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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147

Material Information

Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 11, 2013
Publication Date: 06-13-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00303

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147

Material Information

Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 11, 2013
Publication Date: 06-13-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00303


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com ATG Navigates New Training ATG Mayport PAOWith minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor ingenuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for sur face Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated naviga tion team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships naviga tion teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive sim ulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships with out ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simulation. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have com plex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills necessary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hard ware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equip ment and innovated an inte grated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, head -HSL-60 Jaguars On Prowl For Drugs CNAFR Public AffairsDarkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-aday. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for night time use of force against drug boats. As they pre pare for their next deploy ments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the counter-nar cotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of responsibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marks men aboard who are authorized to fire dis abling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to comply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a sus pected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, author ity over the helicopter is transferred to the regional Coast Guard command er, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard pre cision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforce ment members who have been selected for the precision marksman ship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering GSA Expo At MayportFrom MWRAll purchasing agents, buyers and credit card holders, the 2013 GSA Expo will be held at Naval Station Mayport on June 19. MWR will host more than 75 vendors for this annual event who will feature products from office supplies to heavy equipment for ships. Visitors to the expo will get a chance to meet and speak direct ly with vendor representatives and see their prod ucts. This will give the buyer a better idea of what they need and what product best meets their needs in their work environment. The Expo will be held at Beachside Community Center Wednesday, June 19, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is open to both civilian and military personnel. Vendors will also be handing out free samples of their products. After speaking to the vendors, you can enjoy a free lunch for all attendees. For more information, please call (904) 270-5228.See ATG, Page 16 See HSL-60, Page 15 -Photos courtesy of HSL-60Above, HSL-60 Firescout Det 3 is pictured in 2012 during their Airborne Use of Force (AUF) coun ter narcotics deployment aboard USS Simpson (FFG 56) Right, drugs and a dis abled boat motor that were confiscated during a recent Airborne Use of Force (AUF) counter narcotics deployment with Navy, Coast Guard, and partner organizations.21st Century Sailor Office EstablishedFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsEffective June 1, Navy headquarters staff realigned in support of the establishment of 21st Century Sailor office (OPNAV N17). Establishment of the 21st Century Sailor office will provide for more coordinated and streamlined efforts in Sailor resiliency and readiness programs. Full details of the realignment can be found in Naval Administrative Message 153/13. The office is responsible for the integration of the Navys objectives for equal opportunity, Sailor personal and family readiness; physical readiness; substance abuse prevention; suicide prevention; sexual harassment and sexual assault prevention and response (SAPR), hazing prevention, and tran sition assistance. The goal of 21st Century Sailor office is to pro vide our Sailors with the support network, programs, resources, training, and skills needed to overcome adversity and thrive, said Rear Adm. Walter Ted Carter, Director of the 21st Century Sailor office. Resilience is not one program or ini tiative, but a comprehensive effort to build life skills that not only ensure Navy readiness, but also fully develop the personal and professional talent of our force. The 21st Century Sailor office will drive policy and strategies that are responsive to our Sailors and their families. The 21st Century Sailor office was created through a realignment of existing Navy resources as part of the recommendations from Task Force Resilient. Task Force Resilient was chartered by Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson on January 22, 2013 to review Navy resil iency efforts as well as suicide related events in order to increase resilience and reduce suicides. Led by Rear Adm. Walter Ted Carter, Task Force Resilient determined Navy resilience resources could better serve Sailors if aligned under one over arching and integrated organization that provided See 21st Century, Page 13

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror When it comes to the subject of happiness and joy, we see and hear so many stories about it on the news or read about it online. Often times, the sto ries center around the lack of happiness and joy as seen from Hollywood celebrities who are sup posed to have it all, but seem to have missed that important part of life. So I thought I would share a few thoughts and stories about happiness to help brighten your week and possibly give you some thing to think about as well. Lets begin with this funny little story. A man just finished his annual physical exam and was waiting for the doc tors initial report. After a few minutes, the doctor came in with his charts in his hand and said, Theres no reason why you cant live a completely normal life as long as you dont try to enjoy it. Nathaniel Hawthorne used this description, Happiness is a butterfly, which, when pursued, is always just beyond your grasp, but which, if you will sit down quietly, may alight upon you. Now, thats some good food for thought. Joseph Addison offers this perspective. The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, someone to love and some thing to hope for. C.L. James used the philosophical approach of a dog chasing its tail to talk about happiness. A big dog saw a little dog chasing its tail and asked, Why are you chas ing your tail so? Said the puppy, I have mastered philosophy, I have solved the problems of the universe which no dog before me has right ly solved; I have learned that the best thing for a dog is happiness, and that happiness is my tail. Therefore I am chasing it; and when I catch it, I shall have happiness. Said the old dog, My son, I too, have paid attention to the prob lems of the universe in my weak way, and I have formed some opinions. I, too, have judged that hap piness is a fine thing for a dog, and that happiness is in my tail. But I have noticed when I chase after it, it keeps running away from me, but when I go about my business, it comes after me. Finally, a story is told of a little boy who was given a priceless possession: his deceased grandfathers gold pocket watch. How he treasured it! But one day, while playing at his fathers ice plant, he lost the watch amid all the ice and sawdust. He searched and scratched, becoming frantic, but no watch. Then he suddenly realized what to do. He stopped scurrying around and became very still. In the silence, he heard the watch ticking. God has given each of us a priceless gift of hap piness and joy. How easy it is for us to lose our inner joy and then our outward happiness in the scurrying around of daily life. Yet, it is always there to find; if we will but pause and listen to the beautiful presence of God within our hearts. Chap Steve Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHappiness And Joy Are Within Your GraspHomeschooling is an educational option which military families are choosing more and more frequently. Since a typical military family moves every two to four years, homeschooling can provide continuity in education and eliminate the stress of leaving one school district and mov ing to another. The goal for the home schooling parent is to identify how and when their child learns best and to adapt the teaching style to the child. Finding that special curriculum which works best for the child can sometimes be challenging. Also the costs associated with homeschooling may vary depending on the method and/or curriculum select ed by the family. Listed below are few examples of the most popular types of homeschooling programs available to families: schooling, and Recently, many states have enacted legislation requiring public school access for homeschool ers. Related services such as speech and language, physical therapy, or assis tance in traditional aca demic areas such as math and reading may be avail able in Florida. Parents should check with the individual district. So how do you know which type of curriculum to select for your child and what Florida requires for home school enroll ment? Check out this years Home Education Resource Information (H.E.R.I.) Convention, June 28 & 29 at the Prime Osborn Convention Center from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. each day. Parking is free in convention center lot. This years guest speak ers are Joe and Zan Tyler, Dr. Stephen Guffanti, and Brenda Dickinson of the Florida Home Education Network. Workshop top ics will include home schooling, portfolios, special needs students, high school require ments, and dual enroll ment. For those seeking curriculum options, the Curriculum Hall will be filled with exhibitors to get you informed and excited about starting a new homeschooling pro gram or energizing your current program. Pre-registration is available from now through June 20 at www.home school-life.com/fl/heri jax/. Go to the websites event calendar and click on June 28, 2013 to preregister. Member cost of $17/family for both days includes spouse, 1 set of grandparents, and all children in family being homeschooled. Nonmember cost of $32/fam ily for both days includes spouse, 1 set of grand parents, and all children in family being home schooled. On-site regis tration for members is $27 and non-members are $42. Another convention event is the Student Art Gallery Exhibit. This will feature the works of local homeschoolers. Also featured is H.E.R.I.s Youth Entrepreneur Showcase. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingGet To Know More About HomeschoolingMy 40-something brain regularly forgets that my sunglasses are perched on my head, cant remember where I parked the mini van, and compels me to walk around my house mumbling to myself, Now, why did I come in here again? However, for some unknown rea son, I have an incredibly detailed memory of my childhood. I dont have a perfect chronological recollection of my upbringing; instead, I have an almost photo graphic memory of cer tain mundane, seemingly unimportant occurrences like climbing my neigh bors tree or eating dry Tang out of the jar with my licked finger. Its as if I can transport myself back in time and re-experience all the sights, sounds, smells, tastes and feelings all over again. Sometimes, if one looks at snapshots or home movies, one can artificial ly remember the events depicted. However, other than a couple shaky 8 mm films in my mothers attic with out a workable projector to watch them, and a few yellowing photo albums -with a clear preponder ance of shots of my older brother, I might add my family did not regularly memorialize events on film. Therefore, my child hood memories are totally legit. A couple weeks ago, I was at Walmart buying cards for Fathers Day. Our kids think their Dad is the greatest thing since Double Fudge Cookie Dough Blizzards, so they were happy to help. While they looked for cards, I figured Id get one for my own father. I read card after card, but could only mumble to myself, grimace and shake my head. None seemed to fit my complex circum stances. None described our complicated relation ship. None communicat ed the vastly mixed emo -Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesKeeping It Simple During Fathers Daytions and unique bond that my father and I have. The kids were done, so I sent them to find a gallon of milk to buy me more time. Stop overthink ing this, I said to myself, there must be something here that you can send to Dad. Before picking up another card, I tried to remember how I felt about my dad when I was a kid. Before my marriage to my Navy husband emp tied my parents nest. Before my parents got divorced. Before my Dad resented me for not speaking to him for five years. Before I resented him for breaking up our family. Before we butted heads trying to form a new relationship. Before we had to forgive each other. I thought back to a time when I was just a kid and he was just my Dad. As the details of my childhood awoke from hibernation, vivid scenes began to flash in my mind. Dad taking out his false tooth (college foot ball accident) on a fam ily road trip, and talking to the tollbooth opera tor with a fake hillbilly accent, just to make my brother and I laugh. Dad letting me skip school to go with him to Pittsburgh for business, and me throwing up pea nut butter cookies in the A/C vents of his Buick on the way. Dad lying shirtless on the floor so my brother and I could draw on his back with ink pens while he watched golf tourna ments. Dad lecturing my brother and me at the dinner table on report card day. Dad explaining to the police officer why he was teaching me how to do doughnuts in the icy natatorium parking lot after swim practice one night. Dad handing me an old tube sock filled with tools a small hammer, screw drivers, pliers before I left for college. Dad ner vously walking me down the isle at my wedding. One memory lead to another, and to another. Then, my mind was seized by one final recol lection, which ended my paralyzing over-analysis. I could see my father lifting me from the back seat of our station wagon. I had fallen asleep on the way home, but woke up when my parents pulled into the driveway. I kept my eyes closed and pretended, lazily allowing my arms to drape around my fathers neck and my head to lie upon his shoulder. I bobbed gently as he walked through the house and into my yellow bedroom, where he laid me in my mock brass bed, removed my shoes and tucked the covers around my chunky little frame. I felt him kiss my fore head, and then, he stood there and waited a moment before he turned and left the room. Suddenly, there at the Walmart, the Fathers Day cards on the rack had rel evance. My father raised me, protected me, cared for me, loved me. I love and appreciate him. Enough said. Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comVacation Bible School Registration BeginsFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold its annual Vacation Bible School from July 22-26 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children ages 4-12. This years theme is Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God. At Kingdom Rock, kids will meet new Bible Buddies, like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children how Gods love, family, friends, prayer and trust can help them stand strong. There is no cost for VBS, but space is limited. Register at the Chapel during normal working hours or call 270-5212 for more information.

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New Online Survey For Commissary CustomersFrom DeCA Public AffairsWhether you shop at your local commis sary or not, the Defense Commissary Agency wants to hear from you. From June 1 through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www. commissaries.com by clicking on the take our survey link or access ing the survey directly at https://www.survey monkey.com/s/DeCAShopping-Survey. Were asking for input from our regular shop pers, occasional shoppers and non-shoppers alike, said Tracie Russ, director of DeCAs business devel opment directorate. The responses will be ana lyzed and used to improve the commissary for all our patrons. The survey takes only 8-12 minutes to complete, and Russ said the time spent will have mean ingful impact on future improvements at com missaries worldwide. Supporting NMCRS -Photo by Paige GnannRepresentatives from the Amelia Island Concours dElegance Foundation pres ent a $20,000 check to Mayport Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society raised by the Concours foundation earlier this year. Pictured from left is NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Ron Hays, Dick Messer, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, Bill Warner, Director Bill Kennedy, Brian Webber and CMDCM Bob White. Chamber Appreciates Military -Photo courtesy of Beaches ChamberBeaches Division of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce held its Military Appreciation Luncheon on Thursday, May 23 at Casa Marina, Jacksonville Beach. Pictured from left is Elaine Brown with the Beaches Division of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Ships Serviceman 2nd Class Jose Rivera, CMDCM Bob White and NS Mayport Chaplain, Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Honor Detail bow their heads during an invocation by Cmdr. Steve Souders at the Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony held aboard USS The Sullivans on June 5.Mayport Commemorates Battle of Midway4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville held a Battle of Midway commemo ration ceremony aboard USS The Sullivans (DD668) at Naval Station Mayport, June 5. The Battle of Midway took place June 4-7, 1942. During the battle, U.S. Navy carrier strike forc es defeated an Imperial Japanese strike force that prevented them from cap turing Midway Island. Attending and speak ing at the ceremony was Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet. Harris shared a statement from the Chief of Naval Operations about the Battle of Midway. Though a lifetime has passed since the battle of Midway, and the world and our Navy have changed in many ways, the lessons of June 1942 still resonate today, said Harris. The NavyMarine Corps team, act ing decisively in defense of our Nations interests, can project more power, across greater distances, more effectively, than any Naval Force the world has ever seen. That was dem onstrated at Midway and throughout the Pacific in World War II, and main taining that capability is our charge today. The ceremony con cluded with the official party boarding a C-tractor 12 tug boat to the Naval Station Mayport basin for a Wreath laying to honor all Service Members who served in the Battle of Midway, followed by a 21 gun salute. David Tellez, U.S. 4th Fleet command mas ter chief, took part in the wreath laying ceremony and emphasised the importance of honoring a key moment in Navy his tory. To have the opportuni ty to take part in this cer emony is a true honor, it is important for us as Sailors and a Nation to remem ber those who served so bravely, said Tellez. The Battle of Midway is considered the cru cial turning point in the Pacific War. The Japanese lost all four aircraft carri ers they had at Midway, preventing their naval forces from being an offensive force; while the U.S. lost only one air craft carrier of the three, largely due to the success of U.S. Naval intelligence to decode Japanese mes sages. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime -Photo by Paige GnannA trumpeter from Navy Band Southeast plays Taps during a wreath laying ceremony, part of NS Mayports Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony.See Midway, Page 5 -Photo by Paige GnannNavy Band Southeast plays during the arriving of the official party at the NS Mayport Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony. Crewmembers of USS The Sullivans salute during Taps and a wreath laying ceremony.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 5 -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerRear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks about the impor tance the Battle of Midway and turning point of World War II in the Pacific aboard the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) June 5 at a remembrance ceremony at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Honor Detail performs a 21-gun salute in commemoration of the Battle of Midway on board USS The Sullivans. domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional secu rity and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Paige GnannThe NS Mayport Color Guard parades the colors during the beginning of the Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony held aboard USS The Sullivans on June 5. From Page 4Midway-Photo by Paige GnannUSS The Sullivans Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Samuel de Castro introduces guest speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet.-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the official party throw a wreath into the middle of the Mayport basin in commemoration of the Battle of Midway.-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, salutes as the NS Mayport Color Guard parades the colors.

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Summer Fun Means Sun, Vacation SafetyFrom TRICAREFor many, Memorial Day Weekend marks the official start of summer. There are backyard bar becues, road trips to the beach or just lazy days under the hazy summer sun. Summer is a time to unwind and enjoy mild temperatures and great weather, as long as vaca tioners are mindful of the dangers of summer sun. Sun burns, heat exhaus tion and heat stroke can bring a quick end to any vacation or day at the beach. It is important to know the symptoms of sun-related illnesses and also to know where to go for help. Depending on the shade of the skin, sun burns can be pink to bright red or darker brown. The severity of the burn will determine whether medical care is necessary.First degree burns, while painful, are the easiest to treat and do not necessarily require medical attention. Anyone with sunburn should seek shade, get some water and apply a first-aid lotion to the burn to relieve the pain. Second degree burns will produce liquid filled blisters. By send ing fluid to the skin, the body is trying to cool itself and stop the burn ing. It is important not to open or break these blisters because open ing the wound could lead to infection. Call 911 or another emergency num ber to get help. If you can, apply a cool mist to the skin. Dont wrap the burned area or allow clothing to touch the blis ters because the cloth will stick to the skin and pull it off. Third degree burns are serious and can result in death. Someone with third degree sunburn is likely unconscious, so call 911 immediately. Bring shade to them dont try to move them and keep their airway open so they can breathe. Sunburn could be a sign for the onset of a more serious condition like heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Look for other symptoms like profuse sweating, muscle cramps, weakness or dizziness and nausea and vomiting. If medical care is nec essary, it is important to always know where to get help, especially while traveling. TRICARE bene ficiaries are covered while traveling on business or vacation, but it is vital to know what you need to do to get help. Emergency care is cov ered for all TRICARE beneficiaries. Beneficiaries enrolled in TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Overseas, TRICARE Prime Remote Overseas or the TRICARE Young AdultPrime Option must contact their primary care manager within 24 hours or the next business day after receiving emer gency care. People using TRICARE Standard and Extra will save money if they use a network pro vider. For more informa tion on how to get care when traveling, please visit www.tricare.mil/ GettingCare/Traveling. aspx. HEALTHReaping The Benefits Of Physical ActivityFrom TRICAREFor many people life is busy with work and fam ily obligations, and find ing the time and moti vation to exercise can be difficult. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recom mends incorporating 150 minutes of physical activi ty per week for adults, and 60 minutes a day for children. This may seem like a lot of time, but it is time well spent and can add years to a persons life. Regular exercise and physical activity keeps the body healthy and improves endurance, lung and heart function, and blood circulation. It strengthens bones and muscles, improves men tal health and mood, and reduces stress. One benefit commonly associated with regular exercise is weight control. According to CDC one third of American adults and 17 percent of children are obese. Exercising reg ularly reduces a persons chances of developing serious health conditions like cardiovascular dis ease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndromes that are linked to obesity. Devoting 150 minutes a week to exercise might seem overwhelming, but starting off slowly is OK, especially when starting a regular exercise program. CDC suggests dividing the time into 10 or 15 minute aerobic workouts. For example: Take a brisk 15 minute walk, twice a day, five days a week. Its also important to include muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week that work all major muscle groups. As long as the activity is of moderate intensity it counts towards the sug gested guidelines for reg ular exercise. Establishing a routine incorporating exercise into daily life is essential, and any major changes in diet and exer cise should be discussed with a primary care pro vider. Losing weight is healthy for many reasons. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), Aim for a Healthy Weight campaign highlights the difference loosing even a small amount of weight can make. According to the NIH losing 5 to 10 percent of body weight can reduce a persons chances for developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes or having a stroke. It can decrease stress on the knees, hips and lower back as well as improve sleep apnea. The NIH website has helpful tools for losing and main taining a lower weight, including a body mass index calculator, menu planner and tips for stay ing active. For more infor mation go to www.hhs. gov/onepoundatatime Exercising is a good way to keep healthy. Another important way to stay healthy is by staying up to date on all recom mended immunizations and health screenings. TRICARE helps benefi ciaries stay healthy with access to cost-free pre ventive care including immunizations, cancer screenings, and blood pressure and cholesterol screenings. All TRICARE beneficiaries are covered for preventive services. For more information about TRICAREs covered preventive care services go to www.tricare.mil/ livewell/preventive It is never too late to begin a regular exercise routine. Some benefits can be felt and noticed almost immediately including increased ener gy levels, more restful sleep and reduced stress. For more information about physical fitness and healthy living go to www. tricare.mil/livewell.Stay Current: Update DEERS TodayFrom TRICAREAs summer approaches many service members and their families are gearing up for permanent change of station moves, and retirees may be head ing north after spend ing the winter in warmer climes. An important part of any move for TRICARE beneficiaries active, reserve and retired is updating their Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS) information to make sure their health care follows them to their new address. This means making sure that all personal information phone numbers, postal and email addresses is up to date. Also, just like when moving, sponsors who experience any of the following life events must update their DEERS records as soon as pos sible: ment eligible Making changes to DEERS information is easy and can be done online at milConnect (www.dmdc.osd.mil/mil connect), by fax or mail, or in person at the near est uniformed services identification card office. For more information on how to update DEERS information, go to www. tricare.mil/DEERS. Other life events that affect DEERS eligibility and require an update to beneficiary information are: child loss of eligibility enrollment status Survivors whose sponsors have died are respon sible for making DEERS updates. Many DEERS updates require supporting doc umentation: marriage licenses, birth or death certificates, Medicare cards or DD-214 dis charge forms. Be sure to bring copies of all paper work that might be need ed when updating DEERS information. For ques tions about TRICARE eli gibility, please visit www. tricare.mil/DEERS. NNOA Jacksonville Hosts Annual Scholarship BanquetFrom NNOAThe National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter hosted their Fourth Annual Scholarship Banquet at the Orange Park Courtyard Marriot on May 17, 2013. NNOA Jacksonville Chapter delivered scholarship checks in amounts of $750 and $1000, totaling $13,000 to 15 area grad uating high school stu dents from Clay, Duval, St. Johns, and Camden County, Georgia. This event represented a sincere effort on the part of the NNOA organization to positively impact our community and to rep resent the sea services. Without the support of our community, partners, donors, and members, NNOA JAX would not have been able to provide $30,000 in scholarships over the past three years to deserving high school seniors throughout the Southeast region. There were 64 attend ees in attendance at the event with Dr. Richard Danford, CEO of the Jacksonville Urban League, serving as the keynote speaker. RDML Sinclair Harris, USN, Commander 4th Fleet/U.S. Navy Forces Southern Command was NNOAs special guest, who deliv ered his personal com mand coin to each schol arship recipient. An event such as this requires a great deal of commitment to plan and organize. A special thanks to the expert leadership of Lt. Cmdr. Brian Martin, MSC, USNR and Lt. Harold Jones, USN (Ret), both members of the Bureau of Navy Medicine, this years scholarship commit tee chair and co-chair; received high praise from all in attendance for their hard work. A spe cial thanks also goes out to scholarship committee: RDML Gene Kendal, USN (Ret); Lt. Cmdr. Herlena Washington, MSC, USN (Ret); and CWO4 Herman McCrary, USN (Ret). Visit us on Facebook: NNOA Jacksonville Chapter for additional information about this organization or how to become a member. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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Enhanced Appointment Scheduling At Branch Health Clinic Mayport Naval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs OfficerNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayportas one of six Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville facilitiesis changing its approach to appointment schedul ing, to offer more sameday urgent-care appoint ments and better support patients Medical Home Port teams. To make an appoint ment or get clinical advice, patients call the same appointment line they always haveand now a new greeting pro vides an option for each branch health clinic. Knowing which team theyre on helps patients quickly connect with an appointment clerk who will be physically located in their care team. NBHC Mayport has three teams: Family Medicine (grey and orange teams) and Pediatrics pink team. There are 14 teams in total across the com mand. Each Medical Home Port care team is laserfocused on meeting all of their patients preven tive, routine and urgent care needs, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And by locating our appointing staff in the care teams, we get better real-time communica tionwhich enhances our ability to make use of any openings in the schedule to offer sameday, urgent-care appoint ments. The teamby taking a whole-person approach to healthaims for total health and wellness and is better positioned than an emergency room to man age urgent care. Urgent care includes things like a minor cut, sprain, migraine, earache, ris ing fever or urinary tract infection. (For emergen cies, patients should call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.) Each team includes an appointing clerk, front desk staff, medical assis tants, corpsmen, nurses, a case manager and a phar macistled by the prima ry care managers (PCMs): physicians, physician assistants and nurse prac titioners. Navy Medicine clinicians have the same education and training as their private-sector col leaguesand also have experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitar ian missions. To meet the PCMs on NBHC Mayports grey, orange and pink teams, visit the commands website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax Patients can reach their team by secure email (for non-urgent issues) by signing up for Medical Home Port Onlineon the commands website or at www.relayhealth.com To get care or clinical advice, NBHC Mayport patients call the appoint ment line at (904) 5424677 or (800) 529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospital can call week days from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is availablevia the appointment lineon evenings, weekends and holidays. NBHC Mayport is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities in Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a PCM at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax -Photo by Jacob Sippel Capt. Stella Hayes, a family medicine physician and primary care manager (PCM), consults with her care teams appointment clerk, Renata Belgrave, about the days patient schedule. The updated approach to appointment scheduling helps each patients Medical Home Port meet all preventive, routine and urgent care needs. This includes making use of any openings in the schedule to offer same-day appointments for urgent care. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 7

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8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 Auto Skills Center June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 15: UFC 161-Bararo vs Wineland. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Community Events June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflata bles and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 June 16: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Fathers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 12 pm at Focsle; Reservations required Celebrate Dad with an all you can eat brunch fea turing omelet bar, cham pagne fountain, carv ing station and more. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Passholders receive unlimited access to Shipwreck Island at Adventure Landing Jacksonville Beach as well as daily deals throughout the week and special dis counts on off-season and holiday events. 270-5145 Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $31.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 5 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 14: Movie Trip: Man of Steel. Van departs 6 p.m. June 15: UFC 161Barao vs. Eddie. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE June 17: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 19: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 21: Movie Trip: World War Z. Van departs 6 p.m. June 22: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 24: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. June 25: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 14: Outdoor MoviesParental Guidance (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The Messdeck Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, pick les, onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Smashed Sandwich, $8 Grilled 5.5 oz burger, driz zled with our own chipotle aioli, your choice of cheese (American, Swiss or provolone), topped with shoestring French fries and sandwiched in our Panini press Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 A seasoned chicken breast, topped with provolone cheese, fresh spinach, driz zled with pesto and pressed on foccacia bread Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Tossed mixed greens, chicken breast, shavings, fresh sliced straw berries, drizzled with our own raspberry vinaigrette Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Sourdough stuffed with sharp white cheddar, American cheese, apple wood smoked bacon, grilled to a golden brown crisp Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Jumbo grilled shrimp, crisp bacon, stuffed in a pita with shredded lettuce, diced toma toes and our own special sauce Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water Free Summer Visits To Museums For Troops, FamiliesAmerican Forces Press ServiceDuring the busy sea son of military transfers, adjusting to new com munities and register ing children for school, more than 2,000 muse ums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service mem bers and their families as a break from the sum mer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their fami lies can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspir ing, educational and economical activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deploy ments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very limited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This pro gram is an investment in our families. Arecord number of museums are participat ing this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 muse ums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. This program is help ing us make memories -memories for our fami lies, Hull-Ryde said. But its more than that. It is making a difference not only in the force of today, but in the force of the future. Navy 311 Has Answers To Your QuestionsNAVY 311 is ready to help Sailors answer any question, anywhere, any time. NAVY 311 is the single point of entry for help desk support across the Navy. Ask NAVY 311 about systems, equip ment, training, personnel, facilities, career, IT, medi cal, logistics, quality of life and more. Whether youre at sea, in port, on duty or lib erty, NAVY 311 is avail able 24/7 via phone (855NAVY311), email, web, text, chat and more.Be Careful Cooking OutsideFrom Mayport Fire & Emergency ServicesEnjoyment of out door grilling and barbe cuing is totally under standable. Barbecuing gives food great fla vor, its fun, it keeps the kitchen cool, and its a great way to entertain. However, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), grills cause 900 structure fires and 3,500 outdoor fires each year. Exposure to toxic gases, such as car bon monoxide, kills 30 people and injures 100 more. Following a few basic safety steps can ensure a safe cookout. Placing grills to close to combustibles and leaving cooking unat tended are the two lead ing causes for grill fires. NAVSTAMYPTINST 11320.4M 904e states that the use of charcoal or gas fired grills and fire pits, including tiki torches, is prohibited within struc tures, on boats, on or under balconies, decks or porches, or within 15 feet of combustible patios on ground floors. Prevent burn injuries! Keep the grill away from play and traffic areas. Keep children and pets away from the grill area and declare a 3 foot safe zone around the grill. Follow the manufacturers instructions on how to set up the grill, maintain and operate it. Use long handled grilling tools for plenty of clearance from heat and flames while grilling. NEVER leave the grill unattended while in use. Use baking soda to control a grease fire and have a fire extinguisher handy. If you do not have a fire extinguisher, keep a bucket of sand or a gar den hose nearby. Outdoor Cooking Fire Safety

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Aquatics Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes. 270-5377 June 16: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. $6.00 for 90 minutes of bowling and shoe rental, plus Colored Headpin Bowling. Hot Dog and French fries $2.75. 2705377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retir ees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25. MWR Sports/Fitness Fitness Schedules Gymnasium, Bldg. 1391 (904) 270 5451 or 5452 Monday through Thursday 0500 1400 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 1130 Spinning 1730 Kids Clinic 1130 Steel Anchor 1630 Spinning 1130 Rowing 1130 Spinning 1130 Steel Anchor 0730 Spinning 1130 Rowing (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Zumba 1130 Kickboxing 1130 Strength Training for Women 0930 Yoga 1130 Strength Training for Women 0700 Sunrise Yoga 1130 Zumba 1130 Yoga (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Rehab 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Toning (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Running Clinic 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0730 Command Bootcamp 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 NOFFS 0700 Open Sandbox 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 1730 TRX 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Command Bootcamp 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 77 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 9

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-Photo byMC2 Matthew R. ColeCapt. Daniel B. Uhls, commanding officer of USS Hu City (CG 66), addresses the ships Engineering department dur ing an awards quarters on the ships forecastle. -Photo by MCSN Andrew SchneiderThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) pulls alongside the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) as a pair of HH-60H Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to the Nightdippers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 5 prepare to land on the flight deck. Dwight D. Eisenhower and Hu City are deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo byMC2 Matthew R. ColeQuartermaster 2nd Class Daniel Wilson shows Midshipman 3rd Class Hunter Lampp how to plot a navi gation track in the pilothouse of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosSailors combat a simulated fire during a drill in the for ward gym aboard USS Hu City (CG 66). USS Hu City On Patrol THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 11

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12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 15, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will par ticipate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. June 17, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 17-21, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 18, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting (ages 13-19) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 19, 11 a.m.-noon, Financial Planning For Deployment FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Budgeting means using dollars with sense mak ing sure theres enough money available at the right time. Money is needed for food, fun, clothes, savings, shelter, emergencies, transportation and charity. So its never too early to learn the basic skills youll needfor today and in the future. INVEST your time and learn some basic budgeting skills, how to set financial goals, and begin planning for your future. June 22, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will par ticipate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. June 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. June 24, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 24-28, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1, Room 104 June 25, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum FFSC Building 1, Room 719 June 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting (ages 13-19) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants realize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. A completed rough resume will be required. Family Readiness Program Conducts Emergency Response ExerciseNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsThe Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness hosted a tri-base Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exercise, May 30. The exercise, designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks follow ing the landfall of a hurricane, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, includ ing installation and training officers and emergency man agement personnel from all three bases. Our ability to take care of our families after a natural disaster is critical to our ability to carry out our mission and support the fleet, said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Our Sailors and civilians need to be assured their loved ones are safe so they can focus on their duties in the event a hurricane actually does hit one of our installations. The exercise came one week after the completion of HURREX 2013, which tested the regions hurricane prepared ness through a scenario involv ing multiple, simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. The EFAC exercise was essentially a continuation of that scenario, and its focus was on the recovery phase of Disaster Response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to landfall and each base suffered exten sive flooding as the simulated storm passed. Afterward, FFSC personnel from all three par ticipating bases worked with emergency management and training personnel to estab lish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emer gency response personnel to provide a wide range of sup port services for affected family members. Most of the support is man aged through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment portion of NFAAS and spec ify what they need, said Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness program Work and Family Life Coordinator. Then our case managers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the resources they need. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC per sonnel to assess needs after a disaster, it is not the only one. People can also come directly to the EFAC for assistance. During the exercise, partici pants simulated what kind of EFAC services would be neces sary at two days after a hurri cane, one week after, and two weeks after. The circumstances in the days and weeks following a major storm can change quick ly and EFAC personnel and services need to be adjusted accordingly, said Lucius. We need to decide who we should have in the EFAC based on what we think peoples needs are because its not staffed only with FFSC personnel its chap lains, medical, legal, housing and many others. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agencies and local offi cials in order to get people the help they need. Most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world sce nario occurs. An emergency is a crisis event and it never really hap pens the way you exercise it, said Lucius, but we at least need to have a plan in place. We are going to be providing ser vices and need to be sure that our people have confidence in themselves, confidence in their leadership and confidence in the plan. This training is essential for preparing emergency manage ment and FFSC personnel for an actual event. It important for family members and depen dents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS, said Lucius. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be contacted and they know how to contact somebody for help. The exercise was phase one of a three-phase process. While this phase included only play ers from installation FFSCs, training and emergency man agement personnel, participa tion will be expanded in phase two and three. Phase two will include additional partici pants from on-base organiza tions, such as the base housing office and legal. Phase three will expand even further to include players from outside the fence line, including the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and gov ernment civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily. navy.mil where they can update their contact information, report their status or submit a needs assessment. Sailors, dependents and government civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily.navy.mil to update contact information or submit a needs assessment.Benefit Training For Same-Sex Partners, Children BeginsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy will begin training for leadership and support elements to be ready to provide eli gible benefits to samesex domestic partners of service members and their children beginning August 31. Extending these ben efits reinforces the princi ple that all those who vol unteer to serve are treated with dignity and respect and ensured fairness and equal treatment to the extent allowable under law, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director military plans and policy. Training must be accessed by all current and prospective, active and reserve command tri ads via Navy e-Learning and must be completed by August 23 according to NAVADMIN 152/13. The training will assist leadership in a knowl edgeable and professional extension of ben efits beginning August 31 when service members will be able to submit a Declaration of Domestic Partnership for DEERS Enrollment (DD653) and obtain a Department of Defense identification for their same-sex partners to access benefits detailed in the February 11 memo by Secretary of Defense. Earlier this year, the Department of Defense identified family member and dependent benefits that the services can law fully provide to same-sex partners and their fami lies through changes in Department of Defense policies and regulation. To make all of these ben efits available to same-sex partners of our service members, Navy reviewed and is modifying all nec essary instructions, notic es, and MILSPERMAN articles, and conducting training to ensure a clear understanding of the ben efits and documentation requirements. Benefits that will be extended to same-sex domestic partners and families include: (DD Form 1173) which will be renewed in accor dance with existing poli cies Exchange Welfare and Recreation (MWR) youth programs. This includes child care, youth programs and youth sponsorship. on DoD Aircraft (collocation) for dual-mil itary partners Assistance Center Programs and emergency leave of absence for the military member to attend to part ner emergencies. assault counseling pro gram. Emergency care provided; additional care determined by medical eligibility. tile-fire areas for dualmilitary if partner is killed in a combat zone. from certain places of employment and on mili tary installations and from Primary and Secondary school for minor dependents compensation: depen dents of members held as captives person ticipate in surveys of mili tary families, including the quadrennial quality of life review. Secretary to transport remains of a dependent Changes to instruc tions, notices, and MILSPERMAN articles needed to implement extending eligible benefits to same-sex partners will be completed by August 31. Benefit FAQs are post ed on Navys DADT Post Repeal website on Navy Personnel Commands web page under Support and Services http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ support/dadt/Pages/ default.aspx

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PCU Ford Officially Establishes Crew PCU Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Public AffairsMore than 100 Sailors from the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) attended a special ribbon-cutting ceremony, May 15, to officially establish the crew of the first Ford class air craft carrier and open the building where they will work while the ship is constructed. The Shipyard and the crew decided to have a turnover and an offi cial ceremony to stand up PCU Ford. As our first official function as a crew, we wanted this ceremony to help us say we are a crew, said Cmdr. Robert Kurz, Combat Systems Officer. The Commanding Officer just arrived back from school as did our Executive Officer, and we have a total of 170 Sailors onboard at this time, so manning is extremely minimal. Sailors from Ford had a few offices that were run out of the 4th deck of building 608. In April, the command took over the whole building as the home for their PCU offices. Now with their office space established, the crew is working to increase their communi ty involvement and raise awareness about the new carrier. There is still a great deal of work that has to be done before our ship is fleet ready, said Capt. John F. Meier, Commanding Officer. With the beginning of the crew here today, and the official start of our new facility that we will be operating out of until our ship is ready, we are now well on the way. One of the primary focuses at this time is to build the base structure of the command, by writing ship specific instructions, beginning to form the departments and under standing the security lev els, all from the ground up. CVN 78 is going to be a great ship, with great potential for the Navy, said Meier. But, without our Sailors, we couldnt bring the ship to life. On the count of three the ribbon was cut by Meier and Rolf Bartschi, vice president for Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) con struction at Newport News Shipbuilding, a divi sion of Huntington Ingalls Industries, in front of the building while the ships current crew stood by. The crew coming onboard is a sign that the ship is beginning to come to life, said Bartschi. Soon we will be bringing on operating systems to start testing before they are welded into place, testing electrical readi ness for the ship, testing pumping of fluid through piping systems. This is a huge step forward for us! Named for the 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford will be the premier forward asset for crisis response and early decisive striking power in a major combat operation. The carrier and the carrier strike group will provide forward pres ence, rapid response, endurance on station, and multi-mission capability. Recently, Ford celebrat ed a milestone with the announcement that the flight deck was complete following the final Super Lifts which placed the forward bow section and a final sponson. U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. The 1,050-metric ton gantry crane at Newport News Shipbuilding lifts the forward end of one of the catapults of the aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) into place. This completes more than three years of structural work making the primary hull structure of the aircraft carrier 100 percent complete. unity of effort across the Navy enterprise. Task Force Resilient recommended establishing the 21st Century office, led by a Line Flag officer, to serve as the overall lead for Navy resilience efforts by focusing on outcomes and con tinuity of care across Navy pro grams. Building resilience through a culture of total fitness (physical, mental, social, and spiritual) will empower a force that is always ready to operate forward and execute our warfighting mission, said Carter. There is much work to be done, but the 21st Century Sailor office establishment is an important step toward support ing life skills programs that our Sailors will want to better them selves and improve our readiness. 21st Century Sailor office will include six individual policy branches residing under the N17 organization: Total Sailor Fitness (N170), Suicide Prevention (N171), Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (N172), Sexual Harassment Prevention and Equal Opportunity (N173), and the Office of Hazing Prevention (N174). The realignment of the Navy 21st Century Sailor Office began June 1, 2013 and will be complet ed prior to January 2014. To view the Task Force Resilient report, visit http:// www.navy.mil/docs/ TaskForceResilientFinalReport. pdf For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp /. From Page 121st Century THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 13

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more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can readily pierce the hull of fiber glass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we captured $1 billion in ille gal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive offi cer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to con figure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive train ing before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits periph eral vision and depth percep tion. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, airspeed, and other critical flight parameters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turn ing their heads constantly to look at the instrument panel. This increased safety and pro vided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these missions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coor dinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin flying these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when neces sary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accomplished.From Page 1HSL-60 HSL-48 Flares Up -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosAviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class William Moore, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Squadron Light (HSL) 48, loads chaff flares on an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck aboard the guidedmissile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. From Enlisted To LawyerFrom Navy Judge Advocate General Corps Public AffairsIn a NAVADMIN released June 4, the Navy Judge Advocate Generals (JAG) Corps announced the In-Service Procurement Program (IPP) designed to create a pathway for enlisted Sailors to become judge advocates. The JAG Corps IPP is open to qualified and career-motivated enlist ed personnel of all rat ings. Candidates selected for the JAG Corps IPP have the opportunity to complete a Juris Doctor in preparation for a JAG Corps commission. The JAG Corps IPP provides a commission ing option for talented and motivated Sailors, said Vice Adm. Nanette DeRenzi, Judge Advocate General of the Navy. The JAG Corps IPP provides both funded and unfunded paths to JAG Corps commissions. Sailors who have earned a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree may apply for funded legal education; Sailors who have already earned a Juris Doctor degree from an American Bar Association accredit ed law school and a bar license from any state may apply for direct appointment. The JAG Corps IPP is open to active-duty enlisted personnel and Navy full-time support personnel, in any rating or military occupational specialty, in pay grades E-5 through E-7 with at least two years and not more than 10 years of ser vice. Applicants must be at least 21 years old and under the age of 42 by the time of commissioning. Complete application procedures and education requirements are provid ed in NAVADMIN 154/13 and can be found at JAG Corps Web site. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 15

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16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 From Page 1ATGsets, and reformat existing computers to complete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of under way times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in naviga tion and ship handling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experi ence the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent training class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic train ing. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qual ify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course sim ulates relative motion, which means the bear ings, tide, and currents are constantly chang ing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual tar get with the MSN simu lation was exponentially better than reading it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the system with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were award ed Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator class room. For more informa tion or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Operation Specialist work on ranges and communicating with the bridge in the simu lated CIC.-Photos courtesy of ATG MayportVMS operators and the OOD work together to reconfirm their position. Country Rocks The Beach ConcertFree Tickets To Active Duty Today Saturday, June 22, Craig Morgan, Dustin Lynch, The Lacs, Jamie Davis/ Rion Page, Aaron Taylor, and Lauren Elise will be rocking Fernandina Beach. The NAS Jax USO, Mayport USO, and the Kings Bay ITT Office will have a limited number of FREE tickets available for ACTIVE DUTY only. Only TWO free tickets will be provided per ACTIVE DUTY family regardless of dual service status. You may pick-up your FREE tickets first come, first served. Tickets must be picked up by service member. Spouses may pickup if service member is deployed. 2013 Freedom Cup Join fellow active duty service members in a Ryder Cup style tourna ment at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club on Monday, June 17. The tournament is free to the first 70 active duty service members from each base (NAS JAX, Mayport, and Kings Bay). You may signup for the Tournament by calling the Fernandina Beach Golf Club at (904) 277-7370. Thinking About Going Back To School? Are you thinking about going back to school? Do you have a son or daughter going off to school? Join us at the NAS Jacksonville USO on Wednesday, June 26 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for more information on Grand Canyon University. A rep resentative will be avail able to answer any ques tions. Teen Driving CourseNAS Jacksonville The NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class targeting young, depen dent drivers between the ages of 15 and 21. The class will be held on June 14 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. There will not be any time behind the wheel. Teens will receive an AAA-Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. For more informa tion, or to register your child, call Linda at (904) 542-3082, Cindy at (904) 542-2584, or Kristen at (904) 542-8810. Theatreworks-Free Summer Shows June 19th And 20th Every summer, the atreworks at the Florida Theatre provides four FREE summer shows, June 1920 at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The show on the 19th is Gary Krinskys Toying With Science, a unique approach to teaching elements of sci ence which combines circus skills, mime, origi nal music and audience involvement to explore the basic principles of science. Dive into the imaginations of scientists who have played important roles in the exploration and discovery of concepts that define our world. This is a science show that they will go home and talk about! The show on the 20th is Aesops Dinosaur Fables. Dinosaur Fable features singing and dancing by six giant pre historic puppets and the live actor leader of our tale, TryANTasaurus. To make reservations for your family, call (904) 353-3500. Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League The Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League invites activeduty Military personnel, and their dependents, to attend their roller derby games in Orange Park, Florida. The Tri-County Rolling Militias adult roller derby team, the Jade Grenades, is an allfemale, full contact recre ational and competitive roller derby team based in Orange Park. Come out and experience the hardhitting action of womens flat-track roller derby the same roller derby that is currently under con sideration for the 2020 Olympics! The Tri-County Rolling Militia (TCRM) has five remaining home games (or bouts as they are called in roller derby) for the 2013 sea son. The venue for these bouts is the Skate Station Funworks at 230 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park, Florida. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout begins at 6 p.m. The game dates are June 23, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater Jacksonville USO and For the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the Greater Jacksonville USO. Visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitch en, showers, and quiet reading room. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, recep tions, parties and predeployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead pro jector are available. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOFriday, June 14 Motown is coming to town! The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is hosting a Motown concert in the Gardens from 7-9 p.m. Local band KTG will have you swaying to all your favorites, including the Temptations and Marvin Gaye. TreeCup Caf will have plenty of treats, beer and wine available for purchase, but you are welcome to pack a pic nic. After claiming your spot in the Gardens, ven ture inside the Museum and view the classic cars on display as part of the current exhibition, Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile. Members $10 per person and Nonmembers $20 per person. Reserved table for the concert $400, includes seating for 10 and a picnic meal. For more informa tion or to register, please call (904) 899-6038 or visit http://www.cummer.org/ concerts-cummer. The Ladies Auxillary Unit #290 will hold a pot roast dinner at the branch home, 390 Mayport Rd. A donation of $8 is request ed. The event is open to the public. Take out orders are welcome. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, June 15 As part of Great Outdoors Month, join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural com munities of the undevel oped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. June 17-21 Isle of Faith UMC will hold a free Vacation Bible School, SonWest Roundup, A Rip Roarin Good Time With Jesus! from 6-8:30 p.m. The VBS Celebration will be June 22 from noon-2 p.m. with lunch, Space Walk bounce houses and water slides. To register go to www. iofumc.org/vbs. The VBS Mission Project will be a Stop Hunger Now meal packaging event on June 22 from 10 a.m.-noon. For more information email Jennifer@iofumc. org. Wednesday, June 19 and Thursday, June 20 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., continues its Talks and Tea series by highlighting, Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile at 1:30 p.m. Talks and Tea lecture series invites visi tors to sit comfortably in the Galleries and Gardens of The Cummer while art historians, artists, and other experts facilitate informational and educa tional discussions on vari ous topics related to the Museums permanent col lection, as well as special exhibitions. At the conclu sion of each talk, tea and light refreshments will be served. Members and Non-members $6 per per son, includes lecture, tea, refreshments and admis sion to the Museum and Gardens. Pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, please call (904) 899-6038. Saturday, June 22 What better way to cel ebrate Great Outdoors Month than by joining a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these crea tures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, July 6 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Sunday, July 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR -Photo submittedPictured, Race participants take off during the inaugural JAXEX Runway 5K. The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) hosted its Inaugural JAXEX RUNWAY 5K at Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport (JAXEX) for a day of community, exercise and supporting local military families. The event, benefiting The Greater Jacksonville Area USO featured a 5K run and a one-mile fun run. A portion of both race courses included the airport runway at JAXEX, which was closed to air traffic during the event. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO provides support and services to local military members and their families. Proceeds from the event will be presented to the USO in July during the dedication of the James E. Craig Memorial Pavilion at JAXEX. Craig, the namesake of the airport, was a Jacksonville native killed during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.Runners Take-Off At Inaugural JAXEX RUNWAY 5K

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com ATG Navigates New Training ATG Mayport PAOWith minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor ingenuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for sur face Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated naviga tion team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships naviga tion teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive sim ulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships without ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simulation. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills necessary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hard ware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equip ment and innovated an inte grated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, head -HSL-60 Jaguars On Prowl For Drugs CNAFR Public AffairsDarkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-aday. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats. As they pre pare for their next deployments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the counter-nar cotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of responsibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marks men aboard who are authorized to fire dis abling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to comply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a sus pected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, author ity over the helicopter is transferred to the regional Coast Guard command er, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard pre cision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforce ment members who have been selected for the precision marksman ship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering GSA Expo At MayportFrom MWRAll purchasing agents, buyers and credit card holders, the 2013 GSA Expo will be held at Naval Station Mayport on June 19. MWR will host more than 75 vendors for this annual event who will feature products from office supplies to heavy equipment for ships. Visitors to the expo will get a chance to meet and speak directly with vendor representatives and see their prod ucts. This will give the buyer a better idea of what they need and what product best meets their needs in their work environment. The Expo will be held at Beachside Community Center Wednesday, June 19, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is open to both civilian and military personnel. Vendors will also be handing out free samples of their products. After speaking to the vendors, you can enjoy a free lunch for all attendees. For more information, please call (904) 270-5228.See ATG, Page 16 See HSL-60, Page 15 -Photos courtesy of HSL-60Above, HSL-60 Firescout Det 3 is pictured in 2012 during their Airborne Use of Force (AUF) coun ter narcotics deployment aboard USS Simpson (FFG 56) Right, drugs and a disabled boat motor that were confiscated during a recent Airborne Use of Force (AUF) counter narcotics deployment with Navy, Coast Guard, and partner organizations.21st Century Sailor Office EstablishedFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsEffective June 1, Navy headquarters staff realigned in support of the establishment of 21st Century Sailor office (OPNAV N17). Establishment of the 21st Century Sailor office will provide for more coordinated and streamlined efforts in Sailor resiliency and readiness programs. Full details of the realignment can be found in Naval Administrative Message 153/13. The office is responsible for the integration of the Navys objectives for equal opportunity, Sailor personal and family readiness; physical readiness; substance abuse prevention; suicide prevention; sexual harassment and sexual assault prevention and response (SAPR), hazing prevention, and transition assistance. The goal of 21st Century Sailor office is to pro vide our Sailors with the support network, programs, resources, training, and skills needed to overcome adversity and thrive, said Rear Adm. Walter Ted Carter, Director of the 21st Century Sailor office. Resilience is not one program or initiative, but a comprehensive effort to build life skills that not only ensure Navy readiness, but also fully develop the personal and professional talent of our force. The 21st Century Sailor office will drive policy and strategies that are responsive to our Sailors and their families. The 21st Century Sailor office was created through a realignment of existing Navy resources as part of the recommendations from Task Force Resilient. Task Force Resilient was chartered by Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson on January 22, 2013 to review Navy resil iency efforts as well as suicide related events in order to increase resilience and reduce suicides. Led by Rear Adm. Walter Ted Carter, Task Force Resilient determined Navy resilience resources could better serve Sailors if aligned under one overarching and integrated organization that provided See 21st Century, Page 13

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror When it comes to the subject of happiness and joy, we see and hear so many stories about it on the news or read about it online. Often times, the sto ries center around the lack of happiness and joy as seen from Hollywood celebrities who are sup posed to have it all, but seem to have missed that important part of life. So I thought I would share a few thoughts and stories about happiness to help brighten your week and possibly give you some thing to think about as well. Lets begin with this funny little story. A man just finished his annual physical exam and was waiting for the doc tors initial report. After a few minutes, the doctor came in with his charts in his hand and said, Theres no reason why you cant live a completely normal life as long as you dont try to enjoy it. Nathaniel Hawthorne used this description, Happiness is a butterfly, which, when pursued, is always just beyond your grasp, but which, if you will sit down quietly, may alight upon you. Now, thats some good food for thought. Joseph Addison offers this perspective. The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, someone to love and some thing to hope for. C.L. James used the philosophical approach of a dog chasing its tail to talk about happiness. A big dog saw a little dog chasing its tail and asked, Why are you chasing your tail so? Said the puppy, I have mastered philosophy, I have solved the problems of the universe which no dog before me has right ly solved; I have learned that the best thing for a dog is happiness, and that happiness is my tail. Therefore I am chasing it; and when I catch it, I shall have happiness. Said the old dog, My son, I too, have paid attention to the prob lems of the universe in my weak way, and I have formed some opinions. I, too, have judged that happiness is a fine thing for a dog, and that happiness is in my tail. But I have noticed when I chase after it, it keeps running away from me, but when I go about my business, it comes after me. Finally, a story is told of a little boy who was given a priceless possession: his deceased grandfathers gold pocket watch. How he treasured it! But one day, while playing at his fathers ice plant, he lost the watch amid all the ice and sawdust. He searched and scratched, becoming frantic, but no watch. Then he suddenly realized what to do. He stopped scurrying around and became very still. In the silence, he heard the watch ticking. God has given each of us a priceless gift of hap piness and joy. How easy it is for us to lose our inner joy and then our outward happiness in the scurrying around of daily life. Yet, it is always there to find; if we will but pause and listen to the beautiful presence of God within our hearts. Chap Steve Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHappiness And Joy Are Within Your GraspHomeschooling is an educational option which military families are choosing more and more frequently. Since a typical military family moves every two to four years, homeschooling can provide continuity in education and eliminate the stress of leaving one school district and mov ing to another. The goal for the home schooling parent is to identify how and when their child learns best and to adapt the teaching style to the child. Finding that special curriculum which works best for the child can sometimes be challenging. Also the costs associated with homeschooling may vary depending on the method and/or curriculum selected by the family. Listed below are few examples of the most popular types of homeschooling programs available to families: schooling, and Recently, many states have enacted legislation requiring public school access for homeschool ers. Related services such as speech and language, physical therapy, or assistance in traditional aca demic areas such as math and reading may be available in Florida. Parents should check with the individual district. So how do you know which type of curriculum to select for your child and what Florida requires for home school enroll ment? Check out this years Home Education Resource Information (H.E.R.I.) Convention, June 28 & 29 at the Prime Osborn Convention Center from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. each day. Parking is free in convention center lot. This years guest speak ers are Joe and Zan Tyler, Dr. Stephen Guffanti, and Brenda Dickinson of the Florida Home Education Network. Workshop top ics will include home schooling, portfolios, special needs students, high school require ments, and dual enroll ment. For those seeking curriculum options, the Curriculum Hall will be filled with exhibitors to get you informed and excited about starting a new homeschooling pro gram or energizing your current program. Pre-registration is available from now through June 20 at www.home school-life.com/fl/heri jax/. Go to the websites event calendar and click on June 28, 2013 to preregister. Member cost of $17/family for both days includes spouse, 1 set of grandparents, and all children in family being homeschooled. Nonmember cost of $32/fam ily for both days includes spouse, 1 set of grand parents, and all children in family being home schooled. On-site regis tration for members is $27 and non-members are $42. Another convention event is the Student Art Gallery Exhibit. This will feature the works of local homeschoolers. Also featured is H.E.R.I.s Youth Entrepreneur Showcase. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingGet To Know More About HomeschoolingMy 40-something brain regularly forgets that my sunglasses are perched on my head, cant remember where I parked the mini van, and compels me to walk around my house mumbling to myself, Now, why did I come in here again? However, for some unknown rea son, I have an incredibly detailed memory of my childhood. I dont have a perfect chronological recollection of my upbringing; instead, I have an almost photo graphic memory of cer tain mundane, seemingly unimportant occurrences like climbing my neigh bors tree or eating dry Tang out of the jar with my licked finger. Its as if I can transport myself back in time and re-experience all the sights, sounds, smells, tastes and feelings all over again. Sometimes, if one looks at snapshots or home movies, one can artificially remember the events depicted. However, other than a couple shaky 8 mm films in my mothers attic without a workable projector to watch them, and a few yellowing photo albums -with a clear preponderance of shots of my older brother, I might add my family did not regularly memorialize events on film. Therefore, my child hood memories are totally legit. A couple weeks ago, I was at Walmart buying cards for Fathers Day. Our kids think their Dad is the greatest thing since Double Fudge Cookie Dough Blizzards, so they were happy to help. While they looked for cards, I figured Id get one for my own father. I read card after card, but could only mumble to myself, grimace and shake my head. None seemed to fit my complex circumstances. None described our complicated relationship. None communicat ed the vastly mixed emo -Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesKeeping It Simple During Fathers Daytions and unique bond that my father and I have. The kids were done, so I sent them to find a gallon of milk to buy me more time. Stop overthink ing this, I said to myself, there must be something here that you can send to Dad. Before picking up another card, I tried to remember how I felt about my dad when I was a kid. Before my marriage to my Navy husband emptied my parents nest. Before my parents got divorced. Before my Dad resented me for not speaking to him for five years. Before I resented him for breaking up our family. Before we butted heads trying to form a new relationship. Before we had to forgive each other. I thought back to a time when I was just a kid and he was just my Dad. As the details of my childhood awoke from hibernation, vivid scenes began to flash in my mind. Dad taking out his false tooth (college foot ball accident) on a fam ily road trip, and talking to the tollbooth opera tor with a fake hillbilly accent, just to make my brother and I laugh. Dad letting me skip school to go with him to Pittsburgh for business, and me throwing up pea nut butter cookies in the A/C vents of his Buick on the way. Dad lying shirtless on the floor so my brother and I could draw on his back with ink pens while he watched golf tourna ments. Dad lecturing my brother and me at the dinner table on report card day. Dad explaining to the police officer why he was teaching me how to do doughnuts in the icy natatorium parking lot after swim practice one night. Dad handing me an old tube sock filled with tools a small hammer, screw drivers, pliers before I left for college. Dad ner vously walking me down the isle at my wedding. One memory lead to another, and to another. Then, my mind was seized by one final recol lection, which ended my paralyzing over-analysis. I could see my father lifting me from the back seat of our station wagon. I had fallen asleep on the way home, but woke up when my parents pulled into the driveway. I kept my eyes closed and pretended, lazily allowing my arms to drape around my fathers neck and my head to lie upon his shoulder. I bobbed gently as he walked through the house and into my yellow bedroom, where he laid me in my mock brass bed, removed my shoes and tucked the covers around my chunky little frame. I felt him kiss my fore head, and then, he stood there and waited a moment before he turned and left the room. Suddenly, there at the Walmart, the Fathers Day cards on the rack had relevance. My father raised me, protected me, cared for me, loved me. I love and appreciate him. Enough said. Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comVacation Bible School Registration BeginsFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold its annual Vacation Bible School from July 22-26 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children ages 4-12. This years theme is Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God. At Kingdom Rock, kids will meet new Bible Buddies, like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children how Gods love, family, friends, prayer and trust can help them stand strong. There is no cost for VBS, but space is limited. Register at the Chapel during normal working hours or call 270-5212 for more information.

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New Online Survey For Commissary CustomersFrom DeCA Public AffairsWhether you shop at your local commis sary or not, the Defense Commissary Agency wants to hear from you. From June 1 through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www. commissaries.com by clicking on the take our survey link or access ing the survey directly at https://www.survey monkey.com/s/DeCAShopping-Survey. Were asking for input from our regular shop pers, occasional shoppers and non-shoppers alike, said Tracie Russ, director of DeCAs business development directorate. The responses will be ana lyzed and used to improve the commissary for all our patrons. The survey takes only 8-12 minutes to complete, and Russ said the time spent will have mean ingful impact on future improvements at com missaries worldwide. Supporting NMCRS -Photo by Paige GnannRepresentatives from the Amelia Island Concours dElegance Foundation pres ent a $20,000 check to Mayport Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society raised by the Concours foundation earlier this year. Pictured from left is NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Ron Hays, Dick Messer, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, Bill Warner, Director Bill Kennedy, Brian Webber and CMDCM Bob White. Chamber Appreciates Military -Photo courtesy of Beaches ChamberBeaches Division of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce held its Military Appreciation Luncheon on Thursday, May 23 at Casa Marina, Jacksonville Beach. Pictured from left is Elaine Brown with the Beaches Division of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Ships Serviceman 2nd Class Jose Rivera, CMDCM Bob White and NS Mayport Chaplain, Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Honor Detail bow their heads during an invocation by Cmdr. Steve Souders at the Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony held aboard USS The Sullivans on June 5.Mayport Commemorates Battle of Midway4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville held a Battle of Midway commemo ration ceremony aboard USS The Sullivans (DD668) at Naval Station Mayport, June 5. The Battle of Midway took place June 4-7, 1942. During the battle, U.S. Navy carrier strike forc es defeated an Imperial Japanese strike force that prevented them from capturing Midway Island. Attending and speak ing at the ceremony was Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet. Harris shared a statement from the Chief of Naval Operations about the Battle of Midway. Though a lifetime has passed since the battle of Midway, and the world and our Navy have changed in many ways, the lessons of June 1942 still resonate today, said Harris. The NavyMarine Corps team, act ing decisively in defense of our Nations interests, can project more power, across greater distances, more effectively, than any Naval Force the world has ever seen. That was dem onstrated at Midway and throughout the Pacific in World War II, and main taining that capability is our charge today. The ceremony con cluded with the official party boarding a C-tractor 12 tug boat to the Naval Station Mayport basin for a Wreath laying to honor all Service Members who served in the Battle of Midway, followed by a 21 gun salute. David Tellez, U.S. 4th Fleet command mas ter chief, took part in the wreath laying ceremony and emphasised the importance of honoring a key moment in Navy his tory. To have the opportunity to take part in this cer emony is a true honor, it is important for us as Sailors and a Nation to remem ber those who served so bravely, said Tellez. The Battle of Midway is considered the cru cial turning point in the Pacific War. The Japanese lost all four aircraft carri ers they had at Midway, preventing their naval forces from being an offensive force; while the U.S. lost only one air craft carrier of the three, largely due to the success of U.S. Naval intelligence to decode Japanese mes sages. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime -Photo by Paige GnannA trumpeter from Navy Band Southeast plays Taps during a wreath laying ceremony, part of NS Mayports Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony.See Midway, Page 5 -Photo by Paige GnannNavy Band Southeast plays during the arriving of the official party at the NS Mayport Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony. Crewmembers of USS The Sullivans salute during Taps and a wreath laying ceremony.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 5 -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerRear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks about the impor tance the Battle of Midway and turning point of World War II in the Pacific aboard the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) June 5 at a remembrance ceremony at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Honor Detail performs a 21-gun salute in commemoration of the Battle of Midway on board USS The Sullivans. domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Paige GnannThe NS Mayport Color Guard parades the colors during the beginning of the Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony held aboard USS The Sullivans on June 5. From Page 4Midway-Photo by Paige GnannUSS The Sullivans Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Samuel de Castro introduces guest speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet.-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the official party throw a wreath into the middle of the Mayport basin in commemoration of the Battle of Midway.-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, salutes as the NS Mayport Color Guard parades the colors.

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Summer Fun Means Sun, Vacation SafetyFrom TRICAREFor many, Memorial Day Weekend marks the official start of summer. There are backyard bar becues, road trips to the beach or just lazy days under the hazy summer sun. Summer is a time to unwind and enjoy mild temperatures and great weather, as long as vaca tioners are mindful of the dangers of summer sun. Sun burns, heat exhaustion and heat stroke can bring a quick end to any vacation or day at the beach. It is important to know the symptoms of sun-related illnesses and also to know where to go for help. Depending on the shade of the skin, sun burns can be pink to bright red or darker brown. The severity of the burn will determine whether medical care is necessary.First degree burns, while painful, are the easiest to treat and do not necessarily require medical attention. Anyone with sunburn should seek shade, get some water and apply a first-aid lotion to the burn to relieve the pain. Second degree burns will produce liquid filled blisters. By send ing fluid to the skin, the body is trying to cool itself and stop the burn ing. It is important not to open or break these blisters because open ing the wound could lead to infection. Call 911 or another emergency num ber to get help. If you can, apply a cool mist to the skin. Dont wrap the burned area or allow clothing to touch the blisters because the cloth will stick to the skin and pull it off. Third degree burns are serious and can result in death. Someone with third degree sunburn is likely unconscious, so call 911 immediately. Bring shade to them dont try to move them and keep their airway open so they can breathe. Sunburn could be a sign for the onset of a more serious condition like heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Look for other symptoms like profuse sweating, muscle cramps, weakness or dizziness and nausea and vomiting. If medical care is nec essary, it is important to always know where to get help, especially while traveling. TRICARE bene ficiaries are covered while traveling on business or vacation, but it is vital to know what you need to do to get help. Emergency care is cov ered for all TRICARE beneficiaries. Beneficiaries enrolled in TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Overseas, TRICARE Prime Remote Overseas or the TRICARE Young AdultPrime Option must contact their primary care manager within 24 hours or the next business day after receiving emer gency care. People using TRICARE Standard and Extra will save money if they use a network pro vider. For more informa tion on how to get care when traveling, please visit www.tricare.mil/ GettingCare/Traveling. aspx. HEALTHReaping The Benefits Of Physical ActivityFrom TRICAREFor many people life is busy with work and fam ily obligations, and find ing the time and moti vation to exercise can be difficult. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recom mends incorporating 150 minutes of physical activity per week for adults, and 60 minutes a day for children. This may seem like a lot of time, but it is time well spent and can add years to a persons life. Regular exercise and physical activity keeps the body healthy and improves endurance, lung and heart function, and blood circulation. It strengthens bones and muscles, improves men tal health and mood, and reduces stress. One benefit commonly associated with regular exercise is weight control. According to CDC one third of American adults and 17 percent of children are obese. Exercising regularly reduces a persons chances of developing serious health conditions like cardiovascular dis ease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndromes that are linked to obesity. Devoting 150 minutes a week to exercise might seem overwhelming, but starting off slowly is OK, especially when starting a regular exercise program. CDC suggests dividing the time into 10 or 15 minute aerobic workouts. For example: Take a brisk 15 minute walk, twice a day, five days a week. Its also important to include muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week that work all major muscle groups. As long as the activity is of moderate intensity it counts towards the sug gested guidelines for reg ular exercise. Establishing a routine incorporating exercise into daily life is essential, and any major changes in diet and exercise should be discussed with a primary care pro vider. Losing weight is healthy for many reasons. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), Aim for a Healthy Weight campaign highlights the difference loosing even a small amount of weight can make. According to the NIH losing 5 to 10 percent of body weight can reduce a persons chances for developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes or having a stroke. It can decrease stress on the knees, hips and lower back as well as improve sleep apnea. The NIH website has helpful tools for losing and maintaining a lower weight, including a body mass index calculator, menu planner and tips for stay ing active. For more information go to www.hhs. gov/onepoundatatime. Exercising is a good way to keep healthy. Another important way to stay healthy is by staying up to date on all recom mended immunizations and health screenings. TRICARE helps benefi ciaries stay healthy with access to cost-free pre ventive care including immunizations, cancer screenings, and blood pressure and cholesterol screenings. All TRICARE beneficiaries are covered for preventive services. For more information about TRICAREs covered preventive care services go to www.tricare.mil/ livewell/preventive. It is never too late to begin a regular exercise routine. Some benefits can be felt and noticed almost immediately including increased ener gy levels, more restful sleep and reduced stress. For more information about physical fitness and healthy living go to www. tricare.mil/livewell.Stay Current: Update DEERS TodayFrom TRICAREAs summer approaches many service members and their families are gearing up for permanent change of station moves, and retirees may be heading north after spend ing the winter in warmer climes. An important part of any move for TRICARE beneficiaries active, reserve and retired is updating their Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS) information to make sure their health care follows them to their new address. This means making sure that all personal information phone numbers, postal and email addresses is up to date. Also, just like when moving, sponsors who experience any of the following life events must update their DEERS records as soon as pos sible: ment eligible Making changes to DEERS information is easy and can be done online at milConnect (www.dmdc.osd.mil/mil connect), by fax or mail, or in person at the near est uniformed services identification card office. For more information on how to update DEERS information, go to www. tricare.mil/DEERS. Other life events that affect DEERS eligibility and require an update to beneficiary information are: child loss of eligibility enrollment status Survivors whose sponsors have died are responsible for making DEERS updates. Many DEERS updates require supporting doc umentation: marriage licenses, birth or death certificates, Medicare cards or DD-214 dis charge forms. Be sure to bring copies of all paper work that might be needed when updating DEERS information. For ques tions about TRICARE eli gibility, please visit www. tricare.mil/DEERS. NNOA Jacksonville Hosts Annual Scholarship BanquetFrom NNOAThe National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter hosted their Fourth Annual Scholarship Banquet at the Orange Park Courtyard Marriot on May 17, 2013. NNOA Jacksonville Chapter delivered scholarship checks in amounts of $750 and $1000, totaling $13,000 to 15 area grad uating high school stu dents from Clay, Duval, St. Johns, and Camden County, Georgia. This event represented a sincere effort on the part of the NNOA organization to positively impact our community and to rep resent the sea services. Without the support of our community, partners, donors, and members, NNOA JAX would not have been able to provide $30,000 in scholarships over the past three years to deserving high school seniors throughout the Southeast region. There were 64 attend ees in attendance at the event with Dr. Richard Danford, CEO of the Jacksonville Urban League, serving as the keynote speaker. RDML Sinclair Harris, USN, Commander 4th Fleet/U.S. Navy Forces Southern Command was NNOAs special guest, who deliv ered his personal com mand coin to each schol arship recipient. An event such as this requires a great deal of commitment to plan and organize. A special thanks to the expert leadership of Lt. Cmdr. Brian Martin, MSC, USNR and Lt. Harold Jones, USN (Ret), both members of the Bureau of Navy Medicine, this years scholarship commit tee chair and co-chair; received high praise from all in attendance for their hard work. A spe cial thanks also goes out to scholarship committee: RDML Gene Kendal, USN (Ret); Lt. Cmdr. Herlena Washington, MSC, USN (Ret); and CWO4 Herman McCrary, USN (Ret). Visit us on Facebook: NNOA Jacksonville Chapter for additional information about this organization or how to become a member. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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Enhanced Appointment Scheduling At Branch Health Clinic Mayport Naval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs OfficerNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayportas one of six Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville facilitiesis changing its approach to appointment schedul ing, to offer more sameday urgent-care appoint ments and better support patients Medical Home Port teams. To make an appoint ment or get clinical advice, patients call the same appointment line they always haveand now a new greeting pro vides an option for each branch health clinic. Knowing which team theyre on helps patients quickly connect with an appointment clerk who will be physically located in their care team. NBHC Mayport has three teams: Family Medicine (grey and orange teams) and Pediatrics pink team. There are 14 teams in total across the com mand. Each Medical Home Port care team is laserfocused on meeting all of their patients preven tive, routine and urgent care needs, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And by locating our appointing staff in the care teams, we get better real-time communica tionwhich enhances our ability to make use of any openings in the schedule to offer sameday, urgent-care appoint ments. The teamby taking a whole-person approach to healthaims for total health and wellness and is better positioned than an emergency room to man age urgent care. Urgent care includes things like a minor cut, sprain, migraine, earache, ris ing fever or urinary tract infection. (For emergen cies, patients should call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.) Each team includes an appointing clerk, front desk staff, medical assis tants, corpsmen, nurses, a case manager and a pharmacistled by the primary care managers (PCMs): physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners. Navy Medicine clinicians have the same education and training as their private-sector col leaguesand also have experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitar ian missions. To meet the PCMs on NBHC Mayports grey, orange and pink teams, visit the commands website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure email (for non-urgent issues) by signing up for Medical Home Port Onlineon the commands website or at www.relayhealth.com. To get care or clinical advice, NBHC Mayport patients call the appoint ment line at (904) 5424677 or (800) 529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospital can call week days from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is availablevia the appointment lineon evenings, weekends and holidays. NBHC Mayport is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities in Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a PCM at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. -Photo by Jacob Sippel Capt. Stella Hayes, a family medicine physician and primary care manager (PCM), consults with her care teams appointment clerk, Renata Belgrave, about the days patient schedule. The updated approach to appointment scheduling helps each patients Medical Home Port meet all preventive, routine and urgent care needs. This includes making use of any openings in the schedule to offer same-day appointments for urgent care. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 7

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8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 Auto Skills Center June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 15: UFC 161-Bararo vs Wineland. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Community Events June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflata bles and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 June 16: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Fathers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 12 pm at Focsle; Reservations required. Celebrate Dad with an all you can eat brunch fea turing omelet bar, cham pagne fountain, carv ing station and more. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Passholders receive unlimited access to Shipwreck Island at Adventure Landing Jacksonville Beach as well as daily deals throughout the week and special dis counts on off-season and holiday events. 270-5145 Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $31.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 5 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 14: Movie Trip: Man of Steel. Van departs 6 p.m. June 15: UFC 161Barao vs. Eddie. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE June 17: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 19: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 21: Movie Trip: World War Z. Van departs 6 p.m. June 22: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 24: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. June 25: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 14: Outdoor MoviesParental Guidance (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The Messdeck Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, pick les, onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsEvery Day Smashed Sandwich, $8 Grilled 5.5 oz burger, driz zled with our own chipotle aioli, your choice of cheese (American, Swiss or provolone), topped with shoestring French fries and sandwiched in our Panini press Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 A seasoned chicken breast, topped with provolone cheese, fresh spinach, driz zled with pesto and pressed on foccacia bread Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Tossed mixed greens, chicken breast, shavings, fresh sliced straw berries, drizzled with our own raspberry vinaigrette Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Sourdough stuffed with sharp white cheddar, American cheese, apple wood smoked bacon, grilled to a golden brown crisp Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Jumbo grilled shrimp, crisp bacon, stuffed in a pita with shredded lettuce, diced toma toes and our own special sauce Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water Free Summer Visits To Museums For Troops, FamiliesAmerican Forces Press ServiceDuring the busy sea son of military transfers, adjusting to new com munities and register ing children for school, more than 2,000 muse ums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service mem bers and their families as a break from the sum mer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their fami lies can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspir ing, educational and economical activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deploy ments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very limited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This program is an investment in our families. Arecord number of museums are participat ing this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. This program is help ing us make memories -memories for our families, Hull-Ryde said. But its more than that. It is making a difference not only in the force of today, but in the force of the future. Navy 311 Has Answers To Your QuestionsNAVY 311 is ready to help Sailors answer any question, anywhere, any time. NAVY 311 is the single point of entry for help desk support across the Navy. Ask NAVY 311 about systems, equip ment, training, personnel, facilities, career, IT, medical, logistics, quality of life and more. Whether youre at sea, in port, on duty or lib erty, NAVY 311 is avail able 24/7 via phone (855NAVY311), email, web, text, chat and more.Be Careful Cooking OutsideFrom Mayport Fire & Emergency ServicesEnjoyment of out door grilling and barbe cuing is totally under standable. Barbecuing gives food great fla vor, its fun, it keeps the kitchen cool, and its a great way to entertain. However, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), grills cause 900 structure fires and 3,500 outdoor fires each year. Exposure to toxic gases, such as car bon monoxide, kills 30 people and injures 100 more. Following a few basic safety steps can ensure a safe cookout. Placing grills to close to combustibles and leaving cooking unat tended are the two lead ing causes for grill fires. NAVSTAMYPTINST 11320.4M 904e states that the use of charcoal or gas fired grills and fire pits, including tiki torches, is prohibited within struc tures, on boats, on or under balconies, decks or porches, or within 15 feet of combustible patios on ground floors. Prevent burn injuries! Keep the grill away from play and traffic areas. Keep children and pets away from the grill area and declare a 3 foot safe zone around the grill. Follow the manufacturers instructions on how to set up the grill, maintain and operate it. Use long handled grilling tools for plenty of clearance from heat and flames while grilling. NEVER leave the grill unattended while in use. Use baking soda to control a grease fire and have a fire extinguisher handy. If you do not have a fire extinguisher, keep a bucket of sand or a garden hose nearby. Outdoor Cooking Fire Safety

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Aquatics Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes. 270-5377 June 16: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. $6.00 for 90 minutes of bowling and shoe rental, plus Colored Headpin Bowling. Hot Dog and French fries $2.75. 2705377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retirees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25. MWR Sports/Fitness Fitness Schedules Gymnasium, Bldg. 1391 (904) 270 5451 or 5452 Monday through Thursday 0500 1400 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 1130 Spinning 1730 Kids Clinic 1130 Steel Anchor 1630 Spinning 1130 Rowing 1130 Spinning 1130 Steel Anchor 0730 Spinning 1130 Rowing (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Zumba 1130 Kickboxing 1130 Strength Training for Women 0930 Yoga 1130 Strength Training for Women 0700 Sunrise Yoga 1130 Zumba 1130 Yoga (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Rehab 0930 Aqua Fitness 0930 Aqua Toning (904) 270 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Running Clinic 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0730 Command Bootcamp 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 NOFFS 0700 Open Sandbox 1530 1700 Open Sandbox 1730 TRX 0700 Open Sandbox 0700 Command Bootcamp 1100 1230 Open Sandbox 77 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1530 1600 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1600 1700 WOD 0700 0730 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 0730 WOD 1100 1130 Intro to HIT/ HIT Skill Review 1130 1230 WOD THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 9

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-Photo byMC2 Matthew R. ColeCapt. Daniel B. Uhls, commanding officer of USS Hu City (CG 66), addresses the ships Engineering department during an awards quarters on the ships forecastle. -Photo by MCSN Andrew SchneiderThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) pulls alongside the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) as a pair of HH-60H Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to the Nightdippers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 5 prepare to land on the flight deck. Dwight D. Eisenhower and Hu City are deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo byMC2 Matthew R. ColeQuartermaster 2nd Class Daniel Wilson shows Midshipman 3rd Class Hunter Lampp how to plot a navigation track in the pilothouse of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosSailors combat a simulated fire during a drill in the forward gym aboard USS Hu City (CG 66). USS Hu City On Patrol THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 11

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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 FFSC Classes Give Tools To Help SailorsFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 15, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. June 17, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 17-21, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 18, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting (ages 13-19) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 19, 11 a.m.-noon, Financial Planning For Deployment FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Budgeting means using dollars with sense mak ing sure theres enough money available at the right time. Money is needed for food, fun, clothes, savings, shelter, emergencies, transportation and charity. So its never too early to learn the basic skills youll needfor today and in the future. INVEST your time and learn some basic budgeting skills, how to set financial goals, and begin planning for your future. June 22, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. June 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. June 24, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 24-28, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1, Room 104 June 25, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum FFSC Building 1, Room 719 June 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting (ages 13-19) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants realize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. A completed rough resume will be required. Family Readiness Program Conducts Emergency Response ExerciseNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsThe Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness hosted a tri-base Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exercise, May 30. The exercise, designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks follow ing the landfall of a hurricane, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, includ ing installation and training officers and emergency man agement personnel from all three bases. Our ability to take care of our families after a natural disaster is critical to our ability to carry out our mission and support the fleet, said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Our Sailors and civilians need to be assured their loved ones are safe so they can focus on their duties in the event a hurricane actually does hit one of our installations. The exercise came one week after the completion of HURREX 2013, which tested the regions hurricane prepared ness through a scenario involving multiple, simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. The EFAC exercise was essentially a continuation of that scenario, and its focus was on the recovery phase of Disaster Response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to landfall and each base suffered exten sive flooding as the simulated storm passed. Afterward, FFSC p ersonnel from all three par ticipating bases worked with emergency management and training personnel to estab lish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emer gency response personnel to provide a wide range of sup port services for affected family members. Most of the support is man aged through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment portion of NFAAS and spec ify what they need, said Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness program Work and Family Life Coordinator. Then our case managers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the resources they need. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC personnel to assess needs after a disaster, it is not the only one. People can also come directly to the EFAC for assistance. During the exercise, partici pants simulated what kind of EFAC services would be neces sary at two days after a hurri cane, one week after, and two weeks after. The circumstances in the days and weeks following a major storm can change quick ly and EFAC personnel and services need to be adjusted accordingly, said Lucius. We need to decide who we should have in the EFAC based on what we think peoples needs are because its not staffed only with FFSC personnel its chaplains, medical, legal, housing and many others. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agencies and local offi cials in order to get people the help they need. Most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world sce nario occurs. An emergency is a crisis event and it never really hap pens the way you exercise it, said Lucius, but we at least need to have a plan in place. We are going to be providing ser vices and need to be sure that our people have confidence in themselves, confidence in their leadership and confidence in the plan. This training is essential for preparing emergency manage ment and FFSC personnel for an actual event. It important for family members and depen dents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS, said Lucius. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be contacted and they know how to contact somebody for help. The exercise was phase one of a three-phase process. While this phase included only play ers from installation FFSCs, training and emergency man agement personnel, participa tion will be expanded in phase two and three. Phase two will include additional partici pants from on-base organiza tions, such as the base housing office and legal. Phase three will expand even further to include players from outside the fence line, including the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and gov ernment civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily. navy.mil where they can update their contact information, report their status or submit a needs assessment. Sailors, dependents and government civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily.navy.mil to update contact information or submit a needs assessment.Benefit Training For Same-Sex Partners, Children BeginsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy will begin training for leadership and support elements to be ready to provide eli gible benefits to samesex domestic partners of service members and their children beginning August 31. Extending these ben efits reinforces the principle that all those who volunteer to serve are treated with dignity and respect and ensured fairness and equal treatment to the extent allowable under law, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director military plans and policy. Training must be accessed by all current and prospective, active and reserve command triads via Navy e-Learning and must be completed by August 23 according to NAVADMIN 152/13. The training will assist leadership in a knowl edgeable and professional extension of ben efits beginning August 31 when service members will be able to submit a Declaration of Domestic Partnership for DEERS Enrollment (DD653) and obtain a Department of Defense identification for their same-sex partners to access benefits detailed in the February 11 memo by Secretary of Defense. Earlier this year, the Department of Defense identified family member and dependent benefits that the services can law fully provide to same-sex partners and their fami lies through changes in Department of Defense policies and regulation. To make all of these ben efits available to same-sex partners of our service members, Navy reviewed and is modifying all nec essary instructions, notic es, and MILSPERMAN articles, and conducting training to ensure a clear understanding of the benefits and documentation requirements. Benefits that will be extended to same-sex domestic partners and families include: (DD Form 1173) which will be renewed in accor dance with existing poli cies Exchange Welfare and Recreation (MWR) youth programs. This includes child care, youth programs and youth sponsorship. on DoD Aircraft (collocation) for dual-military partners Assistance Center Programs and emergency leave of absence for the military member to attend to partner emergencies. assault counseling pro gram. Emergency care provided; additional care determined by medical eligibility. tile-fire areas for dualmilitary if partner is killed in a combat zone. from certain places of employment and on military installations and from Primary and Secondary school for minor dependents compensation: depen dents of members held as captives person ticipate in surveys of military families, including the quadrennial quality of life review. Secretary to transport remains of a dependent Changes to instruc tions, notices, and MILSPERMAN articles needed to implement extending eligible benefits to same-sex partners will be completed by August 31. Benefit FAQs are post ed on Navys DADT Post Repeal website on Navy Personnel Commands web page under Support and Services http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ support/dadt/Pages/ default.aspx

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PCU Ford Officially Establishes Crew PCU Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Public AffairsMore than 100 Sailors from the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) attended a special ribbon-cutting ceremony, May 15, to officially establish the crew of the first Ford class air craft carrier and open the building where they will work while the ship is constructed. The Shipyard and the crew decided to have a turnover and an offi cial ceremony to stand up PCU Ford. As our first official function as a crew, we wanted this ceremony to help us say we are a crew, said Cmdr. Robert Kurz, Combat Systems Officer. The Commanding Officer just arrived back from school as did our Executive Officer, and we have a total of 170 Sailors onboard at this time, so manning is extremely minimal. Sailors from Ford had a few offices that were run out of the 4th deck of building 608. In April, the command took over the whole building as the home for their PCU offices. Now with their office space established, the crew is working to increase their communi ty involvement and raise awareness about the new carrier. There is still a great deal of work that has to be done before our ship is fleet ready, said Capt. John F. Meier, Commanding Officer. With the beginning of the crew here today, and the official start of our new facility that we will be operating out of until our ship is ready, we are now well on the way. One of the primary focuses at this time is to build the base structure of the command, by writing ship specific instructions, beginning to form the departments and under standing the security lev els, all from the ground up. CVN 78 is going to be a great ship, with great potential for the Navy, said Meier. But, without our Sailors, we couldnt bring the ship to life. On the count of three the ribbon was cut by Meier and Rolf Bartschi, vice president for Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) con struction at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, in front of the building while the ships current crew stood by. The crew coming onboard is a sign that the ship is beginning to come to life, said Bartschi. Soon we will be bringing on operating systems to start testing before they are welded into place, testing electrical readi ness for the ship, testing pumping of fluid through piping systems. This is a huge step forward for us! Named for the 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford will be the premier forward asset for crisis response and early decisive striking power in a major combat operation. The carrier and the carrier strike group will provide forward presence, rapid response, endurance on station, and multi-mission capability. Recently, Ford celebrated a milestone with the announcement that the flight deck was complete following the final Super Lifts which placed the forward bow section and a final sponson. U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. The 1,050-metric ton gantry crane at Newport News Shipbuilding lifts the forward end of one of the catapults of the aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) into place. This completes more than three years of structural work making the primary hull structure of the aircraft carrier 100 percent complete. unity of effort across the Navy enterprise. Task Force Resilient recommended establishing the 21st Century office, led by a Line Flag officer, to serve as the overall lead for Navy resilience efforts by focusing on outcomes and con tinuity of care across Navy pro grams. Building resilience through a culture of total fitness (physical, mental, social, and spiritual) will empower a force that is always ready to operate forward and execute our warfighting mission, said Carter. There is much work to be done, but the 21st Century Sailor office establishment is an important step toward support ing life skills programs that our Sailors will want to better them selves and improve our readiness. 21st Century Sailor office will include six individual policy branches residing under the N17 organization: Total Sailor Fitness (N170), Suicide Prevention (N171), Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (N172), Sexual Harassment Prevention and Equal Opportunity (N173), and the Office of Hazing Prevention (N174). The realignment of the Navy 21st Century Sailor Office began June 1, 2013 and will be completed prior to January 2014. To view the Task Force Resilient report, visit http:// www.navy.mil/docs/ TaskForceResilientFinalReport. pdf For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp /. From Page 121st Century THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 13

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more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can readily pierce the hull of fiber glass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we captured $1 billion in ille gal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive officer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to con figure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive train ing before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits peripheral vision and depth percep tion. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, airspeed, and other critical flight parameters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turning their heads constantly to look at the instrument panel. This increased safety and provided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these missions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coor dinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin flying these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when neces sary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accomplished.From Page 1HSL-60 HSL-48 Flares Up -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosAviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class William Moore, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Squadron Light (HSL) 48, loads chaff flares on an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck aboard the guidedmissile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. From Enlisted To LawyerFrom Navy Judge Advocate General Corps Public AffairsIn a NAVADMIN released June 4, the Navy Judge Advocate Generals (JAG) Corps announced the In-Service Procurement Program (IPP) designed to create a pathway for enlisted Sailors to become judge advocates. The JAG Corps IPP is open to qualified and career-motivated enlist ed personnel of all rat ings. Candidates selected for the JAG Corps IPP have the opportunity to complete a Juris Doctor in preparation for a JAG Corps commission. The JAG Corps IPP provides a commission ing option for talented and motivated Sailors, said Vice Adm. Nanette DeRenzi, Judge Advocate General of the Navy. The JAG Corps IPP provides both funded and unfunded paths to JAG Corps commissions. Sailors who have earned a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree may apply for funded legal education; Sailors who have already earned a Juris Doctor degree from an American Bar Association accredit ed law school and a bar license from any state may apply for direct appointment. The JAG Corps IPP is open to active-duty enlisted personnel and Navy full-time support personnel, in any rating or military occupational specialty, in pay grades E-5 through E-7 with at least two years and not more than 10 years of service. Applicants must be at least 21 years old and under the age of 42 by the time of commissioning. Complete application procedures and education requirements are provid ed in NAVADMIN 154/13 and can be found at JAG Corps Web site. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 15

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 13, 2013 From Page 1ATGsets, and reformat existing computers to complete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of under way times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in naviga tion and ship handling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experi ence the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent training class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic training. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qual ify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course sim ulates relative motion, which means the bear ings, tide, and currents are constantly chang ing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual tar get with the MSN simu lation was exponentially better than reading it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the system with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were award ed Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator class room. For more informa tion or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Operation Specialist work on ranges and communicating with the bridge in the simu lated CIC.-Photos courtesy of ATG MayportVMS operators and the OOD work together to reconfirm their position. Country Rocks The Beach ConcertFree Tickets To Active Duty Today Saturday, June 22, Craig Morgan, Dustin Lynch, The Lacs, Jamie Davis/ Rion Page, Aaron Taylor, and Lauren Elise will be rocking Fernandina Beach. The NAS Jax USO, Mayport USO, and the Kings Bay ITT Office will have a limited number of FREE tickets available for ACTIVE DUTY only. Only TWO free tickets will be provided per ACTIVE DUTY family regardless of dual service status. You may pick-up your FREE tickets first come, first served. Tickets must be picked up by service member. Spouses may pickup if service member is deployed. 2013 Freedom Cup Join fellow active duty service members in a Ryder Cup style tourna ment at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club on Monday, June 17. The tournament is free to the first 70 active duty service members from each base (NAS JAX, Mayport, and Kings Bay). You may signup for the Tournament by calling the Fernandina Beach Golf Club at (904) 277-7370. Thinking About Going Back To School? Are you thinking about going back to school? Do you have a son or daughter going off to school? Join us at the NAS Jacksonville USO on Wednesday, June 26 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for more information on Grand Canyon University. A representative will be avail able to answer any ques tions. Teen Driving CourseNAS Jacksonville The NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class targeting young, depen dent drivers between the ages of 15 and 21. The class will be held on June 14 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. There will not be any time behind the wheel. Teens will receive an AAA-Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. For more informa tion, or to register your child, call Linda at (904) 542-3082, Cindy at (904) 542-2584, or Kristen at (904) 542-8810. Theatreworks-Free Summer Shows June 19th And 20th Every summer, the atreworks at the Florida Theatre provides four FREE summer shows, June 1920 at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The show on the 19th is Gary Krinskys Toying With Science, a unique approach to teaching elements of sci ence which combines circus skills, mime, origi nal music and audience involvement to explore the basic principles of science. Dive into the imaginations of scientists who have played important roles in the exploration and discovery of concepts that define our world. This is a science show that they will go home and talk about! The show on the 20th is Aesops Dinosaur Fables. Dinosaur Fable features singing and dancing by six giant pre historic puppets and the live actor leader of our tale, TryANTasaurus. To make reservations for your family, call (904) 353-3500. Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League The Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League invites activeduty Military personnel, and their dependents, to attend their roller derby games in Orange Park, Florida. The Tri-County Rolling Militias adult roller derby team, the Jade Grenades, is an allfemale, full contact recre ational and competitive roller derby team based in Orange Park. Come out and experience the hardhitting action of womens flat-track roller derby the same roller derby that is currently under con sideration for the 2020 Olympics! The Tri-County Rolling Militia (TCRM) has five remaining home games (or bouts as they are called in roller derby) for the 2013 sea son. The venue for these bouts is the Skate Station Funworks at 230 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park, Florida. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout begins at 6 p.m. The game dates are June 23, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater Jacksonville USO and For the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the Greater Jacksonville USO. Visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitch en, showers, and quiet reading room. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, recep tions, parties and predeployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead pro jector are available. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOFriday, June 14 Motown is coming to town! The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is hosting a Motown concert in the Gardens from 7-9 p.m. Local band KTG will have you swaying to all your favorites, including the Temptations and Marvin Gaye. TreeCup Caf will have plenty of treats, beer and wine available for purchase, but you are welcome to pack a pic nic. After claiming your spot in the Gardens, ven ture inside the Museum and view the classic cars on display as part of the current exhibition, Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile. Members $10 per person and Nonmembers $20 per person. Reserved table for the concert $400, includes seating for 10 and a picnic meal. For more informa tion or to register, please call (904) 899-6038 or visit http://www.cummer.org/ concerts-cummer. The Ladies Auxillary Unit #290 will hold a pot roast dinner at the branch home, 390 Mayport Rd. A donation of $8 is request ed. The event is open to the public. Take out orders are welcome. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, June 15 As part of Great Outdoors Month, join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural com munities of the undevel oped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. June 17-21 Isle of Faith UMC will hold a free Vacation Bible School, SonWest Roundup, A Rip Roarin Good Time With Jesus! from 6-8:30 p.m. The VBS Celebration will be June 22 from noon-2 p.m. with lunch, Space Walk bounce houses and water slides. To register go to www. iofumc.org/vbs. The VBS Mission Project will be a Stop Hunger Now meal packaging event on June 22 from 10 a.m.-noon. For more information email Jennifer@iofumc. org. Wednesday, June 19 and Thursday, June 20 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., continues its Talks and Tea series by highlighting, Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile at 1:30 p.m. Talks and Tea lecture series invites visi tors to sit comfortably in the Galleries and Gardens of The Cummer while art historians, artists, and other experts facilitate informational and educa tional discussions on various topics related to the Museums permanent collection, as well as special exhibitions. At the conclusion of each talk, tea and light refreshments will be served. Members and Non-members $6 per person, includes lecture, tea, refreshments and admis sion to the Museum and Gardens. Pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, please call (904) 899-6038. Saturday, June 22 What better way to celebrate Great Outdoors Month than by joining a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, July 6 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Sunday, July 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Fees include the $6.00 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR -Photo submittedPictured, Race participants take off during the inaugural JAXEX Runway 5K. The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) hosted its Inaugural JAXEX RUNWAY 5K at Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport (JAXEX) for a day of community, exercise and supporting local military families. The event, benefiting The Greater Jacksonville Area USO featured a 5K run and a one-mile fun run. A portion of both race courses included the airport runway at JAXEX, which was closed to air traffic during the event. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO provides support and services to local military members and their families. Proceeds from the event will be presented to the USO in July during the dedication of the James E. Craig Memorial Pavilion at JAXEX. Craig, the namesake of the airport, was a Jacksonville native killed during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.Runners Take-Off At Inaugural JAXEX RUNWAY 5K

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