an arti ficial waterway in Egypt running alongside the Sinai Peninsula that con nects the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. For many deploying Sailors, it marks the symbolic start of their transit home. During the Running of the Ditch, Hu City Sailors run a continuous relay around the weather decks for the entire duration of the 110-mile transit. The 15-hour northbound tran sit is exhausting for many, but the opportunity to go for a run, relieve some stress, and share in cama raderie one last time. Running a combined distance of almost 700 miles during the transit, the Golden Dragon crew exceeded expectations and surpassed totals from the proceeding relays. I really enjoy the run ning of the ditch because it allows the whole crew to participate in one event, said Ensign Savanna Reynolds and because it is an all day event it allows all the Sailors to partici pate despite their watch schedule. This event was marked by specialized t-shirts created by event organizers Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Lisa Broadfield and Information Systems Technician 1st Class Shana Alger to com memorate the event. The shirts are tan in color to signify the desert geog raphy of Egypt and com plete with a historic pic ture of the canal on the back. The t-shirts were a good incentive for those who typically do not enjoy running to get out on the weather decks for a jog. The t-shirts really brought the crew together as a whole and created a team-like atmosphere, said Cryptologic Technician Collection 3rd Class Katherine McGarvey. As always, the Running of the Ditch was a suc cessful event and hope fully something the Golden Dragons will remember for years to come. It is events like these that dont fade from ones memory fast and events like these that remind Hu City Sailors of the family and team atmosphere they have onboard. Hu City is sailing alongside USS Dwight D. Eisenhower on their tran sit home after their sec ond deployment to the US Central Command Area of Responsibility in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts. Lt .j.g Anastasia Abid, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), participates in the run ning of the ditch, a relay for the 101-mile length of the ships transit. -Photos by MC2 Matthew R. ColeSailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) participate in the running of the ditch, a relay for the 101-mile length of the ships transit. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Hu City Arrives In Palma de Mallorca, SpainUSS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public AfairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 18. The visit will provide the crew with welldeserved rest and relax ation before continuing on to the ships homeport of Mayport, Fla. The Hu Citys crew recently completed their mission to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsi bility with the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group. It was many of the Sailors second deployment in the last 13 months on the ship. Mediterranean port visits are always a favor ite for Sailors, said Capt. Daniel B. Uhls, com manding officer. We consider it as sort of a reward for all of the hard work Hu City Sailors did in part one and two of deployment. Palma de Mallorca gives Sailors a chance to sight see, shop and explore a new place that many have not seen before. Palma de Mallorca sounds like an amaz ing place and Im look ing forward to enjoying the food and seeing the impressive architecture of its historic buildings, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class Francisco Villalon of Hu City. This port call will also provide an opportunity to strengthen the relation ship between Spain and the U.S. and help main tain a safe maritime envi ronment. The U.S. and Spain work together to develop cooperative solutions to support regional securi ty and stability through out this vital region of the world, said Uhls. Port visits like this lead to expanded military interoperability that enhances our ability to provide ready forces for bilateral and multilateral exercises and operations. -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeCmdr. William Davis, executive officer USS Hu City (CG 66), presents an American flag to the families of Alfonso Casanovas and Robina Cornille, Spanish liaisons to the U.S. Navy, during a memorial service on the ships flight deck. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Branch Clinics Awarded Medical Blue H For ExcellenceNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, with its hospital and five branch health clin ics (BHCs), earned the Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Blue H for the fourth consecutive year for command excellence in health promotion for 2012. The Blue H award symbolizes our priority to provide the best care possible to each and every one of our patients (our nations heroes) and their families, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, commanding officer, NH Jacksonville. People come from all over the nation to see us because we provide the highest quality care and best outcomes at our hospital and branch health clinics. Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville and Navy Reserve Navy Operational Health Support Unit (NH OHSU) Detachment G each received the Gold Star level. At its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, NH Jacksonville received the Silver Eagle award and the Bronze Anchor award at its Branch Health Clinic Albany. Receiving the Navy Surgeon General Blue H award is a true reflection of our dedication and focus on health promotions that all the members of the entire Navy Operation Support Center medical team exhibit on a daily basis, said Capt. Jonathan Groh, medical officer, NOSC Jacksonville. The Blue H award recognizes excellence in clinical primary prevention services, community health promotion and medical staff health. The award assesses health topics such as alcohol abuse prevention, injury prevention, nutrition physical activity, psychological health, sexual health, tobacco cessation and weight management. A total of 271 Navy and Marine Corps active and reserve units were selected for the Blue H award, which is divided into three categories: Fleet, Medical and Semper Fit Center. Managed by The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, headquartered in Portsmouth, Va., the annual Blue H encourages and rewards the promotion of health in Navy and Marine Corps organiza tions. Since founding in 1941, NH Jacksonville is committed to the care of the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys fourth largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. On average each day, a team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 sameday surgeries, fills 4,700 pre scriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers three babies. Up to eight percent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. For more information on Navy wellness programs, con tact NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at (904) 542-5292. For additional information on The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), visit the Blue H website at: http:// www.med.navy.mil/sites/ nmcphc/health-promotion/ pages/blue-h.aspx Mayport Rides To Work -Photos by Paige GnannAbove left, Naval Station Mayport Lead Motorcycle Safety Instructor Alan Manges checks out Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW) Thomas Menard of SWOS before he begins an obstacle course designed to test rider skills at Mayports Ride to Work on June 24. The event was held to raise awareness and show support for motorcycle safety. Above right, Motorcycle Instructor Greg Wojciechowski watches as Hull Technician 1st Class (SW) Wesley Deckard navigates the course set up at C12 Hangar. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 15

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your child is too young to do an internet research, you can help. Finding out the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports schedules, and clubs available will provide information to ease the transition. Routine is another key element to reducing anxi ety because it provides structure to the childrens day and security in know ing what to expect. Even though it is summer and most schedules just fly out of the window, start a summer routine. Establish a bed time and a waking up schedule fol lowed by some jobs which will help you to get moved in. If your children are really young, maybe they can help with removing all that paper from the packing. Be inventive so they feel a part of this exciting experience! If school anxieties seem greater than normal, you might want to try a visit to the school. Be sure to call ahead since area schools have reduced staff in the summer. Explain that you just want to walk around you really dont need an official tour. The School Liaison Officer at Judith. cromartie@navy.mil can help set up that tour and provide detailed enroll ment information. Being proactive can minimize the time you spend strug gling with incidents relat ed to move anxiety. Relationship-building does not have to wait until the start of school. The Youth Sponsorship Program coordina tor Veronica Mandez at veronica.mandez@navy. mil or at (904) 270-5680 can provide names of students at the new school who would be willing to become email buddies. Knowing someone before you even get to school can relieve some of the anxiety about who will I know or who will sit with me at lunch? If your child really wants to get to know some area youth right away, the Youth Activity Center at NS Mayport is a great way to meet youth. Call the Youth Center at (904) 2705680 for summer happenings. You can also access their Activity Calendar online at Facebook.com/ mwrmayport. Positive communica tion and continuing to establish reliability, rou tine, and relationships will ensure a happier less anxious summer. Tips to help make the first days and weeks eas ier: Establish a summer schedule. Having a sum mer schedule will make it much easier to establish a back-to-school schedule. Stay positive. If youre excited about this latest move, it will rub off on your kids even if they dont want you to know it. Help your younger children get to know neighborhood kids. While some kids are great at making new friends, oth ers will need the assis tance of an adult to help break the ice. Create opportunities to meet your older chil drens new friends. Have the new friends over for a picnic/bar-b-que or take everyone to base pool. For more information, go to Military OneSource is a useful resource for relocation information, child care, and help with child or teenager with special needs. Access the service at 800.342.9647 or at www.militaryo nesource.com. Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC): MCEC (www. militarychild.org) is a non-profit, world-wide organization which iden tifies the challenges facing the highly mobile military child. Military Teens on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the Department of Defense and available at http:// dod.mil/mtom. This web site is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to military youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. From Page 2SLO On The Messdeck Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Smashed Sandwich, $8 Grilled 5.5 oz burger, driz zled with our own chipotle aioli, your choice of cheese (American, Swiss or provolone), topped with shoestring French fries and sandwiched in our Panini press Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 A seasoned chicken breast, topped with provolone cheese, fresh spinach, driz zled with pesto and pressed on foccacia bread Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Tossed mixed greens, chicken breast, shavings, fresh sliced straw berries, drizzled with our own raspberry vinaigrette Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Sourdough stuffed with sharp white cheddar, American cheese, apple wood smoked bacon, grilled to a golden brown crisp Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Jumbo grilled shrimp, crisp bacon, stuffed in a pita with shredded lettuce, diced toma toes and our own special sauce Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 5: Outdoor MoviesIron Man (PG-13). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 12: Outdoor MoviesDespicable Me (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 15: Registration for Youth Fall Baseball and Soccer Opens. Soccer available to ages 5-14, baseball available to ages 6-15. Cost is $50 per child (military) and $60 (DOD/Civ). Season begins Sept. 14, 2013. Register at the Youth Center. 270-5018 July 19: Outdoor MoviesMegamind (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 26: Outdoor MoviesThe Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Auto Skills Center June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 July Special: 10% off all vehicle lifts plus free vehi cle diagnostic for most vehicles. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rota tion on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 July 3: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 July 6: UFC 162-Silva vs. Weidman. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 12: Foam Party. 9 pm behind Castaways Lounge. Food, prizes and music with DJ Adam. 2707205 July 17: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflat ables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT July 12: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70.00. 2705145 Aquatics June 7: Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 July 8: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 5 & 6 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 22: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins Registration is July 19 & 20 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Intramural Sports July 9: Moonlight 5K Run / 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 9: Summer Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins July 22; season ends Sept 5. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 July 28: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy three hours of bowling and an awesome video laser light show as well as a breakfast dinner, presents for the kids, free Santa hats and more. 2705377 MWR Sports/FitnessThe following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in July: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! July 3: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Military Appreciation Game with Fireworks! FREE. July 4: Fireworks at Jacksonville Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Transportation Only. July 5: Laser Tag. 6-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. FREE July 7: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! July 14: NBA2K13 Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. July 17: Help Feed the Homeless. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Have A Blast At MayportBy StaffNaval Station Mayport is gearing up for the 2013 Freedom Fest to celebrate Americas Independence on Saturday (June 29) held at Sea Gull Pavilion this year. The Greater Mayport Chief Petty Officer Association is sponsoring this years event with MWR and has planned an afternoon and evening of food, fun and fireworks. Rides, games and water and dry slides are being set up to keep the family entertained while a beach obstacle course and races will be held down in the sand. There will also be a sand castle building contest going on throughout the afternoon. Plus, clowns will entertain with face painting and bal loon art. A DJ will be set up to keep the tunes jumping from 4-8 p.m. There will be live music by Second Tyme Around and usher in the pyrotechnics at 9 p.m. Food and drinks will be on sale throughout the day. For more information about the event, contact MWR at 270-5228.No Paper For July 4Due to the holiday season, The Mirror will be closed on July 4 and will not publish a July 4 edition. Photos and stories should still be submitted through The Mirror email, mayportmirror@comcast.net, no later than July 5 to be included in the July 11 edition of the paper. Free Fleet Market classified ads can be submitted online at www.mayportmirror.com or by fill ing out the free form in the Classified section and submitting by July 5. For more information, call 270-5226 ext. 1011. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyThe guided missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departs Naval Station Mayport for a scheduled deployment. The Sullivans is the second ship of the Arleigh Burke-class named for the five Sullivan brothers George, Francis, Joseph, Madison, and Albert Sullivan, aged 20 to 27 who lost their lives when their ship, USS Juneau, was sunk by a Japanese submarine in November 1942. The Sullivans Heads EastBy CNSL Public AffairsGuided-missile destroy er USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departed Naval Station Mayport today on a sixmonth Ballistic Missile Defense deployment in sup port of Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. The ship will deploy first to the European theater as part of the Phased Adaptive Approach, the purpose of which is to protect European allies, partners, U.S. forc es in the region, and the U.S. homeland against cur rent and emerging ballistic threats. The Sullivans returned from their last deployment on May 22, 2012 following completion of a successful seven-month deployment to the Mediterranean Sea. The ship most recently participated in 71st Anniversary of the Battle of Midway wreath lay ing ceremony in which Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, went aboard and spoke about the impact of the Battle of Midway, which was fought June 4 to 7 in 1942 in North Pacific Ocean. The ship, commanded by Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, has a crew of nearly 300 Sailors and was commissioned in 1997. The Sullivans is an Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer with ballistic missile defense capabilities and the second ship of the United States Navy to be named after the five Sullivan brothers. The brothers were from Waterloo, Iowa and served together on the USS Juneau (CL-52) during World War II are: George, 28; Francis, 27; Joseph, 24; Madison, 23; and Albert, 20; lost their lives during the Battle of Guadalcanal on November 13, 1942. Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, commanding officer of the guided missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), hugs his wife on the pier at Naval Station Mayport before he and his crew left on a scheduled deployment. Bailey Closes TemporarilyFrom Public Works Department MayportPublic Works Department Mayport will shut down a portion of Bailey Avenue on July 1-3 for crosswalk work New crosswalk stripping and repairs of temporary paving will be installed along the Bailey Avenue, in front of the Base Gym. Detour signs will be in place along Bailey Avenue to help direct traffic flow. Once this activity has been completed, the road will be reopened. Working At The Car Wash -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of NEX join NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, and CMDCM Bob White at a ribbon cutting for the newly renovated car wash at the base Gas Station. The NEX is also running a promotion for customers to receive 20 per gallon discount on gas if they purchase a car wash at the pump. Pictured from left is AUTEC representative Sean Forsyth, Gas Station attendants Estrella Baker and Linda Gentry, NEX General Manager Bill Hockenbury, White and Pickard.Register Kids Now For VBSFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold its annual Vacation Bible School from July 22-26 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children ages 4-12. This years theme is Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God. At Kingdom Rock, kids will meet new Bible Buddies, like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children how Gods love, family, friends, prayer and trust can help them stand strong. There is no cost for VBS, but space is limited. Register at the Chapel during normal working hours or call 270-5212.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, First off, let me extend an invitation to all Naval Station Mayport to come out on June 29 to celebrate Americas Independence at the annual Freedom Fest and fireworks show from 4-9 p.m. This years event will be held at the Sea Gull Pavilion, next the CPO Club. I want to thank the Greater Mayport Area CPOA for stepping up and taking care of their own by sponsoring the event after sequestration eliminated funding for the festival. The Chiefs stepped in and made it happen and they have planned a great day with MWR. Its going to be a great time. I hope to see you out there. There will be rides, a sandcastle competition and live music before the fireworks. Im sure the food will also be great, espe cially if the Chiefs Mess decides to make ribs. They beat out my own special recipe to take home the prize at the second annual Battle of the Ribs competition sponsored by Navy Exchange on June 14. Teams from the CPOA, USS Roosevelt, and Base Security joined me in sweat ing over a hot grill to cook up some of the tastiest competition around. Thanks to judges Commodore Dan Boyles, XO Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Angi Thacker and Joyce Parrish for taking on the daunting task of eating all seven entries even though they didnt pick mine as winner. Again. For the second year. But whos counting. On Tuesday evening, I was invited, along with the COs, XOs and CMCs from Mayports tenant commands, to join our Ombudsmen for their annual picnic. It was a good opportunity for everyone to come together for an evening of fun and information. Representatives from MWR also got a chance to highlight their great summer program options. MWR has so many wonderful, familyfriendly activities going on this summer. One of the best programs MWR spon sors every summer is the outdoor mov ies Friday nights at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sailors and their families can come out, bring their chairs and blankets and enjoys a movie under the stars. Wendy Sawyer was also there to demonstrate equipment available at Outdoor Adventures. If you havent taken advan tage of Outdoor Adventures, you really should. They have all the camping and outdoor equipment you will need for a fun adventure trip. Dont forget about the pool this summer either. The base pool is open for recreational swim, as well as swim lessons for the whole family. As long as were on the subject of fitness, I know everyone is looking forward to our beautiful new Fitness Center; and from the looks of it, we wont have to wait too much longer. Talking about summer and the upcoming Independence Day holiday, I want to remind everyone that this is a time of celebration and celebrations are a lot more fun when good decisions are a part of them. The summer months are often a high point of our year as we take a welldeserved vacation and spend time with family and friends. The summer allows for an opportunity to relax and refresh. However, many of the activities we pursue during our vacation time put us at risk for accidents that have potentially serious consequences. As you drive to and from vacation destinations, remember that 81 percent of the non-combat fatalities in 2012 total took place over the summer. Last sum mer, 80 service members died in motor vehicle collisions; 27 in 4-wheel vehi cles, 47 while riding motorcycles, 4 were pedestrians, and 2 were bicyclists. These fatalities occurred in spite of state laws and Department of Defense policies requiring the use of seatbelts while in a car and protective gear while riding motorcycles and bicycles. Some of you will enjoy water activities such as swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, or water skiing. Sadly, six ser vice members died while participating in water-related activities last summer. It is important to follow swimming area rules and to be aware of the hidden dangers inherent in participating in water activities. Alcohol is all too often a component in these tragic accidents. Recognize the risks and make good decisions. We all know that alcohol, even in small quantities, impairs our decision-making and is often a significant factor in many accidents. So before taking our first sip, we need to remember never to drink and drive. Plan ahead and always think before acting. We all must do everything we can to be safer this summer. Each of us must do our part to keep everyone around us safe off-duty, as we do on-duty. If you have been walking along Mayports beach over the past few weeks, you may have noticed several areas up on the sand banks cordoned off by orange netting. These are to pro tect the sea turtle nests that are bur ied just under the sand. Naval Station Mayport has long been a preferred nesting ground for these beautiful endan gered species and it is behooved of us all to take responsibility for these creatures survivability while in our care. There are several things we can do throughout this nesting season. Turn off all unnecessary lights and not use flashlights without a red lenses. Reposition the source of any light fixture so it is not visible from the beach. Use motion detectors on outside lights for security purposes. Place timers on lights so they are off by 10 p.m. Close all Navy Lodge, BOQ and house curtains at sunset that face the beach. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatchling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS Mayport Beach Patrol immediately at 270-5101 for the base beach and Hanna Park. Call the Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol at 613-6081 for all Jacksonville area beaches or the Florida Marine Patrol at 270-2500. Finally, you all have heard a lot over the past year about sexual assault and sexual harassment within the Department Of Defense. This is a sub ject that I take very seriously, and this CRIME will not be tolerated on this Installation. Secretary Mabus told the Senate that he was angry about sexual assault in the Navy and we should all be angry too! We are a team and to achieve Team Victories the single most impor tant tenant is the respect, trust and treatment of our teammates. Sexual assault tears our moral fabric apart, it negatively impacts our warfighting capability, vio lates our core values and the high stan dards of professionalism and personal discipline we are held accountable to. It takes courage to come forward and say you have been a victim. We have set up several avenues for support and I want to reiterate the fact that I will not toler ate it at this command. Lets continue to work together to eliminate this crime from our Service and eliminate the conditions that make this crime possible lets stay proactive and get to the left of it! Please continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSIve received many calls and emails this past month from parents who have just moved to the Jacksonville area or who are arriving any day now. While most children and their families get excited about moving to a new community because it is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore different scenery, and maybe get your own bedroom, a move can be filled with anxiety. Children have left friends and will be start ing in a new school. Most of the students in this school have already formed friendships. They may even know the teacher. Your child is wor ried about Who will be my teacher? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common ques tions you are probably going to hear over and over this summer. While you may be concerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a cli mate change, your chil dren are worried about school and right now Who am I going to play or do things with? When can we go to the beach? I am bored what can I do? Roughly 16 mil lion American families move each year. And the adjustment can be hard on kids. One of the keys to making it easier is time. Psychologist Gary Santavicca says, In gen eral, the more prepara tion you have, the easier a transition is. Totally preventing moving anxiety may not be possible, but attempts to do so can benefit all in the family not just the children. Consider three key elements: reliability, routine, and relationships. By promoting these three elements, youll expe rience a more positive move for everyone. When parents trust the move, you will send a positive message to children about the good place they have moved to and the good people, and especially, the school here in Jax. Your feeling of reliability will be transferred to your children, helping them to feel con fident about the move and the school experi ence. It is easy to distrust the unknown, so reli ability should be devel oped through familiarity and a pattern of helpful response. If you didnt have time before you left your last base, have your chil dren now go online to learn about NS Mayport on Facebook, their new school at www. duvalschools.org, and what has been going on there like athletics, clubs, grade level activi ties. They can also check out the happenings in and around town and the beach at www.coj.net. If Weve Moved! What Now? Whats Next?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingNext month the requirement for Department of Decals to enter Navy installations will go away. These decals have been on the automo biles of service mem bers for several decades. Change. In August, Capt. Doug Cochrane will hand over the mantle of Commanding Officer of Naval Station Mayport to Capt. Wesley McCall. Change. In base housing, almost every day this last week, a moving truck can be easily spotted. Again, change. Change is everywhere. Change is part of life, and in particular part of Navy life. Life is full of events that have beginnings and ends. It is easy to sug gest that the only thing constant in life is change itself. Many people thrive and find change exciting. However, while most people accept it as a simple fact of life, change can also be unsettling. As a Chaplain, I often have the privilege of pro viding counsel to Sailors and their families who often struggle with the changes of their lives. Multiple changes in ones life going on all at once can bring significant pressure on single and mar ried Sailors alike. When we sit down to talk, they often share their uncer tainties, doubts, and fears about whats next and what the future may hold. Deep down inside, they express a yearning for stability, assurance, and hope. While life goes through its cycles, seasons, ebbs and flows, ups and downs, good times and bad, change gives us the opportunity to draw close and turn to God and grow in our faith and our rela tionship with Him. God is faithful and enduring. Note the fol lowing passages found in the Bible (New King James Version): Malachi 3:6 For I am the LORD, I do not change; Therefore you are not consumed, O sons of Jacob. Hebrews 13:8 Jesus Christ is the same yester day, today, and forever. James 1:17 Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and comes down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow of turning. The Christian scrip tures remind us that in the midst of change, Jesus is a solid rock, a sure foun dation, and an anchor for our lives. While our days are full of change and a con stant pace of go, go, go, I encourage you each eve ning before bed, to take a moment and to pause and offer prayers, praise and thanksgiving to God. One of my favorite prayers is found in the Book of Common Prayer and is used at the close of each day. I encourage you to use these words tonight: Be present, O merci ful God, and protect us through the hours of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and chances of this life may rest in your eternal changelessness; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.Chap Jay Cayangyang NS Mayport Chaplain CHAPLAINSChange Is A Part Of Life In & Out Of NavySee SLO, Page 16

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U.S. 4th Fleet Commander Visits BNS Tapajo At Naval Station Mayport4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Admiral Sinclair Harris, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet visited the Brazilian submarine BNS Tapajo, June 20 at Naval Station Mayport. Tapajo was at Naval Station Mayport after completing a sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX) with the USS Truman (CVN-75). The exercise was a scenario based predeployment exercise in the Atlantic Ocean that began June 3, and fin ished June 17. The 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR) includes South America, Central America, the Caribbean and surround ing waters. The United States has vital national interest in the region of the, strengthening ties, promoting friendships and increasing interoper ability among the naval forces in the Western Hemisphere. Harris talk ed about this during his visit. The Brazilians are a true partner in our Hemisphere, and in the world, this exercise is a great example of the benefits of working together. The SUSTAINEX was a pre deployment exercise for Truman battle group. The exercise put the ships together for several coordinated evolutions, including maritime secu rity operations and test ing air defense and antisubmarine warfare proficiencies. The exercise also proved very valuable from a command-andcontrol standpoint. Harris discussed the benefits of having a partner nation participate with the U.S. in these types of evolu tions. When we get a chance to operate in a exercise like this the SUSTAINEX it is an outstanding venue for training, where Brazil benefits, as well is the U.S. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and Commander U.S. 4th Fleet, is rendered honors from Brazilian Navy Cmdr. Cartier Horacio, commanding officer, of the Brazilian Navy subma rine BNS Tapajo (S-33). Harris toured the submarine after it completed predeployment work-ups with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group.Navy Installations Plan Reduction In ForceBy Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsCommander, Navy Installations Command announced today a plan to conduct a Reduction in Force action in fiscal year 2013 that will be completed in 2014. Over the course of the next seven months, CNIC will eliminate 745 civilian positions throughout its shore enterprise in seven Navy Regions across 20 states, the District of Columbia, the Island of Guam, and in the coun tries of Italy, Greece and Cuba. The actual total number of people directly impacted by this RIF action will be determined once other workforce shaping mea sures such as Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments, Voluntary Early Retirement Authority and placement into current vacancies have been completed. CNIC, along with other Navy commands, has experienced reduced budgets and must imple ment cost-saving mea sures across the entire force. This action is not taken lightly, but is part of a conscious, risk-based approach to future shore capabilities that are aligned with the Navy Mission, said Vice. Adm. William French, CNIC. I am committed to ensur ing that we do all we can to assist those people directly impacted by this action by providing them access to all tools avail able under Reduction in Force rules and assisting them with finding future employment. Career transition ser vices for the employees affected by the RIF action will vary depending on their needs, but servic es available will include skills assessment, resume and cover letter prepa ration, networking and interviewing techniques, counseling, job search assistance, and retraining, if necessary. Reducing these posi tions may have marginal impacts on the services CNIC has provided in the past. However, it will not have any direct impacts to CNICs capability to sup port the mission of pro viding service to the fleet, fighter and family. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 DESRON 40 Lends A Helping Hand DESRON 40 PAOWhen the Sailors at COMDESRON 40 found out their 2013 Humanitarian Assistance mission had been cancelled due to sequestra tion, they put their heads together and decided on lend ing a helping hand to the local community instead. OS1 (SW) Christopher Macias took the lead on the volunteer plan and his first selection was Habitat for Humanity, Jacksonville (HabiJax). We chose to work with HabiJax because it is a great organization that consistent ly reaches out to people in Jacksonville; they are always looking for help and know that it takes all members of the community to make a difference. The HabiJax ReStore was the first volunteer stop for the staff. At the ReStore warehouse staff members moved furni ture, measured doors, unloaded trucks, and stocked shelves. Lt. Cmdr. Angela Johnson said, Volunteering at the HabiJax ReStore was a reward ing experience, we were able to give back while getting a great work out. It was a win win! The ReStore warehouse in Jacksonville has lots of great merchandise at a great price. If you havent been by there it is worth checking out. Staff members also devoted time at two different HabiJax constructions sites. Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW) Jermaine Lawton was a part of both builds and said, Habitat homes are especially near and dear to my heart. To have helped establish a new home means you have helped some one establish a new life and the time spent is worthwhile. The DESRON staff has also dedicated over 100 hours of manpower working at the Ronald McDonald house, help ing to beautify the facility inside and out. Some members of the staff weeded and remulched the garden areas around the play ground, while others helped the cleaning crew with everyday tasks such as cleaning windows and blinds and mopping the floors. ITCS (IDW/SW) Jefferies was asked to help with painting. Serving the Ronald McDonald house was a great experience, he said. Anytime you can put a smile on a childs face by showing them you care is satisfying. A little work goes a long way, and shows volumes for not only the command but for the Navy as a whole. Lt. Paolo Camogliano said, It was a great experience meet ing some of the children and knowing that we have made a difference in their lives. I would definitely do it again. Macias said the staff has plans to continue its work as the DESRONs operational sched ule permits. We have contacted many other local nonprofit organiza tions. We hope to carry out our volunteer effort throughout the summer and maybe into the 2013 Holiday Season, he said. -Photos submitted by DESRON 40Volunteers from COMDESRON 40 pose for a group picture outside of the Ronald McDonald House, one of several non-profit organizations the command has helped out in Jacksonville. Lt. Paolo Camogliano blows off the walkway at the Ronald McDonald House. Sailors stack and sort drywall and moulding at the HabiJax ReStore. A DESRON 40 Sailor cleans off a window at a new HabiJax house build. Sailors pour concrete to set a post at a new HabiJax house build.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 5 Lt.j.g. Sherrie Flippin pulls weeds at the Ronald McDonald House garden, Chief Yoeman Townsend cleans a window at the Ronald McDonald House volunteer opportunity sponsored by DESRON 40. A Sailor helps sort home goods at the HabiJax ReStore. Lt. Paolo Camogliano and Lt. Juan Granja play soccer with one of the children staying at the Ronald McDonald House. CS1 (SW) Jermaine Lawton sweeps up leaves in the parking lot at Ronald McDonald House.

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Navy Training Reviewed For College Credit NETC Public Affairs OfficeThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATT) and Center for Information Dominance (CID) are the latest commands to con tinue receiving recom mended college credits for their training. The American Council on Education (ACE) completed its review June 20. The courses reviewed were either new or had undergone revisions since the last ACE review. We promise our Sailors a lifetime of career opportunities, said Roland Perez, Naval Education and Training Commands (NETC) educational pro gram and management analyst. Sailors have the chance to submit credits they receive from their training towards most colleges and universities. Capt. Katherine Erb, CNATT commanding officer, spoke to civilian aca demic professionals from ACE before their review. I think the ACE train ing evaluations are a fab ulous idea. The courses we instruct provide our Sailors and Marines with skills for their military careers; the fact that this training also provides an opportunity to gain civilian college credit is of even more benefit to our personnel, said Erb. This is a great experience for the instructors, as well. It is motivational to teach a military course that you know is equivalent to a college course. We are very appreciative for what ACE continues to do for our military. ACE supports the edu cational goals of the Navys Sailors throughout all learning centers within NETC. By recommend ing academic credits for training course work and/ or occupational experi ence, ACE provides an additional benefit to military. We have a great work ing relationship with ACE. The Navy is leading the way for other mili tary branches in regard to instruction, training courses and number of academic credits recom mended by ACE, says Perez. The life span of credit recommendation is 10 years, after which the particular training course or occupation (if still active) must be re-evaluated. Training courses may be recommended for aca demic credits on four levels (vocational-cer tificate, associate/lower division baccalaureate degree, upper division baccalaureate and gradu ate degree). The content of the training courses or service occupations value affects the number of academic credits that may be recommended by ACE. Sailors should refer to their Sailor/Marine ACE Registry Transcript (SMART), a complete educational and training history of a member while serving in the Navy, when planning for their education or career, said Perez. ACE credit recommendations are published online in the ACE Guide. The Navy College Office (NCO) counselors use this guide as a standard refer ence for both active duty personnel and veterans. The results of the ACE review will be announced in the next few months. To learn more about the ACE Military Guide, visit www.acenet.edu/newsroom/Pages/MilitaryGuide-Online.aspx/. Vendors Talk With Purchasers At GSA Expo -Photo by Paige GnannMore than 100 purchasing agents, buyers and credit card holders attended 2013 GSA Expo held at Naval Station Mayport on June 19. MWR hosted more than 75 vendors for this annual event, featuring products from office supplies to heavy equipment for ships. Health Info At Click Of MouseFrom TRICARETRICARE beneficiaries who regularly get their care at military clinics and hospitals can download a summary of their person al health data including lab results, medications, allergies and problem lists from the TOL Secure Department of Defense Patient Portal in a conti nuity of care document (CCD) format. The new CCD is available via the TOL Blue Button at www. tricareonline.com. The CCD is an indus try standard and is easy to share with other health care systems like RelayHealth and Microsoft Health Vault. Patients can download TOL Blue Button data into a CCD and share it with any health care system capable of accepting the file, including non-DoD health care systems. The CCD guarantees the complete and accurate trans fer of Blue Button health data. Patients can down load CCD data to their computers and upload it to their personal health record. In some cases, it may not be possible to read the actual CCD data on a personal computer because of the file type, but the information can downloaded as a PDF. To take advantage of the CCD, patients need to go towww.tricareonline. com and log in to their accounts. Once there they need to: Download My Data and date range to down; click Save as CCD select Save File, select the location and click OK 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Midshipmen Embark USS Gettysburg For Sustainment Exercise USS Gettysburg Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) is currently hosting 17 Midshipmen from col lege Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs during a June underway to take part in a sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX). Sustainment exercises like this one offer mid shipmen so many oppor tunities to see surface ships, in every possible operation they could par ticipate in, said Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Hagan, Gettysburg senior watch officer. During their time onboard the midshipmen witnessed and participat ed in multiple shipboard evolutions including live fire exercises, small boat operations, watch stand ing, man overboard drills, underway replenish ments, flight operations, navigation, and engineering drills. The exercise shows the flexibility and capability of todays modern naval fleet, said Hagan. Junior midshipmen were paired with sailors in order to gain an understanding of the life of the crew. Senior midshipmen were assigned young division officers to give them an understanding of what their job will be in a few short months. My experience onboard has been great. Im even thinking about picking Gettysburg for ship selection, said Midshipman 1st Class Michael Hagan. Everyone is so enthusiastic about their job. Some of the mid shipmen are only a few months from commis sioning. For some of them this opportunity is their last chance to gain expe rience before arriving at their new commands in August. It is very exciting to learn so much information with my upcoming commissioning. Im more than overwhelmed with all of the information, said Midshipman 1st Class Alex Kirkland-El, who commissions in August. I am very eager to learn and Gettysburg has given me that opportunity. The midshipmen will remain onboard for the remainder of the exercise. Gettysburg is currently underway in prepara tion for their upcoming deployment with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. -Photos by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Capt. Brad Cooper welcomes Midshipman 2nd Class Ahmed Kahn to guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg. The Midshipmen will be aboard for a sustainment exercise with the Harry S. Truman Strike Group during the month of June as Gettysburg prepares to deploy. Quarter Master 2nd Class Connie Williams teaches Midshipman 2nd Class James Kempa how to use a stadimeter aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg during a sustainment exercise with the Harry S. Truman Strike Group. Midshipman 1st Class James Wiltshire takes the conn during an underway replenish ment aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg with USNS John Lenthall during a sustainment exercise with Harry S. Truman Strike Group. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 1, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Command Liaison Building 1 Room 104 July 2, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 2, 8 a.m.-noon, Point of Contact Building 1 Room 104 July 2, 1-3 p.m., Data Collection Coordinator, Building 1 Room 104 July 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 8, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO July 8, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Building 1, Room 719 July 8-12, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 9, 9-11 a.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 July 9, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19, FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 10, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 10, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center July 11, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 15-19, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training, FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 16, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 22, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 22-26, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 23, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Ages 13-19 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 24, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 July 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 25, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1, Room 1124 July 29, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 July 29, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 July 29-Aug. 2, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 July 31, 9 a.m.-noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 July 31, 10:30-11:30 a.m., How to Survive the Holidays, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Tuesday, July 2 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. John Reed, a noted wildlife and out door photographer will present on the subject of Photographing at the zoo. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types welcomed and encour aged to come and learn more about photography. For more information www.beachesphotogra phyclub.org Wednesday, July 3 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is cel ebrating Independence Day with a Garden Concert featuring The River City Satin Swing Band from 7-9 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. Put on your red, white and blue, grab a blanket or chair and come celebrate Americas birthday in The Cummer Gardens. With the St. Johns River as a backdrop and stars above, the sounds of The River City Satin Swing Band will keep you entertained all evening. The Cummer will be closed during normal business hours on July 4. Guests are wel come to bring blankets, chairs, food and alcohol ic beverages. Tickets are $10 for members, $20 for non-members and $400 for a table, which includes reserved seating and a gourmet picnic basket for 10 people. Children 5 and under enjoy free admis sion. The concert will go on rain or shine. To pur chase tickets, please call (904) 899-6004 or visit www.cummer.org/con certs-cummer. Saturday, July 6 They lived here for 10,000 years. Come learn about the first inhabit ants of the Talbot Islands, the Timucuan. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. to hear stories of their daily lives, epic battles and cultural traditions. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event.Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Riverside Arts Market (RAM) are part nering to host River Ruckus a family festival to celebrate the St. Johns River from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. River Ruckus pro vides an opportunity for the community to come together to celebrate two of our most impor tant local assets the St. Johns River and RAM. The event will showcase the recreational benefits pro vided by the river and the importance of respecting, protecting, and enjoying this tremendous natural resource. Sunday, July 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional informa tion, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 4th Fleet GolfU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet will host a golf tournament on July 10 with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start at Windy Harbor Golf Club. Format will be a four-person scramble (best ball) and cost is $50 per player, including green fees, cart, breakfast prior to play, range balls, non-alcoholic beverages on course and lunch after play. Every player will receive a Fourth Fleet golf ball and golf towel. Prizes will be awarded for closest to the pin and long drive, along with others. For more information, contact Cmdr. Lewis Preddy at 270-4069 or lewis.preddy@navy.mil; QM1 Amos Riley at 270-4120 or amos.riley@navy.mil; or Jon Fine at 270-5380 or jon.fine@navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 11

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HSL-48 Detachment 5 Delivers -Photo by MC3 Billy HoAn SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, carries pallets of supplies to the flight deck of the guidedmissile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) during a vertical replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Joshua Humphreys (T-AO 188). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Navy Implementation Plan Approved, More Positions Open For Women Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy is mov ing forward to open all positions previously closed to the assign ment of women, continu ing in the Department of Defenses rescission of 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule. Navys implemen tation plan, submit ted by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey and acknowledged by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, has now been submitted for Congressional notifi cation. Navys deliberate approach to reducing gender-based barriers to womens service will provide the time neces sary to integrate women into occupational fields so they can succeed and flourish, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, direc tor, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. This is important, and weve taken our time to get it right. Our implementa tion plan has addressed all positions currently closed to the assignment of women, ensuring we maximize professional opportunities for our Sailors. According to the implementation plan, the Navy will have no closed occu pations, very limited number of closed posi tions, and equal profes sional opportunity for females in every officer designator and enlist ed rating in the Navy by January 1, 2016. Following the required 30-day Congressional notification period, over 400 Navy positions in the Coastal Riverine Force will be opened for the assignment of women. The 400 Navy positions in the Coastal Riverine Force small craft include both female officers and enlisted. More than 5,000 posi tions are currently closed to the assign ment of women in the USMC Ground Combat Element. Navy will follow the USMC Implementation Plan as units are opened. These positions include female Hospital Corpsmen (HM) and Religious Program Specialists (RP) and female medical officers, Chaplains, and surface warfare officers, subma rine officers, and avia tors serving as Naval Gunfire Liaison Officers (NGLO). All Navy personnel assigned to the USMC Ground Combat Element will be required to adhere to USMC occupational standards as applicable. Over 3,000 positions in Naval Special Warfare remain currently closed to the assignment of women. The Navy will follow the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) developed integrated timeline for the poten tial integration of women into Special Forces. According to the time line, Congressional noti fication for Naval Special Warfare integration is scheduled for July 2015. Election for Navy enlisted boot camp and officer selection is scheduled to begin in October 2015, with the Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) and Special Warfare Combatant Craft Crewmen (SWCC) pipe line opening to females and cadre placement beginning in January 2016. The first opportuni ty for female enlisted personnel to attend SEAL/ SWCC training is sched uled for March 2016, with the first opportunity for officers to ship to SEAL/ SWCC training June 2016. USSOCOM is working with all of the Services to tie occupational standards to opera tional requirements. Additionally, USSOCOM will research and analyze social impacts of integra tions on small, elite units operating in austere and remote environments and conduct behavioral science analysis, with all studies scheduled to be complete by July 1, 2014. During the USSOCOM female integration imple mentation process, quar terly progress reports on the elimination of gender-restrictive policies will be made to the Secretary of Defense through the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. Privacy, berthing, and leadership require ments currently restrict approximately 19,000 Navy positions to the assignment of women on both surface ships and submarines. The Navy will decide wheth er to expand assignment opportunity for enlisted women to Frigates, Mine Countermeasure ships, and Patrol Coastal Craft no later than June 2014. Following in-depth analysis of cost, habitability decommissioning and commissioning sched ules, the Navy will decide on the future assignment of female enlisted on submarines no later than March 2015. If restrictions for assignment will be necessary based on cost prohibi tive privacy and berthing updates, and if equal professional opportunity cannot be found elsewhere, the Navy will request an exception to policy by the Secretary of Defense. The Navy supports integrating women into newly opened positions and units as expeditiously as possible, considering good order and judicious use of fiscal resources. The Navys deliberate approach to reducing gender-based barriers to womens service will provide the time neces sary to integrate women into occupational fields so they can succeed and flourish. More information on women in the Navy can be found at the Navy Office of Womens Policy web site at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/organization/ bupers/WomensPolicy/ Pages/default.aspx THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 13

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Running Of The Ditch: The Final Leg USS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsToday, amidst the anticipation of return ing home, the Golden Dragon crew of USS Hu City (CG 66) continued their tradition and ran their third relay around the weather decks as their ship conducted a northbound transit of the Suez Canal. After backto-back deployments into the Arabian Gulf, this was Hu Citys final scheduled transit of the Suez Canal and their last time to participate in the Running of the Ditch for quite some time. The Suez Canal is an arti ficial waterway in Egypt running alongside the Sinai Peninsula that con nects the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. For many deploying Sailors, it marks the symbolic start of their transit home. During the Running of the Ditch, Hu City Sailors run a continuous relay around the weather decks for the entire duration of the 110-mile transit. The 15-hour northbound transit is exhausting for many, but the opportunity to go for a run, relieve some stress, and share in camaraderie one last time. Running a combined distance of almost 700 miles during the transit, the Golden Dragon crew exceeded expectations and surpassed totals from the proceeding relays. I really enjoy the run ning of the ditch because it allows the whole crew to participate in one event, said Ensign Savanna Reynolds and because it is an all day event it allows all the Sailors to partici pate despite their watch schedule. This event was marked by specialized t-shirts created by event organizers Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Lisa Broadfield and Information Systems Technician 1st Class Shana Alger to com memorate the event. The shirts are tan in color to signify the desert geog raphy of Egypt and com plete with a historic pic ture of the canal on the back. The t-shirts were a good incentive for those who typically do not enjoy running to get out on the weather decks for a jog. The t-shirts really brought the crew together as a whole and created a team-like atmosphere, said Cryptologic Technician Collection 3rd Class Katherine McGarvey. As always, the Running of the Ditch was a suc cessful event and hope fully something the Golden Dragons will remember for years to come. It is events like these that dont fade from ones memory fast and events like these that remind Hu City Sailors of the family and team atmosphere they have onboard. Hu City is sailing alongside USS Dwight D. Eisenhower on their transit home after their sec ond deployment to the US Central Command Area of Responsibility in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts. Lt .j.g Anastasia Abid, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), participates in the run ning of the ditch, a relay for the 101-mile length of the ships transit. -Photos by MC2 Matthew R. ColeSailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) participate in the running of the ditch, a relay for the 101-mile length of the ships transit. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Hu City Arrives In Palma de Mallorca, SpainUSS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public AfairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 18. The visit will provide the crew with welldeserved rest and relax ation before continuing on to the ships homeport of Mayport, Fla. The Hu Citys crew recently completed their mission to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsi bility with the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group. It was many of the Sailors second deployment in the last 13 months on the ship. Mediterranean port visits are always a favor ite for Sailors, said Capt. Daniel B. Uhls, com manding officer. We consider it as sort of a reward for all of the hard work Hu City Sailors did in part one and two of deployment. Palma de Mallorca gives Sailors a chance to sight see, shop and explore a new place that many have not seen before. Palma de Mallorca sounds like an amaz ing place and Im look ing forward to enjoying the food and seeing the impressive architecture of its historic buildings, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class Francisco Villalon of Hu City. This port call will also provide an opportunity to strengthen the relation ship between Spain and the U.S. and help main tain a safe maritime environment. The U.S. and Spain work together to develop cooperative solutions to support regional securi ty and stability through out this vital region of the world, said Uhls. Port visits like this lead to expanded military interoperability that enhances our ability to provide ready forces for bilateral and multilateral exercises and operations. -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeCmdr. William Davis, executive officer USS Hu City (CG 66), presents an American flag to the families of Alfonso Casanovas and Robina Cornille, Spanish liaisons to the U.S. Navy, during a memorial service on the ships flight deck. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Branch Clinics Awarded Medical Blue H For ExcellenceNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, with its hospital and five branch health clin ics (BHCs), earned the Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Blue H for the fourth consecutive year for command excellence in health promotion for 2012. The Blue H award symbolizes our priority to provide the best care possible to each and every one of our patients (our nations heroes) and their families, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, commanding officer, NH Jacksonville. People come from all over the nation to see us because we provide the highest quality care and best outcomes at our hospital and branch health clinics. Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville and Navy Reserve Navy Operational Health Support Unit (NH OHSU) Detachment G each received the Gold Star level. At its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, NH Jacksonville received the Silver Eagle award and the Bronze Anchor award at its Branch Health Clinic Albany. Receiving the Navy Surgeon General Blue H award is a true reflection of our dedication and focus on health promotions that all the members of the entire Navy Operation Support Center medical team exhibit on a daily basis, said Capt. Jonathan Groh, medical officer, NOSC Jacksonville. The Blue H award recognizes excellence in clinical primary prevention services, community health promotion and medical staff health. The award assesses health topics such as alcohol abuse prevention, injury prevention, nutrition physical activity, psychological health, sexual health, tobacco cessation and weight management. A total of 271 Navy and Marine Corps active and reserve units were selected for the Blue H award, which is divided into three categories: Fleet, Medical and Semper Fit Center. Managed by The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, headquartered in Portsmouth, Va., the annual Blue H encourages and rewards the promotion of health in Navy and Marine Corps organiza tions. Since founding in 1941, NH Jacksonville is committed to the care of the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys fourth largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. On average each day, a team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 sameday surgeries, fills 4,700 pre scriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers three babies. Up to eight percent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. For more information on Navy wellness programs, con tact NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at (904) 542-5292. For additional information on The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), visit the Blue H website at: http:// www.med.navy.mil/sites/ nmcphc/health-promotion/ pages/blue-h.aspx Mayport Rides To Work -Photos by Paige GnannAbove left, Naval Station Mayport Lead Motorcycle Safety Instructor Alan Manges checks out Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW) Thomas Menard of SWOS before he begins an obstacle course designed to test rider skills at Mayports Ride to Work on June 24. The event was held to raise awareness and show support for motorcycle safety. Above right, Motorcycle Instructor Greg Wojciechowski watches as Hull Technician 1st Class (SW) Wesley Deckard navigates the course set up at C12 Hangar. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013 15

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your child is too young to do an internet research, you can help. Finding out the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports schedules, and clubs available will provide information to ease the transition. Routine is another key element to reducing anxiety because it provides structure to the childrens day and security in knowing what to expect. Even though it is summer and most schedules just fly out of the window, start a summer routine. Establish a bed time and a waking up schedule followed by some jobs which will help you to get moved in. If your children are really young, maybe they can help with removing all that paper from the packing. Be inventive so they feel a part of this exciting experience! If school anxieties seem greater than normal, you might want to try a visit to the school. Be sure to call ahead since area schools have reduced staff in the summer. Explain that you just want to walk around you really dont need an official tour. The School Liaison Officer at Judith. cromartie@navy.mil can help set up that tour and provide detailed enroll ment information. Being proactive can minimize the time you spend struggling with incidents relat ed to move anxiety. Relationship-building does not have to wait until the start of school. The Youth Sponsorship Program coordina tor Veronica Mandez at veronica.mandez@navy. mil or at (904) 270-5680 can provide names of students at the new school who would be willing to become email buddies. Knowing someone before you even get to school can relieve some of the anxiety about who will I know or who will sit with me at lunch? If your child really wants to get to know some area youth right away, the Youth Activity Center at NS Mayport is a great way to meet youth. Call the Youth Center at (904) 2705680 for summer happenings. You can also access their Activity Calendar online at Facebook.com/ mwrmayport. Positive communica tion and continuing to establish reliability, rou tine, and relationships will ensure a happier less anxious summer. Tips to help make the first days and weeks eas ier: Establish a summer schedule. Having a sum mer schedule will make it much easier to establish a back-to-school schedule. Stay positive. If youre excited about this latest move, it will rub off on your kids even if they dont want you to know it. Help your younger children get to know neighborhood kids. While some kids are great at making new friends, oth ers will need the assis tance of an adult to help break the ice. Create opportunities to meet your older chil drens new friends. Have the new friends over for a picnic/bar-b-que or take everyone to base pool. For more information, go to Military OneSource is a useful resource for relocation information, child care, and help with child or teenager with special needs. Access the service at 800.342.9647 or at www.militaryonesource.com. Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC): MCEC (www. militarychild.org) is a non-profit, world-wide organization which iden tifies the challenges facing the highly mobile military child. Military Teens on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the Department of Defense and available at http:// dod.mil/mtom. This website is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to military youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. From Page 2SLO On The Messdeck Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Smashed Sandwich, $8 Grilled 5.5 oz burger, driz zled with our own chipotle aioli, your choice of cheese (American, Swiss or provolone), topped with shoestring French fries and sandwiched in our Panini press Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 A seasoned chicken breast, topped with provolone cheese, fresh spinach, driz zled with pesto and pressed on foccacia bread Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Tossed mixed greens, chicken breast, shavings, fresh sliced straw berries, drizzled with our own raspberry vinaigrette Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Sourdough stuffed with sharp white cheddar, American cheese, apple wood smoked bacon, grilled to a golden brown crisp Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Jumbo grilled shrimp, crisp bacon, stuffed in a pita with shredded lettuce, diced toma toes and our own special sauce Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 5: Outdoor MoviesIron Man (PG-13). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 12: Outdoor MoviesDespicable Me (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 15: Registration for Youth Fall Baseball and Soccer Opens. Soccer available to ages 5-14, baseball available to ages 6-15. Cost is $50 per child (military) and $60 (DOD/Civ). Season begins Sept. 14, 2013. Register at the Youth Center. 270-5018 July 19: Outdoor MoviesMegamind (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 26: Outdoor MoviesThe Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Auto Skills Center June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 July Special: 10% off all vehicle lifts plus free vehicle diagnostic for most vehicles. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 July 3: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 July 6: UFC 162-Silva vs. Weidman. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 12: Foam Party. 9 pm behind Castaways Lounge. Food, prizes and music with DJ Adam. 2707205 July 17: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflat ables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT July 12: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $70.00. 2705145 Aquatics June 7: Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 July 8: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 5 & 6 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 22: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins Registration is July 19 & 20 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $45 per child/adult; $40 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Intramural Sports July 9: Moonlight 5K Run / 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 9: Summer Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins July 22; season ends Sept 5. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 July 28: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy three hours of bowling and an awesome video laser light show as well as a breakfast dinner, presents for the kids, free Santa hats and more. 2705377 MWR Sports/FitnessThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in July: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! July 3: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Military Appreciation Game with Fireworks! FREE. July 4: Fireworks at Jacksonville Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Transportation Only. July 5: Laser Tag. 6-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. FREE July 7: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! July 14: NBA2K13 Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. July 17: Help Feed the Homeless. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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