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Mirror (Mayport, FL) ( March 11, 2013 )


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Celebrate DiversityFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will hold an Asian American and Pacific Island Heritage Month cel ebration today (May 30) at 1 p.m. at the Base Chapel. The program topic will be Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion.In Case Of EmergencyThe Mirror editorNew blue Emergency poles have been installed along the coastline at four different boardwalks on Naval Station Mayport. Bought with MWR end-of-the-year funds, the four poles have been positioned at Boardwalk 1, 2,5 and 6, according to NS Mayport Aquatics Coordinator Richard Joe, Sr.. The poles will help help compliment lifeguard ser vices since they will be available even when the lifeguards are not manning the chairs. Right now, lifeguards are out on NS Mayport beaches Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fridays will be added to the schedule starting June 7. Its a huge asset to the beaches area, especially during those times when its not being guarded, said NS Mayport MWR Director Lonnie Kenney. Especially since many people dont like taking phones to the beach, Joe added. The new poles will directly connect to the Regional Dispatch Center, which can send out an Emergency Response team from Mayport. Kenney said that par ents should also be reminded that it is not a button for their children to play with and should only be pressed in case of emergency.-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Aquatics Coordinator Richard Joe, Sr, demonstrates the new Emergency poles installed at Boardwalk #5 to MWR Director Lonnie Kenney. The new poles, funded through MWR, are directly linked to the Regional Dispatch Center to send police and Emergency Services to the area in case of an emergency.Help Protect Sea Turtles, Turn Off LightsFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport beaches are a great place to live and visit for both people and endangered species of sea turtles. It is just a little tough er to find a good place to nest if you are an endangered sea turtle. Turtle nesting takes place May 31 through Oct. 31. However, their safety depends on you. Hatchlings find their way to the sea by light clues, such as brightness. They instinctively crawl towards the brightest light and become disoriented if artificial lights are shining from behind. Artificial light from beachfront homes, street lights or even flashlights can attract the hatchlings away from the safety of the water and lead them to their deaths. Lights and people dis orientate female turtles coming ashore to nest. If one is sighted coming ashore, contact the base Environmental Office and remain clear, stay quiet, do not use a light source and dont allow anyone near her to disturb her nesting. How can you help? By simply keeping our beaches as dark and quiet as possible through out the nesting period. Consider the following suggestions: sary lights and do not use flashlights without a red lenses. of any light fixture so it is not visible from the beach. on outside lights for secu rity purposes. so they are off by 10 p.m. BOQ and house curtains at sunset that face the beach. And Remember tions conducted on Naval Station Mayport beach areas during nest ing season must be cleared through the base Environmental Office first. holes and rutting on the beach area. must be on a leash at all times. ing female or emerging hatchlings. These actions are a violation of federal and state laws. Only per mit holders are allowed to touch or move a sea turtle. Never try to push a live sea turtle back into the water. If the turtle is out of the water and on the beach, keep the shell wet with a damp towel or sprinkle water over it. Environmental Office, Mayport Beach Patrol, Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol or the Florida Marine Patrol if you find a live or dead sea turtle unless the turtle has a red X on its shell indicating it has already been checked by the appropriate authority and is waiting for burial by beach sanitation units. The turtles have been here for more than 150 million years and are on the endangered species list. Lets all do our part to help protect them and ensure that they remain part of life in Florida. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatchling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS Mayport Beach Patrol immedi ately at 270-5101 for the base beach and Hanna Park. Call the Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol at 613-6081 for all Jacksonville area beaches or the Florida Marine Patrol at 270-2500.Getting HealthyFrom StaffHealth Promotion by the Ocean, 2050 Marshall Couch Dr., will host the quarter ly Command Fitness Leader meeting on June 11 from 1-2 p.m. There will also be a quarterly Base Health Promotion meeting from 1-2 p.m. on June 13. Remembering Those Who Died For Freedom-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang stands with other guests and salutes during the singing of the National Anthem at the annual Memorial Day service sponsored by the Beaches area veterans groups. The event featured Parade of the Colors with Beaches Honor Guard; the Sons of the American Revolution (in colonial uniforms); Military Order of the Stars & Bars; and the High School Color Guards; as well as high school drill team exhibitions by Terry Parker NJROTC and Nathan B. Forest AFJROTC.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror If you hang around this boating club we call the enough, there can be a very natural tendency to take some remarkable things for granted. The capability and durability of these remarkable ves sels we go underway on, for example. Many of us have been on Frigates, LPDs, Cruisers, and the mam moth carriers. Many of us know how rough those trans-Atlantic voy ages are and have seen first-hand our ship being pummeled by the heavi est of seas. The explosion of water crashing across the bow can in the midst of mighty noreaster is something one is likely never to forget. And yet our Navy ships plod on through deep troughs and frothy caps methodically. We take our ships north where ice encases our railings and decks and yet our ships endure. We take our vessels through The Ditch into the blazing, relentless heat of the GOO (Gulf of Oman) and Persian Gulf. We have felt the burning metal under our hands as we bake in a sun that seems far too close, and yet our ships endure. It seems like whatever Mother Nature can dish endure. Yet as mighty as our ships are, they are also intrinsically depen dant upon a device we see everywhere in our profession...the anchor. We have anchors on our Navy documents, on the Navy Flag, perhaps most famously on our Navy Chief Petty Officers. It would be reasonable to argue that the anchor may be the single greatest invention in the world of nautical professions from the days of ships of cloth and wood through the era of behemoths made of steel. Where would a 100,000-ton Nimitz Class Aircraft Carrier be with out a couple of 30-ton anchors? Ship captains everywhere shudder at the thought. And there are many kind of anchors as well. We have the Fluke anchor, the NorthHill anchor, the Claw anchor, and many more. Yes, the States Navy can endure the worst of Mother Nature, but at the end of the day; the voyage; the deployment, they will drop anchor somewhere so that they may not drift aimlessly without direc tion. Recently we have borne witness to the terrible destruction of nature. We have seen the splin ters of wood like match sticks and chaotic rubble of former homes, neighborhoods, and schools in Moore, OK. We see pictures on T.V. and can scarcely believe that days ago these structures were intact. And while we wit ness the physical destruc tion, our minds struggle to comprehend the depth of human agony, anguish, despair, and pain that is the real story lying in the television pictures we see. We cant imagine what it must be like to be a parent searching for your child. We dont want to imagine. Moore, Oklahoma has not been the first tragedy we have seen. Its been a rough year. Some are natural disasters and oth ers are man-made, but we are reminded daily of the struggles and pains of this life. As we analyze our own existence, we can rea sonably expect that the odds are significantly long enough that we will never have to worry about a tornado turning our life upside down or not? If its not a tornado, we certainly know that life will inevitably throw something at us that will threaten to overwhelm us be it financial burdens, marital struggles, emo tional depressions, deep uncertainties, on and on. is made up remarkable men and women, but we are not invincible. In my profession, I deal con stantly and chronically with the human being who has come to the end of their own wisdom and strength, and many times they have no anchor. Its not a Fluke anchor or a Claw, but our faith is the single greatest anchor of our life. Often we dont reach for it until those most desperate moments of life that are full of uncertainty and finality. Dont waitcultivate your life anchors now. The Mariners cross is symbol constructed by mariners for mariners. It is simply a cross that morphs into an anchor at its base. In nautical communities it carries the unspoken message of new beginnings and hope. It is a message we echo in spirit for the people of Moore and this is the message we seek for ourselves. Chap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain CHAPLAINSAnchors Hold Us Steady In Rough SeasWith school over for the 2011-2012 school year in less than a week, it is important for high school students to be aware of some important tasks they must complete over the summer months. Even graduating seniors have several tasks they most complete before starting college in the fall. Check out these impor tant reminders! Graduating Seniors: completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application and received a response from colleges. Bright Futures funds will not be released in the fall without this. This is a new BF eligibility rule. Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov to apply. Futures application at www.floridastudentfinan cialaid.org to indicate the college you actually plan to attend. sports in college, make sure your high school sends to the NCAA Clearinghouse this sum mer your final transcript, which confirms your high school graduation. Rising 9-12th Graders: the summer. Who offers a degree program you are interested in? What are the application deadlines? What does the colleges Freshman Profile look like (GPA, test scores)? At www.ACT.org check out their college planning checklist for Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years. Other great college planning resourc es include www.flvc.org, www.campustours.com, and www.collegeboard. com. or SAT scores for college admissions, graduation, post secondary readiness or Bright Futures? Try these free websites for test prep www.majortests. com www.SoarAtHome. org www.March2Success. com Futures eligibility require ments at http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid. org/ssfad/bf/ nity service work. Bright Futures now requires community service for all three levels of their scholarships. Students promoted to ninth grade can start earning community service hours. Check out the district guide lines online at http:// www.duvalschools.org/ static/aboutdcps/depart ments/acadprog/guid ance_services/down loads/Community%20 Service%2012-11.pdf. The verification form for completed hours is available at http://www. duvalschools.org/static/ aboutdcps/departments/ acadprog/guidance_ser vices/downloads/service verif.pdf munity service? Try HandsOn Jacksonville at www.handsonjackson ville.org all the different activities you have participated in, including clubs, sports, community service, and work activities. Also include schools attend ed, courses taken, grades received. While a first step for deciding what to do after high school is talking to your school counselor, these summer tasks will certainly put students on the right road to graduat ing from high school and selecting a college. If your student is still not sure about a career or even his strengths, weaknesses, and interests to discover a potential career choice, have him take these free self-assessments at www. federalstudentaid.ed.gov/ preparing and also at www.flvc.org. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingFast Facts About Summer For High SchoolersWe have lived on base three times in my 20 years as a military spouse, in conditions that might best be described as some what like a chicken coop. Its not the appearance of the base that makes it like a coop. (Truth be told, the fences and ster ile buildings make mili tary bases more reminis cent of asylums.) Nobody throws feed corn at us. No one lays eggs as far as I know. But it is the pecking order that renders base living similar to an enor mous cage full of clucking hens, strutting roosters and peeping chicks run ning wild. Every time we move onto a base, I become cognizant of the unique social order. As a new arrival, I take some time to nest, but after my rooster flies the coop for work and the chicks go off to school, boredom and loneliness always set in. I wander the range in search of a flock to hud dle with, but none can be found. Sure, there are hens everywhere and a few stay-at-home roost ers, I wouldnt want to be sexist. But I soon realize that I am at the bottom of the pecking order and have to scratch and claw my way to roost with the others. Careful not to count my chickens before theyre hatched, I lay the foundation for my social accep tance into the flock. By the end of my first year, I become familiar with the gaggle, clucking away as we walk the chicks to Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesThe Lame Duck In The Chicken Coopschool together, hatch plans for shopping trips, complain about our wat tles and chicken fat, and cackle on our patios. Im securely perched at a comfortable elevation in the social pecking order, and life is good. As new chickens enter the coop, we chuckle from our high roost, fully aware of the work that they must do to find their places in our flock. Frankly, we get downright cocky. Toward the end of every tour, my family learns that it must fly the coop and find a new flock. Thoughts of moving leave me a little wistful and reflective. I find myself pondering weighty ideas such as, Why did the chicken cross the road? and Who came first, the chicken or the egg? This melancholy state brings about a need for the comfort and compan ionship of the other hens in my coop, but alas! I discover that, as an out bound hen, Ive been pushed back to the bot tom of the pecking order! I have to scratch for social scraps! How did this hap pen? Did I do something fowl? My pea-sized brain realizes that Ive become a lame duck in the chick en coop. Im no longer a contender in the social order because Im about to leave. The other hens wont invest valuable time in further incubating our friendship. Its not personal, theres no reason to get my feath ers ruffled, the sky isnt falling. Its just the way things work. As I prepare to take wing, I thank my fine friends for their compan ionship, offer each a peck on the cheek, bid them a final cock-a-doodle-doo, and fly, fly away.

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Gettysburg Returns From Group Sail USS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard guid Gettysburg (CG 64) returned home this week after spending two weeks underway as part of Harry S. Truman Strike Group pre-deployment workups. 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile (CG 56), guided-missile (DDG 84), guided-mis (DDG 87), Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) 74 Det. 2, and mari time support reconnais sance patrol aircraft from Patrol Squadrons (VP) 8, 16, and 62 for the two week long exercise, cul minating with their par ticipation in Submarine Commanders Course at and Evaluation Center The Submarine Commanders Course (SCC) allows perspective submarine captains to learn the full integration of their systems, capabili ties, and tactics. Surface ships participate and gain the opportunity to train in Anti-Submarine Warfare exercises. Throughout the course, the ships participated in various scenarios, simu lating situations they could face during deploy ment. With aircraft, subma rine, and surface assets all involved in the course, both future submarine captains and current sur face captains were able to walk away with lessons learned and experiences that may help them later on. Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Groups participation in this exercise allowed its sur face combatants to work together for the first Gettysburg and her crew took the opportunity pre sented during this exer cise to refine their tactics, techniques and proce dures. Working with such a variety of experience and leadership within this strike group has truly brought out the best in the Gettysburg crew, says Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Lewis, the ships executive offi cer. The exceptional Sailors aboard have prov en their professionalism and competency during this underway. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Gunners Mate Chief Luigi Baldo and Fire Controlman Chief James McKay take the grill at the steel beach picnic.-Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Quartermaster First Class Peter Hill trains with QM2 Lonnie Williams aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) during the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Group Sail.-Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Capt. Brad Cooper leads his bridge watch team during an Underway Replenishment with the USNS John Lenthall (T-AO 189) off of the coast of Florida during the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Group Sail. Supply Corps Lt. Michael Mueller, Ensign Matthew Clark, L.t.j.g. Jordan Klein support L.t.j.g. Kevin Mullins, USS Gettysburgs Navigator, as he came alongside the oiler. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 -Photos by Paige GnannCOMDESRON 14 CMDCM Dion Beauchamp, Greater Mayport Area CPOA president, along with NS Mayport CMDCM Robert White and MWR Director Lonnie Kenney cut the ribbon to officially reopen the newly renovated CPO Club, Focsle Lounge on May 22. The renovations include an expanded kitchen area, a new waitress station, a custom built 30-foot bar and a service window.New Look For Focsle Lounge From StaffChief Petty Officers, retired and active duty, came out on May 22 to celebrate the grand reopening of the newly renovated CPO Club, Focsle Lounge. Members of the Jacksonville Jaguars also came out to participate in the celebration amd sign autographs. Funded using CNRSE MWR recapitalization money, the project was completed in five months and includes a custombuilt bar and expanded kitchen areas. There are new coolers, storage cabinets and a new draft sys tem. A serivce window was cut out to the deck, allow ing service directly to the patio from the bar. There are new televisions and seating was complete ly rearranged, accord ing to Greater Mayport Area CPOA President and COMDESRON 14 CMDCM Dio Beauchamp. The work was done by members of MWR Facilities and Maintenance team, including Chuck Loveday, Tom Krygowski, Tim Sprink, Allen Jones, Hugh Blair and Jesse Wolfe. During their time at the club, it only closed for two days for demolition. I think its great, Beauchamp said. MWR needed a bigger kitchen and we were given an opportunity update [the club] and make it a place people wanted to come. MWR could have spent that money on a lot of other things. We appreci ate their continued sup port. The CPO Club was constructed in 1946 as a sin gle story building, which housed a lounge and bar on the southside and full service kitchen and din A look back at the Focsle Lounge in 2011. The bar was located on the far west wall and lacked a waitress station.See CPOA, Page 5Chief Boatswains Mate Robert Nelson and his family enjoy food prepared by the SERMC CPO Mess during the grand reopening and Steak Night on the patio at the CPO Club, Focsle Lounge, on May 22.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 5 ing room on the north side, according to MWR. It was originally built as the Officers Club, but was revamped to the CPO Club in 1961. The club had some rough years and was even closed tempo rarily from 1994-98. When it reopened, it had morphed into not just a CPO Club, but also a musuem featuring arti facts from Naval Station Mayport ships, including Stark. The Chiefs Mess has always been an attrac tion because of what is in here, he said. Some of the history thats in here only exists here. In 2010, MWR and the Greater Mayport Area CPOA established a partnership to increase patronage and revenue by offering more program ming and activities to the Chiefs community. A highlight of these activities are monthly steak nights/seafood boils sponsored by local com mand CPO messes. The Greater Mayport Area CPOA has also participat ed in several fundraisiers that directly benefit Naval Station Mayport Sailors and families. Beauchamp said the CPOA was able to step in and host the bases annual Freedom Fest after MWR was set to cancel it due to budget cuts from the sequestration. The CPOA is also establishing a scholarship for CPO families.From Page 4CPOAChief Master-at-Arms Dennis Mattingly prepares a snow cone for children attending the SERMC-sponsored Steak Night at the CPO Club on May 22. A Chief Petty Officer gets an autograph from Cameron Bradfield at the CPO grand reopening. Isaiah Stanback of the Jacksonville Jaguars poses for a photo during an autograph ses sion at the newly renovated CPO Club. CMDCM Jeff Barlow of HSM 72 shakes hands with Will Rackley of the Jacksonville Jaguars during an autograph session at the CPO Club. Members of the Jacksonville Jaguars stand with Chief Petty Officers attending the grand reopening of the CPO Club and a Steak Night sponsored by SERMC CPO Mess. A young girl takes her turn at a Hammer game set up at the Steak Night.

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SPS 13 Mission Concludes At NS Mayport HSV SwiftMilitary Sealift Command-charted vessel HSV Swift (HSV 2) arrived at Mayport, May 23 to officially mark the com pletion of the Southern Partnership Station (SPS) 2013 mission. The 4th Fleet initiative, designed to strengthen civil and maritime servic es capabilities to respond to a variety of maritime missions, included teams of Riverine, Seabees, explosive ordnance dis posal specialists, Marines and Navy Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) physical security specialists who worked closely with partners in Belize, Guatemala and Honduras to share knowl edge and build interoper ability. More importantly, it allowed members of the nations to build friend ships. It goes beyond our training, Belizean coast guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Merlon Alvarez said. When the Americans come, I feel as though we truly become a joint force and a family. The Swift left Mayport, Fla., in mid-February with its first stop in Belize. From there the SPS mission contin ued in Guatemala and Honduras. Seabee detachments remained in Honduras as the Swift success fully tested an Aerostat inflatable aircraft and possibly serve as future platforms to conduct Operation Martillo coun ter drug operations in the Caribbean Sea. The Aerostat and with state-of-the-art radars, cameras and sen sors that could prove to be useful in detecting Transnational Organized Crime (TOC) organiza tions attempting to smug gle drugs and other illicit materials (guns, people, drug money) in the mari time and littoral environ ments. The Aerostat and actual counter drug oper ations. Frankly, these plat forms arent new to any body, but its technology that were putting inside them and the applica tion of these assets to a maritime environment, specifically the efforts of the Joint Interagency Task Force to combat the flow of drugs and other con traband by transnational organized crime, thats new. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, 4th Fleet, said. Mission Commander, Cmdr. Bob Poling dis cussed the conclusion of a successful deployment. Its difficult to quantify how truly successful this SPS was, said Poling. We were able to work closely with three partner nations to improve our abili ties to work together and improve maritime securi ty in the Central American and Caribbean regions. More importantly, the professional and personal service members and our partner-nation hosts added a level of under standing that cannot be cultivated any other way than to get dirty while working and playing together. Poling went on to say, I think weve certainly made great strides in ensuring future opera tions between our nations happen smoothly. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonMilitary Sealift Command-chartered high speed vessel Swift (HSC 2) returns to Naval Station Mayport on May 23, 2013 after conducting Southern Partnership Station 2013 (SPS-13) in U.S. Navy 4th Fleet Area of Operation. The SPS is a U.S. 4th Fleet initiative designed to strengthen civil and maritime capabilities with regional partner nations in the Caribbean and Central and South America. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Samuel B. Roberts Recharges In Souda Bay USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) Public AffairsThe guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) made a scheduled port visit to Souda Bay, Greece, May 10-13. The port visit served to give the crew some rest and relaxation as the ship prepares for a multimonth deployment in support of maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. While in Souda Bay, the crew was able to enjoy the local cuisine and visit area attractions. Many Sailors visited the nearby town of Chania, a popu lar tourist spot filled with many restaurants and shops. Another popular venue for Roberts crew members was the Morale Recreation and Welfare Center located on the pier. Samuel B. Roberts departed Mayport in April after several months of training. The crew has worked hard to prepare them selves during a challeng ing training cycle and is ready to support maritime objectives in this area of responsibility, said Cmdr. Robert R. Williams, commanding officer of Samuel B. Roberts. We expect to maintain our high state of readiness throughout our deploy ment and look forward to building relationships with our partners in 6th Fleet. Prior to Souda Bay, Samuel B. Roberts spent three days in port Naples, Italy, May 6-9. While in Naples, the ship host ed Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet, Vice Admiral Frank Pandolfe and Commander, Task Force 65, Capt. John Esposito. Pandolfe addressed the crew during his time aboard and emphasized to Roberts Sailors impor tance of readiness and how vital their mission is to maintain security and stability in the region. Esposito shared similar sentiments with the crew. The crew of Roberts also enjoyed liberty in Naples, visiting the many attractions the city had to offer. Samuel B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Fla. is currently on a scheduled deployment in support of maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. -Photos courtesy of USS Samuel B. RobertsVice Adm. Frank Pandolfe, Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet, comes aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts during the ships port visit to Naples, Italy. The ship spent three days in port before heading to Souda Bay, Greece for a sched uled port visit. Pandolfe addresses the crew about the importance of readiness and maintaining security and stability in the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility. From left, Navy Counselor 1st Class Troy Stocking, Operations Specialist Seaman Apprentice William Lybrook, Executive Officer, Cmdr. Erica Hoffmann, and Operations Specialist 3rd Class Dillian Cannady participate in a burial at sea.-Photos courtesy of Surface Force Ministry CenterUSS Samuel B. Roberts participates in a burial at sea ceremony held on the fantail of the ship while on deployment to the U.S. Sixth Fleet area of operation.Fair Winds and Following Seas THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 7

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Maintaining Appearances On USS Hu City -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeInterior Communications Electrician 1st Class Brian Hasaan and Electronics Technician 2nd Class Lydia Rodriguez communicate with the pilot house during a replenishment-at-sea aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosHull Maintenance Technician 1st Class Justin Duff grinds a bulkhead prior to welding on the fantail of USS Hu City. -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeCulinary Specialist 3rd Class Kiley Sosbe and Ships Serviceman Seaman Corey Gabbard treat Gunners Mate 2nd Class Corey Blakely during a medical training team drill on the fantail of USS Hu City. -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Lorenzo Coleman tightens the bolts of a main seawater strainer to prevent leakage aboard USS Hu City. -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosFire Controlman 2nd Class Alejandro Zuniga wipes down an ammo box during a fresh water wash down aboard USS Hu City. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Navy Names Next Two DestroyersFrom Department of DefenseSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today the next Arleigh Burke-class destroyers Daniel Inouye. As secretary of the Navy it is my privilege to name these ships to honor a respected naval leader and a true American hero. Mabus said. For decades to Inouye will represent the the building of partner ships and projection of power around the world. Ignatius (DDG 117) hon ors Paul Ignatius who served as secretary of the Navy 1967-1969 and as assistant secretary of defense under President Lyndon Johnson. Inouye (DDG 118) is named to honor for mer Sen. Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii. Inouye was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in Tuscany, Italy, during World War II and later be the first naval ships to bear these names. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers conduct a variety of operations from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projec tion. They are capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simul taneously and contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support mari time warfare. DDG 117 and DDG 118 are part of the DDG 51 multiyear procurement with the contract award to the building yard pend ing. The ships will be 509 feet long, have a beam length of 59 feet and be capable of operating at speeds in excess of 30 knots.Special Programs: Think Equal Opportunity AdvisorNavy Personnel Command Public Affairs OfficeSailors looking to enhance their career by working outside their rate should consider becoming an Equal Opportunity Advisor (EOA), Navy lead ers said May 22. Equal opportunity advisors play a vital role in the Navys ability to maintain operational readiness and accomplish its mission, said Senior Chief Sonar Technician (Surface) Mark Vandervort, EOA detailer, Navy Personnel Command (NPC). According to MILPERSMAN 1306-917, EOAs can stimulate a free-flow of com munication at all levels within a chain of command, making them an invaluable asset to the Navy. Vandervort says EOAs are command climate experts who strengthen a chain of command by keeping leadership aware of any equal opportunity related issues as well as procedures and practic es that may affect the mission, readiness, welfare and morale of Sailors. Those commands that can capitalize on their Sailors skill sets are those that perform the best, said Vandervort. As the command climate expert, it is the EOAs responsibility to assess the com mand climate and determine not only what is working right within a command, but also identify potential barriers that may prohibit Sailors from achieving their full potential. Sailors in pay grades E-6 to E-9 may be eligible to apply for EOA duty after being interviewed by an EOA. To become an EOA, Sailors must earn the 9515 Equal Opportunity Advisor Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) by attending the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The EOA course is intense but rewarding, said Vandervort. The train ing not only provides students with the tools required to be an EOA, but also provides them with a variety of tools that will allow them to grow as leaders. The 12-week EOA course provides training in gender communications and cultural awareness, socialization, con flict management, complaints process ing, interpersonal communications, and many other topics. EOAs ensure Sailors are being treated fairly and with the dignity and respect with which all Sailors should expect to be treated. When utilized correctly, the EOA can be an integral member of the commands leadership team, said Vandervort. EOAs are assigned to major shore commands, nuclear aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships and training commands. A complete listing of eligibil ity requirements can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-917. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for EOA duty should request release to Special Programs by submit ting a completed NAVPERS 1306/7 to their rating detailer prior to entering their normal detailing window. The required obligated service for an EOA tour is 36 months, and members selected are required to complete two full consecutive EOA tours, one sea and one shore. Special Program detailers assign Sailors to more than 20 special programs Navy-wide, including Recruit Division Commander duty and recruiting duty, ment to the Blue Angels or the Navy Ceremonial Guard. MILPERSMAN 1306900 contains a complete list of special programs available. For more information, visit the EOA Web Page on the NPC website at www. npc.navy.mil/ENLISTED/DETAILING/ SHORESPECIALPROGRAMS/Pages/ EOASARPNAVLEAD.aspx Hagel Directs DoD To Implement GuidanceFrom American Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel has directed the Defense Department to implement the guidance President Barack Obama outlined in his national security speech delivered at the here today, including efforts to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In a statement issued imme diately after the speech, Hagel said the president presented a comprehensive vision for con tinuing to protect the nation from terrorism, especially from al-Qaida and its affiliates, while remaining true to the nations values and laws. I have directed the Department of Defense to work closely with our interagency partners and allies to imple ment the presidents guid ance, including the efforts to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Hagel said. The secretary noted he has been closely involved in these chairman of the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board and now as defense secretary. I applaud President Obamas strong leadership in defending and advancing our interests around the world, he added. What Lurks Under The Water-Photo by MC1 Gary KeenAerographers mates assigned to the Naval Oceanography Mine Warfare Center at Stennis Space Center, Miss., stand by as an unmanned underwater vehicle leaves the surface to search for mines as part of a training exercise during the International Mine Countermeasures Exercise (IMCMEX) 2013. IMCMEX 13 includes navies from more than 40 countries whose focus is to promote regional security through mine countermeasures operations in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 9

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Auto Skills Center May Special: Transmission flush, cool ant flush and fuel injec tion cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and com puters are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 5: Poker Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 June 7: Live Music by Sha Davis. 8 p.m. at Castaways. Celebrate summer with a free live concert, giveaways and lots of summer fun. 2707205 June 15: UFC 161-Bararo vs Wineland. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Community Events June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflata bles and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 June 16: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Fathers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 12 pm at Focsle; Reservations required Celebrate Dad with an all you can eat brunch fea turing omelet bar, cham pagne fountain, carv ing station and more. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while sup plies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID. The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 31: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 2: Horror Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 7: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 8: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 9: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 10: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! June 12: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line June 10. June 14: Movie Trip: Man of Steel. Van departs 6 p.m. June 15: UFC 161Barao vs. Eddie. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE May 31: Outdoor MoviesWreck It Ralph (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 7: Outdoor MoviesTwilight Saga: Breaking Dawn pt 2 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 14: Outdoor MoviesParental Guidance (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The MessdeckMayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with fries and soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Smashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet With Ice Tea or Water, $8 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Intramural Sports June 6: Mini Biathalon (Swim & Run). 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. 270-5451. June 11: Summer Beach 5K Run / 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. June 11: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins June. 24; season ends Aug. 22. 270-5451. Aquatics June 7: Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 June 10-13: American Red Cross Certified WSI Certification Course Participants must attend all 30 hours of training to be certified. Cost is $200 for Military/Dependents/ DOD and $250 for Civilians. Sign up at the Base Gym or the Pool. For more information, please call (904) 270-5452 or (904) 270-5101 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retir ees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25; includes banquet and awards ceremony. Sign up deadline is June 3 at the Pro-Shop. 270-5380 Surfside Fitness: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR Sports/Fitness Base Bowling Challenge-Photo courtesy of MWRBase Bowl Challenge Returns: Join us for the 2nd Base Bowl Challenge on Wednesday, June 5 at Mayport Bowling Center. This is your second chance to earn the title of Base Bowling Champions! Recruit your friends and family, anyone can play. Grand prize is a free bowling party for up to 120 people and much more. Entry is $15 per person. For more information, please call (904) 270-5377. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 11

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FFSC Workshop, Class Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 30, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup June 1, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individ ual resumes. A complet ed rough resume will be required. June 3, 1-3 p.m., New Dads Class This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and toddlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowledge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. June 3, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 3-7, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 4, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids? FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an addi tional motivator for end ing the violence and seek ing intervention. June 5, 11 a.m.-noon, Military Pay Issues FFSC Building 1, Room 719 June 5, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center June 8, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 Adventure Landing Night at Adventure Landing (Jacksonville Beach) will be held on Wednesday, June 12 from 6-11 p.m. Wristbands for our annual fun evening at Adventure Landing will go on sale Today beginning at NOON. Wristbands will be on sale for $2 each and will be available for pur and families only (Guard and Reserves on active orders eligible). They will be on sale at your ber at Kings Bay ITT. Save the date for this annual sold out event! USO Military Appreciation Night At The Jax Zoo Rescheduled Due to inclement weather Friday, May 3rd, Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo has been rescheduled to July 26 from 6-9 p.m. Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League The Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League invites activeduty Military personnel, and their dependents, to attend their roller derby games in Orange Park, Florida. The Tri-County Rolling Militias adult roller derby team, the Jade Grenades, is an allfemale, full contact recre ational and competitive roller derby team based in Orange Park. Come out and experience the hardhitting action of womens flat-track roller derby the same roller derby that is currently under con sideration for the 2020 Olympics! The Tri-County Rolling Militia (TCRM) has six remaining home games (or bouts as they are called in roller derby) for the 2013 sea son. The venue for these bouts is the Skate Station Funworks at 230 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park, Florida. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout begins at 6 p.m. The game dates are June 23, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17. Free Cat Spay/Neuter Program Duval County Residents First Coast No More Homeless Pets is offer ing free cat spay/neuter services for Duval County residents for a limited time. The program is free for pet and stray cats. For more information, call (904) 425-0005 and visit www.fcnmhp.org. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the See attached flyer and visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. JAXEX RUNWAY 5K The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) will host its Inaugural Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport (JAXEX) on Saturday, June 8. Net proceeds will benefit The Greater Jacksonville Area ture a 5K run beginning at 7:30 a.m. and a onemile Fun Run at 8:30 a.m. A portion of both race courses will include the airport runway at JAXEX (which will be closed to air traffic dur ing the event). To register, visit www.jaxexrunway5k. com. Register before June 1 for the early bird entry fee of $20 for the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run. The 5K registration fee will increase to $30 the day of the race. Space is limited. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX a great fundraiser for the the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 13 Saturday, June 1 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Governor Rick Scott has proclaimed June as Great Outdoors Month along with many other states. This creates an opportu nity for quality activities for the whole family. Celebrate National Trails Day and Great Outdoors Month with an afternoon of hiking and trail trimming. Join park rangers at 2 p.m.to learn and practice trail mainte nance techniques while enjoying a walk through the maritime forest. Please bring water, sun screen, bug spray and gloves. Tools will be pro vided. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. http://www. funoutdoors.com/ files/Florida%20 Proclamation%202013.pdf Sunday, June 2 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Tuesday, June 4 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. Jeff Girard will cover the basics, limitations and demonstrations of flash in the On Camera Flash presentation. This is a Free event with people of all ability levels and cam era types welcomed and encouraged to come and learn more about photog raphy. For more informa tion www.beachespho tographyclub.org Saturday, June 8 Rethreaded, a nonprofit that provides job train ing and employment for women emerging from lives of addiction, vio lence, human trafficking and prostitution, won the top crowd fund vote at One Spark Festival, the five-day festival for creators and innovators. To celebrate, the organi zation is hosting a Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration from 2 p.m.9 p.m. at the Rethreaded warehouse located at 820 Barnett Street Jacksonville, FL 32209. To learn more about Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration or to get involved with Rethreaded, please visit, http://www.rethreaded. com/. Enjoy Great Outdoors Month and learn from a park ranger what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so impor tant. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, June 15 As part of Great Outdoors Month, join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural com munities of the undevel oped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. June 17-21 hold a free Vacation Bible School, SonWest Roundup, A Rip Roarin Good Time With Jesus! from 6-8:30 p.m. The VBS Celebration will be June 22 from noon-2 p.m. with lunch, Space Walk bounce houses and water slides. To register go to www. iofumc.org/vbs. The VBS Mission Project will be a Stop Hunger Now meal packaging event on June 22 from 10 a.m.-noon. For more information email Jennifer@iofumc. org. Saturday, June 22 What better way to cel ebrate Great Outdoors Month than by joining a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these crea tures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARTroops, Families Can Visit Museums FreeAmerican Forces Press ServiceDuring the busy sea son of military transfers, adjusting to new com munities and register ing children for school, more than 2,000 muse ums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service mem bers and their families as a break from the sum mer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their fami lies can take advantage of this cultural and educa tional opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspir ing, educational and economical activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deploy ments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very limited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This program is an investment in our families. Arecord number of museums are participat ing this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. This program is help ing us make memories -memories for our families, Hull-Ryde said. But its more than that. It is making a difference not only in the force of today, but in the force of the future. NavyNEWS A New Perspective-Photo by MC3 Billy HoAviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jeremy Shultz, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, performs maintenance on an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter in the hangar bay aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61). Monterey is deployed supporting maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Command Motorcycle Mentor RequiredNaval Safety Center Public AffairsThe most recent change to the Navys Traffic Safety Instruction, OPNAVINST 5100.12J, requires com mands to set up mentorship programs for motorcycle riders. These programs are designed to give experienced riders the opportunity to teach new riders how to be suc cessful on their bikes. Mentors are those who have been through it, said Stan Jones, the Naval Safety Centers Motorcycle Safety Representative and an advisor to mentor ship programs across the fleet. Its a mindset. Experienced riders have the moral authority to provide tips on riding that the training courses dont have the time to go into. Required training courses, such as the Basic Rider Course and Military Sportbike Rider Course, are designed to teach the basics of bike handling and risk management. Training provides the basic skills in a controlled environment, but men torships are about getting out on the open road, in traffic, riding outside of the square box of a train ing course, Jones said. He suggested that Sailors look for mentors who ride the same type motorcycle. Sportbike riders should pair with other sportbike riders and cruiser riders should seek mentors who have experi ence on cruisers because the nuances of the bikes are different. He also suggested that the traditional rank struc ture of the Navy may be relaxed during mentor ship discussions and rides. There will always be that respect for rank, but its important to move from that mentality to a rider role. You dont want new riders to feel pres sured. They should want to be there, Jones said. He also pointed out that when it comes to motor cycles, inexperienced rid ers come in all ages and ranks. A Second Class Petty Officer who grew up on sportbikes may be a men tor to a Chief who is just transitioning from a cruis er to a sportbike, he said. The requirements for mentorship in the instruc tion leave a lot of latitude for commands to design their own programs. The instruction states, Commands should tailor the motorcycle mentor ship program to address the individual commands training requirements, ridership, local area and resources available. To that end, small com mands with few riders are permitted to team up with other commands to maximize the mentorship opportunities. General guidance, pre-ride inspections, and other topics and information for men torship programs can be found at the Naval Safety Centers website at http://www.public.navy. mil/navsafecen/Pages/ ashore/motor_vehicle/ Motorcycle In fiscal year (FY) 2012, 20 Sailors and Marines lost their lives in motor cycle accidents. As of May 9, 2013, as the spring and summer motorcycle rid ing season was beginning, that number for FY 2013 stood at 18. Department of the Navy leadership believes preventable deaths like these are sim ply unacceptable. Spring Cleaning Your Home For Fire SafetyFrom Mayport Fire & Emergency ServicesA thorough cleaning of your home can do more than simply give the good feeling of having a clean house. If done properly, cleaning can also improve the safety of your home and family in the event of a fire. Reducing the clutter inside your home and garage is one of the most important ways to improve fire safety. While clut ter does not start fires, it can become the fuel for a fire. The more fuel a fire has the more difficult it is for the fire department to extinguish. It can also make it difficult to escape when a fire breaks out. Take a few minutes to plan your fire safety clean up day. Check each room in your house, including the attic and base ment. Dont forget the garage, yard and storage shed! Another important step in the clean ing process is to reduce or eliminate hazardous chemicals in your home. Cleaners, paint and other common household chemicals can fuel a fire and are often hazardous to your health. Maintain only the amounts you need and be sure to use, store and dispose of household hazardous materials in a safe manner as outlined on the product. Never mix chemicals, even when dispos ing of them Pay attention to lint build-up in clothes dryer vents and in the exhaust ducts. Lint build-up blocks the flow of air, causing excessive heat which can result in fires. Have your air conditioner and heat ing unit, inspected and cleaned on an annual basis. Buildups there can cause overheating of the unit, leading to fire. Make sure your smoke alarms are in working order and review your home escape plan so that if in the event of a fire, everyone in your household knows how to get out quickly and safely. If you do not have an escape plan, make one. Get the family involved. For additional information on Fire Safety contact the Fire Prevention Office at 270-5647 ext. 1421 or ext. 1404.

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Celebrate DiversityFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will hold an Asian American and Pacific Island Heritage Month cel ebration today (May 30) at 1 p.m. at the Base Chapel. The program topic will be Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion.In Case Of EmergencyThe Mirror editorNew blue Emergency poles have been installed along the coastline at four different boardwalks on Naval Station Mayport. Bought with MWR end-of-the-year funds, the four poles have been positioned at Boardwalk 1, 2,5 and 6, according to NS Mayport Aquatics Coordinator Richard Joe, Sr.. The poles will help help compliment lifeguard services since they will be available even when the lifeguards are not manning the chairs. Right now, lifeguards are out on NS Mayport beaches Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fridays will be added to the schedule starting June 7. Its a huge asset to the beaches area, especially during those times when its not being guarded, said NS Mayport MWR Director Lonnie Kenney. Especially since many people dont like taking phones to the beach, Joe added. The new poles will directly connect to the Regional Dispatch Center, which can send out an Emergency Response team from Mayport. Kenney said that par ents should also be reminded that it is not a button for their children to play with and should only be pressed in case of emergency.-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Aquatics Coordinator Richard Joe, Sr, demonstrates the new Emergency poles installed at Boardwalk #5 to MWR Director Lonnie Kenney. The new poles, funded through MWR, are directly linked to the Regional Dispatch Center to send police and Emergency Services to the area in case of an emergency.Help Protect Sea Turtles, Turn Off LightsFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport beaches are a great place to live and visit for both people and endangered species of sea turtles. It is just a little tough er to find a good place to nest if you are an endangered sea turtle. Turtle nesting takes place May 31 through Oct. 31. However, their safety depends on you. Hatchlings find their way to the sea by light clues, such as brightness. They instinctively crawl towards the brightest light and become disoriented if artificial lights are shining from behind. Artificial light from beachfront homes, street lights or even flashlights can attract the hatchlings away from the safety of the water and lead them to their deaths. Lights and people dis orientate female turtles coming ashore to nest. If one is sighted coming ashore, contact the base Environmental Office and remain clear, stay quiet, do not use a light source and dont allow anyone near her to disturb her nesting. How can you help? By simply keeping our beaches as dark and quiet as possible throughout the nesting period. Consider the following suggestions: sary lights and do not use flashlights without a red lenses. of any light fixture so it is not visible from the beach. on outside lights for security purposes. so they are off by 10 p.m. BOQ and house curtains at sunset that face the beach. And Remember tions conducted on Naval Station Mayport beach areas during nest ing season must be cleared through the base Environmental Office first. holes and rutting on the beach area. must be on a leash at all times. ing female or emerging hatchlings. These actions are a violation of federal and state laws. Only per mit holders are allowed to touch or move a sea turtle. Never try to push a live sea turtle back into the water. If the turtle is out of the water and on the beach, keep the shell wet with a damp towel or sprinkle water over it. Environmental Office, Mayport Beach Patrol, Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol or the Florida Marine Patrol if you find a live or dead sea turtle unless the turtle has a red X on its shell indicating it has already been checked by the appropriate authority and is waiting for burial by beach sanitation units. The turtles have been here for more than 150 million years and are on the endangered species list. Lets all do our part to help protect them and ensure that they remain part of life in Florida. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatchling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS Mayport Beach Patrol immedi ately at 270-5101 for the base beach and Hanna Park. Call the Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol at 613-6081 for all Jacksonville area beaches or the Florida Marine Patrol at 270-2500.Getting HealthyFrom StaffHealth Promotion by the Ocean, 2050 Marshall Couch Dr., will host the quarterly Command Fitness Leader meeting on June 11 from 1-2 p.m. There will also be a quarterly Base Health Promotion meeting from 1-2 p.m. on June 13. Remembering Those Who Died For Freedom-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang stands with other guests and salutes during the singing of the National Anthem at the annual Memorial Day service sponsored by the Beaches area veterans groups. The event featured Parade of the Colors with Beaches Honor Guard; the Sons of the American Revolution (in colonial uniforms); Military Order of the Stars & Bars; and the High School Color Guards; as well as high school drill team exhibitions by Terry Parker NJROTC and Nathan B. Forest AFJROTC.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror If you hang around this boating club we call the enough, there can be a very natural tendency to take some remarkable things for granted. The capability and durability of these remarkable ves sels we go underway on, for example. Many of us have been on Frigates, LPDs, Cruisers, and the mam moth carriers. Many of us know how rough those trans-Atlantic voy ages are and have seen first-hand our ship being pummeled by the heavi est of seas. The explosion of water crashing across the bow can in the midst of mighty noreaster is something one is likely never to forget. And yet our Navy ships plod on through deep troughs and frothy caps methodically. We take our ships north where ice encases our railings and decks and yet our ships endure. We take our vessels through The Ditch into the blazing, relentless heat of the GOO (Gulf of Oman) and Persian Gulf. We have felt the burning metal under our hands as we bake in a sun that seems far too close, and yet our ships endure. It seems like whatever Mother Nature can dish endure. Yet as mighty as our ships are, they are also intrinsically depen dant upon a device we see everywhere in our profession...the anchor. We have anchors on our Navy documents, on the Navy Flag, perhaps most famously on our Navy Chief Petty Officers. It would be reasonable to argue that the anchor may be the single greatest invention in the world of nautical professions from the days of ships of cloth and wood through the era of behemoths made of steel. Where would a 100,000-ton Nimitz Class Aircraft Carrier be with out a couple of 30-ton anchors? Ship captains everywhere shudder at the thought. And there are many kind of anchors as well. We have the Fluke anchor, the NorthHill anchor, the Claw anchor, and many more. Yes, the States Navy can endure the worst of Mother Nature, but at the end of the day; the voyage; the deployment, they will drop anchor somewhere so that they may not drift aimlessly without direc tion. Recently we have borne witness to the terrible destruction of nature. We have seen the splin ters of wood like match sticks and chaotic rubble of former homes, neighborhoods, and schools in Moore, OK. We see pictures on T.V. and can scarcely believe that days ago these structures were intact. And while we witness the physical destruction, our minds struggle to comprehend the depth of human agony, anguish, despair, and pain that is the real story lying in the television pictures we see. We cant imagine what it must be like to be a parent searching for your child. We dont want to imagine. Moore, Oklahoma has not been the first tragedy we have seen. Its been a rough year. Some are natural disasters and others are man-made, but we are reminded daily of the struggles and pains of this life. As we analyze our own existence, we can rea sonably expect that the odds are significantly long enough that we will never have to worry about a tornado turning our life upside down or not? If its not a tornado, we certainly know that life will inevitably throw something at us that will threaten to overwhelm us be it financial burdens, marital struggles, emo tional depressions, deep uncertainties, on and on. is made up remarkable men and women, but we are not invincible. In my profession, I deal con stantly and chronically with the human being who has come to the end of their own wisdom and strength, and many times they have no anchor. Its not a Fluke anchor or a Claw, but our faith is the single greatest anchor of our life. Often we dont reach for it until those most desperate moments of life that are full of uncertainty and finality. Dont waitcultivate your life anchors now. The Mariners cross is symbol constructed by mariners for mariners. It is simply a cross that morphs into an anchor at its base. In nautical communities it carries the unspoken message of new beginnings and hope. It is a message we echo in spirit for the people of Moore and this is the message we seek for ourselves. Chap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain CHAPLAINSAnchors Hold Us Steady In Rough SeasWith school over for the 2011-2012 school year in less than a week, it is important for high school students to be aware of some important tasks they must complete over the summer months. Even graduating seniors have several tasks they most complete before starting college in the fall. Check out these impor tant reminders! Graduating Seniors: completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application and received a response from colleges. Bright Futures funds will not be released in the fall without this. This is a new BF eligibility rule. Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov to apply. Futures application at www.floridastudentfinan cialaid.org to indicate the college you actually plan to attend. sports in college, make sure your high school sends to the NCAA Clearinghouse this sum mer your final transcript, which confirms your high school graduation. Rising 9-12th Graders: the summer. Who offers a degree program you are interested in? What are the application deadlines? What does the colleges Freshman Profile look like (GPA, test scores)? At www.ACT.org check out their college planning checklist for Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years. Other great college planning resourc es include www.flvc.org, www.campustours.com, and www.collegeboard. com. or SAT scores for college admissions, graduation, post secondary readiness or Bright Futures? Try these free websites for test prep www.majortests. com www.SoarAtHome. org www.March2Success. com Futures eligibility requirements at http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid. org/ssfad/bf/ nity service work. Bright Futures now requires community service for all three levels of their scholarships. Students promoted to ninth grade can start earning community service hours. Check out the district guide lines online at http:// www.duvalschools.org/ static/aboutdcps/depart ments/acadprog/guid ance_services/down loads/Community%20 Service%2012-11.pdf. The verification form for completed hours is available at http://www. duvalschools.org/static/ aboutdcps/departments/ acadprog/guidance_ser vices/downloads/serviceverif.pdf munity service? Try HandsOn Jacksonville at www.handsonjackson ville.org all the different activities you have participated in, including clubs, sports, community service, and work activities. Also include schools attend ed, courses taken, grades received. While a first step for deciding what to do after high school is talking to your school counselor, these summer tasks will certainly put students on the right road to graduat ing from high school and selecting a college. If your student is still not sure about a career or even his strengths, weaknesses, and interests to discover a potential career choice, have him take these free self-assessments at www. federalstudentaid.ed.gov/ preparing and also at www.flvc.org. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingFast Facts About Summer For High SchoolersWe have lived on base three times in my 20 years as a military spouse, in conditions that might best be described as some what like a chicken coop. Its not the appearance of the base that makes it like a coop. (Truth be told, the fences and ster ile buildings make mili tary bases more reminis cent of asylums.) Nobody throws feed corn at us. No one lays eggs as far as I know. But it is the pecking order that renders base living similar to an enor mous cage full of clucking hens, strutting roosters and peeping chicks run ning wild. Every time we move onto a base, I become cognizant of the unique social order. As a new arrival, I take some time to nest, but after my rooster flies the coop for work and the chicks go off to school, boredom and loneliness always set in. I wander the range in search of a flock to hud dle with, but none can be found. Sure, there are hens everywhere and a few stay-at-home roost ers, I wouldnt want to be sexist. But I soon realize that I am at the bottom of the pecking order and have to scratch and claw my way to roost with the others. Careful not to count my chickens before theyre hatched, I lay the foundation for my social accep tance into the flock. By the end of my first year, I become familiar with the gaggle, clucking away as we walk the chicks to Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesThe Lame Duck In The Chicken Coopschool together, hatch plans for shopping trips, complain about our wat tles and chicken fat, and cackle on our patios. Im securely perched at a comfortable elevation in the social pecking order, and life is good. As new chickens enter the coop, we chuckle from our high roost, fully aware of the work that they must do to find their places in our flock. Frankly, we get downright cocky. Toward the end of every tour, my family learns that it must fly the coop and find a new flock. Thoughts of moving leave me a little wistful and reflective. I find myself pondering weighty ideas such as, Why did the chicken cross the road? and Who came first, the chicken or the egg? This melancholy state brings about a need for the comfort and companionship of the other hens in my coop, but alas! I discover that, as an out bound hen, Ive been pushed back to the bot tom of the pecking order! I have to scratch for social scraps! How did this hap pen? Did I do something fowl? My pea-sized brain realizes that Ive become a lame duck in the chick en coop. Im no longer a contender in the social order because Im about to leave. The other hens wont invest valuable time in further incubating our friendship. Its not personal, theres no reason to get my feathers ruffled, the sky isnt falling. Its just the way things work. As I prepare to take wing, I thank my fine friends for their compan ionship, offer each a peck on the cheek, bid them a final cock-a-doodle-doo, and fly, fly away.

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Gettysburg Returns From Group Sail USS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard guid Gettysburg (CG 64) returned home this week after spending two weeks underway as part of Harry S. Truman Strike Group pre-deployment workups. 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile (CG 56), guided-missile (DDG 84), guided-mis (DDG 87), Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) 74 Det. 2, and mari time support reconnais sance patrol aircraft from Patrol Squadrons (VP) 8, 16, and 62 for the two week long exercise, cul minating with their par ticipation in Submarine Commanders Course at and Evaluation Center The Submarine Commanders Course (SCC) allows perspective submarine captains to learn the full integration of their systems, capabilities, and tactics. Surface ships participate and gain the opportunity to train in Anti-Submarine Warfare exercises. Throughout the course, the ships participated in various scenarios, simu lating situations they could face during deployment. With aircraft, subma rine, and surface assets all involved in the course, both future submarine captains and current sur face captains were able to walk away with lessons learned and experiences that may help them later on. Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Groups participation in this exercise allowed its sur face combatants to work together for the first Gettysburg and her crew took the opportunity pre sented during this exer cise to refine their tactics, techniques and proce dures. Working with such a variety of experience and leadership within this strike group has truly brought out the best in the Gettysburg crew, says Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Lewis, the ships executive offi cer. The exceptional Sailors aboard have prov en their professionalism and competency during this underway. -Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Gunners Mate Chief Luigi Baldo and Fire Controlman Chief James McKay take the grill at the steel beach picnic.-Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Quartermaster First Class Peter Hill trains with QM2 Lonnie Williams aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) during the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Group Sail.-Photo by Ensign Kiley Provenzano Capt. Brad Cooper leads his bridge watch team during an Underway Replenishment with the USNS John Lenthall (T-AO 189) off of the coast of Florida during the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Group Sail. Supply Corps Lt. Michael Mueller, Ensign Matthew Clark, L.t.j.g. Jordan Klein support L.t.j.g. Kevin Mullins, USS Gettysburgs Navigator, as he came alongside the oiler. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 -Photos by Paige GnannCOMDESRON 14 CMDCM Dion Beauchamp, Greater Mayport Area CPOA president, along with NS Mayport CMDCM Robert White and MWR Director Lonnie Kenney cut the ribbon to officially reopen the newly renovated CPO Club, Focsle Lounge on May 22. The renovations include an expanded kitchen area, a new waitress station, a custom built 30-foot bar and a service window.New Look For Focsle Lounge From StaffChief Petty Officers, retired and active duty, came out on May 22 to celebrate the grand reopening of the newly renovated CPO Club, Focsle Lounge. Members of the Jacksonville Jaguars also came out to participate in the celebration amd sign autographs. Funded using CNRSE MWR recapitalization money, the project was completed in five months and includes a custombuilt bar and expanded kitchen areas. There are new coolers, storage cabinets and a new draft sys tem. A serivce window was cut out to the deck, allowing service directly to the patio from the bar. There are new televisions and seating was complete ly rearranged, accord ing to Greater Mayport Area CPOA President and COMDESRON 14 CMDCM Dio Beauchamp. The work was done by members of MWR Facilities and Maintenance team, including Chuck Loveday, Tom Krygowski, Tim Sprink, Allen Jones, Hugh Blair and Jesse Wolfe. During their time at the club, it only closed for two days for demolition. I think its great, Beauchamp said. MWR needed a bigger kitchen and we were given an opportunity update [the club] and make it a place people wanted to come. MWR could have spent that money on a lot of other things. We appreci ate their continued sup port. The CPO Club was constructed in 1946 as a sin gle story building, which housed a lounge and bar on the southside and full service kitchen and din A look back at the Focsle Lounge in 2011. The bar was located on the far west wall and lacked a waitress station.See CPOA, Page 5Chief Boatswains Mate Robert Nelson and his family enjoy food prepared by the SERMC CPO Mess during the grand reopening and Steak Night on the patio at the CPO Club, Focsle Lounge, on May 22.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 5 ing room on the north side, according to MWR. It was originally built as the Officers Club, but was revamped to the CPO Club in 1961. The club had some rough years and was even closed tempo rarily from 1994-98. When it reopened, it had morphed into not just a CPO Club, but also a musuem featuring arti facts from Naval Station Mayport ships, including Stark. The Chiefs Mess has always been an attrac tion because of what is in here, he said. Some of the history thats in here only exists here. In 2010, MWR and the Greater Mayport Area CPOA established a partnership to increase patronage and revenue by offering more program ming and activities to the Chiefs community. A highlight of these activities are monthly steak nights/seafood boils sponsored by local com mand CPO messes. The Greater Mayport Area CPOA has also participated in several fundraisiers that directly benefit Naval Station Mayport Sailors and families. Beauchamp said the CPOA was able to step in and host the bases annual Freedom Fest after MWR was set to cancel it due to budget cuts from the sequestration. The CPOA is also establishing a scholarship for CPO families.From Page 4CPOAChief Master-at-Arms Dennis Mattingly prepares a snow cone for children attending the SERMC-sponsored Steak Night at the CPO Club on May 22. A Chief Petty Officer gets an autograph from Cameron Bradfield at the CPO grand reopening. Isaiah Stanback of the Jacksonville Jaguars poses for a photo during an autograph session at the newly renovated CPO Club. CMDCM Jeff Barlow of HSM 72 shakes hands with Will Rackley of the Jacksonville Jaguars during an autograph session at the CPO Club. Members of the Jacksonville Jaguars stand with Chief Petty Officers attending the grand reopening of the CPO Club and a Steak Night sponsored by SERMC CPO Mess. A young girl takes her turn at a Hammer game set up at the Steak Night.

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SPS 13 Mission Concludes At NS Mayport HSV SwiftMilitary Sealift Command-charted vessel HSV Swift (HSV 2) arrived at Mayport, May 23 to officially mark the com pletion of the Southern Partnership Station (SPS) 2013 mission. The 4th Fleet initiative, designed to strengthen civil and maritime servic es capabilities to respond to a variety of maritime missions, included teams of Riverine, Seabees, explosive ordnance dis posal specialists, Marines and Navy Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) physical security specialists who worked closely with partners in Belize, Guatemala and Honduras to share knowledge and build interoper ability. More importantly, it allowed members of the nations to build friend ships. It goes beyond our training, Belizean coast guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Merlon Alvarez said. When the Americans come, I feel as though we truly become a joint force and a family. The Swift left Mayport, Fla., in mid-February with its first stop in Belize. From there the SPS mission contin ued in Guatemala and Honduras. Seabee detachments remained in Honduras as the Swift success fully tested an Aerostat inflatable aircraft and possibly serve as future platforms to conduct Operation Martillo coun ter drug operations in the Caribbean Sea. The Aerostat and with state-of-the-art radars, cameras and sen sors that could prove to be useful in detecting Transnational Organized Crime (TOC) organiza tions attempting to smuggle drugs and other illicit materials (guns, people, drug money) in the mari time and littoral environ ments. The Aerostat and actual counter drug operations. Frankly, these plat forms arent new to any body, but its technology that were putting inside them and the applica tion of these assets to a maritime environment, specifically the efforts of the Joint Interagency Task Force to combat the flow of drugs and other con traband by transnational organized crime, thats new. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, 4th Fleet, said. Mission Commander, Cmdr. Bob Poling dis cussed the conclusion of a successful deployment. Its difficult to quantify how truly successful this SPS was, said Poling. We were able to work closely with three partner nations to improve our abili ties to work together and improve maritime securi ty in the Central American and Caribbean regions. More importantly, the professional and personal service members and our partner-nation hosts added a level of under standing that cannot be cultivated any other way than to get dirty while working and playing together. Poling went on to say, I think weve certainly made great strides in ensuring future opera tions between our nations happen smoothly. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonMilitary Sealift Command-chartered high speed vessel Swift (HSC 2) returns to Naval Station Mayport on May 23, 2013 after conducting Southern Partnership Station 2013 (SPS-13) in U.S. Navy 4th Fleet Area of Operation. The SPS is a U.S. 4th Fleet initiative designed to strengthen civil and maritime capabilities with regional partner nations in the Caribbean and Central and South America. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Samuel B. Roberts Recharges In Souda Bay USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) Public AffairsThe guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) made a scheduled port visit to Souda Bay, Greece, May 10-13. The port visit served to give the crew some rest and relaxation as the ship prepares for a multimonth deployment in support of maritime security operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. While in Souda Bay, the crew was able to enjoy the local cuisine and visit area attractions. Many Sailors visited the nearby town of Chania, a popu lar tourist spot filled with many restaurants and shops. Another popular venue for Roberts crew members was the Morale Recreation and Welfare Center located on the pier. Samuel B. Roberts departed Mayport in April after several months of training. The crew has worked hard to prepare them selves during a challeng ing training cycle and is ready to support maritime objectives in this area of responsibility, said Cmdr. Robert R. Williams, commanding officer of Samuel B. Roberts. We expect to maintain our high state of readiness throughout our deploy ment and look forward to building relationships with our partners in 6th Fleet. Prior to Souda Bay, Samuel B. Roberts spent three days in port Naples, Italy, May 6-9. While in Naples, the ship host ed Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet, Vice Admiral Frank Pandolfe and Commander, Task Force 65, Capt. John Esposito. Pandolfe addressed the crew during his time aboard and emphasized to Roberts Sailors impor tance of readiness and how vital their mission is to maintain security and stability in the region. Esposito shared similar sentiments with the crew. The crew of Roberts also enjoyed liberty in Naples, visiting the many attractions the city had to offer. Samuel B. Roberts, homeported in Mayport, Fla. is currently on a scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. -Photos courtesy of USS Samuel B. RobertsVice Adm. Frank Pandolfe, Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet, comes aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts during the ships port visit to Naples, Italy. The ship spent three days in port before heading to Souda Bay, Greece for a scheduled port visit. Pandolfe addresses the crew about the importance of readiness and maintaining security and stability in the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility. From left, Navy Counselor 1st Class Troy Stocking, Operations Specialist Seaman Apprentice William Lybrook, Executive Officer, Cmdr. Erica Hoffmann, and Operations Specialist 3rd Class Dillian Cannady participate in a burial at sea.-Photos courtesy of Surface Force Ministry CenterUSS Samuel B. Roberts participates in a burial at sea ceremony held on the fantail of the ship while on deployment to the U.S. Sixth Fleet area of operation.Fair Winds and Following Seas THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 7

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Maintaining Appearances On USS Hu City -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeInterior Communications Electrician 1st Class Brian Hasaan and Electronics Technician 2nd Class Lydia Rodriguez communicate with the pilot house during a replenishment-at-sea aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosHull Maintenance Technician 1st Class Justin Duff grinds a bulkhead prior to welding on the fantail of USS Hu City. -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeCulinary Specialist 3rd Class Kiley Sosbe and Ships Serviceman Seaman Corey Gabbard treat Gunners Mate 2nd Class Corey Blakely during a medical training team drill on the fantail of USS Hu City. -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Lorenzo Coleman tightens the bolts of a main seawater strainer to prevent leakage aboard USS Hu City. -Photo by MC3 Luis FiallosFire Controlman 2nd Class Alejandro Zuniga wipes down an ammo box during a fresh water wash down aboard USS Hu City. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Navy Names Next Two DestroyersFrom Department of DefenseSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today the next Arleigh Burke-class destroyers Daniel Inouye. As secretary of the Navy it is my privilege to name these ships to honor a respected naval leader and a true American hero. Mabus said. For decades to Inouye will represent the the building of partner ships and projection of power around the world. Ignatius (DDG 117) hon ors Paul Ignatius who served as secretary of the Navy 1967-1969 and as assistant secretary of defense under President Lyndon Johnson. Inouye (DDG 118) is named to honor for mer Sen. Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii. Inouye was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in Tuscany, Italy, during World War II and later be the first naval ships to bear these names. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers conduct a variety of operations from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection. They are capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simul taneously and contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare. DDG 117 and DDG 118 are part of the DDG 51 multiyear procurement with the contract award to the building yard pending. The ships will be 509 feet long, have a beam length of 59 feet and be capable of operating at speeds in excess of 30 knots.Special Programs: Think Equal Opportunity AdvisorNavy Personnel Command Public Affairs OfficeSailors looking to enhance their career by working outside their rate should consider becoming an Equal Opportunity Advisor (EOA), Navy lead ers said May 22. Equal opportunity advisors play a vital role in the Navys ability to maintain operational readiness and accomplish its mission, said Senior Chief Sonar Technician (Surface) Mark Vandervort, EOA detailer, Navy Personnel Command (NPC). According to MILPERSMAN 1306-917, EOAs can stimulate a free-flow of com munication at all levels within a chain of command, making them an invaluable asset to the Navy. Vandervort says EOAs are command climate experts who strengthen a chain of command by keeping leadership aware of any equal opportunity related issues as well as procedures and practices that may affect the mission, readiness, welfare and morale of Sailors. Those commands that can capitalize on their Sailors skill sets are those that perform the best, said Vandervort. As the command climate expert, it is the EOAs responsibility to assess the com mand climate and determine not only what is working right within a command, but also identify potential barriers that may prohibit Sailors from achieving their full potential. Sailors in pay grades E-6 to E-9 may be eligible to apply for EOA duty after being interviewed by an EOA. To become an EOA, Sailors must earn the 9515 Equal Opportunity Advisor Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) by attending the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The EOA course is intense but rewarding, said Vandervort. The train ing not only provides students with the tools required to be an EOA, but also provides them with a variety of tools that will allow them to grow as leaders. The 12-week EOA course provides training in gender communications and cultural awareness, socialization, con flict management, complaints process ing, interpersonal communications, and many other topics. EOAs ensure Sailors are being treated fairly and with the dignity and respect with which all Sailors should expect to be treated. When utilized correctly, the EOA can be an integral member of the commands leadership team, said Vandervort. EOAs are assigned to major shore commands, nuclear aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships and training commands. A complete listing of eligibil ity requirements can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-917. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for EOA duty should request release to Special Programs by submit ting a completed NAVPERS 1306/7 to their rating detailer prior to entering their normal detailing window. The required obligated service for an EOA tour is 36 months, and members selected are required to complete two full consecutive EOA tours, one sea and one shore. Special Program detailers assign Sailors to more than 20 special programs Navy-wide, including Recruit Division Commander duty and recruiting duty, ment to the Blue Angels or the Navy Ceremonial Guard. MILPERSMAN 1306900 contains a complete list of special programs available. For more information, visit the EOA Web Page on the NPC website at www. npc.navy.mil/ENLISTED/DETAILING/ SHORESPECIALPROGRAMS/Pages/ EOASARPNAVLEAD.aspx Hagel Directs DoD To Implement GuidanceFrom American Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel has directed the Defense Department to implement the guidance President Barack Obama outlined in his national security speech delivered at the here today, including efforts to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In a statement issued imme diately after the speech, Hagel said the president presented a comprehensive vision for con tinuing to protect the nation from terrorism, especially from al-Qaida and its affiliates, while remaining true to the nations values and laws. I have directed the Department of Defense to work closely with our interagency partners and allies to imple ment the presidents guid ance, including the efforts to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Hagel said. The secretary noted he has been closely involved in these chairman of the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board and now as defense secretary. I applaud President Obamas strong leadership in defending and advancing our interests around the world, he added. What Lurks Under The Water-Photo by MC1 Gary KeenAerographers mates assigned to the Naval Oceanography Mine Warfare Center at Stennis Space Center, Miss., stand by as an unmanned underwater vehicle leaves the surface to search for mines as part of a training exercise during the International Mine Countermeasures Exercise (IMCMEX) 2013. IMCMEX 13 includes navies from more than 40 countries whose focus is to promote regional security through mine countermeasures operations in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 9

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Auto Skills Center May Special: Transmission flush, cool ant flush and fuel injec tion cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 5: Poker Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 June 7: Live Music by Sha Davis. 8 p.m. at Castaways. Celebrate summer with a free live concert, giveaways and lots of summer fun. 2707205 June 15: UFC 161-Bararo vs Wineland. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Community Events June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflata bles and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 June 16: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Fathers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 12 pm at Focsle; Reservations required. Celebrate Dad with an all you can eat brunch fea turing omelet bar, cham pagne fountain, carv ing station and more. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while sup plies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID. The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 31: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 2: Horror Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 7: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 8: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 9: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 10: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! June 12: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line June 10. June 14: Movie Trip: Man of Steel. Van departs 6 p.m. June 15: UFC 161Barao vs. Eddie. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE May 31: Outdoor MoviesWreck It Ralph (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 7: Outdoor MoviesTwilight Saga: Breaking Dawn pt 2 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 14: Outdoor MoviesParental Guidance (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The MessdeckMayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with fries and soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Smashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet With Ice Tea or Water, $8 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Intramural Sports June 6: Mini Biathalon (Swim & Run). 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. 270-5451. June 11: Summer Beach 5K Run / 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. June 11: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins June. 24; season ends Aug. 22. 270-5451. Aquatics June 7: Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 June 10-13: American Red Cross Certified WSI Certification Course Participants must attend all 30 hours of training to be certified. Cost is $200 for Military/Dependents/ DOD and $250 for Civilians. Sign up at the Base Gym or the Pool. For more information, please call (904) 270-5452 or (904) 270-5101 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retir ees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25; includes banquet and awards ceremony. Sign up deadline is June 3 at the Pro-Shop. 270-5380 Surfside Fitness: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR Sports/Fitness Base Bowling Challenge-Photo courtesy of MWRBase Bowl Challenge Returns: Join us for the 2nd Base Bowl Challenge on Wednesday, June 5 at Mayport Bowling Center. This is your second chance to earn the title of Base Bowling Champions! Recruit your friends and family, anyone can play. Grand prize is a free bowling party for up to 120 people and much more. Entry is $15 per person. For more information, please call (904) 270-5377. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 11

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FFSC Workshop, Class Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 30, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup June 1, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individ ual resumes. A complet ed rough resume will be required. June 3, 1-3 p.m., New Dads Class This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and toddlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowledge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. June 3, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting (ages 5-12) FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, andencourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. June 3-7, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 June 4, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids? FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. June 5, 11 a.m.-noon, Military Pay Issues FFSC Building 1, Room 719 June 5, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center June 8, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 Adventure Landing Night at Adventure Landing (Jacksonville Beach) will be held on Wednesday, June 12 from 6-11 p.m. Wristbands for our annual fun evening at Adventure Landing will go on sale Today beginning at NOON. Wristbands will be on sale for $2 each and will be available for pur and families only (Guard and Reserves on active orders eligible). They will be on sale at your ber at Kings Bay ITT. Save the date for this annual sold out event! USO Military Appreciation Night At The Jax Zoo Rescheduled Due to inclement weather Friday, May 3rd, Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo has been rescheduled to July 26 from 6-9 p.m. Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League The Tri-County Rolling Militia Roller Derby League invites activeduty Military personnel, and their dependents, to attend their roller derby games in Orange Park, Florida. The Tri-County Rolling Militias adult roller derby team, the Jade Grenades, is an allfemale, full contact recre ational and competitive roller derby team based in Orange Park. Come out and experience the hardhitting action of womens flat-track roller derby the same roller derby that is currently under con sideration for the 2020 Olympics! The Tri-County Rolling Militia (TCRM) has six remaining home games (or bouts as they are called in roller derby) for the 2013 sea son. The venue for these bouts is the Skate Station Funworks at 230 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park, Florida. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout begins at 6 p.m. The game dates are June 23, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17. Free Cat Spay/Neuter Program Duval County Residents First Coast No More Homeless Pets is offer ing free cat spay/neuter services for Duval County residents for a limited time. The program is free for pet and stray cats. For more information, call (904) 425-0005 and visit www.fcnmhp.org. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the See attached flyer and visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. JAXEX RUNWAY 5K The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) will host its Inaugural Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport (JAXEX) on Saturday, June 8. Net proceeds will benefit The Greater Jacksonville Area ture a 5K run beginning at 7:30 a.m. and a onemile Fun Run at 8:30 a.m. A portion of both race courses will include the airport runway at JAXEX (which will be closed to air traffic dur ing the event). To register, visit www.jaxexrunway5k. com. Register before June 1 for the early bird entry fee of $20 for the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run. The 5K registration fee will increase to $30 the day of the race. Space is limited. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX a great fundraiser for the the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 30, 2013 13 Saturday, June 1 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Governor Rick Scott has proclaimed June as Great Outdoors Month along with many other states. This creates an opportu nity for quality activities for the whole family. Celebrate National Trails Day and Great Outdoors Month with an afternoon of hiking and trail trimming. Join park rangers at 2 p.m.to learn and practice trail mainte nance techniques while enjoying a walk through the maritime forest. Please bring water, sun screen, bug spray and gloves. Tools will be provided. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. http://www. funoutdoors.com/ files/Florida%20 Proclamation%202013.pdf Sunday, June 2 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Tuesday, June 4 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. Jeff Girard will cover the basics, limitations and demonstrations of flash in the On Camera Flash presentation. This is a Free event with people of all ability levels and cam era types welcomed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. For more informa tion www.beachespho tographyclub.org Saturday, June 8 Rethreaded, a nonprofit that provides job train ing and employment for women emerging from lives of addiction, vio lence, human trafficking and prostitution, won the top crowd fund vote at One Spark Festival, the five-day festival for creators and innovators. To celebrate, the organi zation is hosting a Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration from 2 p.m.9 p.m. at the Rethreaded warehouse located at 820 Barnett Street Jacksonville, FL 32209. To learn more about Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration or to get involved with Rethreaded, please visit, http://www.rethreaded. com/. Enjoy Great Outdoors Month and learn from a park ranger what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so impor tant. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, June 15 As part of Great Outdoors Month, join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural com munities of the undevel oped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. June 17-21 hold a free Vacation Bible School, SonWest Roundup, A Rip Roarin Good Time With Jesus! from 6-8:30 p.m. The VBS Celebration will be June 22 from noon-2 p.m. with lunch, Space Walk bounce houses and water slides. To register go to www. iofumc.org/vbs. The VBS Mission Project will be a Stop Hunger Now meal packaging event on June 22 from 10 a.m.-noon. For more information email Jennifer@iofumc. org. Saturday, June 22 What better way to cel ebrate Great Outdoors Month than by joining a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, June 29 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or croquet? Have fun during Great Outdoors Month and join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARTroops, Families Can Visit Museums FreeAmerican Forces Press ServiceDuring the busy sea son of military transfers, adjusting to new com munities and register ing children for school, more than 2,000 muse ums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service mem bers and their families as a break from the sum mer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their fami lies can take advantage of this cultural and educa tional opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspir ing, educational and economical activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deploy ments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very limited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This program is an investment in our families. Arecord number of museums are participat ing this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. This program is help ing us make memories -memories for our families, Hull-Ryde said. But its more than that. It is making a difference not only in the force of today, but in the force of the future. NavyNEWS A New Perspective-Photo by MC3 Billy HoAviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jeremy Shultz, assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, performs maintenance on an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter in the hangar bay aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61). Monterey is deployed supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Command Motorcycle Mentor RequiredNaval Safety Center Public AffairsThe most recent change to the Navys Traffic Safety Instruction, OPNAVINST 5100.12J, requires com mands to set up mentorship programs for motorcycle riders. These programs are designed to give experienced riders the opportunity to teach new riders how to be successful on their bikes. Mentors are those who have been through it, said Stan Jones, the Naval Safety Centers Motorcycle Safety Representative and an advisor to mentor ship programs across the fleet. Its a mindset. Experienced riders have the moral authority to provide tips on riding that the training courses dont have the time to go into. Required training courses, such as the Basic Rider Course and Military Sportbike Rider Course, are designed to teach the basics of bike handling and risk management. Training provides the basic skills in a controlled environment, but men torships are about getting out on the open road, in traffic, riding outside of the square box of a train ing course, Jones said. He suggested that Sailors look for mentors who ride the same type motorcycle. Sportbike riders should pair with other sportbike riders and cruiser riders should seek mentors who have experience on cruisers because the nuances of the bikes are different. He also suggested that the traditional rank structure of the Navy may be relaxed during mentor ship discussions and rides. There will always be that respect for rank, but its important to move from that mentality to a rider role. You dont want new riders to feel pres sured. They should want to be there, Jones said. He also pointed out that when it comes to motor cycles, inexperienced rid ers come in all ages and ranks. A Second Class Petty Officer who grew up on sportbikes may be a mentor to a Chief who is just transitioning from a cruiser to a sportbike, he said. The requirements for mentorship in the instruction leave a lot of latitude for commands to design their own programs. The instruction states, Commands should tailor the motorcycle mentor ship program to address the individual commands training requirements, ridership, local area and resources available. To that end, small commands with few riders are permitted to team up with other commands to maximize the mentorship opportunities. General guidance, pre-ride inspections, and other topics and information for men torship programs can be found at the Naval Safety Centers website at http://www.public.navy. mil/navsafecen/Pages/ ashore/motor_vehicle/ Motorcycle In fiscal year (FY) 2012, 20 Sailors and Marines lost their lives in motor cycle accidents. As of May 9, 2013, as the spring and summer motorcycle rid ing season was beginning, that number for FY 2013 stood at 18. Department of the Navy leadership believes preventable deaths like these are sim ply unacceptable. Spring Cleaning Your Home For Fire SafetyFrom Mayport Fire & Emergency ServicesA thorough cleaning of your home can do more than simply give the good feeling of having a clean house. If done properly, cleaning can also improve the safety of your home and family in the event of a fire. Reducing the clutter inside your home and garage is one of the most important ways to improve fire safety. While clut ter does not start fires, it can become the fuel for a fire. The more fuel a fire has the more difficult it is for the fire department to extinguish. It can also make it difficult to escape when a fire breaks out. Take a few minutes to plan your fire safety clean up day. Check each room in your house, including the attic and basement. Dont forget the garage, yard and storage shed! Another important step in the clean ing process is to reduce or eliminate hazardous chemicals in your home. Cleaners, paint and other common household chemicals can fuel a fire and are often hazardous to your health. Maintain only the amounts you need and be sure to use, store and dispose of household hazardous materials in a safe manner as outlined on the product. Never mix chemicals, even when disposing of them Pay attention to lint build-up in clothes dryer vents and in the exhaust ducts. Lint build-up blocks the flow of air, causing excessive heat which can result in fires. Have your air conditioner and heat ing unit, inspected and cleaned on an annual basis. Buildups there can cause overheating of the unit, leading to fire. Make sure your smoke alarms are in working order and review your home escape plan so that if in the event of a fire, everyone in your household knows how to get out quickly and safely. If you do not have an escape plan, make one. Get the family involved. For additional information on Fire Safety contact the Fire Prevention Office at 270-5647 ext. 1421 or ext. 1404.

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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00301


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THE --



--._---;:7T


NIS MAYPORT, FLORIDA


2008 CHINFO Award Winner


Mayport Beaches Get Bulked Up


From Staff
Tons of sand are being
dumped on Naval Station
Mayport's beach as part of
a local beach renourish-
ment project coordinat-
ed by the Army Corps of
Engineers.
The project, which
began Jan. 24, is slated
to continue over the
next 60 days and dis-
tribute approximately
300,000 yards of sand
onto Mayport's mile-long
beach.
The renourishment is
in conjunction with a cur-
rent maintenance dredg-
ing project to the St. Johns
River, according to Naval
Station Mayport's Public
Works department.
High quality sand
recovered from the dredg-
ing is being distributed to
replace the sand lost from
Mayport's beach due to
large storms ravaging the
area over the past several
years.
Beach goers will notice
the distribution machin-
ery moored at the jetties
and bulldozers on the
beach spreading the sand.
Please heed safety warn-
ings during the project.


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-Photo by Paige Gnann
Naval Station Mayport Command Master Chief CMDCM Bob White, and Master Chief Master-at-Arms (SW/AW) Carlos Henriquez watch as a
crane carries piping across the jetties onto Naval Station Mayport's beach. The base's beach is undergoing a renourishment project for the next 60 days.


New Copays For Some Drug Prescriptions


From TRICARE
New copayments for pre-
scription drugs covered by
TRICARE will go into effect Feb.
1.
The Fiscal Year 2013 National
Defense Authorization Act
requires TRICARE to increase
copays on brand name and
non-formulary medications
that are not filled at military
clinics or hospitals. There is no
increase to copays for generic


medications.
TRICARE Pharmacy copays
vary based on the class of drug
and where beneficiaries choose
to fill their prescriptions. The
copay for generic medica-
tions stays at $5 when a pre-
scription is filled at a network
pharmacy. There is no co-pay
when generic prescriptions are
filled through TRICARE Home
Delivery. The new copay for a


30-day supply of a brand name
medication purchased at a
retail network pharmacy will be
$17, up from the current $12.
Beneficiaries using TRICARE
Home Delivery will pay $13 for
brand name drugs, up from $9.
However, the Home Delivery
price is for a 90-day supply.
The greatest change in copays
applies to non-formulary medi-
cations. The $25 copay for these


drugs increases to $44 at retail
pharmacies and $43 through
Home Delivery. The TRICARE
Uniform Formulary is a list of
all the medications TRICARE
covers.
For fiscal 2014 and beyond,
the new law directs that copays
increase annually by the same
percentage as retiree cost-of-
living adjustments. In years
when a COLA increase would


total less than a dollar, it will be
delayed a year and combined
with the next adjustment so
increases will always be $1 or
more.
Pharmacies at military hos-
pitals and clinics will continue
to provide medications with no
copays. Visit www.TRICARE.
mil/pharmacycosts for more
details.


-Photo by Paige Gnann
Incoming Commanding Officer, Cmdr. William Maske, speaks to guests and the squad-
ron after assuming command ofHSL-60 during a change of command ceremony on Jan.
25. Also pictured is CMDCM (AW/SW) Don Carr, left, and outgoing Commanding
Officer, Cmdr. William Howey, middle.


New CO For HSL-60


From HSL-60
Cmdr. William Maske relieved Cmdr.
William Howey as commanding officer
of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron
Light 60 (HSL-60) during a Change of
Command ceremony on Jan. 25. The
Jaguars of HSL-60 are the only reserve
SH-60B squadron in the Navy.
Under Howey, the Jaguars wrote new
chapters in naval aviation history. HSL-
60 deployed the first Active Component
- Reserve Component composite MQ-8B
Firescout Vertical Takeoff and Landing
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV)
detachment in the United States Navy.


Looking For Best Athlete
Applications for Athlete of the Year are avail-
able at the Mayport Gym. Active duty men and
women are eligible. Applications due Jan. 31.


Additionally, HSL-60 partnered with
Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons
School Atlantic (HSMWSL), USCG
Tactical Law Enforcement Team
(TACLET) South, and USCG Aviation
Training Center (ATC) Mobile to stand-
up and deploy the Navy's first Night
Airborne Use-of-Force (NAUF) quali-
fied detachment. This proof of concept
capability resulted in the Navy's first
NAUF interdiction.
Maske, a native of Prince Frederick,
MD, graduated from the United States
Naval Academy in 1995 and served as
the executive officer since August 2011.


Mayport Police


Get New Cruisers


From Staff
Naval Station Mayport
Security new cruisers are
all style and function.
The base has recently
acquired several new
2013 Ford Impalas to
replace older, outdated
vehicles and come in line
with new decal require-
ments throughout the
Southeast Region, said
Security Supply Clerk
Donald Cyphert.
You can see big chang-
es on the outside of
the vehicle with larger
"Police" identification
and more stripping.
There is also a lot more
of the flashing lights stra-
tegically placed on the
hood, in the front grill
and back beams and rear
window that is synony-
mous with a police vehi-
cle, he said.
"If one comes up
behind you, you have no
doubt who it is now," he
said.
But the biggest change
is on the inside. Police
officers have additional


MWR Sports Kick Off
Kick off the 2013 Sports Season with MWR Lunchtime
Captain's Cup Kickball. Games are scheduled Monday thru
Thursday. For more information, contact Rita at 270-5451.


-Photo by Paige Gnann
Naval Station Mayport Police Sgt. Ken Swetman stands
beside one of the new Ford Impalas added to base
Security's fleet.
outlets for computers windows to limit the
and a new rifle rack to possibility of escape,
allow for more fire power. Cyphert said.
The cages that sepa- "It's going to ma a big
rate the officers from difference for the patrol
suspects have also been people," he added. "It's
modified with slick pan- more professional and
eled doors and bars on that's the main idea."

Check us out Online!
Medical R uAi
Makes Program Changes

Page 6
mayportmirror.com


- -~




2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


Falling In Love With Love Again


Chap Justin Top
Surface Force Ministry
Center

There are a lot of things
that destroy marriag-
es, including infidelity,
neglect and abuse. But
one of the most common
issues that ends marriages
comes from something
much less sinister. It usu-
ally is explained by one of
the spouses like this: "I
love him/her, but I am no
longer 'in love.'"
They usually go on to
explain that there is noth-
ing the spouse is doing


wrong, and they still have
deep love and respect for
their spouse, but there is
no "spark" anymore.
So after struggling with
the dilemma for a while
they may have decided
(often with the prompting
of friends), that they need
to "follow their heart" by
ending the current rela-
tionship to pursue a new
one.
Usually that means
sending their life and
those they love into physi-
cal, financial and emo-
tional upheaval so they
can go chase the excite-
ment of a new relation-
ship.
Here are 5 reasons why
I think that is a really bad
idea.
The "in love" feeling


doesn't last. It is normal
to see the excitement fiz-
zle out in a relationship.
Research shows that the
"spark" or in-love feel-
ing lasts an average of 2-3
years. But that doesn't
mean the relationship is
dead, or that the spark
cannot be rekindled or
a new kind of emotional
fulfillment discovered. If
you bail on your current
relationship because of
lack of emotional excite-
ment, be ready to do the
same thing every few
years with future relation-
ships.
Your "heart" is not
always as wise as you
think it is. We think that
in order to be happy we
just need to do what our
heart is telling us to do.


CHAPLAIN'S
CORNER


But the truth is that we
don't actually know as
much as we think we do
about what will make us
happy.
Our desires are often
impulsive and shortsight-
ed and driven by psycho-
logical insecurities. Mid-
life crisis-fueled purchas-
es, desire to quit your job
and do something "amaz-
ing', and even buying into
expensive timeshares, for
example, may feel like
the right thing to do at
the time, but that doesn't
mean they will make you
happy. Usually they just
lead to a little excitement
and then a different kind
of unhappiness.
Attraction is a fickle
thing. Basing a relation-
ship solely on "sparks"
is dangerous because
attraction changes so
quickly. This is true for
emotional attraction
even more than physi-


cal attraction. Who we
are attracted to is often
based on what they or the
relationship represents
to us emotionally. We
fall in love with the way
the relationship makes
us feel about ourselves.
But as our emotional
needs change, so does
the attraction. Often the
things that attract us at
first drive us nuts later.
It is human nature
to be dissatisfied. The
grass always appears to
be greener on the other
side of the fence, but that
doesn't mean it actually
is. It doesn't help that
movies and other media
set unrealistic expecta-
tions about love.
No matter how "per-
fect" your relationship
is, you may eventually
become dissatisfied and
convinced that there is
someone better for you
out there. It would be a


Keep Your Children Safe


- Online and Off


Judy Cromartie
School Liaison Officer


St. Johns County
Education Foundation
in conjunction with
Communities in Schools
is hosting three celebrity
parent experts speak-
ing on topics which will
empower parents and
children in the ongoing
effort to keep kids safe.
This is a powerful series


Knowing
THE ROPES


intended to teach parents
in North Florida about
possible dangers facing
kids and effective tips for
staying safe.
Session One "The
Media and Sex Cases &
How to Talk to Your Young
Kids about Private Parts"
takes place on Saturday,
Feb. 2. The presenter will
be Stacey Honowitz, who
has served 20 years in
the Sex Crimes and Child
Abuse Unit of the State
Attorney's Office. She
will be speaking about
sex crimes in Florida. She
will also be addressing
how to talk to your young


kids about private parts.
Her goal is to help parents
educate their children on
this matter in a fun and
comfortable way. Free
fingerprinting for kids will
also be available!
Session Two "Social
Jungle: Peer Pressure to
Bullying" (Mar. 9) and
Session Three "Digital
Natives Meet the Digital
Immigrants" (April 27)
as well as Session One
will all take place at the
World Golf Village IMAX
Theatre, 1 World Golf
Place, St. Augustine, FL
32092. The doors open
for each event at 9 am.


The Meat&Potatoes
OF LIFE


Lisa Smith Molinari
Military Spouse
Columnist

I'll try anything once.
Well, maybe not cliff div-
ing, or running with the
bulls, or a Mohawk hair-
do, or snorting angel dust,
or silicone lip injections.
But when it comes to
food, I'm totally adventur-
ous.
When our military
family moves to a new
place, I'm always excited
to try the local cuisine.
Sometimes, our experi-
mentation with native
dishes produces an
instant fondness, and we
adopt local recipes into
our regular meal routine.
Early in our marriage,
my husband was assigned
to the Naval Postgraduate
School in Monterey,
California. At first we were
bummed that we couldn't
find a "Mom & Pop" piz-
zeria, which we took for
granted back East.
Much to our dismay,
pizzas in California had
foo-foo toppings such
as sprouts, gorgonzola,


shallots, walnuts, fen-
nel, pears, and chicken.
And the waitresses wore
trendy glasses, thumb
rings and Greenpeace
t-shirts. What ever hap-
pened to good old fash-
ioned pepperoni and
mozzarella, served by
someone named "Ang"
with bad highlights and a
moustache, for goodness
sakes?
However, once we tast-
ed the local foods fresh
caught squid, Gilroy gar-
lic, Castroville artichokes,
and San Francisco sour-
dough bread we were
hooked.
Similarly, our next tour
in England (granted, not
exactly known for its cui-
sine) added crumpets and
Shepherd's pie to our rep-
ertoire. Chesapeake Bay
Blue Crabs and plump
Virginia peanuts became
staples after back-to-
back tours in Virginia
Beach. Germany brought
us countless European
delights including schnit-
zel, beer, goulash, beer,
spaetzle, beer, chocolate
and beer. Oh, and did I
saybeer?
Now we find ourselves
in the Deep South, where
we are becoming con-
noisseurs of fried chicken,
hush puppies, shrimp and


grits, barbecue, cornbread
and biscuits. Dee-licious!
But, hold up. For every
delectable indigenous
morsel that has passed
favorably over my taste
buds, there have been
countless other native
foods that triggered my
gag reflex.
I said I was adventur-
ous, but I'm not stupid.
Our experiences living in
different areas has taught
us that every region has
its share of really bad
foods, and I'm not such a
foodie that I will pretend
to like them.
There are certain "red
flags" a clear sign that
the food you are about
to eat is not that tasty.


Command Chaplain
Lt. Cmdr.
Jerome Cayangyang
Roman Catholic Mass
Sunday 9 a.m.
Monday-Thursday
11:30 a.m.
Confessions:
before & after mass or upon
request
CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed:
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Baptisms
3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m.
Catholic Youth Group
2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m.
Protestant Worship
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Sunday school 9:15 a.m.
Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m.
Baptism: For
information contact your chaplain
Women's Bible Study
Wednesday 10 a.m.
Protestant Youth Group
1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30
p.m.
3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m.
PWOC
2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m.
PMOC
3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9
a.m.
MOPS
1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m.
For more information or other
worship opportunities and reli-
gious organizations in Jacksonville,
call 270-5212.


The presentations will
take place from 10 am
- noon. That will be fol-
lowed by a meet and
greet from noon 1 pm.
An exhibition area will be
open from 9 am 1 pm.
Honowitz is the author
of two books on the sub-
ject of child sexual abuse,
which is the fastest grow-
ing crime in the country.
Dr. Michele Borba's work-
shop (Session Two) will
deal with the social jungle
kids deal with today from
peer pressure to bullying.
Session Three's presenter
Theresa Payton, CEO of
Fortalice, will discuss the
importance of digital safe-
ty, identify theft with kids,
and technology in today's
world as it concerns chil-
dren.


For example, if someone
tells you that you have
to "develop a taste for
it," that means you will
need to consume copious
amounts of the substance
to desensitize your taste
buds to its wretched fla-
vor. When I first ordered
southern boiled peanuts
at a football game, I found
a slippery, mushy nut
that tasted like a mutated
potato. But after giving
them several tries, I find
that I can now eat a few
without shuddering.
If someone tells you,
"It taste's like [chicken
or some other familiar
meat]," beware that you
are about to eat mysteri-
ous animal parts. Whilst
in England, I was served
black pudding with break-
fast, and told it was a vari-
ety of sausage. A tiny nib-
ble filled my mouth with


The series is geared
toward parents, educa-
tors, school-age children,
and everyone who wants
to make their community
a safer place for kids. This
also includes grandpar-
ents and anyone raising
or working with children
today. The series will
be especially timely and
instructive for day care
center personnel.
Following an introduc-
tion by State Attorney
R.J. Larizza, Honowitz
in Session One will be
speaking on the following
topics:
Stranger Danger
Good Touch, Bad
Touch
Sexual Predators
Private Parts
The Media and Sex


the taste of bloody vital
organs, no thank you. At
a B&B in Scotland, I was
offered a sliver of hag-
gis and told that it tasted
just like pork and oats.
One swallow and I felt as
if I'd just licked the salty
underbellies of a herd of
sweaty sheep.
If someone says, "It's
great with butter," that
generally means that the
food is dry as the Sahara.
Does anyone really like
Irish Soda Bread? No one
really knows, because we
all slather it with butter so
we can swallow it.
If someone tells you,
"it just needs a little hot
sauce," they are saying
that you will need to dis-
tract yourself with pain
in order to ingest this
foul tasting dish. At the
risk of igniting another
Civil War, let me say that


Cases
Go to www.Community
EmpowermentSeries.com
for tickets, more informa-
tion about Sessions Two
and Three, and speaker
bios for all three speakers.
Cost for adults is $20 and
$10 for kids with a special
discount for families.
Judy Cromartie is the
School Liaison Officer for
NS Mayport. If you have
questions about this arti-
cle or concerns about an
educational issue impact-
ing your child, she can
be reached via email at
judith., cromartie@navy.
mil or by phone at (904)
270-6289 X1305 [office] or
(904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or
you can schedule a meet-
ing with her in her office
in Building One.


greens are not as good as
southern folk proclaim.
Collards, kale, mustards,
Swiss chard isn't it sus-
picious that they are all
slow cooked in bacon fat
and disguised with Texas
Pete?
On the other hand,
there are, in fact, certain
truisms that hold eternal
in the world of local cui-
sine: beware of anyone
who tells you to "suck
the juice out of the head,
because that's the best
part," and you can always
trust someone who says
in earnest "it's great deep
fried," because let's face
it, what isn't good deep
fried?
Get more wit and
observations from Lisa at
her blog, The Meat and
Potatoes of Life, www.
themeatandpotatoesofli-
fe.com


shame to leave a good
relationship to chase after
an illusion of something
better.
Simple, steady love is
far more important than
the "spark." Romance
and passion are impor-
tant in marriage, but not
the most important. The
spark itself is not love.
Once removed from the
warmth of the fire it will
quickly diminish.
It would be a monu-
mental shame to choose
to abandon a relationship
that has developed solid
and steady love, friend-
ship and respect--the very
core of lasting happiness
in our lives--to pursue
the emotional rush of an
impulsive relationship.
Lasting happiness is not
found through romance.
It is in the "unromantic"
things in a relationship
that true love is born.


Naval Station Mayport
Capt. Douglas F. Cochrane.............................................................................. Com m ending O officer
C m dr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive O officer
CM DCM Robert L. W hite................................................................................ Com m and M aster Chief
Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff
M CC W illiam Tow nsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs O officer
FC2 Robert Leonard ............................................................................. Assistant Public Affairs O officer
Pa ig e G n a n n............................................................................................................................... Ed itor
The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayport's Navy community, including the Naval Station,
on- and off base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies
are also available at the Naval Station's Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1
Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202.
The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles
should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to:
The Mirror
P.O. Box 280032
Naval Station
Mayport, FL 32228 0032
Commercial: (904) 270 -7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012
Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329
Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net
CO Actionline: 270 5589 or 1 800-270 6307
This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of
The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department
of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way
connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear
ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by
the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised.
Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without
regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation,
or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the
responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to:

iiii 1 I s

Ellen S.Rykert Publisher
1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-41 68
Advertising Sales
(904) 359-4336 FAX: (904) 366-6230
Pat Waterman Territory Sales Representative (904) 359-4680




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013 3


Defense Department Rescinds



Direct Combat Exclusion Rule


From Department ofDefense
Public .;

Defense Secretary Leon
E. Panetta and Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, Gen. Martin
Dempsey announced
Jan. 24 the rescission
the 1994 Direct Ground
Combat Definition
and Assignment Rule
for women and that the
Department of Defense
plans to remove gender-
based barriers to service.
"Women have shown
great courage and sac-
rifice on and off the bat-
tlefield, contributed in
unprecedented ways to
the military's mission
and proven their abil-
ity to serve in an expand-
ing number of roles,"
Secretary of Defense
Leon E. Panetta said.
"The Department's goal
in rescinding the rule is
to ensure that the mission
is met with the best-qual-
ified and most capable
people, regardless of gen-
der."
Today, women make up
approximately 15 percent,
or nearly 202,400, of the
U.S. military's 1.4 million
active personnel. Over the
course of the past decade,
more than 280,000
women have deployed in
support of operations in
Iraq and Afghanistan.
Today's announce-
ment follows an extensive
review by the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, who unanimous-
ly concluded that now is
the time to move forward
with the full intent to inte-


grate women into occupa-
tional fields to the maxi-
mum extent possible.
It builds on a February
2012 decision to open
more than 14,000 addi-
tional positions to women
by rescinding the co-loca-
tion restriction and allow-
ing women to be assigned
to select positions in
ground combat units at
the battalion level.
"The Joint Chiefs share
common cause on the
need to start doing this
now and to doing this
right. We are committed
to a purposeful and prin-
cipled approach," said
Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin
Dempsey.
The Department of
Defense is determined
to successfully integrate
women into the remain-
ing restricted occupa-
tional fields within our
military, while adhering
to the following guiding
principles developed by
the Joint Chiefs of Staff:
-Ensuring the success of
our nation's warfighting
forces by preserving unit
readiness, cohesion, and
morale.
-Ensuring all service
men and women are
given the opportunity to
succeed and are set up for
success with viable career
paths.
-Retaining the trust
and confidence of the
American people to
defend this nation by
promoting policies that
maintain the best quality


and most qualified peo-
ple.
-Validating occupation-
al performance standards,
both physical and mental,
for all military occupa-
tional specialties (MOS),
specifically those that
remain closed to women.
Eligibility for training
and development within
designated occupational
fields should consist of
qualitative and quantifi-
able standards reflect-
ing the knowledge, skills,
and abilities necessary
for each occupation. For
occupational specialties
open to women, the occu-


national performance
standards must be gen-
der-neutral as required
by Public Law 103-160,
Section 542 (1993).
-Ensuring that a suffi-
cient cadre of midgrade/
senior women enlisted
and officers are assigned
to commands at the point
of introduction to ensure
success in the long run.
This may require an
adjustment to recruiting
efforts, assignment pro-
cesses, and personnel
policies. Assimilation of
women into heretofore
"closed units" will be
informed by continual in-


stride assessments and
pilot efforts. Using these
guiding principles, posi-
tions will be opened to
women following service
reviews and the congres-
sional notification proce-
dures established by law.
Secretary Panetta
directed the military
departments to submit
detailed plans by May 15,
2013, for the implementa-
tion of this change, and to
move ahead to integrate
women into previously
closed positions.
The secretary's direc-
tion is for this to be com-
plete bv lan. 1,.2016.


From Secretary of the Navy Public

Secretary of the Navy
Ray Mabus released the
following statement Jan.
24 on the Women in
Service Review.
I fully support
Secretary Panetta's deci-
sion to rescind the
1994 Direct Ground
Combat Definition and
Assignment Rule, which
removes barriers prevent-
ing women Sailors and
Marines from reaching
their potential in certain
fields.
I am pleased the Navy
has completed an initia-
tive I announced several
months ago to open up
one of the few areas not
currently available to
women, that of service on
Virginia Class submarines
(SSNs).
Three years ago we
announced a policy
change allowing women
to serve in guided-missile
attack (SSGNs) and bal-
listic missile submarines
(SSBNs) and this is a
planned continuation of
that effort. Newly com-
missioned female officers
have been selected for
assignment to Virginia
Class submarines upon
successful completion
of the Naval Nuclear
Powered training pipe-
line.
We expect these offi-
cers, along with female
Supply Corps Officers,
to report to their subma-
rines in FY15. We also
plan to include female
enlisted Sailors in this
process. The Navy has a
long history of inclusion
and integration and I am
proud we have achieved
another important mile-
stone during my tenure as
Secretary.
Along with the changes
already being made in the
submarine force, rescind-
ing the Direct Ground
Combat and Assignment


Rule allows Navy to
expand opportunities for
women in our riverine
forces and in Navy bil-
lets that directly support
Marine infantry opera-
tions like hospital corps-
man and chaplains.
The Marine Corps has
already opened officer
and staff noncommis-
sioned officer billets in
unrestricted mission
occupational special-
ties in ground combat
units that were previously
closed to women such as
artillery, armor, low alti-
tude air defense and com-
bat engineer battalions.
We will continue to seek
female volunteers to train
at the Infantry Officer
Course to prepare women
to serve in the infantry as
part of a comprehensive
research plan that will
inform the Marine Corps'
implementation plan.
The Marines are dedi-
cated to maintaining the
highest levels of combat
readiness and capitalizing
upon every opportunity
to enhance our warfight-
ing capabilities and the
contributions of every
Marine--it's simply the
right thing to do.
As the Marine Corps
moves forward with this
process, our focus will
remain on combat readi-
ness and generating
combat-ready units while
simultaneously ensur-
ing maximum success for
every Marine.
Women continue to
serve bravely and honor-
ably at sea and ashore.
Drawing from their talent
in additional assignments
increases our ability to
maintain readiness.
We will meet the goals
and timeline laid out by
Secretary Panetta and we
will continue to deploy
the finest naval force in
the world.


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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


USS Farragut Practices VBSS Manuevers


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- ** ..... _.-. ... N

- --- -,, .- -0 -
-- 4 .. . -- --_M^ ".


Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Brandon Highwood, a
member of the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS)
team from the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut
(DDG 99), boards the guided-missile destroyer USS
Jason Dunham (DDG 109) during a VBSS exercise.


Sif -'.,l-















-Photos by MC2 Deven B. King
Sailors from the guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) maneuver in rigid-hull inflatable boats
near the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) during a visit, board, search and seizure exercise. Jason
Dunham and Farragut are deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of
responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions
for Operation Enduring Freedom.


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t


':4


-'3-



11.1


*9~4
-t


Sailors from the guided-missile destroyers USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) and USS Farragut (DDG 99) conduct maneuvers in a rigid-hull inflatable boat during a visit,
board, search and seizure exercise.


-Photo by Paul Farle
USS Robert G. Bradley arrives for a scheduled port visit in Souda Bay, Greece. RG1
is homeported in Mayport, Fla. and is deployed conducting maritime security opera
tions and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibil
ity.


At Sea





0,





























B
7- -Photo by Paul Farle3
- The guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) arrives for a scheduled
port visit.








__*


-Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts
-Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Damage Controlman 2nd Class Jeffrey Reams and Hull Technician 3rd Class
Navy Counselor 1st Class Stephen Burkey and Damage Controlman 1st Class Scott Alex Gilfoy walk together as Hot Suitmen under the supervision of Chief Damage
Taylor stand at the ready during a Crash and Smash drill onboard USS Robert G. Controlman Kenneth Recio onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) during a
Bradley (FFG 49). Crash and Smash drill.


I
y




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013 5


F-k


-Photos by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jessica Potter
Members from Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville and the Afloat Training Group gathering in front of the Jacksonville-based Ronald McDonald House, Thursday Jan. 24, 2013.
Members spent the day participating in grounds beautification, interior cleaning, moving furniture and hosted a cookoutfor the families.



Coast Guard Mayport Volunteer at



Jacksonville Ronald McDonald House


By Petty Officer 3rd
Class Jessica Potter
U.S. Coast Guard Public.,
Members from Coast
Guard Sector Jacksonville
in Atlantic Beach and
the Coast Guard Afloat
Training Group, based at
Naval Station Mayport,
participated in a vol-
untary cleanup day at
the Jacksonville-based
Ronald McDonald House
last Thursday.
Coast Guardsmen com-
pleted grounds beautifi-
cation, interior cleaning
and moving furniture
and ended the day with a
cookout for the families.
"The Coast Guard


being here is great," said
Cat McCarroll, event and
marketing manager for
the Ronald McDonald
House. "In addition to all
the work that they have
done today they have
changed what would have
been an ordinary day for
the families into a fun and
exciting day."
The Ronald McDonald
House is a non-profit
organization that provides
a "home-away-from-
home" for families so they
can stay close to their
hospitalized children at
little or no cost.


Right, Members from Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville
complete yard work in the courtyard of the Jacksonville-
based Ronald McDonald House, Thursday Jan. 24, 2013.
Coast Guardsmen from Sector Jacksonville and the Afloat
Training Group participated in grounds beautification,
interior cleaning, moving furniture and hosted a cookout
for the families.


A Member from Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville pulls weeds in the Jacksonville-based
Ronald McDonald House courtyard, Thursday Jan. 24, 2013. Members from Coast
Guard Sector Jacksonville and the Afloat Training Group participated in a voluntary
cleanup day at the house and hosted a cookout for the families.
ooo


Petty Officer 2nd Class Jaime Yeoman, a member from Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville,
rakes leaves during a voluntary clean-up and cookout day at the Jacksonville-based
Ronald McDonald House, Thursday Jan. 24, 2013. The Ronald McDonald House is a
niiin pifij organization that provides a h,,ii iii ir I-Iii'iiic" for families so they
can stay close to their children at little or no cost.




6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


NH Jax Introduces New Health Care System


By MC3 Damian Berg
NPASEDet

Naval Hospital Jacksonville
(USNH) will introduce a new
online model of patient and
family-centered health care Jan.
29.
The Medical Home Port
initiative introduces a new
approach to patient and family-
centered health care delivery
for primary care.
This new system is a team-
based, comprehensive care
approach that will fully meet


the health and wellness needs
of the patients. This model of
care will also improves access to
quality care received by benefi-
ciaries an increase patient sat-
isfaction.
"Each patient will be assigned
to a Medical Home Port team,
led by one's provider," said
Cmdr. Troy Borema, USNH
Jacksonville director of medical
services. "The patient is a part
of that team that also includes a
nurse, hospital corpsmen, sup-
port staff and ancillary services


which manage clinic operations
and basic patient care, allowing
the provider to focus on diag-
nosing and treating patients."
The second portion of this
new initiative includes Medical
Homeport Online where
patients now have the ability to
e-mail their provider directly.
This will allow patients to
reschedule or request appoint-
ments, request lab results,
request medication renewal
for expired prescriptions and
access information to manage


their health; all from their home
computer or smartphone.
"This system is a secure, Web-
based doctor-patient service
designed to potentially save the
patient an office visit by allow-
ing them to manage non-urgent
medical needs anytime, any-
where from any internet con-
nection," said Borema. "This
will reduce phone calls, wait-
ing-room time and the time it
takes to travel to the doctor's
office.'
In addition to Family


Medicine, the Pediatrics depart-
ment and Primary Care at
Branch Health Clinics Mayport,
Albany, Jax, Kings Bay, and
Key West have implemented
Medical Home Port as well.
"Patient and family-centered
care is at the core of our deliv-
ery of health care," said Borema.
"Medical Home Port enhances
patient satisfaction by provid-
ing increased coordination and
access to high quality care."


New Website For Navy, Marine


Corps Public Health Center


By Hugh Cox
Navy and Marine Corps Public Health
Center Public. ;-
The Navy and Marine
Corps Public Health Center
(NMCPHC) announced the
unveiling of its upgraded pub-
licly-facingwebsite Jan. 8.
The upgraded website http://
www.med.navy.mil/sites/
nmcphc/Pages/Home.aspx fea-
tures an improved search capa-
bility and optimized navigation
to provide user-friendly access
to the center's vast library of
public health tools and resourc-
es.
"NMCPHC is excited about
the upgrades to our website,"
said Capt. Mike Macinski,
NMCPHC commanding officer.
"We have listened to our cus-
tomers worldwide, and have
developed a more user friend-
ly page to navigate. The more
people that we can educate on
Public Health, Navy Medicine,
and ways to keep our forces
fit and healthy, the better our
readiness is for the Navy."
Visitors to the website will
notice a fresh new "look" on the
homepage specifically designed
to match NMCPHC's latest
branding.
NMCPHC's web content has
been revised and will continue


to be updated, reflecting the
command's most recent strate-
gic initiatives.
"We designed the web site
to facilitate easy access to our
programs which are aligned to
support jointness, value, and
readiness," said Capt. Wes Farr,
NMCPHC executive officer and
project champion.
The website homepage also
features news and alerts for the
latest information relating to
Navy Medicine, public health
and operational preventive
medicine.
According to Cmdr. Denise
Gechas, NMCPHC director for
Population Health, the pub-
lic web site is one of the most
important outreach tools avail-
able to communicate with cus-
tomers and leadership.
"We designed the site to make
it an easy to use 'one-stop-shop'
for all our customer's health
promotion and wellness needs,"'
said Gechas.
Integration of social media
will play a large part in con-
tent sharing as well as engaging
customers and stakeholders. A
mobile version of the website
is also available, enabling users
to access content conveniently
from their smart-phones.
Customers will be able to pro-


vide feedback and ask questions
through the "Ask Us" tab at the
top of the homepage. Queries
will be directed to the appro-
priate subject matter expert for
timely resolution.
NMCPHC will also employ a
web analytics tool for tracking
and analyzing web traffic.
NMCPHC is part of the Navy
Medicine team, a global health
care network of 63,000 Navy
medical personnel around the
world who provide high-qual-
ity health care to more than
one million eligible beneficia-
ries. Navy Medicine personnel
deploy with Sailors and Marines
worldwide, providing critical
mission support aboard ship, in
the air, under the sea and on the
battlefield.


Go Red For Women


By Laura Goldstein
Wellness Center nurse educator
Although some people
might think of heart disease
as a man's problem, heart
disease is the No. 1 killer of
women in the United States.
It's also a leading cause of
disability among women.
The most common cause
of heart disease is narrowing
or blockage of the coronary
arteries, the blood vessels
that supply blood to the heart
itself. This is called coronary
artery disease, and it hap-
pens slowly over time. It's
the major reason people have
heart attacks.
The older a woman gets,
the more likely she is to get
heart disease. But women of
all ages need to be concerned
about heart disease. All
women can take preventive
steps by practicing healthy
lifestyle habits:
*know blood pressure
*exercise regularly
*don't smoke
*get tested for diabe-
tes (and if having it, keep it
under control)
*know cholesterol and
triglyceride levels and keep
them under control
*eat plenty of fruits and
vegetables


*maintain a healthy weight
Millions of Americans
will help women in the fight
against heart disease when
they join the American
Heart Association's "Go Red
for Women" campaign in
February. It's an inspiring
movement that helps women
discover their unique lifesav-
ing power by learning about
heart disease, reducing risk
and loving their heart.
All Americans are encour-
aged to wear red on Feb.
1, National Wear Red
Day, to show their sup-
port for women and the
fight against heart dis-
ease. To find out more, go
to www.GoRedForWomen.
org. You can also contact
Branch Health Clinic (BHC)
Mayport's Health Promotions
by the Ocean at 270-5251.
The priority of BHC
Mayport and its parent
command, Naval Hospital
Jacksonville, is to heal the
nation's heroes and their
families. BHC staff consists
of 25 providers and 190 allied
health and support staff, who
perform 98,000 outpatient
visits each year and fill close
to 20,000 prescriptions each
month.


II WW'F2




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013 7


New Health Assessment Now Available



For Deploying Service Members


By Hugh Cox
Navy and Marine Corps Public
Health Center, Public. ;
The Navy and Marine
Corps Public Health
Center (NMCPHC)
announced last week the
introduction of a new
version of the electron-
ic Deployment Health
Assessment (eDHA).
This latest version,
made available to the
Fleet Jan. 1, 2013, is an
upgrade to the previ-
ous version originally
launched in 2008 that ini-
tially required seven sepa-
rate assessments.
The most signifi-
cant change to the
series of assessments
was the integration of
the Congressionally-
mandated mental health
assessment into the
Pre-Deployment Health
Assessment and Post-
Deployment Health


Navy
N E \V S


Reassessment. Now,
Sailors, Marines and
Coast Guardsmen will
be able to complete two
assessments instead
of the four that were
required to complete the
original eDHA.
The new format focuses
on the signature condi-
tions of OIF/OEF alco-
hol abuse, depression,
traumatic brain injuries
(TBI), and post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
and offers the opportunity
for the member to discuss
his or her health concerns
with a medical profes-
sional during the face-to-
face review.
"This was a techno-
logical challenge," said


Mr. Azad Al-Koshnaw,
NMCPHC Lead
Developer of the eDHA
application. "Providing a
seamless tool that com-
fortably collects sensitive
health information and
facilitates the member-
provider meeting was the
goal of this version."
According to Ms.
Tina Luse, NMCPHC
Lead Epidemiologist for
Deployment Health, the
new format is a value-
added resource to mili-
tary leadership for help-
ing assess Fleet and Force
readiness.
"Deployment health
assessments are a valu-
able tool for all con-
cerned. By spacing the


assessments out over
the entire deployment
cycle, the members have
several opportunities to
discuss their health with
their medical provid-
ers," said Luse. "Some of
these conditions have a
delayed mental or physi-
cal response and could be
missed if the assessments
were done just once or
too early."
Currently, eDHA is
fully implemented and is
available for Department
of Defense (DOD) active
and reserve components.
Because the tool is web-
based, many units com-
plete the assessment
while still in theater. The
Air Force has completed
implementation while the
Army is scheduled to be
implemented by March
2013.
"With all services using
the same assessments,


our service members
can get their deployment
health assessments done
in any military treatment
facility around the world,
including in theater," said
Capt. Michael Macinski,
NMCPHC Commanding
Officer. "The addition
of the enhanced mental
health questions will pro-
vide a good measure of
the effects of the conflict
on resilience and readi-
ness."
Medical and Line lead-
ers across the Department
of Defense (DOD) have
offered high-praise for
the health status reports
that are derived from
these deployment health
assessments.
"Our monthly Force
Health reports provide
senior Marine Corps lead-
ership a snapshot of the
health and concerns of
the Force, enabling us to


focus on risk reduction
and prevention strate-
gies that improve the
health and well-being of
our Marines." Said Capt.
William Padgett, Director
of Preventive Medicine,
Health Services,
Headquarters U.S. Marine
Corps.
NMCPHC is part of
the Navy Medicine team,
a global health care net-
work of 63,000 Navy med-
ical personnel around
the world who provide
high-quality health care
to more than one mil-
lion eligible beneficiaries.
Navy Medicine person-
nel deploy with Sailors
and Marines worldwide,
providing critical mission
support aboard ship, in
the air, under the sea and
on the battlefield.


Navy Announces Conversion Opportunities To NC


From Navy Personnel Command
Public. ,-

The Navy seeks moti-
vated first and second
class petty officers with
career counselor experi-
ence to consider applying
for a rating conversion
to Navy Counselor (NC),
officials said Jan. 23.
"The Navy's goal is to
make 81 active-duty Navy
Counselors this fiscal
year," said Master Chief
Navy Counselor Darryl
Blackmon, NC technical
advisor, Bureau of Naval
Personnel, enlisted com-
munity management divi-
sion.
Unlike other ratings,


NC is not open to incom-
ing recruits and the rating
must attract experienced
Sailors from the fleet.
Applicants must be
active duty first and sec-
ond class petty officers
with six to 14 years of
active Naval service; have
no marks below 3.0 in the
previous three years per-
formance evaluations;
have an Armed Services
Vocational Aptitude
Battery (ASVAB) test score
of VE+AR=105, mini-
mum 50 AR; have at least
12 consecutive months
experience as a com-
mand, departmental or
divisional career coun-


selor during the previous
three years prior to appli-
cation date. Additional
guidance is outlined in
MILPERSMAN 1440-020.
"This rating requires
a thorough knowledge
of the Navy's person-
nel and administrative
procedures and policies.
Any Sailor who intends
to apply for the NC rat-
ing should be ready to
accept the responsibil-
ity as Command Career
Counselor and provide
a positive lasting impact
to the Navy's greatest
asset; its Sailors," said
Blackmon.
The NC rating assists


commands in planning
and implementation of
the enlisted command
career development and
retention program. NCs
are the commands' prin-
cipal advisors on policies
and regulations related
to Navy career planning
matters.
Responsibilities include
execution of enlisted
retention programs of
the Navy and counseling
Sailors and their families
on active duty and post-
retirement incentives,
opportunities and ben-
efits.
"Successful NCs work
hard to develop strong


counseling techniques, as
well as exemplary orga-
nizational and admin-
istrative habits," said
Blackmon. "The commu-
nity relies on strong oral
and written communi-
cation skills to keep our
Sailors informed, and
ensure the right Sailor fills
the right billet."
There are currently
more than 600 NCs pro-
viding career manage-
ment services to Fleet
Sailors. Opportunity for
advancement consis-
tently exceeds the Navy
advancement average.
Sailors competing for
first class petty officer


typically have 100 percent
advancement opportu-
nity. The NC rating was
established in 1972 to
assist in managing reten-
tion and augmenting
recruiting with subject
matter experts in the all
volunteer force.
Sailors who wish to
apply for conversion
should speak with a
Navy Counselor and read
MILPERSMAN 1440-020
available at www.npc.
navy.mil.
For more news
from Navy Personnel
Command, visit www.
navy.mil/local/npc/


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8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


De Wert Honors Martin Luther King Jr.


By Ensign
Hannah N. Johnston
USS De Wert PAO
While at sea participat-
ing in COMTUEX, USS
De Wert took time to pay
tribute to the honorary
Martin Luther King, Jr. On
the afternoon of Monday,
Jan. 21, the crew assem-
bled on the messdecks to
participate in a ceremony
where the life, accom-
plishments, and dreams
of Martin Luther King, Jr.,
were reflected.
Sailors of all races and
ethnic backgrounds gave
speeches about how MLK
Jr. had influenced their
life. The ceremony con-
cluded with a cake and
a nice dinner prepared
by De Wert's Culinary
Specialists.
"Martin Luther King
Jr. Observance day was a
joyful vivid day for every-
one on board USS De
Wert. He paved the way


for equal opportunity,
enculturation, and diver-
sity. I felt and seen the
expression on the crew
when the seven crew
members gave there
speeches. Most speeches
were built on the inspira-
tion through the accom-
plishments he has done
for us Americans and the
World. I also believe our
Navy and Armed forces
are the most powerful
branches in the world
because of Diversity. I
am proud to say Martin
Luther King Jr. Thank
you for paving the way,"
said Chief Gunner's Mate
Tyrone Lumpkin.
USS De Wert continues
to embody the principles
taught by Martin Luther
King, Jr. everyday as the
crew works together as a
family of all cultures and
backgrounds.


-Photo courtesy of USS De Wert
From left, Logistics Specialist s' Class (SW) Truman Roughton, Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Darren Pointer,
Chief Gunner's Mate (SW) Tyrone Lumpkin, USS De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, Chief Sonar
Technician Surface (SW) Benjamin Ebert, Logistics Specialist 2nd (SW) Mark Nash, and Seaman Josell Gonzalez
spoke during the Martin Luther King, Jr., ceremony on board USS De Wert while at sea participating in a COMTUEX.


Navy Celebrates 2013 Black History Month


By Ensign Amber Lynn Daniel
Navy Office ofDiversity and Inclusion
As announced by NAVADMIN 009/13 released Jan. 16, the
Navy joins the nation in celebrating the vibrant history and
culture of African American and Black Sailors during African
American/Black History Month throughout the month of
February.
Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President
Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration in 1976 to include
the entire month of February.
This year Navy commands are encouraged to celebrate
and reflect on the theme, "At the Crossroads of Freedom and
Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on
Washington."'
African American Sailors have a legacy of honorable service
in every major armed conflict since the Revolutionary War.
African Americans continue to serve with distinction, now
comprising more than 17 percent of the active duty Navy total
force end-strength.
Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future
African American Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the
first African American graduate of the United States Naval
Academy in 1949, joining the Navy's Civil Engineer Corps and
retiring at the rank of lieutenant commander. He died May 22,


2012 after a distinguished career both in the Navy and in the
civilian workforce.
Edna Young, the first African American woman to enlist in
the regular Navy and later the first African American woman
to achieve the rank of chief petty officer also died in 2012.
Young was a World War II veteran who joined the Navy after
the passage of the Women's Armed Services Integration Act
July 7, 1948.
In 2012, Vice Adm. Michelle Janine Howard became the first
African-American woman to receive a third star in flag rank
within the Department of Defense when she was promoted
Aug. 24. Howard is currently serving as deputy commander for
U.S. Fleet Forces Command. This was not Howard's first time
in the Navy history books, however. In 1999, she became the
first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S.
Navy when she took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47).
Immediately following this year's celebration of African
American/Black History Month, Force Master Chief April
Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command
Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navy's first female
African American Fleet Master Chief. Beldo will become the
Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) Fleet
Master Chief in March 2013.
Sailors and their commands are encouraged to use this


month to celebrate and recognize the exceptional and distinc-
tive contributions and the unique histories and cultures that
our African American shipmates bring to our Navy.
More information on the many milestones achieved by
African American Sailors and the history of the African
American Navy experience can be found at the Naval History
and Heritage Command at http://www.history.navy.mil/spe-
cial%20highlights/africanAmerican/African-hist.htm
A full-color brochure on the history of African Americans
in the United States Navy is also available for download
through the Naval History and Heritage Command link. A
complete educational presentation, including a download-
able educational poster on African American/Black History
month can be requested from the Defense Equal Opportunity
Management Institute (DEOMI) by email at deomipa@us.af.
mil.
More information on Navy diversity events, including the
observance of African American/Black History Month, is
available on the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion calen-
dar at http://www.public.navy.mil/BUPERS-NPC/SUPPORT/
DIVERSITY/Pages/DiversityObservances.aspx.
For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of
Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnp-diver-
sity/


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-Photo by Paul Farley
The guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG-40) arrives for a scheduled port
visit. Halyburton is on a scheduled deployment operating in the U.S. 6th Fleet area
of responsibility.


Plan Now For COQ Lunch


F r.., .. ,,,,


Naval Station Civilian
Employee of the Quarter/
Year and Supervisor of
the Year 2012 Luncheon/
Presentation will be held
on Feb. 5 at 11:30 a.m. at
Ocean Breeze Conference
Center. All are welcome
to attend and support
the nominees. Nominees
are listed below. RSVP
is required no walk-ins
please. RSVP to sandra.
barrettl@navy.mil by 3
p.m. on Feb. 1. Lunch is
$8, pay at the door.


Nominees for Employee
of the Quarter (4th
Quarter) (Oct-Dec 2012)
David Lam, Fire/
Emergency Services
Cheryl Washington,
Housing
Mary Henry, MWR
Leslie Allen, PWD
Luis Soto, Security
Tegwen McNeal, Air
Ops
Allan Schlegel, Security
Employee of the Year
Nominees:
Scott McPherson, PWD
(1st Quarter)


Percy Williams, Security
(2nd Quarter)
Lawrence Ossi (3rd
Quarter)
4th Quarter not select-
ed yet (announced at lun-
cheon/presentation)
Nominees for
Supervisor of the Year
2012
Douglas McClain, Fire/
Emergency Services
Pam Larsen, MWR
Ryan Howard, PWD
David Hixon, Housing
Mary-Grace Hansen,
NGIS


Station Mayport Sailors, families and civilians have the mild January weather










with temperatures reaching into the 80s on some days. -



-Photo by Paige Gnann
Linda Doktor enjoys a quiet moment on the beach on Monday morning. Naval
Station Mayport Sailors, families and civilians have the mild January weather
with temperatures reaching into the 80s on some days.


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10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


Out in Town

Saturday, Feb. 2
The City of
J ac ksonville s
Environmental Protection
Board, The Museum
of Science & History
(MOSH), and the St. Johns
Riverkeeper will come
together from 10 a.m.-
4 p.m. to host the 2013
Water Education Festival
at MOSH, 1025 Museum
Circle.
The event boasts a vari-
ety of exciting activities
for children and families,
and includes free admis-
sion. Among the sched-


Military Wives Vendor
Show
Come out and sup-
port your local military
spouse businesses at the
Mayport USO on Feb. 3
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and
get a head start on your
Valentines Day shopping.
This event is free and
open to the public.
MLS Soccer Match
Coming To Jacksonville
On Feb. 15, 2013, the
Philadelphia Union will
face another MLS team,
to be announced in the
near future, at Everbank
Field starting at 7:30 p.m.
Use the link and password
listed below and $2 for
every ticket will be donat-
ed back to your local
Jacksonville USO office.
Come out and support
this great event and our
local Military Men and
Women. There will also
be a FREE youth clinic at
5:30 p.m before the game.
PASSWORD USOJAX
http://www.tick-
etmaster.com/
event/2200498AAODC6
031?did=uso
COMPASS: A
Course For Navy Life -
Upcoming Course For
Navy Spouses
COMPASS is a 12-hour


COMMUNITY
(.\ [. I NI).\


uled activities are science
theatre shows, river boat
trips and a fish feeding.
There will also be access
to MOSH exhibits, as well
as games and crafts for
children. Planetarium
shows will have a small
fee.
Join a Park Ranger
at 2 p.m. for a leisurely
paced hike to discover
the island's natural com-
munities. Participants are
encouraged to bring bug


spray and bottled water.
This program will take
place at the Ribault Club
on Fort George Island
Cultural State Park. No
reservations are necessary
and the program is free.
Feb. 2-3
The Florida
Department of
Environmental
Protection's Fort Clinch
State Park, 2601 Atlantic
Ave., Fernandina Beach,
will host a Union Garrison


USO
N 1: \\'


Team mentoring program
developed by spouses
for spouses. Come make
new friends as you learn
about the Navy lifestyle
and gain knowledge and
skills to successfully meet
the challenges ahead.
COMPASS is FREE and
open to ALL Navy spous-
es! For more information
and to register for the
upcoming February ses-
sion, please visit: http://
www.gocompass. org/
jacksonville.html
2013 Players
Championship Birdies
For Charity Campaign
The Greater
Jacksonville Area USO is
pleased once again to be
participating in the 2013
Players Championship
Birdies for Charity
Campaign held in May
in conjunction with The
Players Championship.
For more information
visit www.birdiesforchar-
ity.playerschampionship.
com to participate and
become eligible to win a
fabulous grand prize.
2nd Annual Jax Area


USO Chili Cook Off
Do you think you make
the best chili around?
Would you like a chance
to prove it? The 2nd
annual Jax Area USO Chili
Cook off will be held Feb.
23 from 12:00-5:00pm
at the Fleet Reserve on
Collins Road. For more
information and registra-
tion, visit www.jaxuso-
chilicookoff.com.
Rugged Maniac 5k
Obstacle Race
How about a day filled
with epic obstacles
and live bands? Rugged
Maniac 5K Obstacle
Race on Feb. 16 has got
you covered! Here's how
it works: Sign up for the
race and you'll get a
chance to run our 3.1-
mile course filled with
25 obstacles designed to
push you to your limits!
While you're waiting for
your turn on the course,
you'll get to hang out
with thousands of other
maniacs in the festival
area where you can ride
mechanical bulls, play
muddy tug-o-war, pre-


event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
on Saturday and 9 a.m.-
noon on Sunday. This
program will allow visi-
tors to interact with living
historians to experience
life in the fort as it was in
1864. The grounds will be
bustling with soldiers in
period costumes involved
in firing demonstrations,
marching drills, cooking
and daily activities. For
additional information,
contact the park at (904)
277-7274 or visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org.
Saturday, Feb. 9
An "Eating and
Growing Seasonable"
Workshop; a food demo/


tend to be a kid in our
adult bounce houses, or
just hang out and listen
to the bands while enjoy-
ing plenty of food and
beverages. Not only that,
but each runner gets a
high-quality t-shirt with
registration! Courses fea-
tures 25 obstacles; you'll
climb over walls up to 20
feet high, slide down a
100 foot water slide, jump
over fire, crawl through
tunnels of mud and face
a host of other challenges
all while running through
a combination of forests,
fields, motocross tracks
and ski slopes! Each wave
of runners is limited
to 250 maniacs to avoid
overcrowding. In short,
Rugged Maniac strikes the
perfect balance between
fun and physicality with
a day-long party and our
award-winning course.
Military and student dis-
counts are available. For
more information, along
with the full 2013 event
schedule, go to www.rug-
gedmaniac.com.
Supporting America's
Heroes
The American Red
Cross is expanding ser-
vices to provide assis-
tance and resources to


sampling using seasonal
produce and learn to
grow warm season veg-
etables, at Duval County
Extension Office 1010 N.
McDuff Ave. 32254, from
9 a.m.-noon. Cost is $10
with pre-registration
and pre-payment being
required. Please con-
tact Jeannie Crosby at
255-7450. Make checks
payable to: DCOHAC
and mail to: Duval
County Extension Office,
Attention: Jeannie.
Join a park ranger at 2
p.m. to learn about the
many common species
that inhabit the natural
communities of the unde-


veterans of Operation
Enduring Freedom and
Operation Iraqi Freedom
to help support their tran-
sition into civilian life.
Emergency needs that
may warrant assistance
may include medical and
dental needs, rent assis-
tance, utility payments,
and food; access to refer-
ral services; or other
assistance depending on
need. Applicants for these
funds must demonstrate
financial hardship, and/
or lack of other available
resources due to par-
ticipation in OEF or OIF.
Eligible veterans include
those of all services, the
Reserve component and
National Guard.
For more informa-
tion, please contact a Red
Cross Military Services
caseworker at (904) 246-
1395
Recycling
Recycling has come to
the Greater Jacksonville
Area USO. If you have
any office paper, shred-
ded paper, old magazines,
and newspapers that you
would like to donate,
please bring it to either
the Mayport or NAS JAX
USO Center. This will be
a great fundraiser for the


veloped barrier islands of
northeast Florida. This
program will take place at
the Ribault Club on Fort
George Island Cultural
State Park. No reserva-
tions are necessary and
the program is free.
Saturday, Feb. 16
Want to find out how to
lawn bowl or play bocce
ball? Join a ranger at 2
p.m. on the green to learn
about these fun outdoor
games. This program will
take place at the Ribault
Club on Fort George
Island Cultural State Park.
No reservations are nec-
essary and the program is
free.


USO so please help us fill
the bins. Help support the
troops with your unwant-
ed paper!
United Through
Reading program makes
it possible to share in the
enjoyment of reading to
the children in your life,
even while thousands of
miles apart. The Mayport
Center and NAS Center
can record you reading
a book to your children
and send it to them after
you have gone on deploy-
ment. Please contact your
local USO center for more
information.
There is a computer
resource center avail-
able to all service mem-
bers with email, Internet
and word processing. Fax,
copy and free notary ser-
vice is also available.
There is a full kitchen,
showers, a quiet reading
room and a meeting room
available at the USO. The
USO is available for meet-
ings, support groups,
receptions, parties and
pre-deployment briefs.
For more information
about activities or meet-
ing availabilities, call 246-
3481 or stop by the center
at 2560 Mayport Road.


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THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013 11


Learn To Manage Your Money With FFSC


From FFSC
The following class-
es and activities are
offered by the Fleet and
Family Support Center
(FFSC) and are free of
charge. Pre-registration
is required and childcare
is not available. For more
information about the
classes or to register call
270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC
is located in Building One
on Massey.
Jan. 31, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottle Tyme Playgroup,
USO
USO Parents and chil-
dren together meet to
share parenting concerns,
ideas, and fun! The group
invites professionals to
address specific areas of
concern such as nutrition,
toilet training, etc. We
even take field trips sev-
eral times a year to local
parks, museums and play-
grounds. This group is
designed for moms new
to the area or moms who
want their child to inter-
act with other children
their child's age. All chil-
dren age four and below
are invited to attend.
Feb. 4, 1-3 p.m.,
Relationship
Communication, FFSC
Room 702
Whether you've been
dating for 6 months or
married for 20 years,
effective communica-
tion is critical to keeping
your relationship happy,
healthy and strong. Come
learn new techniques that
will help you build on the
strengths of your relation-
ship and learn to iden-
tify barriers to effective
communication. Class is
a one-time 3 hour class.
Couples are encouraged
but not required to attend
class together.
Feb. 4-8, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.,
TAP Retiree Workshop,


Building 1 Room 1616
Designed for Military
personnel within 90-180
days of leaving the mili-
tary. The seminar focus-
es on benefits for service
members and their fam-
ily members. Participants
receive help in translat-
ing their military acquired
skills into civilian lan-
guage and are exposed
to the civilian job mar-
ket and how to success-
fully compete in the civil-
ian employment arena;
learning about resumes,
employment interviews
and marketing them-
selves. If you are within
a minimum of 180 days
of leaving the military see
your career counselor
for a quota for this highly
successful program.
Feb. 5, 9-11 a.m., Active
Parenting Class, FFSC


Room 702
Feb. 6, 9 a.m.-noon,
Employment Seminar,
FFSC Room 719
Feb. 6, 8:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m., Stress
Management, Wellness
Center
Stress is a normal part
of everyone's life. It can
be energizing and a fac-
tor in motivating us. But
too much stress, without
relief, can have debili-
tating effects. This pro-
gram is designed to pro-
vide participants with an
understanding of what
stress is and how it affects
them. It will also help
participants begin to look
at their own lives and
ways they currently cope
with stress. Participants
will be challenged to
develop behavior and
lifestyle changes that will


improve their ability to
cope with stress.
Feb. 7, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottle Tyme Playgroup,
USO
Feb. 7, 10-11 a.m., Craft
Hour (During Tottle Tyme
Playgroup), USO
Feb. 11-15, 8 a.m.-4
p.m., TAP Separatee
Workshop, Building 1
Room 1616
Designed for Military
personnel within 90-180
days of leaving the mili-
tary. The seminar focus-
es on benefits for service
members and their fam-
ily members. Participants
receive help in translat-
ing their military acquired
skills into civilian lan-
guage and are exposed
to the civilian job mar-
ket and how to success-
fully compete in the civil-
ian employment arena;


learning about resumes,
employment interviews
and marketing them-
selves. If you are within
a minimum of 180 days
of leaving the military see
your career counselor
for a quota for this highly
successful program.
Feb. 11, 6-7 p.m., IA
Family Connection
Group, USO
Feb. 12, 9-11 a.m.,
Active Parenting Class,
FFSC Room 702
Feb. 13, 9 a.m.-noon,
Employment Seminar,
FFSC Room 719
Feb. 14, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottle Tyme Playgroup,
USO
Feb. 19, 9-11 a.m.,
Active Parenting Class,
FFSC Room 702
Feb. 19, 1-3 p.m.,
Financial Leadership
Seminar, Building 1


Mayport Saves With FFSC


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Room 104
Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m.,
Thrift Savings Plan
Workshop, Building 1
Room 104
Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon,
Employment Seminar,
FFSC Room 719
Feb. 21, 11 a.m.-noon,
Savings and Investment
Class, Building 1 Room
104
Feb. 21, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottle Tyme Playgroup,
USO
Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m., Banking and
Financial Services Class,
Building 1 Room 104
Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m., Anger Management
Class, FFSC Room 702
What does anger do
for you? Communicate
for you? Keep people
at a safe distance from
you? Keep you in charge?
For many people, anger
serves them many uses,
but all too often, it is at a
high cost...usually of rela-
tionships, unhappiness
in the workplace, and
a general feeling of dis-
dain. If you want to be
able to break out of the
"get angry/get even" syn-
drome, come to this class.
Participants learn how
anger and judgment are
related, about irrational
beliefs and faulty self-talk,
what "E + R = 0" means,
and the roles of stress and
forgiveness in anger.
Feb. 25-March 1, 8 a.m.-
4 p.m., TAP Separatee
Workshop, Building 1
Room 1616
Feb. 26-27, 7:30 a.m.-
4 p.m., Million Dollar
Sailor Workshop,
Building 1 Room 104
Feb. 26, 6-8 p.m.,
Ombudsman Assembly,
Building 1, Room 104
Feb. 26, 9-11 a.m.,
Active Parenting Class,
FFSC Room 702


-Photo by ET3 Taylor Wells
Members of the Fleet and Family Support Center team join Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) and NS
Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, kneeling, in proclaiming Feb. 25-March 2 as Military Saves Week.
FFSC personal financial management team and NMCRS are teaming up to help Sailors and their families make
good fiscal choices. FFSC has several workshops scheduled throughout February to help steer Sailors in the right
direction. For more information, call 270-6600.


GET PRE-APPROVED
ONLINE NOW!
USADISCOUNTERS.NET


S *Payments listed are examples only and are based on zero down payment at 19.99% APR for 24 months with approved credit, taxes and any delivery and installation charges not included. To calculate the total cost of financing simply multiply the payment amount by
V 48. Other financing rates and terms are available with approved credit and differ depending on the state where purchased. Jewelry is enlarged to show detail and may not always be exactly as shown. Items shown may not represent items in stock. Limited time offer;
BTB no substitutions; limited quantities. Offer expires 3/6/2013.All products or service names mentioned on ad are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. See store for details.. VSubject to credit approval. Other terms may apply. Offer not valid on
u previous purchases or a refinance of or add-on to a current account. Any late payment nullifies the zero interest offer. Minimum payments required. Limited time offer. See store for details.


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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


Feb. 1: TGIF Extreme
Bowling Party. Every
Friday from 4-6 p.m. at
Mayport Bowling Center.
Free for Active Duty;
guests $5. Beer & drink
specials, half-price wings,
awesome music videos
and light show! 270-5377
Feb. 1: Sugar & Spice
Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways
Lounge. Featuring live
band Aftershock. Free
food, beverage specials,
giveaways and more. 270-
7205
Feb. 2: Xtreme
Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every
Saturday at Mayport
Bowling Center. $10
include 2 hours of black
light bowling, shoe rental,
prizes and dazzling laser


Command Bootcanmp
Monday 7:30 am
Friday 7:00 am
at Mayport Sandbox
(behind Surfside Fitness Center)
Sunrise Command Yoga
Thursday 7:00 am
at Mayport Sandbox
(behind Surfside Fitness Center)
Command Spinning
Friday 7:30 am
at the Gym


MWR
HAPPENINGS


light show. 270-5377
Feb. 2: UFC 156- Aldo
vs. Edgar. 10 p.m. at
Castaway's Lounge. 270-
7205
Feb. 3: Bowling Family
Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at
Mayport Bowling Center.
Cost is $10 per person and
includes your choice of a
14 lb hamburger or a hot-
dog with fries and a soda,
All-You-Can Bowl with
shoes, music videos, light
show and colored head-
pin bowling for prizes.
270-5377


Feb. 3: The Big Game at
Castaway's Lounge. Pre-
game at 5:30 p.m. Kick off
at 6 p.m. Watch the Big
Game while you enjoy
refreshments, snacks,
giveaways and more. Free
t-shirts for the first 100
attendees through the
door. 270-7205
Feb. 5: All Khaki Wings
and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m.
every Tuesday at Foc'sle
CPO Club with 40-cent
wings, drink specials
and all-you-can-drink
soft drinks for $1. Trivia


begins at 5:30 p.m. All
Khakis welcome (Chief
Petty Officers, Officers
and their guests).
Feb. 6: Lunchtime
Bingo. Every Wednesday
at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside
Bingo. Two $500 payouts
every week. Buy two, get
one free. Still only $13 per
pack.270-7204
Feb. 6: Chicken
Wednesday. Every
Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2
p.m., at Foc'sle Lounge.
Enjoy a two-piece fried
chicken plate with two
sides for only $7.
Feb. 6: Just For Fun
Wednesday. Every
Wednesday at Mayport
Bowling Center.


NOF=FS
(Navy Operational Fitness & Fueling Series)
Wednesday 7:00 am at Surfside
Fitness Center
CFL/ACFL NOFTS
Certification Course
1-3 pm Tuesdays
2-part course, taught
by request at your command
CFI-I.ACI- TRX Course
1-3 pm Tuesdays
2-part course
Bring TRX to your command
By Appointment Only


MIVission Nutiltion
1-3 pm Tuesdays
2-part class, taught
on request at your command


F ormoe.nf r a e c*a* L904.270 I


Feb. 1: Teen Base
Round Up. 7 p.m. at the
Teen Center. Follow up
the Base Round up with
soda and sliders at the
Teen Center. Permission
slip required. 246-0347
Feb. 2: Freedom
Friday- Football
Fanatics. 7-11 p.m. at the
Youth Center. Cost is $8


KID
Z 0 N E


advanced sign-up and $10
day of, space permitting.
Feb. 3: Bowling Family
Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at
Mayport Bowling Center.


Cost is $10 per person and
includes your choice of a
14 lb hamburger or a hot-
dog with fries and a soda,
All-You-Can Bowl with


shoes, music videos, light
show and colored head-
pin bowling for prizes.
Feb 14: Youth Drama
Club Presents "Charlie
Brown's Valentine" 4:15
p.m. at the Youth Center.
Feb. 15: Freedom
Friday- Cupid Shuffle.
7-11 p.m. at the Youth
Center.


The following activities
target single or unaccom-
panied Sailors. For more
information, call 270-
7788/89 or stop by the
Mayport Liberty Center
and pick up the month-
ly activity calendar with
a complete listing of all
upcoming Liberty events.
Jan. 31: Movie Trip.
Van departs 6 p.m. Cost
$5.
Feb. 1: TGIF Extreme
Bowling Party. Every
Friday from 4-6 p.m. at
Mayport Bowling Center.
Free for Active Duty;
guests $5. Beer & drink
specials, half-price wings,
awesome music videos
and light show! 270-5377
Feb. 1: Sugar & Spice
Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways
Lounge. Featuring live
band Aftershock. Free
food, beverage specials,
giveaways and more. 270-
7205
Feb. 2: Xtreme
Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every
Saturday at Mayport
Bowling Center. $10
include 2 hours of black
light bowling, shoe rental,
prizes and dazzling laser
light show. 270-5377
Feb. 2: UFC 156- Aldo
vs. Edgar. 10 p.m. at
Castaway's Lounge.
Feb. 3: The Big Game at
Castaway's Lounge. Pre-
game at 5:30 p.m. Kick off
at 6 p.m. Watch the Big
Game while you enjoy
refreshments, snacks,
giveaways and more. Free
t-shirts for the first 100
attendees through the
door. 270-7205
Feb. 4: Command
Break-In. Look for us
at Barracks 1586 & 1587
and get the latest news on
your Liberty program.
Feb. 5: WWE
Smackdown. Van departs


5 p.m. FREE. Must be in
uniform.
Feb. 6: Chicken
Wednesday. Every
Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2
p.m., at Foc'sle Lounge.
Enjoy a two-piece fried
chicken plate with two
sides for only $7.
Feb. 6: Just For Fun
Wednesday. Every
Wednesday at Mayport
Bowling Center. It's not
about how good you
bowl, it's about how
much fun you can have!
$1 Colormania Bowling,
drink specials, request
your favorite music all day
long and more. 270-5733
Feb. 6: Military
Appreciation Day every
Wednesday at Windy
Harbor Golf Club.18
Holes and a Cart Only
$15. Offer open to DOD,
active duty, retired, and
military dependents
(Must provide proper ID)
Feb. 6: Chess Club &
Tournament. 6 p.m. at
Liberty Center.
Feb. 7: Snag Golf. 4
p.m. at Liberty Center.
Learn the basics, hone
your skills, or just have
some fun.
Feb. 8: Xtreme
Bowling. 8 p.m. to
Midnight every Friday at
Mayport Bowling Center.
$10 include 2 hours of
black light bowling, shoe
rental, prizes and dazzling
laser light show. 270-5377
Feb. 9: Cosmic Ice
Skating. Van departs
1 p.m. Cost $5. Sign up
deadline Feb. 7
Feb. 11-13: Pre-Season
Softball Tournament.
Sign up by Feb. 4.
Feb. 12: Kick Mardi
Gras 3K Walk/5K Run.
8:10 a.m. in front of the
gym.


U'' i OP
rIMWjj'[Iiiiiim


9 D.R.Horton Communities
U Convenient To Mayport & Kings Bay!


BAINEBRIDGE ESTATES

D.R.Horton's Newest North Jacksonville Community!


* Extravagant resort-style amenity center
featuring community pool, spacious
clubhouse, pavilion, playground &
lighted tennis courts
* Conveniently located minutes from 1-95
and 1-295, Jacksonville International
Airport, shopping and dining at the
brand new River City Marketplace


HOMES FROM

THE $110's*


LOW

COMMUNITY

FEES!


For more information please call (904) 374-5590

Directions: 1-95, take exit 366 onto Pecan Park Road
and travel west approximately 1 mile. Turn right onto
Bainebridge Drive into the Bainebridge Estates community.


BR-HORION



WWW.DRHORTON.COMI/NFL


*Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities are subject to change and prior
sale at any time without notice or obligation. See your new home consultant for details. Pictures, elevations, features, sizes and colors are
Sw approximate for illustration purposes only and will vary from the homes as built. CBC058997 2013 DR Horton, Inc. All rights reserved.


LIBERTY
CA LL


0jO7--------LAE-1


FIT C


-I-------SAE


PCV




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013 13


Naval Station Mayport
has updated its fitness
classes effective immedi-
ately for Surfside Fitness
and the Gymnasium.
The new Surfside
Fitness class schedule is
as follows:
Monday
11:30 a.m., Kickboxing
4:30 p.m., Cut N Core
Want to see more mus-
cles in the mirror? Perfect
your form and technique
in a resistance training
class designed to maxi-
mize muscle strength.
This full body strength
training class will chal-
lenge every major mus-
cle group and includes
core training specifically
designed to build and
strengthen the muscles of
the abdomen and back.
5:30 p.m., Flex 'N
Stretch
Reap the benefits of
flexibility training in this
30-minute class designed
for increasing range of
movement of limbs and
improving circulation.
Stretching assists with
relaxation, flexibility,
strength and injury pre-
vention. Class includes
active and passive stretch-
es as well as myofascial
release.
Tuesday
9:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga
11:30 a.m., Zumba
A fusion of hot,
sexy and explosive
Latin American and
International dance
music. Caloric output, fat
burning and total body
toning are maximized
through fun and easy to
follow dance steps. Come
experience the ultimate
dance party in this high
energy, motivating class
that is great for both the
body and the mind.
4:30 p.m., Yoga
Wednesday
11:30 a.m., Strength
Training For Women
12:30 p.m., Flex 'N
Stretch


4:30 p.m., Zumba
Thursday
9:30 a.m., Strength
Fundamentals
Learn basic strength
training with focus on
form and proper tech-
nique utilizing dumbbells,
barbells, resistance bands
and medicine balls. The
results will be an overall
increase in energy and
endurance, a more effi-
cient metabolism, health-
ier posture and much
more!
11:30 a.m., Zumba
4 p.m., Kickboxing
Friday
9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics
11:30 a.m., Strength
Training For Women
12:30 p.m., Flex 'N
Stretch
Mayport Sandbox
The Mayport Sandbox
is a high intensity (H.I.T.)
outdoor workout area
located oceanfront
behind Surfside Fitness
Center. The area includes
a Pull -up Bar and Ring
rig, Kettlebells, Sleds,
Tires, TRX Suspension
Frame, Slam Balls,
Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge
Hammers, Farmers Walk,
Olympic Lift area and
equipment, Monkey Bars,
Low Crawl, Sprint and
Drag area. H.I.T. training
involves functional pro-
gramming that will take
your workout to the next
level. Both open Sandbox
hours and instructor led
classes are provided by
Olympic Lift and Crossfit
certified Mayport Fitness
Team members.
Monday
7:30 a.m., Command
Bootcamp
11:30 a.m., TRX
Suspension Training
Tuesday
7-8:30 a.m.


Open Sandbox
2:30-4:30 p.m.
Open Sandbox
Wednesday
7 a.m., NOFFS
9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX
Suspension Training
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Open Sandbox
Thursday
7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga
Oceanfront Yoga
(weather permitting) will
transform your body and
your attitude. Start your
busy day with stretch,
strength and stress relief.
7-8:30 a.m.
Open Sandbox
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Open Sandbox
2:30-4:30 p.m.
Open Sandbox
Friday
7 a.m., Command
Bootcamp
HIT At the Sandbox
Monday
7 a.m., HIT
8 a.m., Intro to HIT
11 a.m., HIT


MWR
S PC) RTS/F I T NESS


AL etThe


g 0Good Times







MRDI* GRS 3K H1llK/sK Ruf i
TUESDY, FEB. 12*. ,
*- a8.10 M I M n FROfT OF THE GYM
0 .*


12 p.m., HIT Skill
Review
Tuesday
7:30 a.m., HIT Skill
Review
11 a.m., HIT
12 p.m., Intro to HIT
3 p.m., Intro to HIT
Wednesday
7 a.m., HIT
8 a.m., Intro to HIT
Thursday
11:30 a.m., HIT for
Women
3 p.m., Intro to HIT
Friday
7 a.m., HIT
8 a.m., HIT Skill Review
11 a.m., HIT
12 p.m., Intro to HIT
Saturday
9:30 a.m., HIT
10:30 a.m.
Intro to HIT
The new Gymnasium
class schedule is as fol-
lows:
Monday
11:30 a.m., Spinning
5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic
This clinic is designed
for children ages 10-14. It
teaches how to safely use
fitness equipment and
provides general informa-
tion on exercise and fit-
ness workouts. Held at


Surfside Fitness Center.
After completion of the
course, participants will
be issued a card which
will allow them to use the
facility when accompa-
nied by a parent or legal
guardian.
Tuesday
11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor
4:30 p.m., Spinning


Pre-Season

SoftbaII


APORT Tournament

February 11-13
Sign up by Feb. 4
Men's Captain's Cup Softball
Season Begins Feb. 19.
Season ends Apr. 18

For more information, please call (904) 270-5452

. .. ..


MWR's Fit Trail
at the beach
*Fit Trail begins behind the CPO
Pavilion at Surfside Fitness Center
*1.25 mile course with 5 exercise
station for strength, flexibility,
balance and endurance
*5 different training exercises
per station
*An Individual workout in the
outdoors for the avid runner
and fitness enthusiast
*The Ideal tool for any
runner in training
For more information, please call
(904) 270-5451


IF- I -




2013 Running Schedule
All runs begin at the Base Gym






. I .


Starting at only

$14,988
Buy any wrangler in stock for
invoice, minus 1%, and then subtract any and all
rebates. Active or retired military only.

Starting at$21,2rn

2013 Jeep Wran
Up To

U$6f,000

OFF MSRP

BRAND NEW 2013 Dodge Charg


applicable


.,9 OFF I
MSRP
pier w BRAND NEW 2012 Dodge Ram
Active duty or retired Any model, any equipment you
r military only. want, priced at 1% below invoice
'"- ,minus any and all applicable rebates.



Starting at 25,487
ers Every BRAND NEW 2013 Jeep Grand


1500's reg cabs,
quad cabs, crew
cabs, 4x4 or
S 2 wheel drive
SActive duty or
retired military
I only.








ios


CHECK ENGINE OiL CHNA E 125 PUNWT


LIGHT ON? INSPECTION
09 5 125, POINT INSPECTION OF ANY VEHICLE,

Get it diagnosed here at no $ 1 5 ANY'MAKEOR MODEI AT NO CHARGE.
125: POINT! INSPECTION WILL COVER
NOT IN CONJUNCTIONWlTH ANY OTHER OFFERS OR PREVIOUS ALMOST ALL' OPERATING SYSTEMS OF,
charge. This month only. PURCHASES. TAXAND SHOPSUPPLIES NOT INCLUDED.
EXCLUDES HEMI'S, DIESELS AND SYNTHETIC OILS. MOST VEHICLES.
Must present coupon to dealer. Must present coupon to dealer. Must present coupon to dealer.


=0 R=- M . .I[. 904-493-0000


Wednesday
7 a.m., Rowing
11:30 a.m., Rowing
11:30 a.m., Spinning
Thursday
11:30 a.m., HIT for
Women
3 p.m., Intro to HIT
Friday
7:30 a.m., Spinning
11:30 a.m., Rowing




14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013


THI


Classified


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


CLASSIFIED INDEX


BY PHONE
Mon. Thurs.
Fri. 7:30 a.m.
TOLL FREE
BY FAX


366-6300
7:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
- 5:30 p.m.
800-258-4637
904-359-4180


IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classified in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines

Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction
and billing adjustments.
Ad Cancellation Normal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. When cancelling your ad, a cancellation
number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
Billing Inquiries Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324. To answer questions about
payments or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all
advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of
publication. Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal,
State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.
Standard abbreviations are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


4 The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


Auctions


Employment


I RalEsat fr al Srvce


Real Estate for Rent


Financial


Merchandise


Transportation


I vE 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears
online at no additional charge.


R u A


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment

North Jacksonville

OCEANWAY Large lot off Dunn
Creek Rd. Remodeled, owner
financed home. We supply
mortgage 3 or 2 bedrooms,1.5 ba.
$68K, $6K down call 904-376-9210


V Nassau County

STATE OF FLORIDA
NASSAU COUNTY
BELL RIVER WATERFRONT
MINIMUM BID $510,000.
20.09 +/- acre parcel with multiple
buildings. For complete terms,
call Lisa Kremer (850)245-2746
BID #BPLA2013-001
Bid deadline is 10:00 AM, EST,
February 13, 2013
Sold by quitclaim deed
"AS IS" WHERE IS"

W Waterfront


CLEARWATERI/GRANDIN FLA.
Newly built 2 bedroom on
Lake Clearwater / Grandin, large
lot, boat house and pier $75,000.
Call 256-608-9725 or 256-437-2612
256-608-8552 1

PRICE FREE FALL $89K $89K $89K



$89K. St Johns River frontage--125';
high & dry. Best buy on the river
Putnam Co. WORTH THE DRIVE.
904-814-6915

"'VOut of Area/Town/State

TIMBERLAND SALE
Cherokee & Rusk Counties, TX
5 Tracts from 110 acres to 255 acres
Will not Divide
Price $1,500/ac to $2,000/ac
Excellent Timber & Hunting
Creeks, Mature Timber, and
Premerchantable Timber
Call 850-509-8817

Manufactured Homes

Countryside Village Mobile Home
Park, 10960 Beach Blvd. 8 miles west of
Jax Beach. Extra Irg mobile hm on
Irg corner lot, 4br/2ba w/living rm
dining rm combo, Irg den w/wood
burning firepic, eat in kitc. $36,000
obo. Call Frank Mayo 904-620-0031,
904-463-5758 or Rema at 904-472-9340

WSt. Johns Condominiums
for Sale

PONTE VEDRA BEACH -
Gated Sawgrass CC, Quail Pointe
1 Level spacious 2br/2bath for
sale by owner includes all appli-
ances, blinds, linens, dishes/pots,
micro, some furniture. Call
845-216-9694, edbouton@aol.com



Apartments Furnished
Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Mini-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St Johns Apartments Furnished
St Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St Johns Condominiums
St Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St Johns Houses Furnished
St Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St Johns Lots
St Johns Roommates
St Johns Rooms to Rent
St Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St. Johns Vacation Rental
St. Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St. Johns Wanted to Rent

'W Apartments Furnished

RIVERSIDE SOUTHSIDE SAN MARCO
Nicest clean studio, great area +
parking $695 & up. Incis UTILITIES
walk 2 shops, cafes 737-8194 616-3367

'Apartments Unfurnished

ARLINGTON REGENCY AREA
lbd Apt, CH&A, swimming pool
laundry matt special starting $550.
Call George 993-1529

MURRAY HILL III Affordable
Senior Living Must be 62 +.
Studios & 1 bedrooms incl. utils.
Handicap accessible units avail!
Income based rent.
Equal housing opportunity.
Call 904-381-4800; TTY 800-955-8771

ORANGE PARK 1BR/1BR
All appliances, w/d hookup, newly
painted tile floor t/o, 1 small pet
max 20lbs. No smoking $650mo.
+ $650dp. Backgrd/credit check.
904-545-5029. 37 Knight Boxx Rd,

Riverside -1 Bdrm $425
Westside- 1 Br $450 2 Br $550
$3SApp. Fee! 771-12143
$200 OFF 1st Month Rent (wap)

WESTSIDE/MURRAY HILL
SPECIAL 1BR $399.00
LIMITED TIME OFFER!
$99.00 Security Deposit
904-329-1985


W Condominiums

Southside Luxury Furnished 1br
condo in gated community, all
appliances, w/d, refrig., stove,
d/w, microwave all like new. Pool
& gym. No smkg & no pets.
$890/month. 904-307-1386

SOUTHSIDE The Lakes
Nice large 2/2, 1st floor, appls,
W/D, backs up to woods.
$795mo.+$795dep 904-807-8743


"V Houses Furnished


ORTEGA FARMS
2BR Furn $475. 2BR Unfurn $450.
w/d conn. No pets/No smokers.
Call 904-388-1335


SHouses Unfurnished


3 Bedroom/2 Bath;

1589 Sq. Ft.

(904) 379-0481
Visit our website at
www.jaxpm.com to view our
available rental homes

Voted Best Rental Selection
Iy in Jacksonville

Arlington off Atlantic & Nitram
7138 Hallock St. 3/2, new int,
tile & wood firs, big den,
fenced, $825mo.
Westside off 103rd & Kinkaid St
8536 Cheryl Ann Ln. brick 3/2,
dbl gar, 1300sf, ch&a, $995mo.
382-3886

ARLINGTON/FT. CAROLINE
4br/2ba Avail. 3//13.
Fenced yard & deck. Access to
boat ramp &comm. pool.15 min.
to Mayport Navy base 1 month sec.
& lyr lease req. Call 651-6563

EASTSIDE- 3314 Haines Street,
32206. 3br/1ba, ch&a, w/d hkup, fncd
yrd, close to downtown/shopping/
sports complex. $750mo + $350 sec
dep. Call Curtis 407-342-6233 or
email: cwilliamsl@cfl.rr.com

NORTHSIDE 3BR/1BA
CH&A, w/d hookup
HUD ok, near bus route.
$650mo + dep.
Call 904-219-3902

ORANGE PARK CC Gated
Community 4/3 beautiful brick
house spacious open floor plan,
fireplace, 2 car garage, great
backyard. $1,650mo. 305-607-7464

SOUTHSIDE 3/2.5, 1700sf,
townhome in gated commu-
nity w/club house and pool,
has lake views. 1-car garage,
screened patio, fresh paint,
small pets ok with dep.
$1350/mo. Call 954-234-8759
WESTSIDE 3Br CLEAN Starting e
$695mo. CH&A, carpet, tile fenced,
w/d hkup. 384-2944 www.tpsiax.com

Westside We have several
affordable 3/2 & 4/2 w/low secu-
rity deposits. Easy access to 1-95
& 1-295. Call 904-631-5906, 463-4165
email: mccoyrosiemccoy@aol.comI


0r Manufactured Homes

ARLINGTON FT. CAROLINE
3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME ON
1/2 ACRE PRIVATE LOT. EASY
10 MIN DRIVE TO MAYPORT.
13050 Mt. PLEASANT RD. CH&A.
$800/MO. $500/DEP. 904-234-4280


W Rooms to Rent

ARLINGTON/W'side/N'side Furn,
ph, TV, w/d, $100-$130 wk 838-4587
MAYPORT Jax beach off Fl Blvd.
Quiet single family with pool share
kitchen. REF $425/mo Jan 242-0411
Northside nr bus route furn. rm, ch&a w/d
$125wk empi verif/bkgrd 672-5337, 219-3902


Storage/Mini-Lockers

Pan Am Mini Storage
2383 Mayport Rd, Atlantic Beach,
FL 32233, 241-2300,
Free Month & Free Lock!


Support
your military
newspaper.

Mirr...or


-mIl


Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent

r Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
Warehouse w/Offices 3.80 SF and under
Great for Ind/Svc/Dist. Grade Level. $4/sf
NNN & under! Near J IA,95, 295 & 9A.
Units have access to Common Area
Ramps, 3 phase power Call Lisa 493-5555


JACKSONVILLE


ST. JOHN'S WOODS 4/2 $1295
BONAPARTE LANDING 3/2 $1150
DEERFIELD LAKES 1/1.5 $595
PARADISE COVE 3/2 $1350
BISHOPS COURT AT WINDSOR PARK 1/1 $695


ESPLANADE AT TOWN CENTER 1/1
ARLINGTON HILLS 3/1
HIDDEN VILLAGE 3/2
MEADOWLAKES 4/2
COBBLESTONE 3/2
EAGLES HAMMOCK 4/3
MERRILL PINES 3/2
SEASONS AT MILL COVE 2/2.5
RIVERPOINT 3/2


$700
$795
$1000
$1200
$1150
$1450
$850
$950
$1275


Avail NOW
Avail 3/10
Avail 2/1
Avail 2/15
Avail NOW
Avail 2/1
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail 12/1
Avail 1/1/13
Avail 12/1
Avail 11/15
Avail NOW


I
-uins&


Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold

"'Business Opportunities

LASER BUSINESS & PATENTS
High Profit Margin 500 + Dealers
$450K (912)379-0990







Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events

"V AC and Heating

Repair All A/C Brands Family
owned and operated by retired
Navy lic # cac 1815374. 904-755-7760


' Cleaning Service

FREE Cleaning Services. go to:
YOUR PERSONAL MAID.COM
Call Today! (904) 651-3334


7.8 Billion
Th eoonomlo Impact of the
military in Northest Florida
and Southeast Omorgla te
*T.8 billion.
Loxal hu. ene mmes nfit ,m le nlll1r and Mllnan petrsnelwho
kn .. wh your blni.. has ,. offer by ad. sng In o, or all of
- ...d. d-_..




', g. a .. F
igi-i.g Miirror- -rIlgue
-,.- b

l~iORPMANS I


The best bargain
in town.
Mi ror






Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
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Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
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Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted


-.

.I d w .lMa& ld. s. aa C cllaksa l
904-720-5266 www.lyndworld.com 301 Caravan Circle Jacksonville, FL
S.: W4C r ail'fot4VPW ailsMi k -


Navy

Classified

Ads


THE FLEET________________________________

M ARKET Rank/Grade: Work Phone# Organization: Date Submitted:
Name(please print): Signature:
A DVERTI1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military 7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
RU L ES personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to the Mayport calling 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
th Naval Station. 8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-366-6230, however, they must be completed
Please fill out this 2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to on an original form.
form in black or help qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads Select the number of weeks ad is to run: 0 1 wk 0 2 wks 0 3 wks 0 4 wks
blue ink. such as sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. ANIMAL To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Mirror.
OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED FREE. CHILD CARE NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No
DEADLINES PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT more than one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free
OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF ads per family, per week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the
STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN Classified Index.
TH IEI ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD- OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
T EII 3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be
written independent of other information contained on this form.
RROR 4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue. Category:
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, Bldg. 3.
Box 280032, Mayport Naval Station, Mayport, FL 32228-0032, or to The Mirror, ,.. M s MAYPORT. FLORIDA
NOOn One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 r
Frda 6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the r
-rnday above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any
or all ads. One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202

m | r f| DT


I


i- -I


I I I 1 0


I I I


Commercial Real Estate Pets/Animals


MANY MORE HOMES AVAILABLE
JUST CALL US AT 241-5501
www.hfriax.com
2292 Mayport Rd, Suite 1 (Near NEX)




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013 15


AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade

1 Appliances

Appliances, buy, sell, trade & repair
W/Ds, Refrigs., stove, $85-up wrnty.
Man- Sun. 9-7. Delivery 904-695-1412
Appliances Equip. cafe closed.
Equip 4 sole. must pickup by 01/31.
call 548-0444
SHoneywell Freestanding Oil
Base Heater, used 1 winter,
S $45. Kenmore Washer/Dryer
series 80, both $150. Avi
01/23/13. Call after 6pm. 904-573-0134
Whirlpool Refrigerator 18cu
top freezer $325. Whirpool
Range $200. Range hood $80.
Good cond. 904-503-4660

W Collectibles

WANT TO BUY U.S. Military
patches & medals. German &
Japanese Souvenirs. Antique swords
guns and knives. Call 477-6412

Estate Sales

B. LANGSTON'S PRESENTS
San Marco Retro Estate
Retro, vintage, 50's-70's, jewelry,
art, riding mower, tools. Fri/Sat. 9-5
4101 Gadsden Rd. blongston.com
B. LANGSTON'S PRESENTS
Mandarin New England Style
Cupboards, primitives, copper,
nice glassware, pottery, jewelry,
prints, sterling, Lusterware, art.
10421 Osprey Nest Dr. W.
Thur 5-7 Fri/Sat 9-5 blangston.com
Northside 1758 Cedar Bay Rd. off
Main St. Fri/Sat 9-5, Sun 11-2, Head
vase collection, women size lX & 2X
clothes. www.yesterdayschildinc.com

'q Furniture / Household

. BANQUET DINNING ROOM
TABLE Open to 8ft 2"
_L $600. 904-247-5686
BED-A BARGAIN brand new
queen pillow top set. Still in origi-
nal plastic $125. call or text 662-2604
SSolid Oak Table, 5 chairs,
medium oak, rattan outdoor
furniture, 4pcs, table, Mag-
navox TV, 904-583-2246,
904-266-0941. Moving Sale!
STwin size bed w/mattress &
Shdbd, exc cond, like new $100.
JStationary bike $60. 553-3887

SGarage Sale

San Marco Garage Sale-Furniture,
art work, rugs, misc. 904-535-7252
4042 Barcelona Ave. Sot. 8am- til ...
This Fri/Sat 9-5. 8291 Barra-
cuda Rd., entertainment cen-
ter, toys, decor, children's &
adult clothes, numerous misc.
904-781-2760


Machinery and Tools

WOOD WORKING SHOP TOOLS
FOR SALE CALL 904-879-4469

Medical





Misc. Merchandise

1997 CLUB CAR Custom, GA3,
6" lift, AM/FMCD, Bikini top,
fender flares, wheel spacers,
H D logo, $3200obo. 912-882-5294.
Electric Water Heater bought
|'06 works great i switched to
Tankless have receipt 7
manual $60. 771-0657
STORE LIQUIDATION
2285 Kingsley Ave Orange Park
1/23-27 Shelving, pallet racking,
office furniture, break room equip,
baler, material handling, safe,
checkout/service counters morel
616 272 4511

W Sporting Goods


4 New Tigershark PowerPod
Golf Driver w/headcover
X senior flex only $60. Call Walt
778-9167- Iv msg.

"' Wanted To Buy or Trade

4, WANTED- Indian Artifacts,
Spearheads range from
$100-$1000ea. & smaller arrow-
heads $5 to $100 each. Free
appraisals. WANTED Old brass
or copper buttons from War of 1812,
Civil War or Civilians from 1800's.
912-576-5945/912-270-6342



Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted

Pets and Supplies

Australian Shepherd Pups,
$250-$300, 912-403-0197
CHIHUAHUA S/W CKC, health cert.
10 weeks, great bloodline 904-361-8813
OLDE ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPS
8W registered $1500. 904-314-7048
Yorkshire Terrier T-cup Pups CKC
Ready March 11th Call 904-259-7867

7.8 Billion
The conomica Impact ol the
military In maoeast Florida
and Southeast Georgia In
$7.8 biliMl.

the military publlkanons dstibuted at heS IyI ba..Inlr th .

lnI..5 1 i..



,, o..w Mirr. r ... iH ,s
-11ro! Mir r -1.1- 1.


Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease

VW Boats

4 1997 SEASPORT C/C 20' 140hp
Suzuki Bimini Fish Finder 3
blade S/S Prop. Many extras.
$9,000obo. 904-505-7455

RVs and Supplies

5th Wheel Camper 3 Slides
Sleep 4 DIx Model Many
upgrades one owner exc cond.
16' Awning $22,000. 904-771-7295
Gulfstream Mako TT 30' 2007 EC,
Fireplace, New Canopy and power
lack, Lg slide out, beautiful inte-
rior, like new. Original list price
$32k asking $16,500/obo
contact: Mike 904-237-5157
, VRI Travel Trir tow eg. 2
TV's, bath, new tires, queen
bed, sips 6, lanai, slide-out
$12K. 642-0881 716-1768

"WMotorcycles/Mini Bikes
SHARLEY DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER EXCEL. COND.
$5900. Black/chrome 6000mi's,
like new. 904-310-6321

W Auto Parts

SLEER Fiberglass truck cover
Dodge $300. Superchip G or D
Dodge 03-07 $450. Tailgate
Dodge 03-07 3500 $200.
904-278-5091

M Automobiles

2003 Jaguar XJ V8 Vanden Plas,
mint condition, original owner
$14,000.00 or best offer. If inter-
ested please contact Talmage or
Marvin at 1-414-378-1602
t, 2011 FORD MUSTANG
Convert., custom Ithr, V6,
13,400mi's, like new garage
kept, $22K. 904-535-5463
Lincoln Towncar 1999 Cartier Ed,
1 owner, dealer maint, 88K miles,
immaculate cond. $4300 904-285-3269
SATURN SL 2001 90k mi, exc
cond, 38mpg, $3800 904-259-7867
S'01 TOYOTA AVALON SLX
S4dr green v6 97k new tires
't great car $7500. '97 Nissan
Max 4dr white $3500obo. '98
BMW 740il 4dr white gar kept
$7900obo RJ 912-467-3367

'Trucks / Trailers I SUVs

1996 CHEVY SILVERADO
Truck, 2dr, extra cab, blue
w/camper top, new Michalen
tires, runs great $3500. 149k
(low miles) Call R.J. 912-467-3376
Chevy S10 2001 AC, CD, radio,
small V6 all new gaskets, hunter
green $2,500. cash only 904-786-0840.
Jeep Wrangler Sport '01 manual,
A/C, 28k mi., exc cond., green w/tan
soft top. Alpine radio. 904-687-4442


mhelimes-llnion





drive


DEALER DIRECTORY






KJTT^TT.TI .ptffT~1.....


0
B11ICK

KEY BUICK-GMC
4660 Southside Blvd.
642-6060
NIMNICHT
BUICK-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy
685-8820





CLAUDE NOLAMCADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd.

--I


NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
904-647-4220
www.nimnichtchevy.com
JERRY HAMM CHEY
3494 Philips Hwy.
398-3036
www.jerryhamm.com

RON ANDERSON
CHEVROLET BUICK GMC
464054 State Rd. 200
YuleeFI 32097
904-261-6821

CHRVSLU-R



ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US1 South
354-4421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A& BAYMEADOWS.
4930000
RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fem Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com
ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd.
777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com


ATLANTIC DODGE
www.alanticeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421

JACKSONLJECHRVMSLR
Nm
9A& Baymeadows 493-0000

ORANGE PARK CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.cmm

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Femrn Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com




PAULCL IKFORDMFAUR
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673
MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325
MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060
MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673




NMNICHT GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 685-8820





DUVAL HONDA
1325CassatAve. 899-1900
LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300


KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd.
642-6060







ATLANTIC JEEP
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US 1 South
354-4421

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A& BAYMEADOWS.
493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Femrn Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com

ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd.
777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com





KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078


TE.lEB


NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN
4620 Southside Blvd.
642-4100

MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN
7700 Blanding Blvd.
777-3673


KEITH PERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circle.
771-9100

ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310CassalAve. 389-4561


O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
VISIT OSTEENVWCOM
TODAY!
904-322-5100
TOM BSH VOLKSWAGEN
VISIT TOMBUSHVW.COM
904-725-0911


OSTEEN VOLVO
www.osteenvolvo.com
396-5486


AUTO UNE
A Family owned
Business
autolinepreowned.com
2126MaypodtRd., Aanic
Beach
904-242-8000

AUTOS
BEACHBLVD.
AUTOMOTIVE
Family Owned Since 1967
beachblvdautomotve.com
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511


DARCARS
WESTSIDE
PRE-OWNED
SUPERSTORE
1672 Cassat Ave.
904-384-6561
www.westsidedodge.net


O'STEENVW
CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED

VISIT OSTEENVW.CON
TODAY;
904-322-5100


WORLD IMPORTS
CERTIED
PRE-OWNED
AUTO CENTER
www.woddimporsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.




SUPPORT
YOUR LOCAL

DEALERSHIPS

BY SHOPPING
LOCALLY.

READ DRIVE
EVERY

SATURDAY IN
THE

TIMES-UNION
OR GO TO
DRIVEJACKSONVILLE.COM

FOR GREAT
LOCAL DEALS.

LETS SHOP
LOCAL!
1403738


_IPAZDAA -W L CT
MDA OF ORANGE PARK




BEST SELECTION BEST DEALS

IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA


2013 MAZDA3




40 MPG* $



STK ,'C7O V
TECHNALIOG Y


Per Month*


20 14 M DA --6E


38 MPG*



TECHNOL OG Y


2013 MAZDA CX-5



1 35 MPG* S


20143 MAZDA OX- 9







Per Month*


TomBushMazda.com
(877)361-6287
9876 Atlantic Blvd.


MazdaCity.com
(877)372-5235
6916 Blanding Blvd.


Start Your Search at TomBush.com

For What Drives You!


ONLY AT

Tom Bush Mazda &

Mazda City


Per Month*


*Estimated 38 HWY MPG




16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 31, 2013





... Jeep6 S
J A K 4N L





........... . .. ...... .. .....:. ."' ..... .":" ...... . ..==========' ." .... ... ... ...


AI
















a BRAND NEW
JEEP PATRIOT
FUN IN THE SUN,
"2 ~~JEEP HERITAGE, 4'
WE GREAT ON GAS

efid WW R r
Prc Paymen $209 S*


BRAND NEW
DODGE AVENGER
GREAT ON GAS, LOADED WITH
EQUIPMENT, AND STILL SAVE
THOUSANDS.




CHRYSLER 200
IMPORTED FROM DETROIT.
CHRYSLER STYLE, CHRYSLER LUXURY,
YOU GET BOTH AT HUGE SAVINGS.
Pi c a m n $ 3
$1 9 8 peSonh


BRAND NEW
JEEP LIBERTY

AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS
& LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, CD


a


$1998 pe mnlI


BRAND NEW
DODGE DART
A/C, POWER WINDOWS,
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, j
AM/FM CD, 39 MPG 1


BRAND NEW
GRAND CARAVAN
7 PASSENGER SEATING,
STOP & GO, AUTOMATIC,
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
KEYLESS ENTRY



BRAND NEW
DODGE CHARGER
STYLISH, SPORTY,
GREAT ON GAS

Price Payment $2990
$21,988 per mo0lh*


r - - - - - - -


ANY SERVICE
NOTTOlBEIUSEDIINICONUUNCTIONWITHANY I
I OTHER'O MI'ERC URONIOR]PREVIOUSIPURCH SE. I
IEXC-iUDEShTAX(SHOR ISUPIES. COUPONMUST I
I BEIRRESENTED AT TIMEOPF'SERVICE.
Must present coupon to dealer.


14AUIGNMENTSREGIAL
T *NOTtOBEIIUSEDIINICONJUNCTIONIWITrANY
T OgERIOJE CRjq0UPONIgglRIRIOPUSIPURCHASE.
I EXCIIUDESTAX ~&SHOP'SURPPLIES. COUPONMUST
S BEIRPRESENTED AT TIMEOF'SERVICE.
Must present coupon to dealer.
L - - - - - - -


O.LCHANGEANDWTIRE


9.9--5
*NO, B E USED]IN CONJUNCTIONNWITHIANYiOTHERLOFFER,
COUPOIN PREVIO P ASE.XMESMA '!SHOP
$.UIES;! EXClUDES1HEMIS .SYNTHETICANDIDIESELS.
'COURONIMUSTiBE'PRESENTEDIAT TIME(OFSERVICE.
Must present coupon to dealer.


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