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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147

Material Information

Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 11, 2013
Publication Date: 06-20-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00304

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147

Material Information

Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 11, 2013
Publication Date: 06-20-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00304


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Goodbye To Vehicle Decals! Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsNavy Region Southeast (NRSE) drivers will no longer be required to display a Department of Defense (DoD) vehicle decal to gain access to installations beginning July 1. The change will be made to comply with a new Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) policy intended to enhance base security by providing electronic cre dentialing and increased scrutiny of authorized identification cards. Eliminating the DoD decals and implementing electronic credentialing will improve our security posture because it will allow our gate security personnel to more carefully scrutinize authorized identification cards with out the added distraction of having to verify the decal, said Capt. Brett Calkins, Navy Region Southeast operations and plans officer. In addition to enhanc ing security at the gate, the new policy will also work to protect Department of Defense personnel when they are off the base, Calkins said. You really never know where or when you are going to encounter ter rorism, he said. Vehicle decals can be easily rec ognizable to those out there that would like to do our service members harm, so not having them on vehicles off base will help to lower visibil ity and, in essence, help protect our people from potential harm. The new policy will also have a major impact on installation budgets, resulting in an estimated $750,000 in annual sav ings Navy-wide, as well as a drastic reduction in administrative tasks. Those savings will be diverted to critical AT/FP programs, reported Navy Times. First and foremost, this policy change is going to help us better protect personnel, but the finan cial benefits to not hav ing stickers are obvious, said Bruce Toth, NRSE regional security officer. Sticker costs can add up, especially when families have multiple vehicles and people are constantly CNRSE To Waive Vehicle Decal Requirements -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyMaster-at-Arms Seaman Apprentice Noely Vazquez of NS Mayports Security checks the identification of a driver before allowing entry to the station. Base decals will no longer be required on motorcycles, cars, trucks and other vehi cles as of July 1. Ride To Work For Motorcycle SafetyFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will hold a Ride to Work event to raise awareness and show support for motorcycle safety on June 24 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the C12 Hangar across from McDonalds. According to Navy Traffic Safety Instructor Alan Manges, there will be demonstrations of evasive manuevers, including stopping quickly/evading, and low speed control manipulation skills, like tight turns in tight spaces. We will be providing some motorcycle safety handouts on group riding, motor cycle pre-ride inspection, hand and arm signals, he said. We will also have some rider skills challenges set-up for riders to participate in if they choose. There will be additional instructors on hand to assist rid ers with any questions regarding PPE, train ing requirements, or general motorcycle/ traffic safety. The event is free and open to all inter ested. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSenior Chief Culinary Specialist Francisco Ramirez of USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) flips a slab of ribs during Naval Station Mayports 2nd Annual Battle of the Ribs cook-off. The Battle of the Ribs cook off was held to build camaraderie, boost morale and raise money for the respective groups involved. Mayport Takes On Battle Of RibsNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detach ment SoutheastThe Mayport Chief Petty Officer Association (CPOA) smoked the competition at the second-annual Battle of the Ribs sponsored by the Mayports Navy Exchange June 14. Eight contestants submitted entries showcasing their own special recipes and barbequing talents. It was a fun-filled event to build camaraderie, boost morale, and a great way to raise money for their respective groups, said Capt. Douglas Cochrane, commanding officer Naval Station Mayport. I have a booth this year. Im super excited about today and I feel we had a really good turn out. Mayports Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Command Master Chief Robert White, Capt. Dan Boyles, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Commissary Assistant Store Director Joyce Parish and Angi Thacker served as judges for the event. The food was fantastic and compe tition was tight, said White. The win ning recipe was chosen near unani mously. Mayports CPOA took first place and a prize of $250 dollars, which they donated to the base Christmas party, as did Cochrane with his second place prize. Competition like this is always fun, said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jose Pacheco. Its always nice to see people enjoying themselves and contributing to command morale. Furlough Could Affect Pass HoursFrom NS Mayport SecurityIf the DoD govern ment service employ ee furlough is executed due to seques tration as planned beginning on July 8, the Naval Station Mayport visitor con trol center (Pass and ID office) will be closed every Friday beginning July 12 through Sept. 27 due to staffing shortfalls. The visitor control center will be open Monday through Thursday from 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Naval Station Mayport Commercial Vehicle Inspection Station (48a) will remain open Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.See Decal, Page 10

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror For any relationship to last, it must be built on a solid foundation of love. The problem is that many are nave about what true love really is. Love does not just happen. It must be planted, cultivated and nurtured. You dont fall into true love, you climb to it. However, love has an evil twin. Infatuation is easily confused with love because it feels so great, and can make you obsessed with another person. You fall in love with how being wanted by another person makes you feel. It seems to fill our insecurities. At its heart, infatuation is all about I need you. That I cant live without you kind of thinking may sound romantic, but it isnt. At its heart, it is self ish. It is more concerned about what you do for me, and how you fill my insecurities so I dont have to. Such infatuation-based relationships usually start off strong, making you feel quickly like you know each other so well and are so perfect for each other. But they cant last as they are without quickly grow ing unhealthy because they arent based on real truth and responsibility. From the moment you begin a relationship there will be an urge to let it consume your life and take control of your will. It is normal for relationships to begin as infatu ation (though you will convince yourself that it is love), but it is impor tant that you maintain self control so that love may begin to grow. True love is not simply an emo tion. It is a lifestyle that you must commit to con tinually. For love to grow, you will have to learn to sacrifice some of the things that fuel the fire of infatuation. Maintaining control of the relation ship is especially impor tant in the early stages of romance since you are establishing patterns of behavior that will affect your future. Here are some important things you can do in the early stages of the relationship to make sure it is built on a solid foundation. GET A LIFE. Infatuation can become like a drug addiction and can consume a persons thoughts and desires. It can get to the point that they dont care about anything but the rela tionship. When a couple isolates themselves, the relationship will begin to stagnate. Such relation ships breed obsession, jealousy, and neediness, all of which are enemies of love. You need to get a life outside of each other. Make sure you maintain your friendships, do fun things with other people, continue to develop tal ents and pursue dreams. Entering into a relation ship doesnt mean that you need to leave the rest of your life behind.Chap Justin Top Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSIts Better To Climb Into Love Than FallYour teen has declared he wants to work at the neighborhood Publix. I need the money for an upgraded IPhone, and a car, he says. Whoa! Is this a step to maturity or a slip toward lower grades, inadequate sleep, and a cramped social life? How do you help him make the right choice about taking a job? Jobs in the summer are great with no homework to juggle. But when school starts back in the fall, how do you help him manage the job, school, and social time? First, make sure you know the rules. Check out federal law to make sure that the employer is following it to the letter. Also check out state laws as well since some states impose stiffer restrictions than the federal govern ment. Once youve exam ined the laws in your area, make sure you and your teen discuss the benefits and the disadvantages. The Pros confidence, a sense of responsibility and inde pendence. dents, who work a moder ate amount, no more than 10 to 15 hours a week, tend to earn higher grades than those who dont work at all. opportunity to practice responsible money man agement. work outside the home, a job during the summer can give your child adult supervision when no adults are home during the day. may expose your teen to new work possibilities and set him on the path to a life-time career. The Cons to 20 hours a week is asso ciated with lower grades. So if this job continues in the fall, watch those grades! many hours may find it hard to keep up with responsibilities around the house, faith-based activities, or social rela tionships. found that teens who work long hours are more likely to engage in activi ties such as drug or alco hol use, in part because they are exposed to older co-workers who lead them into these activities. Since most teens dont like to be told what to do, offer subtle guid ance. Ask them what they want to get out of the job. Career preparation? Fun? Money? Discuss whether this is a job they would like to keep once school starts back. Talk about preparing a budget which will include saving as well as spend ing. Consider making your teen responsible for gas when he drives the car or a portion of the auto insurance or some enter tainment expenses which youve paid in the past. If your teen does take a job, make sure he is get ting his breaks and that he doesnt work more hours for his age than allowed by law. If the job contin ues on into the school year, continue to monitor how many hours a week he works. You may have to reduce those hours if he cant keep up his grades. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. The Five Worst Jobs For Teens The National Consumers League has pegged these jobs as the most dangerous for stu dents. Delivery and other driv ing: including operating or riding on forklifts and other motorized equip ment. Working alone in a cash-based business: including convenience store, gas station, and fast-food establishments. Traveling youth crews: selling candy, magazine subscriptions and other consumer goods on street corners, in unfamiliar neighborhoods, in distant cities, and across state lines. Cooking: exposure to hot oil and grease, hot water and steam, and hot cooking surfaces. Construction: includ ing work at heights and contact with electrical power.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThe Good And Bad Of Summer Jobs For TeensPrepare all you want, but in the end, every move is a craps shoot. In two days, our movers arrive to take our belong ings to Rhode Island. No matter what I do, something will be lost, stolen or arrive broken. I can only pray that its that particleboard microwave cart Ive always hated that some how miraculously sur vived our last seven mili tary moves. Our first movers name was Rusty, a swarthy, seasoned trucker, whod seen many a military transfer. Over lunch, he sat on the hydraulic plat form at the back of his rig and told us stories of moves gone by. Ive never had a late delivery. Even back in my drinkin days, I didnt miss a beat. Why, one time after a fifth of Wild Turkey, I drove from Mississippi clear into Texas and had absolutely no recollection of it. As we watched him drive off with our price less belongings, we mut tered a quick prayer that he would stay off the sauce a bit longer. Our move from England to Virginia was oh so civi lized. The British mov ers were friendly young mates, who properly sat together with us at our kitchen table munching on fish, chips and pints of lager for lunch. As they drove off with our neat ly packed belongings, we bid our new friends tarah. Only later did we realize that theyd nicked our telly. When we moved to Virginia, we requested a full unpack because we knew we would not have much time for unpacking with an infant and tod dler. As luck would have Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesIts Time Again. Every Move Is A Craps Shootit, the movers were two hours late, left early, and refused to unpack boxes or assemble beds. To make matters worse, one Muslim member of the moving crew took a break to pray in our spare bedroom in honor of Ramadan. That was not the problem. The issue was that, ten minutes before he had entered the room, I had hidden in that same bedrooms walk in closet to nurse the baby. Deep in prayer, appar ently facing Mecca, he was quite surprised to see me pop out of the closet, blurting, Howdy, Mohammed! Sorry to interrupt, Ill just scoot on out of here and leave you in peace. Toot-a-loo! Years later, we moved to Germany, and were naively hopeful for a problem-free move. I put out coffee and doughnuts. I bought lunch and cold drinks. I supplied reclos able storage bags, tape and permanent markers for the movers to pack hardware. A few hours later, I watched in horror, as a crewmember formed a little hammock with his shirt, and used it to carry all our furniture hardware pieces over to the truck, then threw handfuls of the pieces in between furni ture and boxes. I immedi ately protested, reminding him of the baggies I gave him for this pur pose. Trust me Maam, just shake out the paper at the bottom of the crate when you get there. Youll see, all the pieces will be there. Of course, they were not. And our last transfer to Florida seemed as if it was our first problem free move. We were so pleased with the German mov ing crew who were thor ough, polite, appreciative, and hard-working -with seemingly super-human strength. After watching two men carry our piano down four flights of stairs, we thought the crew members were heroes. It wasnt until we unpacked six months later at our current home that we realized they had stolen my husbands entire irre placeable military coin collection. So what am I say ing? Should we all for get about the reclosable baggies and permanent markers? Should we give up on buying the movers lunch to butter them up? Should we completely throw caution to the wind and hit the beach on mov ing day? Probably not a good idea. But, we should realize that all military moves are a gamble, and the only thing we can be certain of is that the damned micro wave cart will live to see another day. Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www.themeatandpota toesoflife.comVacation Bible School Registration BeginsFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold its annual Vacation Bible School from July 22-26 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children ages 4-12. This years theme is Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God. At Kingdom Rock, kids will meet new Bible Buddies, like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children how Gods love, family, friends, prayer and trust can help them stand strong. There is no cost for VBS, but space is limited. Register at the Chapel during normal working hours or call 270-5212 for more information.See Chaplain, Page 3

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BRIDLE YOUR PASSIONS. It takes absolutely no love to give in to your sexual impulses. Infatuation encourages you to surrender to what you want right now. Love sacrifices what you want for what is best. Movies and TV shows often pro mote the idea that sexu ality is the key to a relationship. While physical intimacy is important in a relationship, if it is mis used it can actually dam age a couples ability to create emotional intima cy. When detached from true love, trust, and com mitment, sex can blind a person to the real nature of their relationship. It fuels infatuation and self ishness that can shorten the life of the relation ship. One study showed that of couples who had sex within the first 30 days of the relationship, 90% were no longer together a year later. Making love doesnt actually make love. Dont let physical intimacy become the cen ter of your relationship, but rather the result of taking the time to build a solid foundation of love. BE OLDFASHIONED. Back in the good old days relationships developed slowly. People went on formal dates, met parents, and knew in advance the steps that a relation ship should go through to progress to marriage. There was a gradual development of physi cal intimacy over time as respect, trust, and devo tion increased. Today, relationships are often developed quickly and informally. Couples will meet in a hanging out kind of environment, and then jump into a full blown relationship where they act as though they know and love each other, but, in truth, the rela tionship is very shallow. Studies show that hang ing out and hooking up causes a multitude of problems. There is a lot of benefit to taking things slow. Make sure that the time you spend together and the level of intimacy (physical and emotional) starts small and gradu ally increases as trust and respect grow. EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS. Many cou ples end up doing much the same thing every time they are together (which is usually often). Activities such as lying on the couch watching a movie or TV, drinking together, etc. are com mon activities because they are so easy, but they will poison a relationship. Get out and do new things together. If you want your relationship to grow, you need to stretch it. Get cre ative. Love takes effort. The more different experi ences you have together, the stronger your foundation will be. Your rela tionship should make you better and push you to expand your horizons.From Page 2ChaplainNavy Looks To Relieve Administrative Burdens From Fleet Defense Media Activity-NavyThe Chief of Naval Operations has developed a working group focused on reducing the adminis trative overhead on com mands, allowing Sailors to spend more time and energy on Warfighting First. Our goal is to give back to our warfighters, and includes everyone from the CO to the deckplate leaders, more time to focus on the things they need to do, said Rear Adm. Herman Shelanski, deputy to the director of Naval Nuclear Propulsion, and director for the work ing group. These Sailors need to be mission ready, they need to understand their weapons systems, they need to know how to get their ship underway safe ly, and they need time to do that. Instead, feedback from the fleet indicates that Sailors are spending far too much time on admin istrative tasks, such as duplicative training or competing requirements. CNO is hoping that a review of these require ments with an eye toward restoring balance will allow our force to be more efficient and effective. We plan to accomplish this task in phases, said Shelanski. In phase one we plan to really gather information, and look at the broad brush picture of everything out there that can affect us. In phase two we plan to narrow the scope and take a hard look at what we can take care of very quickly. Phase three is about putting that information into action then repeat. This will be a flywheel where we con stantly repeat the cycle to continue to find balance. Within the week the team plans to have a Website up, which will allow Sailors to begin submitting feedback imme diately. The hope is that some commands have already identified ways to reduce some of these administrative burdens and will now have access to a broader audience in which to share that infor mation. A survey will also be going out to solicit even more information from commands to find out what they are spend ing the most time on and get it fixed. We want amaz ing, innovative creative young Sailors of any rank to write in to us, said Shelanski. Here is an administrative process that Im spending all my time on and if I had an IPAD and an App, I could save three hours a day. With that input they plan to move ahead quickly to get some affect back to the fleet and buy them some time. And Although they want fast action from the fleet on this, they dont want this process to become another time drain on our Sailors. We just need to know what is hurting everyones head, said Shelanski. Training is a big one, and we think there is a way to make that more efficient. Take something as com mon as a zone inspection. Walking around with an officer, followed by a petty officer, weve got a pro cess in place that is suck ing up time and this guy is writing things down, then hes got to go to a com puter and fat finger the notes into a data base so theres got to be someone who has an idea on how to make that a little more efficient. The hope is that in a couple of weeks, once the team has a full excel spreadsheet of inputs; they can narrow the focus to some of the things that they can handle. Maybe the training piece cause I think that is one that tends to affect a lot of the commands throughout the fleet. We think there is going to be a flood of informa tion, said Shelanski. So putting together that information in a proper manner so we can sys tematically go through it will be a challenge. But an even bigger challenge is the cultural change that we hope to effect in the future. The team will also look at Websites that hold repetitive information and try to find an IT solu tion to the problem. If our sailors are bur dened by systems like that then certainly its one of the things we want to address, said Shelanski. Its our obligation to Sailors to give them the time that they need to do the right things. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 USO Brings Families Together For FunThe Mirror editorMore than 2,000 service members and their fami lies from NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville, NSB Kings Bay, Coast Guard and local recruit ing districts were able to escape the Florida heat at Adventure Landing and Shipwreck Island Waterpark on June 12 during the seventh annual Military Appreciation Night, sponsored by USO. For only a couple of dollars per person, families were able to enjoy both the wet and dry parks on Beach Boulevard in Jacksonville Beach. Normally, just a ticket to the water park would cost around $25 per per son so the savings are substan tial. For the early birds that do get a pass however, $2 to the USO allowed participants full access to both the dry and water park activities. We just transferred to Mayport, said Sarah Dagatan, wife of Aviation Boatswains Mate Equipment 2nd Class (AW) Mark Dagaton of NS Mayport. Its really great. Weve never been here before. Its our first time participating in something with USO. Service members and their families spent the eve ning lazing along the Lil St. Johns River lazy river or get ting washed ashore with at the Wave Pool. For the little ones, the water park offers the Pirates Play Village, a threestory, interactive water play area with 12 slides, nozzles that squirt and spray water, plus a lot of places to explore. There is also a Kiddie Cove designed for toddlers. For the more daring adven turers, the water park offers the Hydro Half-pipe a 35-foot halfpipe, based on a skate boarders trick maker. They could also swirled along in the Eye of the Storm, a 40-foot body slide where rid ers are challenged to see how many revolutions they can make before dropping into eight feet of water, according to Adventure Landing website. I think its wonderful, said Sky Johnston, whos husband is stationed on USS Taylor. We came last year while [USS Taylor] was on deployment. Its just so nice the USO does this. On the other side of Adventure Landing, family members could enjoy Miniature Golf, Laser Tag, the Wacky Worm roller coaster, Batting Cages, the Adventure Speedway go-karts, and arcade area. -Photos by Paige GnannService members from the tri-base area enjoy an evening at Jacksonville Beachs Adventure Landing to themselves courtesy of Greater Jacksonville USO. This was the seventh annual Military Appreciation Night at the amusement park. Gavin Johnston, 2, whose father is stationed on USS Taylor, enjoys the warm water inside the Kiddie Cove area, designed for toddlers. Ten month old Xyler Smiley and his mom, Yuki, live up to their name, smiling big while enjoying the warm waters at the Kiddie Cove. Cmdr. Russell Holmes, Deputy Commander of Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, gets his adrenaline going on the Hydro Half-pipe. Mariannah, 4, laughs as she tries to avoid a splash from dad, Aviation Boatswains Mate Equipment 2nd Class (AW) Mark Dagaton of NS Mayport, as her 1-year-old brother, Adrian, enjoys the warm water of the Pirates Play Village. A father and his son head down The Rage, an uphill water-coaster that can send a rider along its course at up to 18 MPH. Brianna Anderson, 8, heads down one of the slides at the Pirates Play Village.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 5 Mayport USO No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve hamburgers, hotdogs, pasta/potato salad, and dessert. Kangaroo Express 2013 Support Our Troops CampaignStarting June 26th For the 3rd year in a row, USO headquar ters has partnered with Kangaroo Express stores to salute our troops and families. The Support Our Troops campaign this year runs from June 26-Sept. 4. Last years event was extremely suc cessful in raising funds to support the many programs and services provided by the USO to troops and families. Lets make this years cam paign even better! Stop by the nearest Kangaroo Express and donate via the containers at the reg ister, purchase a RooCup for $.25 refills, or purchase a USO hat. Your donation will go a long way towards assist ing your local Greater Jacksonville Area USO and the many programs supporting our troops and families. Thinking About Going Back To School? Are you thinking about going back to school? Do you have a son or daughter going off to school? Join us at the NAS Jacksonville USO on Wednesday, June 26 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for more information on Grand Canyon University. A rep resentative will be avail able to answer any ques tions. Museum Of Contemporary Art Jacksonville The Museum of Contemporary Art in Jacksonville, located on 333 North Laura Street, will be participating in the national Blue Star Museum Program this summer whereby it offers FREE ADMISSION to Active Duty Military members and fami lies from Memorial Day to Labor Day. For more information, please call (904) 366-6911. Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday, June 10, from 5-7 p.m. the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve spaghetti and meatballs, salad, garlic bread, and dessert. THANK YOU NCTS JAX! USO Military Appreciation Night At The Jax Zoo Rescheduled Due to inclement weather Friday, May 3rd, Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo has been rescheduled to July 26 from 6-9 p.m. Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League The Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League invites activeduty Military personnel, and their dependents, to attend their roller derby games in Orange Park, Florida. The Tri-County Rolling Militias adult roller derby team, the Jade Grenades, is an allfemale, full contact recre ational and competitive roller derby team based in Orange Park. Come out and experience the hardhitting action of womens flat-track roller derby the same roller derby that is currently under con sideration for the 2020 Olympics! The Tri-County Rolling Militia (TCRM) has six remaining home games (or bouts as they are called in roller derby) for the 2013 sea son. The venue for these bouts is the Skate Station Funworks at 230 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park, Florida. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout begins at 6 p.m. The game dates are June 23, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater Jacksonville USO and For the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the Greater Jacksonville USO. Visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Hawaiian Tropic Sunscreen Free At The USO Protect your skin this summer. Stop by the NAS Jax and Mayport USO centers for your free bag of Hawaiian Tropic sun screen and after sun prod ucts. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO Above, families don their wristbands which gets them unlimited use of Adventure Landings wet and dry parks during the USO Military Appreciation Night. Right, Senior Chief Gunners Mate (SW) Frank Magotta of DESRON 14 and 14-year-old son, Kory, watch to see if mom, Kelly makes the shot during a game of putt putt. Families race around the go-kart track at the Adventure Speedway, one of several activi ties available at the amusement park. Its all smiles during the rollercoaster ride, the Wacky Worm. A family enjoys just floating along the Lil St. Johns River lazy river during the late afternoon at the Adventure Landing water park. Senior Chief Information Systems Technician Benjamin Daniels of NSB Kings Bay goes in for the shot against his wife, Ronnalee, as son, Brenden, 12, watches his parents play. Stacey Axline of NS Mayport helps her 15-year-old daughter, Jordan, answer questions at the Deal or No Deal game.

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From MWRThe Mayport Youth Center is participating in Summer Break Spot 2013, a free federal summer lunch program available June 10-Aug. 9. This program allows children 18 years of age and younger to have a lunch and a snack daily, Monday-Friday, at the Youth Activity Center (YAC). Lunch is available 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. and snack is offered 3:30-4:30 p.m. If children are under the age of 10, they must be accompanied by a parent. Children 10 and older can come unaccom panied. Please note the open recreation program is not operating during lunch; however, lunch is still available and will be served. In Accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. For more information, please call (904) 270-5680. Free Summer Lunch Program At YAC On The Messdeck Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Smashed Sandwich, $8 Grilled 5.5 oz burger, driz zled with our own chipotle aioli, your choice of cheese (American, Swiss or provolone), topped with shoestring French fries and sandwiched in our Panini press Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 A seasoned chicken breast, topped with provolone cheese, fresh spinach, driz zled with pesto and pressed on foccacia bread Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Tossed mixed greens, chicken breast, shavings, fresh sliced straw berries, drizzled with our own raspberry vinaigrette Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Sourdough stuffed with sharp white cheddar, American cheese, apple wood smoked bacon, grilled to a golden brown crisp Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Jumbo grilled shrimp, crisp bacon, stuffed in a pita with shredded lettuce, diced toma toes and our own special sauce Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Auto Skills Center June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rota tion on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Passholders receive unlimited access to Shipwreck Island at Adventure Landing Jacksonville Beach as well as daily deals throughout the week and special dis counts on off-season and holiday events. 270-5145 Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $31.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 5 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 270-5145 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 21: Movie Trip: World War Z. Van departs 6 p.m. June 22: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 24: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. June 25: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! Aquatics Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes. 270-5377 June 16: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. $6.00 for 90 minutes of bowling and shoe rental, plus Colored Headpin Bowling. Hot Dog and French fries $2.75. 2705377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retir ees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25. MWR Sports/Fitness Fitness Schedules Gymnasium, Bldg. 1391 (904) 270 5451 or 5452 Monday through Thursday 0500 1400 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 1130 Spinning 1730 Kids Clinic 1130 Steel Anchor 1630 Spinning 1130 Rowing 1130 Spinning 1130 Steel Anchor 0730 Spinning 1130 Rowing (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Zumba 1130 Kickboxing 1130 Strength Training for Women 0930 Yoga 1130 Strength Training for Women 0700 Sunrise Yoga 1130 Zumba 1130 Yoga (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Rehab 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Toning (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Running Clinic 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0730 Command Bootcamp 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 NOFFS 0700 Open Sandbox 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 1730 TRX 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Command Bootcamp 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 77 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD MWR Fun Run -Photo by Sarah BarthelemySixty-six runners and walkers participated in the Summer Beach 5K Run/ 3K walk on Tuesday, June 11. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 7

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Vicksburg Families Have Fun In Sun USS Vicksburg Public AffairsFollowing the passing of Tropical Storm Andrea, shipmates and families assigned to guided-mis sile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) enjoyed good food, fun and fellowship at the annual command picnic. It is very important to involve family in com mand events. They are the key to our mission success. My wife Scarlet and sons Isaac and Caleb had a blast with Vicksburgs families and made many new friends said Command Master Chief Michael Bates. The picnic was held at Kavanaugh Park and sponsored by the Vicksburg Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Committee. This is the first major event of many planned for the Vicksburg MWR commit tee. I would like to thank MR1 Erno, OS3 Ray, LS3 Karol, and STG3 Williams for their huge role in the picnics success said MWR President Chief Sonar Technician (SW) Jonathan Hanson. Bonos BBQ catered and served the festivities. They provided a menu of chicken, pulled pork, baked beans, cole slaw and sweet tea. We truly appreci ate the sacrifices of our Navy family, and serving this meal is only one way we can show our appre ciation to the armed ser vices, said Scott Reese, catering coordinator for Bonos BBQ. Along with food, the children of the crew were occupied with a wide array of activities. Among those were a dunk tank, water slide, and bounce house. Kavanaugh Park also features a large seat ing area and built in play equipment. My favorite activity was the water slide, and all the people on there are my new friends! said Charlie Schmidt, son of Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Christopher Schmidt. The thing I liked was that we got to come and socialize and have fun with family. Also, this is a great opportunity for new Sailors to get to know everyone, said Hull Technician 2nd Class (SW) Greg Harnois. USS Vicksburgs change of command ceremo ny was held on May 10. This was Capt. Lyle Hall and Command Master Chief Michael Bates first opportunity to meet and greet with Vicksburg families. Its an honor for me to get to meet the families of the superstars that serve on Vicksburg. I know how important the support of family is to Sailor success because I wouldnt be here without the support my wife Kim has provid ed, said Hall. USS Vicksburg is homeported in Mayport, Fla., and currently in a Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV), con ducting major repairs on various ship systems. Caleb Bates, son of Command Master Chief Michael Bates takes a plunge in the dunk tank during the annual command picnic for guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) at Kavanaugh Park. Sailors attached to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) enjoy food catered by Bonos BBQ during the annual command picnic. Children of Sailors attached to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) wait their turn for the water slide dur ing the annual command picnic at Kavanaugh Park. -Photos by FC2(SW) George A. DeCoste IIIOperations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Charlon Clarke, Gunners Mate 2nd Class Terrence Robinson, and OSSN James Welch enjoy a free meal catered by Bonos BBQ during the annual command picnic for guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) at Kavanaugh Park. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Reserve Air Boss Visits Jax Squadrons CNAFR Public AffairsCommander Naval Air Forces Reserve visited the four Navy Reserve squad rons at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport last week. Rear Adm. Doug Asbjornsen held a series of meetings with senior leadership as well as question and answer ses sions with many of his Reservists and active-duty Sailors during a threeday tour of Fleet Logistics Squadrons Five Eight (VR-58), Six Two (VR62) and Patrol Squadron Six Two aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Helicopter AntiSubmarine Warfare Light Six Zero (HSL-60) at Mayport. He addressed topics ranging from the future of Reserve aviation, and Reserve manning, to liberty policies in the western Pacific. Cross-assignment of Reservists is a major issue for squadrons that have members in other states. These members are actu ally assigned to two unitsone where they live and one where their actual bil let is. Cross-assignment is an issue and we know it is an issue, Asbjornsen said. As people come off active duty, they have skills that we need to keep in the Navy because we are going to need those skills someday. Not everyone chooses to live in a fleet concentration area. That is why we have NOSCs (Navy Operational Support Centers) in all 50 states. He said that senior leadership including Chief of Naval Reserve, Vice Adm. Robin Braun, is working to make the process smoother so that those Sailors can continue to participate in the Navy Reserve no matter where they live. Asbjornsen talked about the relevance of anti-submarine war fare in the 21st Century, with many nations and non-state actors rapidly expanding their subma rine fleets, ASW is receiv ing an emphasis not seen since the Cold War ended more than 20 years ago. As the P-8A Poseidon becomes the Navys pri mary ASW airplane, Reserve squadrons, fly ing the P-3C Orion will deploy overseas to fill in for active-duty squadrons that are receiving and training with the new air craft stateside. A detach ment from VP-62 has already deployed to Japan to augment VP-26 during this transition. The reality is youre going to be around until the P-8 transition is complete, Asbjornsen said. What you need to do, is knock em dead in WESTPAC. Speaking to the Chiefs mess at HSL-60, Asbjornsen continued on the ASW theme. Become even better at ASW. No other service can do ASWits a Navy thing. If were ever called, anywhere in the world, weve got to get those subs fast Speaking to the VR Sailors, Asbjornsen said, You play an absolutely critical role. If we have to fight, we have to have logistical support. The fleet logistics sup port community is unique to Reserve aviation. There is no active-duty equiva lent flying C-130 or C-40 transport aircraft. In light of several high profile liberty incidents, Asbjornsen stressed the importance of being good ambassadors and repre sentatives of the United States and the Navy both at work and after work. Your choices, on liber ty and professionally, can have an impact on our capability, he said. -Photo by MCCS William LoveladyHSL60 1 -Cmdr. Billy Maske (left), commanding officer of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light SixZero gives a tour ofhis squadron spaces and aircraft to Rear Adm. Doug Asbjornsen, Commander Naval Air Force Reserve.Apprenticeship Tracks Updated In LaDRsNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsThe Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) announced that as of June 6, a major update to the Professional Apprenticeship Career Track Program (PACT) section of the Learning and Development Roadmap (LaDR) has been posted to Navy Knowledge Online (NKO). Targeted for what were formerly known as General Detail (GENDET) Sailors, the PACT program was launched in 2007 to provide milestones and procedures for first-term enlistees that had not selected or obtained rat ings. According to Tom Smith, enlisted education coordinator for the Naval Education and Training Command, the first update in the PACT LaDR series, the Engineering PACT (E-PACT), was reduced from 35 pages to 15 pages, a significant reduction that makes the roadmap more userfriendly and intuitive. Based on the feedback we were getting through the LaDR pages on the NKO website, we realized that the apprenticeship tracks should be updat ed and improved, Smith said We are streamlining all of the PACT LaDRs to focus on the task at hand, which is for Sailors to find a rating for the rest of their career. Chief Machinists Mate (SW/AW) Grover Ducksworth, EPACT/ Basic Engineering Core Curriculum advanced supervisor for the Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS) Unit Great Lakes, Ill. was instrumental in the update to the nonrated engineering apprenticeship program. The E-PACT LaDR is a significant value for young Sailors aspiring to be engineers, said Ducksworth. It provides a step-bystep guide that allows them to achieve their short-term and long-term goal and is the start of the junior to leadership mentorship process, he said. Fireman Recruit Gabriel Sellers, a student at SWOS Unit Great Lakes, believes that the E-PACT LaDR is an essential tool to suc cessfully obtaining an engineering rating. E-PACT makes you feel more secure about your duties as an undesignat ed Fireman, said Sellers. It gives you a basic yet broad view of engineering as a whole. The PACT series includes E-PACT, Surface PACT (S-PACT) and Aviation PACT (A-PACT) and contains the follow ing components: -Job description and tour assignments -Listing of Professional Military Education (PME) skills and training to pur sue -Voluntary education recommendations -Comprehensive refer ence section The EPACT LaDR is currently available on NKO and the S-PACT and A-PACT are being revised and will be added in the near future. To obtain a copy of the PACT LaDRs, visit https:// wwwa.nko.navy.mil/por tal/careermanagement/ eld/home/professionalap prenticeshipcareertracks( pact) and open the appro priate E-PACT, S-PACT or A-PACT.pdf file. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 9

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buying and selling used vehicles not to mention the manpower it takes to supply them. Our goal is to take those funds and reinvest them back into our force protection efforts. According to Toth, the original purpose of the DoD decal was to not only for base access, but also to ensure that driv ers on installations pos sessed a valid drivers license, proof of adequate insurance and a current state vehicle registra tion. While the decals are set for elimination next month, the requirement for vehicles to be regis tered with the installation security departments will continue. Personnel and residents that are perma nently assigned to a Navy installation will in-pro cess and out-process at the installation Pass and Identification Office. According to the new CNIC policy, motorcycle operators safety require ments, barment con trol and enforcement of state licensing, registra tion, insurance and safe ty requirements will be enforced through random vehicle inspections and routine traffic enforce ment. Our requirements will not change. Anyone oper ating a motor vehicle on base will still be required to carry proof of insur ance and registration in accordance with their respective state law, Toth said. The policy change will take effect on board every CNIC installation July 1. Drivers who still need access to other services installations that may still require a decal will be permitted to display the decal until it expires. Under the new policy, base visitors will continue to use the normal visitor procedures established by the installation commanding officer. For more information, please contact your local installation Security Department or Pass and I.D. office.From Page 1Decal USAFRICOM Visits SBR USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) Public AffairsGen. David Rodriguez, commander, U.S. Africa Command, visited the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), during the ships visit to Augusta Bay, June 11. During the visit, Rodriguez, and Capt. John Esposito, commander, Task Force 65, toured the ship with Cmdr. Robert Williams, Samuel B. Roberts commanding officer. Rodriquez con cluded his visit with an address to the ships crew, and with administrating the oath of enlistment for some attendees. It is not everyday that you get a four-star General to reenlist you, said Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Michael Terry. This will be one of the highlights of my naval career. For many Sailors, the visit was a chance to recharge. The deployment has been interesting thus far due to being a part of a multi-faceted mission, said Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Brian West. Samuel B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Fla., is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security opera tions and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. Naval Forces EuropeAfrica area of responsibility. -Photo by MR1 Gary W. SpenceGen. David M. Rodriguez, commander of U.S. Africa Command (USAFRICOM), con ducts an all-hands call aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG58) during the ships port visit in Augusta Bay, Sicily. Samuel B. Roberts is deployed to the U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts.-Photo by MC3 Billy HoAn SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 drops pallets on the foc'sle aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) during a vertical replenishment train ing exercise. Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Delivering SuppliesTake Commissary Survey OnlineFrom DeCAs public affairsWhether you shop at your local commis sary or not, the Defense Commissary Agency wants to hear from you. From June 1 through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www. commissaries.com by clicking on the take our survey link or access ing the survey directly at https://www.survey monkey.com/s/DeCAShopping-Survey. Were asking for input from our regular shop pers, occasional shoppers and non-shoppers alike, said Tracie Russ, director of DeCAs business devel opment directorate. The responses will be ana lyzed and used to improve the commissary for all our patrons. The survey takes only 8-12 minutes to complete, and Russ said the time spent will have mean ingful impact on future improvements. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Cutter Diamondback Relocates To Sector Jax U.S. Coast Guard Public Affairs The Coast Guard Cutter Diamondback and 12-person crew arrived at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach on June 13, offi cially shifting the cutters homeport from Miami. The Diamondback is an 87-foot Coastal Patrol Boat with pri mary missions of search and rescue, maritime law enforcement, fisher ies enforcement, marine environmental protec tion, defense readiness; and ports, waterways and coastal security. Lt. j.g. Johnston Ariail, Diamondbacks com manding officer, said the crew is excited to be in Jacksonville and is look ing forward to operating in the area. An extensive review of multiple potential homeports determined Sector Jacksonville is the best location for the Diamondback and its crew. The Diamondback will become operational in the northern portion of the 7th Coast Guard District July 1, 2013, patrolling the waters from the North and South Carolina border down to southern Florida. The Coast Guard Cutter Kingfisher, anoth er 87-foot Coastal Patrol Boat, is also homeported at Sector Jacksonville as well as the cutters Hammer and Maria Bray. Capt. Tom Allan (right), commander of Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville welcomes Lt. j.g. Johnston Ariail, commanding officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Diamondback. Photos by Petty Officer 1st Class Lauren Jorgensen Crew members aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Diamondback (right) moor the cutter alongside the Coast Guard Cutter Kingfisher at the Diamondbacks new homeport at Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Thursday, April 13, 2013. The Diamondback moved to Jacksonville from Miami and will be operational in the northern portion of the 7th Coast Guard District July 1, 2013. Coast Guard Urges Safe SwimmingFrom U.S. Coast GuardCoast Guard Air Station Savannah has received reports of seven missing swimmers in the last 12 days and urges everyone to take necessary safety precautions before and while swimming. Five of the seven missing swimmers were found deceased. These deaths have touched every por tion of the 450-miles of coastline that Coast Guardsmen aboard Air Station Savannah patrol. The affected communi ties include: Charleston, S.C., Beaufort, S.C., Fernandina Beach, Fla., Jacksonville, Fla., and St. Augustine, Fla. Drowning is the fifth leading cause of acci dental death in the United States. On aver age, 10 people die from unintentional drowning every day. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. In an effort to save lives, the Coast Guard recom mends the following for all swimmers: guard. U.S. Lifesaving Association statistics, during a 10-year period, show that the chance of drowning at a beach with out lifeguard protection is almost five times greater than drowning at a beach with lifeguards. Many drownings involve single swimmers. Learn water rescue techniques you can use if someone you are swimming with is in danger. If caught in a rip current, dont fight it by trying to swim directly to shore. Instead, swim parallel to shore until you feel the current relax, and then swim to shore. Most rip currents are narrow and a short swim parallel to shore will bring a swim mer to safety. a major factor in drown ing. Alcohol can reduce body temperature and impair swimming ability. Both alcohol and drugs impair good judgment, which may cause people to take risks they would not otherwise take. you cant swim. Nonswimmers and weak swimmers often use flo tation devices, such as inflatable rafts, to go off shore. If they fall off, they can quickly drown. No one should use a flotation device unless they are able to swim. Weak swimmers should also consid er wearing an inherently buoyant Coast Guardapproved Type I, II or III life jacket. pected. Wear a life jacket while participating in any activity during which you would unexpectedly enter the water, such as fishing from breakwalls or piers. sary risks. Walking along breakwalls is risky because it only takes a momentary loss of foot ing to invite tragedy. Jumping from breakwalls, waterside structures or into unfamiliar water is extremely dangerous since unseen underwater hazards may exist. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 11

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FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 22, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will par ticipate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. June 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. June 24, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 24-28, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1, Room 104 June 25, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum FFSC Building 1, Room 719 June 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting (ages 13-19) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will par ticipate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. DeCAScholarship Helps Students Pay For CollegeDeCA public affairs specialistMore than $1 million in financial assistance will go to 670 students, con sidered to be among the nations best and bright est, thanks to this years Scholarships for Military Children program. Since its start in 2001, the Scholarships for Military Children pro gram has awarded $1,500 scholarships to 7,412 chil dren of active duty, Guard and Reserve, and retired service members world wide. The Defense Commissary Agency par ticipates in the program by accepting applications of eligible children and submitting their packages to Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship management services organization. Stores celebrate the achievements of their local selections with a ceremony in the commis sary. These ceremonies create a lot of excitement for the military commu nity as they acknowledge the achievements of their recipients, said DeCA Deputy Director Michael J. Dowling. When you think about these young men and women, they are the best of the best, Dowling said. According to Scholarship Managers, there were 4,675 people who applied, and 670 who will receive a scholarship. Doing the math, they represent the top 15 percent. This means theyre exception al. Many of them are high school valedictorians, he said. This $1,500 schol arship helps them move forward in their pursuit of higher education. Commissary vendors, manufacturers, brokers, suppliers and the gen eral public fund the pro gram through donations. And, all donations are applied solely to fund ing the scholarships, said Jim Weiskopf, vice presi dent of Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that assists family members with temporary lodging when they visit hospitalized ser vice members. We want to thank those companies that have supported this very special quality of life pro gram every year since 2001, said Weiskopf, whose organization underwrites the cost of administering the schol arship program. I also want to thank the store directors. They do so much more than sell gro ceries. They are integral parts of their local com munities. During the selection process, Scholarship Managers reviews the applicants grade-point averages, their extracur ricular and volunteer activities, and their essays on an assigned topic. Two of this years 670 scholarship recipients, Kathryn Barisano and Matthew Schneck, spoke to an audience of com missary employees and industry members at the DeCA scholarship lun cheon April 25. The lun cheon was held during the two-day 2013 DeCA and American Logistics Association Commissary Roundtable event in Richmond, Va. Barisano, the daugh ter of a retired soldier, is a senior at Thomas Dale High School in Chester, Va. Barisano will attend James Madison University in the fall. Schneck, also the son of a retired soldier, is a senior at Prince George High School in Prince George, Va., where he has a 4.88 GPA and is ranked No. 1 in his class of 410 students. He has also earned varsity letters in volleyball, track and field, and soccer. Schneck received the William and Mary Leadership Award and is president of the Virginia Student Council Association. He will attend Virginia Commonwealth University in the fall. This years essay topic was on the applicants most-admired presidential first lady. Barisano wrote her essay on Laura Bush, and Schneck penned his on Eleanor Roosevelt. The three most popular topics among the scholarship recipients were Roosevelt, with 224 essays; 105 for Betty Ford, and 75 for current first lady Michelle Obama. For information about the 2014 program, check the website, http://www. militaryscholar.org, in December. To see a list of this years recipients, go to the website and click 2013 Scholarship Winners Announced. Thursday, June 20 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., continues its Talks and Tea series by highlighting, Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile at 1:30 p.m. Talks and Tea lecture series invites visi tors to sit comfortably in the Galleries and Gardens of The Cummer while art historians, artists, and other experts facilitate informational and educa tional discussions on vari ous topics related to the Museums permanent col lection, as well as special exhibitions. At the conclu sion of each talk, tea and light refreshments will be served. Members and Non-members $6 per per son, includes lecture, tea, refreshments and admis sion to the Museum and Gardens. Pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, please call (904) 899-6038. The City of Jacksonville Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services (MAVDS) department is hosting its monthly free career and employment counseling seminar for veterans and active duty military from 3-6 p.m. at City Hall, Suite 120, 117 W. Duval St. For more information, please call 630-CITY (2489) or visit the MAVDS departments website. Saturday, June 22 What better way to cel ebrate Great Outdoors Month than by joining a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these crea tures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, July 6 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Sunday, July 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. July 8-12 Enter the epic adven ture of Kingdom Rock VBS that empowers kids to stand strong. Here, Gods victorious power isnt a fairy tale -it chang es kids forever. Join this royally-rockin realm at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road from 9-11:30 a.m. For infor mation call the church at 249-5370 or register online at neptunebeachumc.org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Goodbye To Vehicle Decals! Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsNavy Region Southeast (NRSE) drivers will no longer be required to display a Department of Defense (DoD) vehicle decal to gain access to installations beginning July 1. The change will be made to comply with a new Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) policy intended to enhance base security by providing electronic cre dentialing and increased scrutiny of authorized identification cards. Eliminating the DoD decals and implementing electronic credentialing will improve our security posture because it will allow our gate security personnel to more carefully scrutinize authorized identification cards with out the added distraction of having to verify the decal, said Capt. Brett Calkins, Navy Region Southeast operations and plans officer. In addition to enhanc ing security at the gate, the new policy will also work to protect Department of Defense personnel when they are off the base, Calkins said. You really never know where or when you are going to encounter ter rorism, he said. Vehicle decals can be easily rec ognizable to those out there that would like to do our service members harm, so not having them on vehicles off base will help to lower visibil ity and, in essence, help protect our people from potential harm. The new policy will also have a major impact on installation budgets, resulting in an estimated $750,000 in annual sav ings Navy-wide, as well as a drastic reduction in administrative tasks. Those savings will be diverted to critical AT/FP programs, reported Navy Times. First and foremost, this policy change is going to help us better protect personnel, but the finan cial benefits to not hav ing stickers are obvious, said Bruce Toth, NRSE regional security officer. Sticker costs can add up, especially when families have multiple vehicles and people are constantly CNRSE To Waive Vehicle Decal Requirements -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyMaster-at-Arms Seaman Apprentice Noely Vazquez of NS Mayports Security checks the identification of a driver before allowing entry to the station. Base decals will no longer be required on motorcycles, cars, trucks and other vehicles as of July 1. Ride To Work For Motorcycle SafetyFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will hold a Ride to Work event to raise awareness and show support for motorcycle safety on June 24 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the C12 Hangar across from McDonalds. According to Navy Traffic Safety Instructor Alan Manges, there will be demonstrations of evasive manuevers, including stopping quickly/evading, and low speed control manipulation skills, like tight turns in tight spaces. We will be providing some motorcycle safety handouts on group riding, motor cycle pre-ride inspection, hand and arm signals, he said. We will also have some rider skills challenges set-up for riders to participate in if they choose. There will be additional instructors on hand to assist riders with any questions regarding PPE, training requirements, or general motorcycle/ traffic safety. The event is free and open to all inter ested. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSenior Chief Culinary Specialist Francisco Ramirez of USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) flips a slab of ribs during Naval Station Mayports 2nd Annual Battle of the Ribs cook-off. The Battle of the Ribs cook off was held to build camaraderie, boost morale and raise money for the respective groups involved. Mayport Takes On Battle Of RibsNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastThe Mayport Chief Petty Officer Association (CPOA) smoked the competition at the second-annual Battle of the Ribs sponsored by the Mayports Navy Exchange June 14. Eight contestants submitted entries showcasing their own special recipes and barbequing talents. It was a fun-filled event to build camaraderie, boost morale, and a great way to raise money for their respective groups, said Capt. Douglas Cochrane, commanding officer Naval Station Mayport. I have a booth this year. Im super excited about today and I feel we had a really good turn out. Mayports Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Command Master Chief Robert White, Capt. Dan Boyles, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Commissary Assistant Store Director Joyce Parish and Angi Thacker served as judges for the event. The food was fantastic and competition was tight, said White. The winning recipe was chosen near unani mously. Mayports CPOA took first place and a prize of $250 dollars, which they donated to the base Christmas party, as did Cochrane with his second place prize. Competition like this is always fun, said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jose Pacheco. Its always nice to see people enjoying themselves and contributing to command morale. Furlough Could Affect Pass HoursFrom NS Mayport SecurityIf the DoD govern ment service employ ee furlough is executed due to seques tration as planned beginning on July 8, the Naval Station Mayport visitor con trol center (Pass and ID office) will be closed every Friday beginning July 12 through Sept. 27 due to staffing shortfalls. The visitor control center will be open Monday through Thursday from 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Naval Station Mayport Commercial Vehicle Inspection Station (48a) will remain open Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.See Decal, Page 10

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror For any relationship to last, it must be built on a solid foundation of love. The problem is that many are nave about what true love really is. Love does not just happen. It must be planted, cultivated and nurtured. You dont fall into true love, you climb to it. However, love has an evil twin. Infatuation is easily confused with love because it feels so great, and can make you obsessed with another person. You fall in love with how being wanted by another person makes you feel. It seems to fill our insecurities. At its heart, infatuation is all about I need you. That I cant live without you kind of thinking may sound romantic, but it isnt. At its heart, it is self ish. It is more concerned about what you do for me, and how you fill my insecurities so I dont have to. Such infatuation-based relationships usually start off strong, making you feel quickly like you know each other so well and are so perfect for each other. But they cant last as they are without quickly grow ing unhealthy because they arent based on real truth and responsibility. From the moment you begin a relationship there will be an urge to let it consume your life and take control of your will. It is normal for relationships to begin as infatu ation (though you will convince yourself that it is love), but it is impor tant that you maintain self control so that love may begin to grow. True love is not simply an emo tion. It is a lifestyle that you must commit to continually. For love to grow, you will have to learn to sacrifice some of the things that fuel the fire of infatuation. Maintaining control of the relation ship is especially impor tant in the early stages of romance since you are establishing patterns of behavior that will affect your future. Here are some important things you can do in the early stages of the relationship to make sure it is built on a solid foundation. GET A LIFE. Infatuation can become like a drug addiction and can consume a persons thoughts and desires. It can get to the point that they dont care about anything but the rela tionship. When a couple isolates themselves, the relationship will begin to stagnate. Such relation ships breed obsession, jealousy, and neediness, all of which are enemies of love. You need to get a life outside of each other. Make sure you maintain your friendships, do fun things with other people, continue to develop tal ents and pursue dreams. Entering into a relation ship doesnt mean that you need to leave the rest of your life behind.Chap Justin Top Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSIts Better To Climb Into Love Than FallYour teen has declared he wants to work at the neighborhood Publix. I need the money for an upgraded IPhone, and a car, he says. Whoa! Is this a step to maturity or a slip toward lower grades, inadequate sleep, and a cramped social life? How do you help him make the right choice about taking a job? Jobs in the summer are great with no homework to juggle. But when school starts back in the fall, how do you help him manage the job, school, and social time? First, make sure you know the rules. Check out federal law to make sure that the employer is following it to the letter. Also check out state laws as well since some states impose stiffer restrictions than the federal govern ment. Once youve exam ined the laws in your area, make sure you and your teen discuss the benefits and the disadvantages. The Pros confidence, a sense of responsibility and inde pendence. dents, who work a moderate amount, no more than 10 to 15 hours a week, tend to earn higher grades than those who dont work at all. opportunity to practice responsible money man agement. work outside the home, a job during the summer can give your child adult supervision when no adults are home during the day. may expose your teen to new work possibilities and set him on the path to a life-time career. The Cons to 20 hours a week is associated with lower grades. So if this job continues in the fall, watch those grades! many hours may find it hard to keep up with responsibilities around the house, faith-based activities, or social rela tionships. found that teens who work long hours are more likely to engage in activi ties such as drug or alco hol use, in part because they are exposed to older co-workers who lead them into these activities. Since most teens dont like to be told what to do, offer subtle guid ance. Ask them what they want to get out of the job. Career preparation? Fun? Money? Discuss whether this is a job they would like to keep once school starts back. Talk about preparing a budget which will include saving as well as spend ing. Consider making your teen responsible for gas when he drives the car or a portion of the auto insurance or some enter tainment expenses which youve paid in the past. If your teen does take a job, make sure he is get ting his breaks and that he doesnt work more hours for his age than allowed by law. If the job contin ues on into the school year, continue to monitor how many hours a week he works. You may have to reduce those hours if he cant keep up his grades. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. The Five Worst Jobs For Teens The National Consumers League has pegged these jobs as the most dangerous for stu dents. Delivery and other driving: including operating or riding on forklifts and other motorized equip ment. Working alone in a cash-based business: including convenience store, gas station, and fast-food establishments. Traveling youth crews: selling candy, magazine subscriptions and other consumer goods on street corners, in unfamiliar neighborhoods, in distant cities, and across state lines. Cooking: exposure to hot oil and grease, hot water and steam, and hot cooking surfaces. Construction: includ ing work at heights and contact with electrical power.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThe Good And Bad Of Summer Jobs For TeensPrepare all you want, but in the end, every move is a craps shoot. In two days, our movers arrive to take our belongings to Rhode Island. No matter what I do, something will be lost, stolen or arrive broken. I can only pray that its that particleboard microwave cart Ive always hated that some how miraculously sur vived our last seven mili tary moves. Our first movers name was Rusty, a swarthy, seasoned trucker, whod seen many a military transfer. Over lunch, he sat on the hydraulic platform at the back of his rig and told us stories of moves gone by. Ive never had a late delivery. Even back in my drinkin days, I didnt miss a beat. Why, one time after a fifth of Wild Turkey, I drove from Mississippi clear into Texas and had absolutely no recollection of it. As we watched him drive off with our price less belongings, we mut tered a quick prayer that he would stay off the sauce a bit longer. Our move from England to Virginia was oh so civilized. The British mov ers were friendly young mates, who properly sat together with us at our kitchen table munching on fish, chips and pints of lager for lunch. As they drove off with our neat ly packed belongings, we bid our new friends tarah. Only later did we realize that theyd nicked our telly. When we moved to Virginia, we requested a full unpack because we knew we would not have much time for unpacking with an infant and tod dler. As luck would have Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesIts Time Again. Every Move Is A Craps Shootit, the movers were two hours late, left early, and refused to unpack boxes or assemble beds. To make matters worse, one Muslim member of the moving crew took a break to pray in our spare bedroom in honor of Ramadan. That was not the problem. The issue was that, ten minutes before he had entered the room, I had hidden in that same bedrooms walk in closet to nurse the baby. Deep in prayer, appar ently facing Mecca, he was quite surprised to see me pop out of the closet, blurting, Howdy, Mohammed! Sorry to interrupt, Ill just scoot on out of here and leave you in peace. Toot-a-loo! Years later, we moved to Germany, and were naively hopeful for a problem-free move. I put out coffee and doughnuts. I bought lunch and cold drinks. I supplied reclos able storage bags, tape and permanent markers for the movers to pack hardware. A few hours later, I watched in horror, as a crewmember formed a little hammock with his shirt, and used it to carry all our furniture hardware pieces over to the truck, then threw handfuls of the pieces in between furni ture and boxes. I immediately protested, reminding him of the baggies I gave him for this pur pose. Trust me Maam, just shake out the paper at the bottom of the crate when you get there. Youll see, all the pieces will be there. Of course, they were not. And our last transfer to Florida seemed as if it was our first problem free move. We were so pleased with the German mov ing crew who were thor ough, polite, appreciative, and hard-working -with seemingly super-human strength. After watching two men carry our piano down four flights of stairs, we thought the crew members were heroes. It wasnt until we unpacked six months later at our current home that we realized they had stolen my husbands entire irre placeable military coin collection. So what am I say ing? Should we all for get about the reclosable baggies and permanent markers? Should we give up on buying the movers lunch to butter them up? Should we completely throw caution to the wind and hit the beach on moving day? Probably not a good idea. But, we should realize that all military moves are a gamble, and the only thing we can be certain of is that the damned microwave cart will live to see another day. Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www.themeatandpota toesoflife.comVacation Bible School Registration BeginsFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold its annual Vacation Bible School from July 22-26 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children ages 4-12. This years theme is Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God. At Kingdom Rock, kids will meet new Bible Buddies, like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children how Gods love, family, friends, prayer and trust can help them stand strong. There is no cost for VBS, but space is limited. Register at the Chapel during normal working hours or call 270-5212 for more information.See Chaplain, Page 3

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BRIDLE YOUR PASSIONS. It takes absolutely no love to give in to your sexual impulses. Infatuation encourages you to surrender to what you want right now. Love sacrifices what you want for what is best. Movies and TV shows often pro mote the idea that sexu ality is the key to a relationship. While physical intimacy is important in a relationship, if it is mis used it can actually dam age a couples ability to create emotional intima cy. When detached from true love, trust, and com mitment, sex can blind a person to the real nature of their relationship. It fuels infatuation and self ishness that can shorten the life of the relation ship. One study showed that of couples who had sex within the first 30 days of the relationship, 90% were no longer together a year later. Making love doesnt actually make love. Dont let physical intimacy become the cen ter of your relationship, but rather the result of taking the time to build a solid foundation of love. BE OLDFASHIONED. Back in the good old days relationships developed slowly. People went on formal dates, met parents, and knew in advance the steps that a relation ship should go through to progress to marriage. There was a gradual development of physi cal intimacy over time as respect, trust, and devo tion increased. Today, relationships are often developed quickly and informally. Couples will meet in a hanging out kind of environment, and then jump into a full blown relationship where they act as though they know and love each other, but, in truth, the rela tionship is very shallow. Studies show that hang ing out and hooking up causes a multitude of problems. There is a lot of benefit to taking things slow. Make sure that the time you spend together and the level of intimacy (physical and emotional) starts small and gradu ally increases as trust and respect grow. EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS. Many cou ples end up doing much the same thing every time they are together (which is usually often). Activities such as lying on the couch watching a movie or TV, drinking together, etc. are com mon activities because they are so easy, but they will poison a relationship. Get out and do new things together. If you want your relationship to grow, you need to stretch it. Get creative. Love takes effort. The more different experiences you have together, the stronger your foundation will be. Your rela tionship should make you better and push you to expand your horizons.From Page 2ChaplainNavy Looks To Relieve Administrative Burdens From Fleet Defense Media Activity-NavyThe Chief of Naval Operations has developed a working group focused on reducing the adminis trative overhead on com mands, allowing Sailors to spend more time and energy on Warfighting First. Our goal is to give back to our warfighters, and includes everyone from the CO to the deckplate leaders, more time to focus on the things they need to do, said Rear Adm. Herman Shelanski, deputy to the director of Naval Nuclear Propulsion, and director for the working group. These Sailors need to be mission ready, they need to understand their weapons systems, they need to know how to get their ship underway safe ly, and they need time to do that. Instead, feedback from the fleet indicates that Sailors are spending far too much time on administrative tasks, such as duplicative training or competing requirements. CNO is hoping that a review of these require ments with an eye toward restoring balance will allow our force to be more efficient and effective. We plan to accomplish this task in phases, said Shelanski. In phase one we plan to really gather information, and look at the broad brush picture of everything out there that can affect us. In phase two we plan to narrow the scope and take a hard look at what we can take care of very quickly. Phase three is about putting that information into action then repeat. This will be a flywheel where we con stantly repeat the cycle to continue to find balance. Within the week the team plans to have a Website up, which will allow Sailors to begin submitting feedback imme diately. The hope is that some commands have already identified ways to reduce some of these administrative burdens and will now have access to a broader audience in which to share that infor mation. A survey will also be going out to solicit even more information from commands to find out what they are spend ing the most time on and get it fixed. We want amaz ing, innovative creative young Sailors of any rank to write in to us, said Shelanski. Here is an administrative process that Im spending all my time on and if I had an IPAD and an App, I could save three hours a day. With that input they plan to move ahead quickly to get some affect back to the fleet and buy them some time. And Although they want fast action from the fleet on this, they dont want this process to become another time drain on our Sailors. We just need to know what is hurting everyones head, said Shelanski. Training is a big one, and we think there is a way to make that more efficient. Take something as com mon as a zone inspection. Walking around with an officer, followed by a petty officer, weve got a pro cess in place that is suck ing up time and this guy is writing things down, then hes got to go to a com puter and fat finger the notes into a data base so theres got to be someone who has an idea on how to make that a little more efficient. The hope is that in a couple of weeks, once the team has a full excel spreadsheet of inputs; they can narrow the focus to some of the things that they can handle. Maybe the training piece cause I think that is one that tends to affect a lot of the commands throughout the fleet. We think there is going to be a flood of informa tion, said Shelanski. So putting together that information in a proper manner so we can sys tematically go through it will be a challenge. But an even bigger challenge is the cultural change that we hope to effect in the future. The team will also look at Websites that hold repetitive information and try to find an IT solution to the problem. If our sailors are bur dened by systems like that then certainly its one of the things we want to address, said Shelanski. Its our obligation to Sailors to give them the time that they need to do the right things. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 USO Brings Families Together For FunThe Mirror editorMore than 2,000 service members and their fami lies from NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville, NSB Kings Bay, Coast Guard and local recruit ing districts were able to escape the Florida heat at Adventure Landing and Shipwreck Island Waterpark on June 12 during the seventh annual Military Appreciation Night, sponsored by USO. For only a couple of dollars per person, families were able to enjoy both the wet and dry parks on Beach Boulevard in Jacksonville Beach. Normally, just a ticket to the water park would cost around $25 per person so the savings are substantial. For the early birds that do get a pass however, $2 to the USO allowed participants full access to both the dry and water park activities. We just transferred to Mayport, said Sarah Dagatan, wife of Aviation Boatswains Mate Equipment 2nd Class (AW) Mark Dagaton of NS Mayport. Its really great. Weve never been here before. Its our first time participating in something with USO. Service members and their families spent the eve ning lazing along the Lil St. Johns River lazy river or get ting washed ashore with at the Wave Pool. For the little ones, the water park offers the Pirates Play Village, a threestory, interactive water play area with 12 slides, nozzles that squirt and spray water, plus a lot of places to explore. There is also a Kiddie Cove designed for toddlers. For the more daring adven turers, the water park offers the Hydro Half-pipe a 35-foot halfpipe, based on a skate boarders trick maker. They could also swirled along in the Eye of the Storm, a 40-foot body slide where rid ers are challenged to see how many revolutions they can make before dropping into eight feet of water, according to Adventure Landing website. I think its wonderful, said Sky Johnston, whos husband is stationed on USS Taylor. We came last year while [USS Taylor] was on deployment. Its just so nice the USO does this. On the other side of Adventure Landing, family members could enjoy Miniature Golf, Laser Tag, the Wacky Worm roller coaster, Batting Cages, the Adventure Speedway go-karts, and arcade area. -Photos by Paige GnannService members from the tri-base area enjoy an evening at Jacksonville Beachs Adventure Landing to themselves courtesy of Greater Jacksonville USO. This was the seventh annual Military Appreciation Night at the amusement park. Gavin Johnston, 2, whose father is stationed on USS Taylor, enjoys the warm water inside the Kiddie Cove area, designed for toddlers. Ten month old Xyler Smiley and his mom, Yuki, live up to their name, smiling big while enjoying the warm waters at the Kiddie Cove. Cmdr. Russell Holmes, Deputy Commander of Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, gets his adrenaline going on the Hydro Half-pipe. Mariannah, 4, laughs as she tries to avoid a splash from dad, Aviation Boatswains Mate Equipment 2nd Class (AW) Mark Dagaton of NS Mayport, as her 1-year-old brother, Adrian, enjoys the warm water of the Pirates Play Village. A father and his son head down The Rage, an uphill water-coaster that can send a rider along its course at up to 18 MPH. Brianna Anderson, 8, heads down one of the slides at the Pirates Play Village.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 5 Mayport USO No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve hamburgers, hotdogs, pasta/potato salad, and dessert. Kangaroo Express 2013 Support Our Troops CampaignStarting June 26th For the 3rd year in a row, USO headquar ters has partnered with Kangaroo Express stores to salute our troops and families. The Support Our Troops campaign this year runs from June 26-Sept. 4. Last years event was extremely suc cessful in raising funds to support the many programs and services provided by the USO to troops and families. Lets make this years cam paign even better! Stop by the nearest Kangaroo Express and donate via the containers at the reg ister, purchase a RooCup for $.25 refills, or purchase a USO hat. Your donation will go a long way towards assist ing your local Greater Jacksonville Area USO and the many programs supporting our troops and families. Thinking About Going Back To School? Are you thinking about going back to school? Do you have a son or daughter going off to school? Join us at the NAS Jacksonville USO on Wednesday, June 26 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for more information on Grand Canyon University. A representative will be avail able to answer any ques tions. Museum Of Contemporary Art Jacksonville The Museum of Contemporary Art in Jacksonville, located on 333 North Laura Street, will be participating in the national Blue Star Museum Program this summer whereby it offers FREE ADMISSION to Active Duty Military members and fami lies from Memorial Day to Labor Day. For more information, please call (904) 366-6911. Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday, June 10, from 5-7 p.m. the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve spaghetti and meatballs, salad, garlic bread, and dessert. THANK YOU NCTS JAX! USO Military Appreciation Night At The Jax Zoo Rescheduled Due to inclement weather Friday, May 3rd, Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo has been rescheduled to July 26 from 6-9 p.m. Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League The Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League invites activeduty Military personnel, and their dependents, to attend their roller derby games in Orange Park, Florida. The Tri-County Rolling Militias adult roller derby team, the Jade Grenades, is an allfemale, full contact recre ational and competitive roller derby team based in Orange Park. Come out and experience the hardhitting action of womens flat-track roller derby the same roller derby that is currently under con sideration for the 2020 Olympics! The Tri-County Rolling Militia (TCRM) has six remaining home games (or bouts as they are called in roller derby) for the 2013 sea son. The venue for these bouts is the Skate Station Funworks at 230 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park, Florida. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout begins at 6 p.m. The game dates are June 23, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater Jacksonville USO and For the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the Greater Jacksonville USO. Visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Hawaiian Tropic Sunscreen Free At The USO Protect your skin this summer. Stop by the NAS Jax and Mayport USO centers for your free bag of Hawaiian Tropic sun screen and after sun products. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO Above, families don their wristbands which gets them unlimited use of Adventure Landings wet and dry parks during the USO Military Appreciation Night. Right, Senior Chief Gunners Mate (SW) Frank Magotta of DESRON 14 and 14-year-old son, Kory, watch to see if mom, Kelly makes the shot during a game of putt putt. Families race around the go-kart track at the Adventure Speedway, one of several activities available at the amusement park. Its all smiles during the rollercoaster ride, the Wacky Worm. A family enjoys just floating along the Lil St. Johns River lazy river during the late afternoon at the Adventure Landing water park. Senior Chief Information Systems Technician Benjamin Daniels of NSB Kings Bay goes in for the shot against his wife, Ronnalee, as son, Brenden, 12, watches his parents play. Stacey Axline of NS Mayport helps her 15-year-old daughter, Jordan, answer questions at the Deal or No Deal game.

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From MWRThe Mayport Youth Center is participating in Summer Break Spot 2013, a free federal summer lunch program available June 10-Aug. 9. This program allows children 18 years of age and younger to have a lunch and a snack daily, Monday-Friday, at the Youth Activity Center (YAC). Lunch is available 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. and snack is offered 3:30-4:30 p.m. If children are under the age of 10, they must be accompanied by a parent. Children 10 and older can come unaccompanied. Please note the open recreation program is not operating during lunch; however, lunch is still available and will be served. In Accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. For more information, please call (904) 270-5680. Free Summer Lunch Program At YAC On The Messdeck Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Smashed Sandwich, $8 Grilled 5.5 oz burger, driz zled with our own chipotle aioli, your choice of cheese (American, Swiss or provolone), topped with shoestring French fries and sandwiched in our Panini press Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 A seasoned chicken breast, topped with provolone cheese, fresh spinach, driz zled with pesto and pressed on foccacia bread Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Tossed mixed greens, chicken breast, shavings, fresh sliced straw berries, drizzled with our own raspberry vinaigrette Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Sourdough stuffed with sharp white cheddar, American cheese, apple wood smoked bacon, grilled to a golden brown crisp Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Jumbo grilled shrimp, crisp bacon, stuffed in a pita with shredded lettuce, diced toma toes and our own special sauce Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Auto Skills Center June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Passholders receive unlimited access to Shipwreck Island at Adventure Landing Jacksonville Beach as well as daily deals throughout the week and special dis counts on off-season and holiday events. 270-5145 Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $31.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 5 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 270-5145 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 21: Movie Trip: World War Z. Van departs 6 p.m. June 22: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 24: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. June 25: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! Aquatics Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes. 270-5377 June 16: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. $6.00 for 90 minutes of bowling and shoe rental, plus Colored Headpin Bowling. Hot Dog and French fries $2.75. 2705377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retirees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25. MWR Sports/Fitness Fitness Schedules Gymnasium, Bldg. 1391 (904) 270 5451 or 5452 Monday through Thursday 0500 1400 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 1130 Spinning 1730 Kids Clinic 1130 Steel Anchor 1630 Spinning 1130 Rowing 1130 Spinning 1130 Steel Anchor 0730 Spinning 1130 Rowing (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Zumba 1130 Kickboxing 1130 Strength Training for Women 0930 Yoga 1130 Strength Training for Women 0700 Sunrise Yoga 1130 Zumba 1130 Yoga (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Rehab 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Toning (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Running Clinic 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0730 Command Bootcamp 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 NOFFS 0700 Open Sandbox 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 1730 TRX 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Command Bootcamp 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 77 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD MWR Fun Run -Photo by Sarah BarthelemySixty-six runners and walkers participated in the Summer Beach 5K Run/ 3K walk on Tuesday, June 11. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 7

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Vicksburg Families Have Fun In Sun USS Vicksburg Public AffairsFollowing the passing of Tropical Storm Andrea, shipmates and families assigned to guided-mis sile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) enjoyed good food, fun and fellowship at the annual command picnic. It is very important to involve family in com mand events. They are the key to our mission success. My wife Scarlet and sons Isaac and Caleb had a blast with Vicksburgs families and made many new friends said Command Master Chief Michael Bates. The picnic was held at Kavanaugh Park and sponsored by the Vicksburg Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Committee. This is the first major event of many planned for the Vicksburg MWR commit tee. I would like to thank MR1 Erno, OS3 Ray, LS3 Karol, and STG3 Williams for their huge role in the picnics success said MWR President Chief Sonar Technician (SW) Jonathan Hanson. Bonos BBQ catered and served the festivities. They provided a menu of chicken, pulled pork, baked beans, cole slaw and sweet tea. We truly appreci ate the sacrifices of our Navy family, and serving this meal is only one way we can show our appre ciation to the armed ser vices, said Scott Reese, catering coordinator for Bonos BBQ. Along with food, the children of the crew were occupied with a wide array of activities. Among those were a dunk tank, water slide, and bounce house. Kavanaugh Park also features a large seat ing area and built in play equipment. My favorite activity was the water slide, and all the people on there are my new friends! said Charlie Schmidt, son of Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Christopher Schmidt. The thing I liked was that we got to come and socialize and have fun with family. Also, this is a great opportunity for new Sailors to get to know everyone, said Hull Technician 2nd Class (SW) Greg Harnois. USS Vicksburgs change of command ceremo ny was held on May 10. This was Capt. Lyle Hall and Command Master Chief Michael Bates first opportunity to meet and greet with Vicksburg families. Its an honor for me to get to meet the families of the superstars that serve on Vicksburg. I know how important the support of family is to Sailor success because I wouldnt be here without the support my wife Kim has provid ed, said Hall. USS Vicksburg is homeported in Mayport, Fla., and currently in a Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV), conducting major repairs on various ship systems. Caleb Bates, son of Command Master Chief Michael Bates takes a plunge in the dunk tank during the annual command picnic for guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) at Kavanaugh Park. Sailors attached to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) enjoy food catered by Bonos BBQ during the annual command picnic. Children of Sailors attached to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) wait their turn for the water slide during the annual command picnic at Kavanaugh Park. -Photos by FC2(SW) George A. DeCoste IIIOperations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Charlon Clarke, Gunners Mate 2nd Class Terrence Robinson, and OSSN James Welch enjoy a free meal catered by Bonos BBQ during the annual command picnic for guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) at Kavanaugh Park. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Reserve Air Boss Visits Jax Squadrons CNAFR Public AffairsCommander Naval Air Forces Reserve visited the four Navy Reserve squad rons at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport last week. Rear Adm. Doug Asbjornsen held a series of meetings with senior leadership as well as question and answer ses sions with many of his Reservists and active-duty Sailors during a threeday tour of Fleet Logistics Squadrons Five Eight (VR-58), Six Two (VR62) and Patrol Squadron Six Two aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Helicopter AntiSubmarine Warfare Light Six Zero (HSL-60) at Mayport. He addressed topics ranging from the future of Reserve aviation, and Reserve manning, to liberty policies in the western Pacific. Cross-assignment of Reservists is a major issue for squadrons that have members in other states. These members are actu ally assigned to two unitsone where they live and one where their actual billet is. Cross-assignment is an issue and we know it is an issue, Asbjornsen said. As people come off active duty, they have skills that we need to keep in the Navy because we are going to need those skills someday. Not everyone chooses to live in a fleet concentration area. That is why we have NOSCs (Navy Operational Support Centers) in all 50 states. He said that senior leadership including Chief of Naval Reserve, Vice Adm. Robin Braun, is working to make the process smoother so that those Sailors can continue to participate in the Navy Reserve no matter where they live. Asbjornsen talked about the relevance of anti-submarine war fare in the 21st Century, with many nations and non-state actors rapidly expanding their subma rine fleets, ASW is receiv ing an emphasis not seen since the Cold War ended more than 20 years ago. As the P-8A Poseidon becomes the Navys pri mary ASW airplane, Reserve squadrons, fly ing the P-3C Orion will deploy overseas to fill in for active-duty squadrons that are receiving and training with the new air craft stateside. A detach ment from VP-62 has already deployed to Japan to augment VP-26 during this transition. The reality is youre going to be around until the P-8 transition is complete, Asbjornsen said. What you need to do, is knock em dead in WESTPAC. Speaking to the Chiefs mess at HSL-60, Asbjornsen continued on the ASW theme. Become even better at ASW. No other service can do ASWits a Navy thing. If were ever called, anywhere in the world, weve got to get those subs fast Speaking to the VR Sailors, Asbjornsen said, You play an absolutely critical role. If we have to fight, we have to have logistical support. The fleet logistics sup port community is unique to Reserve aviation. There is no active-duty equiva lent flying C-130 or C-40 transport aircraft. In light of several high profile liberty incidents, Asbjornsen stressed the importance of being good ambassadors and repre sentatives of the United States and the Navy both at work and after work. Your choices, on liber ty and professionally, can have an impact on our capability, he said. -Photo by MCCS William LoveladyHSL60 1 -Cmdr. Billy Maske (left), commanding officer of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light SixZero gives a tour ofhis squadron spaces and aircraft to Rear Adm. Doug Asbjornsen, Commander Naval Air Force Reserve.Apprenticeship Tracks Updated In LaDRsNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsThe Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) announced that as of June 6, a major update to the Professional Apprenticeship Career Track Program (PACT) section of the Learning and Development Roadmap (LaDR) has been posted to Navy Knowledge Online (NKO). Targeted for what were formerly known as General Detail (GENDET) Sailors, the PACT program was launched in 2007 to provide milestones and procedures for first-term enlistees that had not selected or obtained rat ings. According to Tom Smith, enlisted education coordinator for the Naval Education and Training Command, the first update in the PACT LaDR series, the Engineering PACT (E-PACT), was reduced from 35 pages to 15 pages, a significant reduction that makes the roadmap more userfriendly and intuitive. Based on the feedback we were getting through the LaDR pages on the NKO website, we realized that the apprenticeship tracks should be updat ed and improved, Smith said We are streamlining all of the PACT LaDRs to focus on the task at hand, which is for Sailors to find a rating for the rest of their career. Chief Machinists Mate (SW/AW) Grover Ducksworth, EPACT/ Basic Engineering Core Curriculum advanced supervisor for the Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS) Unit Great Lakes, Ill. was instrumental in the update to the nonrated engineering apprenticeship program. The E-PACT LaDR is a significant value for young Sailors aspiring to be engineers, said Ducksworth. It provides a step-bystep guide that allows them to achieve their short-term and long-term goal and is the start of the junior to leadership mentorship process, he said. Fireman Recruit Gabriel Sellers, a student at SWOS Unit Great Lakes, believes that the E-PACT LaDR is an essential tool to suc cessfully obtaining an engineering rating. E-PACT makes you feel more secure about your duties as an undesignat ed Fireman, said Sellers. It gives you a basic yet broad view of engineering as a whole. The PACT series includes E-PACT, Surface PACT (S-PACT) and Aviation PACT (A-PACT) and contains the follow ing components: -Job description and tour assignments -Listing of Professional Military Education (PME) skills and training to pur sue -Voluntary education recommendations -Comprehensive refer ence section The EPACT LaDR is currently available on NKO and the S-PACT and A-PACT are being revised and will be added in the near future. To obtain a copy of the PACT LaDRs, visit https:// wwwa.nko.navy.mil/por tal/careermanagement/ eld/home/professionalap prenticeshipcareertracks( pact) and open the appropriate E-PACT, S-PACT or A-PACT.pdf file. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 9

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buying and selling used vehicles not to mention the manpower it takes to supply them. Our goal is to take those funds and reinvest them back into our force protection efforts. According to Toth, the original purpose of the DoD decal was to not only for base access, but also to ensure that driv ers on installations pos sessed a valid drivers license, proof of adequate insurance and a current state vehicle registra tion. While the decals are set for elimination next month, the requirement for vehicles to be regis tered with the installation security departments will continue. Personnel and residents that are perma nently assigned to a Navy installation will in-pro cess and out-process at the installation Pass and Identification Office. According to the new CNIC policy, motorcycle operators safety require ments, barment con trol and enforcement of state licensing, registra tion, insurance and safe ty requirements will be enforced through random vehicle inspections and routine traffic enforce ment. Our requirements will not change. Anyone operating a motor vehicle on base will still be required to carry proof of insur ance and registration in accordance with their respective state law, Toth said. The policy change will take effect on board every CNIC installation July 1. Drivers who still need access to other services installations that may still require a decal will be permitted to display the decal until it expires. Under the new policy, base visitors will continue to use the normal visitor procedures established by the installation commanding officer. For more information, please contact your local installation Security Department or Pass and I.D. office.From Page 1Decal USAFRICOM Visits SBR USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) Public AffairsGen. David Rodriguez, commander, U.S. Africa Command, visited the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), during the ships visit to Augusta Bay, June 11. During the visit, Rodriguez, and Capt. John Esposito, commander, Task Force 65, toured the ship with Cmdr. Robert Williams, Samuel B. Roberts commanding officer. Rodriquez con cluded his visit with an address to the ships crew, and with administrating the oath of enlistment for some attendees. It is not everyday that you get a four-star General to reenlist you, said Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Michael Terry. This will be one of the highlights of my naval career. For many Sailors, the visit was a chance to recharge. The deployment has been interesting thus far due to being a part of a multi-faceted mission, said Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Brian West. Samuel B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Fla., is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security opera tions and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. Naval Forces EuropeAfrica area of responsibility. -Photo by MR1 Gary W. SpenceGen. David M. Rodriguez, commander of U.S. Africa Command (USAFRICOM), conducts an all-hands call aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG58) during the ships port visit in Augusta Bay, Sicily. Samuel B. Roberts is deployed to the U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts.-Photo by MC3 Billy HoAn SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 drops pallets on the foc'sle aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) during a vertical replenishment training exercise. Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Delivering SuppliesTake Commissary Survey OnlineFrom DeCAs public affairsWhether you shop at your local commis sary or not, the Defense Commissary Agency wants to hear from you. From June 1 through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www. commissaries.com by clicking on the take our survey link or access ing the survey directly at https://www.survey monkey.com/s/DeCAShopping-Survey. Were asking for input from our regular shop pers, occasional shoppers and non-shoppers alike, said Tracie Russ, director of DeCAs business devel opment directorate. The responses will be ana lyzed and used to improve the commissary for all our patrons. The survey takes only 8-12 minutes to complete, and Russ said the time spent will have mean ingful impact on future improvements. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Cutter Diamondback Relocates To Sector Jax U.S. Coast Guard Public Affairs The Coast Guard Cutter Diamondback and 12-person crew arrived at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach on June 13, offi cially shifting the cutters homeport from Miami. The Diamondback is an 87-foot Coastal Patrol Boat with pri mary missions of search and rescue, maritime law enforcement, fisher ies enforcement, marine environmental protec tion, defense readiness; and ports, waterways and coastal security. Lt. j.g. Johnston Ariail, Diamondbacks com manding officer, said the crew is excited to be in Jacksonville and is look ing forward to operating in the area. An extensive review of multiple potential homeports determined Sector Jacksonville is the best location for the Diamondback and its crew. The Diamondback will become operational in the northern portion of the 7th Coast Guard District July 1, 2013, patrolling the waters from the North and South Carolina border down to southern Florida. The Coast Guard Cutter Kingfisher, anoth er 87-foot Coastal Patrol Boat, is also homeported at Sector Jacksonville as well as the cutters Hammer and Maria Bray. Capt. Tom Allan (right), commander of Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville welcomes Lt. j.g. Johnston Ariail, commanding officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Diamondback. Photos by Petty Officer 1st Class Lauren Jorgensen Crew members aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Diamondback (right) moor the cutter alongside the Coast Guard Cutter Kingfisher at the Diamondbacks new homeport at Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Thursday, April 13, 2013. The Diamondback moved to Jacksonville from Miami and will be operational in the northern portion of the 7th Coast Guard District July 1, 2013. Coast Guard Urges Safe SwimmingFrom U.S. Coast GuardCoast Guard Air Station Savannah has received reports of seven missing swimmers in the last 12 days and urges everyone to take necessary safety precautions before and while swimming. Five of the seven missing swimmers were found deceased. These deaths have touched every por tion of the 450-miles of coastline that Coast Guardsmen aboard Air Station Savannah patrol. The affected communi ties include: Charleston, S.C., Beaufort, S.C., Fernandina Beach, Fla., Jacksonville, Fla., and St. Augustine, Fla. Drowning is the fifth leading cause of acci dental death in the United States. On aver age, 10 people die from unintentional drowning every day. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. In an effort to save lives, the Coast Guard recom mends the following for all swimmers: guard. U.S. Lifesaving Association statistics, during a 10-year period, show that the chance of drowning at a beach without lifeguard protection is almost five times greater than drowning at a beach with lifeguards. Many drownings involve single swimmers. Learn water rescue techniques you can use if someone you are swimming with is in danger. If caught in a rip current, dont fight it by trying to swim directly to shore. Instead, swim parallel to shore until you feel the current relax, and then swim to shore. Most rip currents are narrow and a short swim parallel to shore will bring a swim mer to safety. a major factor in drown ing. Alcohol can reduce body temperature and impair swimming ability. Both alcohol and drugs impair good judgment, which may cause people to take risks they would not otherwise take. you cant swim. Nonswimmers and weak swimmers often use flo tation devices, such as inflatable rafts, to go off shore. If they fall off, they can quickly drown. No one should use a flotation device unless they are able to swim. Weak swimmers should also consid er wearing an inherently buoyant Coast Guardapproved Type I, II or III life jacket. pected. Wear a life jacket while participating in any activity during which you would unexpectedly enter the water, such as fishing from breakwalls or piers. sary risks. Walking along breakwalls is risky because it only takes a momentary loss of foot ing to invite tragedy. Jumping from breakwalls, waterside structures or into unfamiliar water is extremely dangerous since unseen underwater hazards may exist. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013 11

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FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 22, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. June 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. June 24, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 24-28, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1, Room 104 June 25, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum FFSC Building 1, Room 719 June 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting (ages 13-19) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. DeCAScholarship Helps Students Pay For CollegeDeCA public affairs specialistMore than $1 million in financial assistance will go to 670 students, con sidered to be among the nations best and bright est, thanks to this years Scholarships for Military Children program. Since its start in 2001, the Scholarships for Military Children pro gram has awarded $1,500 scholarships to 7,412 children of active duty, Guard and Reserve, and retired service members world wide. The Defense Commissary Agency par ticipates in the program by accepting applications of eligible children and submitting their packages to Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship management services organization. Stores celebrate the achievements of their local selections with a ceremony in the commissary. These ceremonies create a lot of excitement for the military commu nity as they acknowledge the achievements of their recipients, said DeCA Deputy Director Michael J. Dowling. When you think about these young men and women, they are the best of the best, Dowling said. According to Scholarship Managers, there were 4,675 people who applied, and 670 who will receive a scholarship. Doing the math, they represent the top 15 percent. This means theyre exception al. Many of them are high school valedictorians, he said. This $1,500 schol arship helps them move forward in their pursuit of higher education. Commissary vendors, manufacturers, brokers, suppliers and the gen eral public fund the pro gram through donations. And, all donations are applied solely to fund ing the scholarships, said Jim Weiskopf, vice presi dent of Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that assists family members with temporary lodging when they visit hospitalized service members. We want to thank those companies that have supported this very special quality of life program every year since 2001, said Weiskopf, whose organization underwrites the cost of administering the schol arship program. I also want to thank the store directors. They do so much more than sell gro ceries. They are integral parts of their local com munities. During the selection process, Scholarship Managers reviews the applicants grade-point averages, their extracur ricular and volunteer activities, and their essays on an assigned topic. Two of this years 670 scholarship recipients, Kathryn Barisano and Matthew Schneck, spoke to an audience of com missary employees and industry members at the DeCA scholarship lun cheon April 25. The lun cheon was held during the two-day 2013 DeCA and American Logistics Association Commissary Roundtable event in Richmond, Va. Barisano, the daugh ter of a retired soldier, is a senior at Thomas Dale High School in Chester, Va. Barisano will attend James Madison University in the fall. Schneck, also the son of a retired soldier, is a senior at Prince George High School in Prince George, Va., where he has a 4.88 GPA and is ranked No. 1 in his class of 410 students. He has also earned varsity letters in volleyball, track and field, and soccer. Schneck received the William and Mary Leadership Award and is president of the Virginia Student Council Association. He will attend Virginia Commonwealth University in the fall. This years essay topic was on the applicants most-admired presidential first lady. Barisano wrote her essay on Laura Bush, and Schneck penned his on Eleanor Roosevelt. The three most popular topics among the scholarship recipients were Roosevelt, with 224 essays; 105 for Betty Ford, and 75 for current first lady Michelle Obama. For information about the 2014 program, check the website, http://www. militaryscholar.org, in December. To see a list of this years recipients, go to the website and click 2013 Scholarship Winners Announced. Thursday, June 20 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., continues its Talks and Tea series b y highlighting, Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile at 1:30 p.m. Talks and Tea lecture series invites visi tors to sit comfortably in the Galleries and Gardens of The Cummer while art historians, artists, and other experts facilitate informational and educa tional discussions on various topics related to the Museums permanent collection, as well as special exhibitions. At the conclusion of each talk, tea and light refreshments will be served. Members and Non-members $6 per person, includes lecture, tea, refreshments and admis sion to the Museum and Gardens. Pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, please call (904) 899-6038. The City of Jacksonville Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services (MAVDS) department is hosting its monthly free career and employment counseling seminar for veterans and active duty military from 3-6 p.m. at City Hall, Suite 120, 117 W. Duval St. For more information, please call 630-CITY (2489) or visit the MAVDS departments website. Saturday, June 22 What better way to celebrate Great Outdoors Month than by joining a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, July 6 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Sunday, July 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. July 8-12 Enter the epic adven ture of Kingdom Rock VBS that empowers kids to stand strong. Here, Gods victorious power isnt a fairy tale -it changes kids forever. Join this royally-rockin realm at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road from 9-11:30 a.m. For infor mation call the church at 249-5370 or register online at neptunebeachumc.org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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