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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00299


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Going The Distance -Photo by Paige GnannLt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger of ATG Mayport completes the swim portion of the Beaches Fine Arts Series triathalon May 18 held on board Naval Station Mayport. Hundreds of athletes to participate in the first of three triathalon events held on the base. The event included a mile ocean swim, 16.8 mile bike and 3.4 mile run. The next triathalon will be held on June 8. There will be an Olympic distance race on July 13, comprised of a .9 mile swim, 25.2 mile bike and 6.2 mile run. The Beaches Fine Arts Kids Triathlon will be held on Sunday, June 23. Please contact the office at 904-270-1771 for location information. -Photo by Paige GnannUSS The Sullivans Color Guard parades the Colors as members of the St. Augustine Navy League, Cmdr. Sam DeCastro, The Sullivans commanding officer, and Chaplain Buster Williams stand for the National Anthem during a ship adoption ceremony on May 20.Navy League Adopts USS The Sullivans CrewThe Mirror editorMembers of the St. Augustine Navy League and the crew of USS The Sullivans gathered on the ships flight deck May 20 for an adoption ceremo ny that continues a long tradition of fellowship between the organization and Mayports waterfront. Also on hand for the ceremony were repre sentatives from Senator Marco Rubio, Senator Bill Nelson and Congressman Ron DeSantis offices. Adoption of a ship by the Navy League is a bond, much like a mar riage, said guest speaker Bill Dudley, guest speaker and former St. Augustine and North East Florida Navy League presi dent. The St. Augustine Council has long his tory of adopting ships [thoughtout NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville and Coast Guard]. We are proud to be a part of The Sullivans family. We will stick together. As there first act of sup port, the council took a moment to recognize the ships Sailors of the Year. I am fortunate to be attached to a ship which has already and will con tinue to experience the hospitality of the Navy League, said Cmdr. Samuel DeCastro, com manding officer of USS New CO At ATG MayportCmdr. Adam M. Aycock took command of Afloat Training Group Mayport on May 14. Aycock was born and raised in Warren County, Tennessee. He graduated from Warren County High School. Aycock spent a year at Vanderbilt University before heading to the United States Naval Academy, where he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Oceanography. After commissioning, Aycock headed to the vast Western Pacific, taking orders to Forward Deployed Naval Forces warships USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60), as Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer, Damage Control Assistant, Chief Engineer, and Communications Officer, and USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), as Assistant Operations Officer. Next, he took orders to stateside warships as the Operations Officer in both USS Stethem (DDG 63) and USS Princeton (CG 59). After Princeton, he reported to the Naval Bureau of Personnel as the assistant SWO Community Manager and the Second Tour Department Head Detailer. He headed to the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College as a student, where he earned a Masters Degree in Military Studies. He went back to sea to command the iron crew MCM Crew Reaper, and the great wooden warships USS Gladiator (MCM 11), forward deployed to Bahrain, and USS Sentry (MCM 3), homeported in Ingleside, Texas. His next assignment was onshore again when he reported to the Joint Staff, J34 Anti-terrorism/ Homeland Defense, as the Maritime SME and the Joint Staffs MOTR Coordinator and Interagency MOTR COIT member. Concurrently, he attended the Joint Forces Staff College as a student of the Joint & Combined Warfighting School, earning JPME Phase II and ulti mately his Joint Qualified Officer designation. Aycock relieved Cmdr. Roy Love as commanding officer. Cmdr. Adam Aycock ATG Mayport COSee The Sullivans, Page 6

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror When the alarm goes off in the morning, and your brains cells begin to stir, a myriad of possible first thoughts might pop into your head. The minivan needs gas for the morning car pool. Should I forgive my husband for the fight we had last night? Dont forget to get something for Fathers Day. I won der if Junior will pass his Calculus exam. None of these early morning contemplations can accurately predict the course of the rest of your day, but there is one par ticular first thought that is a definite Red Flag. If you wake up in the morn ing, and think, I need a nap, you can bet your overpriced wrinkle cream that the rest of your day is pretty much gonna blow. I know this, because that is exactly what Ive been thinking lately. Ive been dragging my weary bones out of bed all week, when all I want to do is crawl back under the cov ers and hide from the inevitable calamity of my unmanageable schedule. Is it the exams, events and final grade panic of the end of the school year thats got me want ing to stay in bed? Well, not quite. Is it my sons Eagle Scout Ceremony, which we insanely decid ed to host at our house this weekend for more than 50 people? Well, not exactly. Is it the fact that my husband is being Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesVPK stands for the Voluntary Prekindergarten Education Program. If you live in Florida, and your child turns 4 four years of age by September 1, your child is eligible to participate in Floridas FREE Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) education program. Transportation is not provided for this program NS Mayports Child Development Center (CDC), Finegan Elementary, and Mayport Elementary will be offer ing VPK for 2013-2014. All three sites will offer the FREE portion of the program from 8:30-11:30 am, Monday through Friday. A fee-based Extended Day program from 11:30 am to 3:00 pm is also available at all of these sites. There is no registration fee for either program at Finegan Elementary or Mayport Elementary. Students currently enrolled at the CDC have first choice for placement in their sites VPK. Other children will be placed on a waiting list. In addi tion to the Extended Day program, there is a WrapAround program which allows a child to attend from as early as 6 AM to as late as 6 PM. For those parents who wish to enroll the child in the Extended Day or WrapAround program, there will be a $60 enrollment fee which is then deduct ed from the first months bill. This Pre-K program prepares children to be ready for school. Children who participate in highquality early childhood education programs develop better language skills, score higher in school-readiness tests and have better social skills and fewer behav ioral problems once they enter school. They are also better prepared for Kindergarten, especially in the areas of pre-read ing, pre-math and social skills. The early years are the learning years. A childs ability to be attentive and to follow directions emerges in these early years. Therefore, a struc tured early learning fos ters these abilities for later success in school and in life. And Pre-K pro motes a love of learning in children. Additionally it enhances what a child learns at home and instills a love of life-long learn ing. With reading and writ ing skills the focus of VPK, it is important the class sizes are small. In the program ratios are one instructor to ten chil dren. Class size must not exceed 18 children in the school-year program. The VPK program will better prepare Floridas young children for a suc cessful Kindergarten experience by focus ing the Department of Educations efforts on early literacy. This legis lation assigns responsi bilities for the day-to-day management of the pro gram to the Office of Early Learning (OEL); licensing and credentialing to the Department of Children and Families (DCF); and the creation of standards, curriculum, and account ability to the Department of Education (DOE). All three agencies are work ing together to provide leadership and support to the local early learning coalitions and school dis tricts to ensure the suc cessful implementation of effective prekindergar ten education programs for Floridas four-year-old children. The Early Learning Coalition (ELC) was des ignated by Department of Education to lead the program in Duval County. ELC has created a partnership with Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) to support learn ing from the earliest stage of a childs development and continues through secondary education. DCPS is confident that this partnership will help eliminate the problem of children starting kinder garten unable to read and provide children with the necessary knowledge to succeed from day one in school. To register your child for VPK, go to ELC office near est you (http://elcofduval. org or 904.208.2044 for locations/application), complete VPK appli cation, receive VPK Certificate of Eligibility, take VPK Certificate of Eligibility to school of choice, complete DCPS regis tration form at Finegan or Mayport, have school office place student of ELC VPK Enrollment Roster Form, review with school staff member the VPK Parent Letter and Handbook, and sign and receive a copy of the Parent Letter. If you have additional questions, you can con tact the CDC at 904-2477740 or 904-241-4507; Finegan Elementary School at 904.247.5999 or Mayport Elementary School at 904-247-5988 or visit Mayport Elementary on May 23 from 6-7:30 p.m. for Coastal Sciences Family Night. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingFall VPK Offered At CDC, Finegan & MayportRemember the days of old; consider the gen erations long past. Ask your father and he will tell you, your elders and they will explain to you (Deuteronomy 32:7, NKJV). A few weeks ago, a friend posted on Facebook about an incident on a plane that upset him. The plane was about to land, and the pilot came on the speaker and asked all passengers to remain in their seats even when plane comes to a complete stop. The pilot went on to explain that the plane was carrying the body of a U.S. Service member and to show respect, if the passengers would remain in their seats while the casket was being taken off the plane. Much to the sur prise and disappointment of my friend, as soon as the plane stopped, a sig nificant number of his fel low passengers stood up and began gather their things in anticipation of deplaning. Although many remain seated in silent observance of the Captains request, enough people stood up to dis rupt the sacred moment. I m certain one could find several compelling reason why several of the passengers chose to ignore the pilots request. Perhaps they were late and afraid to miss a connecting flight. But I am afraid; its possible, that they simply did not care. So many things have shift ed in our culture, that as a people, we may be losing our sense of the sacred. I hope not. In the next few days we will be observing Memorial Day. This is a day our country sets aside to honor the men and women of our Armed Forces who have given the last full measure of devotion to their coun try by dying in service to our country. Initially observed as Decoration Day to honor Union and Confederate military who died in the Civil War, it has since come to be a day to honor all the dead from all of our nations wars and conflicts. Unfortunately, if you were to look at a televi sion ad, you might come to easily believe that Memorial Day is larg est car sales event of the year. You can easily pick up on conversations that speak of long drives, vacations, cook-outs, and par ties, and because that is what many people will likely do, you will hear at a Navy safety stand down that Memorial Day is the beginning of the 100 days of summer. While there is nothing wrong with pur chasing a bargain on a car this weekend, and teach ing Sailors safety and risk management is crucial for a long holiday weekend, Memorial Day is a sacred day that should compel all Americans, regardless of political persuasion, to at least take a moment to pause, reflect, pray and acknowledge our nations war dead. This Memorial Day, I encourage you and your family to participate at a number of events that are being held in our area. The City of Jacksonville is hold ing its Annual Memorial Day Observance at 0900 at Memorial Wall, adja cent to the west parking lot of Everbank Field. The Beaches Memorial Day Program will be held at 1400 at American Legion Post 316 in Atlantic Beach. If you cant make it to make one of these events, at least take some time to pause, reflect, and pray by yourself or with your family. It is, after all, a sacred moment. I invite you now to join with me in this prayer for Memorial Day found in the Book of Common Prayer: ALMIGHTY God, our heavenly Father, in whose hands are the living and the dead; We give thee thanks for all those thy servants who have laid down their lives in the service of our country. Grant to them thy mercy and the light of thy pres ence, that the good work which thou hast begun in them may be perfected; through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord. Amen.Chap Jerome R. Cayangyang Command Chaplain CHAPLAINSMemorial Day: A Sacred Moment Worth TakingGive Me Liberty Or Give Me NapsIm fortunate enough to have an office window that overlooks Massey Avenue here on the Naval Station. But, through that window daily I see things that are disturbing. No, its not the speeders going well over the 25 mph limit. My concern lies in the behavior demonstrat ed by both drivers and personnel outside when we honor our country with morning colors. Drivers must be head ed to some emergency because most of them do not stop their vehi cles when our National Anthem is being played maybe someone in the line has the radio volume below 25 and eventually hears the Anthem being played and stops, forc ing the rest of the traffic behind them to also stop. Those outside or walking may or may not stop and render appropriate hon ors. Some simply contin ue walking to get inside or quickly get back in their car. Some simply stop and stare. A few do face the nearest flag and salute or place their hand over their heart. Its disheartening that we have become so busy so as to not take a few minutes to honor our country. We profess to love and fight for freedom and then we often dem onstrate so little apprecia tion for the very freedom and country we profess to defend and honor. Take a minute tomor row and participate proudly in morning col ors. David C. Phillips SERMC LetterSee Naps, Page 3

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wined and dined all week while on a work trip in South America while I am left driving this runaway train? Well, yes, but not entirely. Or could it be that we are moving to Rhode Island in less than a month, and were nowhere near ready? Well, yeah, maybe. Or is it the fact that I am franti cally scribbling this col umn on a legal pad at Starbucks, because I just killed my laptop when I knocked my coffee onto the keyboard 12 minutes ago, and fear that I might have to use my thumbs to tap this thing into my Smartphone to get it to the editors? Hell yes, truth be told. But its not any one thing that has me dream ing of naps. Its the total ity of my circumstances as a middle-aged Navy wife and mother of three teens. Recently, I was lament ing my to my neighbor, a 25-year Navy wife with two grown boys, when she validated my malaise. Yea, I remember when the boys were in high school, she said, and I told my husband one day, Im exhausted. He told me to go take a nap, and I told him, No, I mean, Im globally tired after 18 years of raising kids. Thirty minutes of shut eye aint gonna cut it. Ironically, now that her boys have flown the coop and shes an empty nester, shes napping more than ever, just because she can. The rest of us middleaged moms must keep slogging along, waiting for the day when our sched ules ease up enough that we can enjoy the luxury of a delicious afternoon nap. In the meantime, we can take comfort in the [slightly modified] immortal words of poet Emma Lazarus, thought fully inscribed on the base of our Statue of Liberty: Give me your tired, your poor, Your befuddled housewives yearn ing to break free, With wretched refuse in their teeming heads. Send these, the napless, tempest-tost to me, And Ill tuck them all into their comfy beds! Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2NapsEverybody Has A Sea Story To TellWe have all heard sea stories; and I think it is safe to say we all want to have a sea story that would be worth telling our children one day. Even better, we all want a story our kids will actually want to hear. I have only been in the Navy a little under four years and I do not yet have a sea story worth telling. I have time, but I still worry I will not do anything noteworthy during my career. In the Shadow of Greatness, tells the sto ries of the United States Naval Academy Class of 2002. In 2011, President Barak Obama suggested that the current military force is the next Greatest Generation, referenc ing back to the World War II generation of ser vice members as the first greatest. When the class of 2002 signed up to serve in 1998, they had no idea that months before becoming commissioned officers that the U.S. would go to war. These officers, seven years my senior also struggle with my same question, what will be my contribution? How do we live up to the title of greatest genera tion? The stories include Marines on the ground, jet pilots in the sky, and at-sea rescues. These sto ries may have a ring of familiarity to some, but they will move you and leave you feeling proud to serve our country. The reality is that the military will take you places that you never expected or even wanted to go. Surface Warfare Officers go to Iraq; Submarine Officers go on peacekeeping missions in Africa; Marines lose comrades; and others get out of the military and do great things in the civilian world. Those experiences are how our sea stories are born. Read a few sto ries from this book and I bet you will discover that you will have your own sea story; and when you find it, write it down. You never know who might want to read it one day. In the Shadow of Greatness is on the Chief of Naval Operations reading list, under the list for books to Be Ready. Until we meet again, keep read ing. Warriors Lt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger ATG MayportMemorial Day Program at ParkFrom BVMPThe Beaches Veterans will hold a Memorial Day Program honoring our fallen Veterans and those Chaplains who died sup porting them in combat since the Revolutionary War at the Beaches Veterans Memorial Park at the intersection of Mayport Road and Atlantic Boulevard. The event will begin at 1:30 p.m. with a High School Drill Team Exhibition, followed by the Memorial program at 2 p.m. The Right Reverend Charles Lovett Keyser, Past Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Forces of the United States, will dedicate The Chaplains Memorial Garden to those brave men who gave their lives for their God and Country. Please bring chairs or blankets since seating is limited and share your time in commemorating this year of remembrance for our lost family mem bers and the conflicts in which they gave their lives. The program will pro ceed in the American Legion 316 Great Hall in case of in climate weather. From StaffNaval Station Mayport Employee of the Quarter (2nd quarter) luncheon/ presentation will be held at Ocean Breeze on May 29 at 11 a.m. Please come out and support the nom inees. Pay $8 at the door. Nominees are as fol lows: Ella Hamilton, Housing Susan Rucker, FFSC Tom Burow, IT Tawana Davis, MWR Ronnie Barnes, Housing William Vermeulen, Air Ops Roy Lewis, PWD/ NAVFAC Michael Lewis, NGIS You must RVSP to Sandra Barrett by Friday, May 24 to ensure you have a seat.EOQ Lunch Set THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Mayport Holds 26th Annual Stark MemorialFrom StaffMore than 100 civil ians and service members gathered at Naval Station Mayports Memorial Park Friday for the 26th anni versary of the attack on USS Stark (FFG 31). On May 17, 1987, 37 Sailors aboard USS Stark were killed after the frig ate was struck by two Iraqi missiles while it was deplooyed on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. Despite the severe damage, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Guest speaker, retired Rear Adm. George Huchting talked about the close relationship Sailors develop as they work, eat, and live together on a ship. Our lives depend on each other and there is a closeness and a bond that forms and it is unique to being a Sailor and being at sea, he said. Shipmates -they are faces. They are flesh and blood. They are laughter. They are common experi ences. And all of you old Sailors know, they are sea stories. The service featured accounts of some of the events that occurred dur ing the attack and also events that followed. During the somber ceremony, the names of those killed at sea were read aloud by a fellow shipmate and a bell tolled for each one; 37 strikes of a bell and a 21-gun salute honored the Sailors who lost their lives. Stark was decommis sioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to pre serve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Mayports Memorial Park was established Aug. 1, 1987, with the dedication of the Stark monument. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSailors from Naval Station Mayport perform a 21-gun salute for the 37 lost Sailors of the USS Stark (FFG 31) on its 26th anniversary. The event took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial. -Photo by Paige GnannFormer USS Stark crewmembers and survivors of the 1987 attack gather at the Stark Memorial after the ceremony on May 17.-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the Orange Park JROTC Color Guard participated in this years memorial ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannNavy Region Southeast Navy Band performs Taps during the ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannFinegan Elementary students sing Proud To Be An American during the program.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 5 -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeParticipants of the USS Stark (FFG 31) remembrance ceremony place a wreath at the Stark Memorial plaque. The event took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFormer Crew member Clifford Cellars of the USS Stark (FFG 31) rings one bell for each of his 37 fallen shipmates who were lost 26 years ago. The Stark remembrance ceremony took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeRetired Rear Adm. George Hutching speaks during a remembrance ceremony for USS Stark (FFG 31). The event took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial.-Photo by Paige GnannMore than 100 civilians and service members attend the 26th anniversary of the attack of USS Stark.-Photo by Paige GnannShips Serviceman 2nd Class Jose Rivera salutes during the wreath laying portion of the service. The Second Class Petty Officer Association joined Naval Order in organizing this years event.-Photo by Paige GnannA former USS Stark crewmember bows his head in prayer during the benediction.

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6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Auto Skills Center May Special: Transmission flush, cool ant flush and fuel injec tion cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and com puters are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 May 12: Mothers Day Bingo12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. 5x $1000 Jackpots, 1x $500 Quinella, free food, extra drawings and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 5: Poker Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 June 7: Live Music by Sha Davis. 8 p.m. at Castaways. Celebrate summer with a free live concert, giveaways and lots of summer fun. 2707205 June 15: UFC 161-Bararo vs Wineland. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Community Events June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflata bles and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 June 16: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Fathers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 12 pm at Focsle; Reservations required Celebrate Dad with an all you can eat brunch fea turing omelet bar, cham pagne fountain, carv ing station and more. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while sup plies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID. Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Passholders receive unlimited access to Shipwreck Island at Adventure Landing Jacksonville Beach as well as daily deals throughout the week and special dis counts on off-season and holiday events. 270-5145 Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $31.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 5 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 24: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. May 26: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 28: COD: Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 31: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 2: Horror Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 7: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 8: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 9: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 10: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! June 12: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line June 10. June 14: Movie Trip: Man of Steel. Van departs 6 p.m. June 15: UFC 161Barao vs. Eddie. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE June 17: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 19: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 21: Movie Trip: World War Z. Van departs 6 p.m. June 22: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 24: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. June 25: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 24: Outdoor MoviesHotel Transylvania (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 May 31: Outdoor MoviesWreck It Ralph (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 7: Outdoor MoviesTwilight Saga: Breaking Dawn pt 2 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 14: Outdoor MoviesParental Guidance (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The MessdeckMayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with fries and soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Smashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet With Ice Tea or Water, $8 NEX Rewards Students For Good GradesFrom NEXCOM The NEX wants to help its customers finance their childrens college edu cation through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarter ly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of May 2013. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and mili tary retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate ver ify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. The Sullivans. We are fortunate you have decided to select us. Welcome aboard and thank you for adopting this ship and crew. We are grateful to you for all you do for our country, our Navy and now our ship. The Navy League plays such a big role supporting the sea services, he said. The Navy League has a long history with The Sullivans stemming back to their relationship with the first The Sullivans (DD 537). As a reslt of the efforts of many Navy Leagueers, the ship was brought to Buffalo, NY in 1975, where I grew up. It was DD 537 as well as the mentorship of family and friends who belonged to the Navy League, that inspired DeSantis to join the Navy, he said. [DD 537] contin ues to serve today as a museum which pays trib ute to a family that has become a national sym bol of commitment, loy alty and sacrifice....The ship is used every sum mer to train Sea Cadets. She also serves as the home of ship reunions, which helps maintain important ties between shipmates and fami lies who served together in this great Navy. All of this helps recruit future members of our Navy who are inspired by the great example provided by patriots who form todays Navy League.From Page 1The Sullivans

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Intramural Sports June 6: Mini Biathalon (Swim & Run). 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. 270-5451. June 11: Summer Beach 5K Run / 3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. June 11: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins June. 24; season ends Aug. 22. 270-5451. Aquatics June 10-13: American Red Cross Certified WSI Certification Course Participants must attend all 30 hours of training to be certified. Cost is $200 for Military/Dependents/ DOD and $250 for Civilians. Sign up at the Base Gym or the Pool. For more information, please call (904) 270-5452 or (904) 270-5101 June 7: Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 2705377 May 27: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Just $12 for 2 hours of bowling, shoe rental, lb hamburger or hot dog with fries, a soda and an ice cream sundae for des sert! Kids 4-5 years old $7; Kids 3 and under FREE. Holiday hours 11 a.m. 5 p.m. 270-5377 June 5: NS Mayport Base Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Everyone can enter; recruit your friends Grand prize is a Free Bowling Party (up to 120 people). Each bowl er on the winning team will receive a bragging rights championship t-shirt, a round of golf for 4 at Windy Harbor and 2 rounds of mini golf at Adventure Landing. Teams will play 3 games of bowling: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize!. Cost is $15 per person. Early registration dead line is May 29; register by the deadline and receive a t-shirt and 50 instant party coupons. 270-5377. June 16: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. $6.00 for 90 minutes of bowling and shoe rental, plus Colored Headpin Bowling. Hot Dog and French fries $2.75. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retir ees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25; includes banquet and awards ceremony. Sign up deadline is June 3 at the Pro-Shop. 270-5380 Surfside Fitness: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga Come experience the many physical, emotional and spiritual benefits of developing a yoga prac tice. This class focuses on the basics for those entire ly new to yoga; it also pro vides a review for anyone who wants to deepen their understanding of align ment and participate in a slower paced yoga regi men. This class focuses on introductory poses to stretch and strengthen all major muscles and joints, as well as develop greater relaxation in the entire body. 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional programming that will take your work out to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Learn how to train using the unique and inno vative TRX Suspension Training System. This class is reserved for those entirely new to TRX train ing. This class will result in increased strength, coordination, balance and CORE-power. Class size limited to 25. Class is held at Mayport Sandbox. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general infor mation on exercise and fitness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR Sports/Fitness MWR Has Fun On The Run-Photo by Sarah Barthlemy More than 60 runners took part in the Armed Forces 5K/10K on May 14. MWR sponsors Fun Runs every second Tuesday at the month starting at 8 a.m. in front of the Base Gym. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 7

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Continuing Promise Gift Helps American Vets COMUSNAVSO/COMFOURTH FLT Communication Synchronization Public AffairsWhen the Navy can celled Continuing Promise 2013 deployment due to sequestration, 280 brand-new wheelchairs from The Wheelchair Foundation, provided for the deployment mis sion to 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility. (AOR), no longer had a final destina tion. Turns out these wheel chairs were just what some American Veterans needed for their visit to the World War II Memorial in Washington D.C. The Tallahassee, Florida, Chapter of the Honor Flight Networ was planning a trip for Veterans from the Tallahassee area, but needed wheelchairs for the mission. The Honor Flight Network is a non-profit organization that trans ports American Veterans to Washigton D.C. to visit their memorials, with the priority being to senior Veterans such as World War II survivors. We need wheel chairs because the youngest of our World War II Veterans is 85 years old, said Captain Scott Barry, Special Operations Director for the Leon County Florida Emergency Management Service. The wheelchairs allow us to safely trans port many of the Veterans and help keep them com fortable as they go from place to place. Capt. Barry contacted the Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Chapter of the Wheelchair Foundation, who had provided the 280 wheel chairs to U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet (USNAVSO/ FOURTHFLT) for Continuing Promise 2013. After a few phone calls and emails, the wheel chairs, located in Norfolk, Virginia, were redirect ed to the Honor Flight Network. But one hurdle remained how to get the wheelchairs loaded onto trucks in Norfolk and taken to Tallahassee in time for the Veterans trip to Washington, D.C. Thats where a group of Fleet Logistic Center Norfolk volunteers con tributed their time and talents to palletize the wheelchairs and stage them for shipment. Approximately 20 Sailors and civilians loaded approximately 35 Pallets on two United Parcel Service semi-trucks for the trip to Tallahassee. On May 11, 79 Veterans made the trip to Washington, D.C. Volunteers from the Honor Flight Network, greeted the Veterans at the Tallahassee and Baltimore airports, and provided a police escort to and from the Memorial, all to say thank you for their service. Many of the Veterans told me this was one, if not best day of their lives, said Capt. Barry. Not only did they get to visit the Memorial but also made connections with other Vets in our area and now will continue to sup port each other in their final years. We are pleased that we were able to play a small role in helping these American heroes see their Memorial, said Rear Admiral Sinclair Harris, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet. Harris went on to say. We like to say that we do real work to help real people to make a real difference, and in this instance, we were for tunate to have just what the Honor Flight Network needed for a memorable day. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. To learn more about the Veterans Trip to Washington, D.C. on May 11, visit the Tallahassee Democrats Website at www.tallahassee.com. For more information about the Honor Flight Network please visit www.honor flight.org> Midway Dinner Tix On SaleFrom Navy Leagu MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is hosting the 71st Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years event, which will be held June 1, at the Renaissance Resort Hotel, World Golf Village in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Adm. William E. Gortney, USN, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Numerous Veterans of the Battle of Midway and several widows of these Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the mili tary have been invited to attend this years din ner. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $65. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civil ian is black tie or busi ness attire. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner Tickets may be purchased from the fol lowing locations: Bob Price, Phone 904-718-2118; email: bpricex4@comcast.net 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Navy Embraces Inclusion During 2013 Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage MonthBy Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy joins our nation in celebrating the contributions of gen erations of patriots dur ing Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month throughout May. The Navy announced April 29 in NAVADMIN 115/13, this years national theme is Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion, Inclusion is a recog nition that diversity of ideas, experiences, areas of expertise, and back grounds contribute sig nificantly to the Navys ability to fulfill its variety of missions both today and in the future. USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) exempli fied this years theme of embracing cultural values and inclusion by utiliz ing the talents, language skills, and cultural back grounds of three Sailors to further their mission in the US Navys first bilat eral anti-piracy exercise with Chinas Peoples Liberation Army (Navy) (PLA(N)). In September 2012, USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and the Chinese Frigate Yi Yang (FF 548) conducted visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) drills near the Horn of Africa to enhance cooperative antipiracy efforts. During the exercise, three Churchill Sailors were utilized as translators. Ships Serviceman 2nd Class Junwen Liang, Ships Serviceman Seaman Qing Su, and Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Guo Rui Liu, all Chinese immigrants, played an integral role in the success of the exer cise by bridging both the language and the cultur al gaps between the two crews. Liang, who immigrated to the United States from China at age 20, said he came to America speak ing almost no English and joined the Navy after pur suing further education in New York. During the exercise, Liang performed as translator for Cmdr. Chris D. Stone, com manding officer of USS Winston S. Churchill. This is a unique opportunity to use both my native and adopted languages in service of my country, said Liang. According to Stone, On-site translation and briefing on customs helped ensure solid com munication between U.S. Navy and PLA(N) Sailors, along with aiding us in understanding the cultur al nuances that help both sides better understand each other. My opportunity to take part in this exchange, and in the Navy itself, reminds me that I serve a country that accepts people from many different parts of the world, said Liang. No matter where and how I serve, Im still serv ing for my freedom and my country. Asians and Pacific Islanders of various nationalities and ances try have been serving in our Navy since the early 19th century. Asians and Pacific Islanders have continued to be at the forefront as leaders in every aspect of American life, including Senator Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaiis first Congressman and the first Japanese American to serve in Congress. Having enlisted in the US Army at age 17 and serving dur ing the Second World War, Senator Inouye was a great champion of all the armed forces throughout his career. He received the Medal of Honor for his extraordinary heroism and indomitable leader ship during an engage ment in World War II. On Dec 17, 2012 Senator Inouye passed away, leav ing behind a noted legacy of leadership and a drive to enhance inclusion in our Armed Forces and across our country. In 2013, Sailors of Asian and Pacific Islander heri tage comprise 6.5 per cent of our active duty Naval force. Over 20,000 active duty Sailors, 4,000 Reservists, and 18,900 Navy civilian employ ees identify as Asian American or Pacific Islander, including 10 flag officers, 9 members of the Senior Executive Service (SES), and 176 master chief petty officers. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders encompass over 50 ethnic and language groups, representing a vast array of cultures, nationalities, and histori cal roots. Directed by Congress in 1978 and established by Presidential Proclamation in 1979, Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week was first observed the week of May 4, 1979. In 1990, President George H. W. Bush expanded the observance to encompass the entire month, and in 1992, Congress passed a law permanently des ignating May as Asian/ Pacific American Heritage Month. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute provides print able posters, presen tations, guidance for organizing observance, and educational facts on their website, http:// www.deomi.org/ under the section Special Observances. For more information about the history of Asian and Pacific Islanders and their numerous contri butions to the Navy, visit http://www.history.navy. mil/special%20high lights/asian/asian-index. htm.From StaffHurricane season is just around the corner and there are several things you can do now to be pre pared. during a hurricane watch (36 to 24 hours prior to the arrival of hurricane conditions). -monitor radio and television reports regularly. The intensity and track of tropical storms and hurri canes can change quickly. If you do not own a NOAA weather alert radio, get one. -inspect your surviv al kit ensuring you have everything you might need. Ensure medications and food/water have not reached expiration dates. Have cash on hand; small bills, $1s, $5s and lots of coins. ATM withdrawals and debit card purchases may not be available. -ensure your vehicle has a full tank of gas, regardless of whether you plan to leave the area, go to a local shelter, or ride out the storm at home. Gas may be difficult to obtain during an evacua tion and gas stations may be out of service after a storm strikes. -prepare your house. Move items indoor that can become deadly air borne missile hazards in strong winds causing injury and damage (gar bage cans, lawn furniture, garden equipment, toys, etc.). Items too heavy to move should be tied down. Lower antennas, brace garage doors and board up or close shut ters on glass doors and windows. Move valuables to upstairs, inner rooms. Ensure gas and propane tanks for emergency gen erators, chain saws and cookers are full. -if a mandatory evacu ation order is in effect, leave the area immediately. Traveling during day light hours is preferred, but dont delay your departure when a manda tory evacuation order is issued. Remember to lock windows and doors, turn off water, gas and electric ity at the main breaker. Plug sink drains to pre vent backup. Fill bathtubs for use as flushing water when you return. If time permits, elevate furniture to protect from flooding or move upstairs. Again, a full tank of gas is essen tial for a proper evacua tion. Roads will be very crowded and it may take many hours to get out of the area. -as time allows, check on your neighbors, espe cially the elderly and fam ilies of those deployed, assist as you can in their preparations and/or evac uation. during a hurricane warn ing (24 hours or less prior to the arrival of hurricane conditions). -closely monitor radio and television for updates and official instructions. -if in a mobile home, check tie-downs and evacuate immediately. A mobile home is not suit able shelter for riding out a hurricane. -if you choose to remain at home, store drink ing water in sanitized containers. Fill bathtubs and larger containers for cleaning and flush ing water. Unplug appli ances with the exception of the refrigerator set it on maximum cold and if power is lost only open when necessary. Close all interior doors and brace external doors. If you are unable to evacuate, seek shelter in an interior room away from doors and win dows on the lowest floor level. Large appliances will support debris if roof or wall collapse occurs. Avoid the temptation to go outside during the brief calm when the Eye of the storm passes over. after the storm. -the orderly return of personnel and their families back to an area of evacuation shall be conducted only when directed by federal, state, or local authorities. Dont try to come back to the area before local emer gency management offi cials have issued the all clear. Watch for closed roads if you come upon a barricade or a flood ed road, turn around, dont drown. be patient, remember everyone else is eager to return home too. Proof of residency may be required (re-entry pass, drivers license, recent utility bill, etc). Call ahead to obtain road con ditions and to determine the availability of servic es. It is best to wait a few days to allow emergency personnel to clean up and restore conditions to normal. Ensure you keep your gas tank full gas may be difficult To get as you get closer to the area. -enter your home with caution. Although it may appear to be structurally sound, water and wind damage could be exten sive. Use a flashlight to inspect for damage; never use an open flame. Check the gas, electrical and water lines for damage. Dont use water from the tap or re-energize electri cal main breaker or gas sources until declared safe by local authorities. -contact your command leadership and monitor local news for informa tion on when you will be required to report back to your command. -be patient. Following a hurricane, it may take several weeks to restore services and clear roads, and months to remove all the debris from neigh borhoods, especially in outlying, rural areas. As able, assist neighbors and shipmates in their return to the area and recovery efforts. ability. -the past few years has seen tremendous effort throughout the Navy to ensure programs and pro cedures are in place to account and care for the Navy family after a crisis. Personnel accountability clearly remains both a command and an indi vidual responsibility. All commands are responsi ble for implementing and administering procedures for determining the status and whereabouts of Navy family members follow ing a catastrophic event and for training their Navy family members on these procedures. Furthermore, these procedures must be robust enough to cover when the unit is at home, away for a few days of training or on extended deployment, and apply equally to when the mem ber and/or family is at home or on vacation any where around the world. -at the heart of this effort is the individu al Navy family mem ber the active duty and reserve Sailor, the civilian employee (to include NAF and NEX employees), and their family members. At the most basic level, all Navy family members must: (1) know their com mands emergency reporting procedures, including how to contact their parent command. (2) know their com mands coop site, (3) know their coordi nating unit (if assigned), (4) know their person nel accountability points of contact, or naval per sonnel commands emer gency communications center [NPC ECC] and the necessity to report your status via the most expe ditious means available. (5) ensure up-to-date recall information is pro vided to your chain of command and kept cur rent. (6) ensure emergency contact information (page 2) is current. (7) update and vali date dependency data in DEERS, etc. (8) we rely on you to reinforce personnel accountability and emer gency preparedness with your Sailors and civilian employees. The only way we can achieve quick and accurate person nel accountability dur ing a catastrophic event is by training person nel to report their sta tus and whereabouts to their command; famil iarize them with NFAAS (https://www.Navyfamily. Navy.mil). Commands should generate and dis tribute emergency wal let information cards to all personnel and their family members. A tem plate sample of this card is available on the CNIC portal web site in the n37/ operations prepare tool kit.Are you Ready For Hurricane Season To Begin? 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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CNRMC Visits SERMC Mayport, Acknowledges Contribution To FleetSoutheast Regional Maintenance Center Public AffairsRear Adm. David J. Gale, Commander of the Navy Regional Maintenance Command (CNRMC) visited the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) in Jacksonville, Fla. May 6 8. During his visit, Admiral Gale held an all hands meeting, thanked everyone for their hard work, and congratulat ed SERMC for recently winning the Regional Maintenance Center Excellence Award for the second year in a row. SERMC has provided exceptional support to the fleet, not only here in Mayport, but also in areas scattered across the world and that support is recognized and greatly appre ciated by the fleet, said Gale. Additionally, during his visit, the Admiral was able to recognize 24 grad uates of the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) pro gram at SERMC. The NAMTS pro gram trains Sailors to obtain particular Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) codes, provid ing important skillsets to Sailors allowing them to be proficient journey men and a valuable, selfsufficient asset to the fleet, said Osbert TeekaSingh, SERMCs NAMTS Coordinator. NAMTS is providing better trained Sailors to the fleet, and I look for ward to seeing the pro gram continue to grow, said Admiral Gale. Currently, SERMC has 114 Sailors enrolled in the NAMTS program and has seen a steady increase in participation ever since the program was recon stituted a couple of years ago. It is nice to have the recognition and support from the Admiral for the NAMTS program. As a graduate now, I look for ward to taking what Ive learned and putting it to good use for the Navy, said Machinist Mate 2nd Class Francisco Carrillo, assigned to SERMCs valve shop division and who received an NEC in valve repair. For more information about Southeast Regional Maintenance Center, visit: http://www.navsea.navy. mil/CNRMC/SERMC/ default.aspx For more news from Naval Regional Maintenance Command, visit: http://www.nav sea.navy.mil/CNRMC/ default.aspx -Photo courtesy of SERMCRear Admiral David Gale presents a Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) certificate to Machinist Mate 2nd Class Francisco Carrillo. Petty Officer Carrillo is assigned to SERMCs valve shop division and received a Navy Enlisted Code in valve repair through the NAMTS program at SERMC.Navys Newest Department Heads Graduate SWOSSurface Warfare Officers School Command Public AffairsThe Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS) graduated Department Head Class 221 in the Pringle Auditorium at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., May 2. The class, consisting of 50 Surface Warfare Officers, completed the 27-week course designed to prepare officers for duty as chief engineers, combat systems and weapons officers, opera tions officers on all classes of ships, and as first lieu tenants on amphibious ships. The course is divided into two major subdivi sions Tactical Action Officer (TAO), which focuses on areas such as undersea warfare, air defense, and surface warfare, and Operations, Readiness, Training, and Engineering (ORTE), which explores the specif ics of each students pro spective job assignments. The length of the SWOS Department Head course, a full six months, is indicative of the invest ment the Navy has made in the future readiness of the students and in their importance to the mission of the ship, said Capt. Richard Brown, SWOS commanding officer. A significant graduation ceremony is merited to acknowledge these facts and to note each officers passage from student to ships officer. The guest of honor for the ceremony, Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, thanked the families and friends of the gradu ates for witnessing this major achievement in their careers. After con gratulating the gradu ates, Sweeney reminded them of the importance of the demanding roles they were about to under take and how they will be relied upon as leaders on their ships. The duties and responsibilities of the shipboard department head are significant and reflect a great degree of authority, said Sweeney. As fully-trained sur face warriors, your com manding officers will be counting on you to lead your respective depart ments and to provide advice on key command decisions; so make sure you are up to the task. Do what is right and trust your instincts. Those things will keep you out of trouble and on the path to success we are counting on you. Lt. Ryan Pierce, pro spective operations officer for the guidedmissile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) received the Arleigh Burke award for the grad uate recognized by class mates as the individual possessing the strongest leadership, industry and perseverance; best exemplifying the fighting spirit of Admiral Burkes famous squadron, the Little Beavers Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 23. The course was more challenging than I expect ed, said Pierce. It was also a huge honor to be chosen by my classmates for this award. Lt. Eric Duffield, pro spective weapons officer for the guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) received the City of Newport award for demonstrating the high est qualities of profes sionalism and leadership, as reflected by his overall contributions to the class. Other awardees hon ored during the gradu ation ceremony were Lt. James Drennan, and Lt. Paul Tranbarger. Drennan, the prospec tive weapons officer for the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) earned the Top Gunner award for having the high est overall grade point average for the tactical action officer portion of the course. Drennan also received the Newport Navy League award for academic excellence as the top graduate for department head class 221. Tranbarger earned the Top Snipe award for having the highest over all grade point average for the engineering portion of the course. The graduates will report to their next assignments aboard ships around the world in the coming months. After more than 50 years, the Department Head course remains the flagship course at SWOS. Approximately 275 students attend the course each year. SWOS is headquartered in Newport, R.I. and over sees nine learning sites, which provide more than 1,000 courses a year to more than 67,000 Sailors. SWOS uses a mix of blended-learning tech niques comprised of instructor-led classes, hands-on labs, simula tion and computer-based training. Courses include specialized training sup porting all enlisted engi neering ratings, and Surface Warfare Officers at every level. Building maritime partnerships, the command also pro vides training to many international students.2013 Memorial Day Weekend Safety Tips From StaffMemorial Day is a time of remembrance of those who have died in service to our great nation. Pause for a moment this holiday to observe and honor the sacrifices those before us made so we can truly appreciate our freedoms and liber ties. Memorial Day week end marks the beginning of the Live to Play Play to Live Summer 2013 Safety Campaign which runs through Labor Day, designed to heighten awareness to activities in which Marines and Sailors are most often injured or killed, specifi cally: crashes; Water activities; Cookouts; Firearms and Alcohol Overindulgence Safety Tips: quately rested prior to travel. Wear your seatbelt and obey speed limits. Dont tailgate or text while driving. Check forecasts and complete a TRiPS assessment. Know riptide signs. Dont combine alcohol and water activities. Ensure someone knows your whereabouts, and esti mated return time. lighter fluids on grills or camp fires. Keep grills a safe distance from any thing flammable. Dispose of foods left unattended. safety rules for firearms. Avoid handling firearms if under the influence. drink drink responsi bly. Drinking and driving comes with many conse quences. Have a plan and remember, keep what you earned. on the phone while driv ing are distractions. At-Risk Factors: Distractions; No Seatbelt; Poor Planning; Lack of Focus; Excessive Alcohol Consequences: and suffering of family and friends; Vehicle dam age or impounded; Ticket; Fines; Court/Lawyer fees; Loss of License; Jail time; Insurance premium increase; Potential of injuring oth ers; Degradation of mis sion readiness and unit morale. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Present Honors The Past At Ship Reunion ATG Mayport PAOAfloat Training Group (ATG) Mayports new Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Adam Aycock delivered the keynote speech Friday night at USS Willard Keith (DD 775) annual ship reunion. Willard Keith is a World War II Destroyer escort. The reunion was held at the Crowne Plaza in downtown Jacksonville. We were hon ored to have a fellow Destroyerman currently serving come speak to us, said retired Capt. Jay OConnell, former execu tive officer of DD 775, who serves as president and host of the event. Aycocks speech high lighted how todays Navy is ever changing with technology; adapting to the world around it, but still remembering and honoring the past. Technology enables the Navy to accomplish its missions with fewer ships and Sailors, Aycock said. Unmanned helicopters now fly off the decks of frigates and engineering plants can be run by com puters. But the Navys strength will always rely on the fighting spirit of those on the deckplates All Sailors recall the heroes of our past and wear the uniform with pride. I sure am glad I dont have to follow up that! That was great, said Joe Mitchell, who served aboard DD 775 as a lieu tenant junior grade. Along with Aycock, Gunners Mate 1st Class Amy Hamilton, ATGs Sailor of the Year, and Chief Logistics Specialist Geordane Deleon proudly represented the Mayport basin and ATG. Attending the event was an assort ment of Sailors who served aboard Willard Keith ranging from 1942 to 1972, including a Pearl Harbor survivor. After dinner, Willard Keith board of directors shared the ships history and accomplishments with ATGs Sailors. Attending USS Willard Keith (DD-775) reunion this past Friday was an awesome experience and an eye opener, Deleon said. It was an honor for me to meet some of the heroes from our ear lier Navy, who have set the path for what we are today. The ceremony was heart touching, especially the recognition of fallen heroes. I now have a dif ferent view of what cama raderie really is. Seeing prior Sailors from differ ent parts of the country come together to keep history alive is just hum bling to me. Im glad I was offered the opportunity to spend some time with such an elite group of citi zens; would be glad to do it again. -Photos by Ensign Will DrummondNew ATG Mayport Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Adam Aycock speaks at USS Willard Keith annual ship reunion. ATG Mayport Chief Logistics Specialist Geordane Deleon poses for a picture with for mer crewmembers of USS Willard Keith during the ships annual reunion. Pictured from left retired Capt. Jay OConnell, Deleon, Mary Lou OConnell, Casey Jones, and Joe Mitchell. USS Phil Sea Enjoys Ship Picnic At Sea Otter -Photos by ET1 Marty ParsonsUSS Philippine Sea Commanding Officer, Capt. Steve Shinego, gets ready for the next pitch and a swim in the dunk booth during a command picnic at Sea Otter Pavilion. Logistics Specialist Seaman Rebensky swinging the hammer to ring the bell. Engineman 2nd Class(SW) Joseph throws a beanbag in a game of cornhole. Phil Sea sailors enjoying some chow during the picnic. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 13

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RGB Completes Deployment In Sixth Fleet USS Robert G. Bradley Public AffairsThe commander of Destroyer Squadron 60 (DESRON 60), Capt. John Esposito, visited USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) as it made its last port of call in the U.S. 6th Fleet in Souda Bay, Greece, May 10. Robert G. Bradley, homeported out of Mayport, Fl., is at the end of a seven-month deploy ment in support of mari time security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. During his visit, Esposito congratulated the crew on their success ful deployment, focus ing on the ships ability to remain at sea for long periods to allow for con tinuous operations in support of maritime secu rity. You all have done a great job, said Esposito. Even though some days may have been long, you pulled through and your service to the Navy and nation has been admira ble. The Commodore also presented awards to several Sailors for their exemplary performance during the deploy ment. He awarded four Navy Commendation Medals and seven Navy Achievement Medals. It was great to be rec ognized for doing hard work and to receive my first award from a Captain in the Navy, said Gas Turbine Systems Technician Electrical 3rd Class Terrence Tucker, one of the Sailors who received a Navy Achievement Medal from the Commodore. For Esposito, handing out the awards gave him a first hand view of those who had kept the ship steaming at a high opera tional level. It is great to personally extend these awards to Robert G. Bradley Sailors, said Esposito during his All-Hands Call. It lets me know about all the great things you are doing out here. The guided-missile frig ate Robert G. Bradley will now head to its homeport of Mayport, Fla., as it con cludes its deployment. -Photo by D. L. Farley Three Sailors bird nest a mooring line onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) while RGB is in its last port of call in U.S. Sixth Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by D. L. Farley Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Kayle Rivers supervises Information Systems Technician Seaman Zachery Jeffcoat and Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Corey Wisdom as they clean an antenna on board USS Robert G. Bradley. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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FFSC Hosts Workshops For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 23, 1 3 p.m., Troops to Teachers Building 1 Room 702 May 28, 6 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 May 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on par ticipants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will par ticipate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. May 30, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Adventure Landing Night The annual USO night at Adventure Landing (Jacksonville Beach) will be held on Wednesday, June 12 from 6-11 p.m. Wristbands for our annual fun evening at Adventure Landing will go on sale Today beginning at NOON. Wristbands will be on sale for $2 each and will be available for pur chase by ACTIVE DUTY and families only (Guard and Reserves on active orders eligible). They will be on sale at your Mayport USO, NAS Jax USO and a limited num ber at Kings Bay ITT. Save the date for this annual sold out event! Barbecue For The Troops Stop by the Mulligans Pub at the Hilton Garden Inn-Jacksonville/Ponte Vedra located at 43 PGA Tour Blvd., Ponte Vedra Beach on Monday, May 27 at 2 p.m. for a bar becue to support the troops. The barbecue is $5.00 for active military and dependents with ID and $15 for civilians. The menu includes CajaChina roasted pig, corn on the cob, coleslaw, potato salad, and apple pie. See attached flyer for more information. The Rascals In ConcertTicket Drawing For the first time in 40 years, The Rascals are back together. Want to see The Rascals Once Upon a Dream con cert May 31 at the Times Union Center Moran Theater? Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is conducting a drawing for two pairs of tickets. The drawing is open to Active Duty (including those on active duty orders) only. The deadline to enter is Wednesday, May 22. To enter, email drawing@ usojax.com with the fol lowing information: LAST NAME, FIRST, MI, COMMAND, EMAIL ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER. USO Military Appreciation Night At The Jax Zoo Rescheduled Due to inclement weather Friday, May 3rd, Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo has been rescheduled to July 26 from 6-9 p.m. Free Cat Spay/Neuter Program Duval County Residents First Coast No More Homeless Pets is offer ing free cat spay/neuter services for Duval County residents for a limited time. The program is free for pet and stray cats. For more information, call (904) 425-0005 and visit www.fcnmhp.org. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater Jacksonville USO and For the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the Greater Jacksonville USO. See attached flyer and visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. JAXEX RUNWAY 5K The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) will host its Inaugural JAXEX RUNWAY 5K at Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport (JAXEX) on Saturday, June 8. Net proceeds will benefit The Greater Jacksonville Area USO. The event will fea ture a 5K run beginning at 7:30 a.m. and a onemile Fun Run at 8:30 a.m. A portion of both race courses will include the airport runway at JAXEX (which will be closed to air traffic dur ing the event). To register, visit www.jaxexrunway5k. com. Register before June 1 for the early bird entry fee of $20 for the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run. The 5K registration fee will increase to $30 the day of the race. Space is limited. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, provide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Friday, May 24 Women Ministry of First Missionary Baptist Church presents Women Conference 2013 at 7 p.m. at 810 Third Avenue South Jacksonville Beach with Rev. Marvin McQueen, II, Pastor and Rev. Dr. Marvin McQueen, I, Overseer. JU Marine Science Research Institute to host sixth annual Ripples on the River. The event will feature live music; a fish ing clinic by TV personal ity Capt. Don Dingman; tours of the beauti ful new W.C. and Susan Gentry Boardwalk and Nature Preserve; SeaBest Seafood and hot dogs, chips and slaw for for lunch; Sweetwater Beer samples; a critter touch tank by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; DeleteRiver Taxi boat rides courtesy of the St. Johns Riverkeeper; and tours of the MSRI. Cost is $10 per adult, chil dren free; payable at the door (cash and checks). The MSRI is the premier biological and environ mental research and education facility on the St. Johns River. The twostory, 32,000-square-foot certified-green build ing has classrooms, labo ratories, offices for the St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and areas for teaching Duval County public school students. RSVP by May 10 to Lauren at (904) 256-7095. Saturday, May 25 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. The pro gram will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. The Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida will host a Memorial Day Weekend program from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. to honor the men and women who served in World War II. Visitors can explore military dis plays, view memorabilia and learn about the uni forms, weapons, vehicles and lifestyle of those who were part of the war dur ing the 1940s. Admission to the park is $6 per vehi cle at the front gate and $2 per person to enter the fort. Children under 6 are free. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks. org. Sunday, May 26 Drowning Pool will be live at Brewsters Megaplex located at 845 University Blvd North, Jacksonville, Florida 32211. All active duty mil itary members get in free. For further information please contact Brewsters Megaplex at (904) 2239850 Women Ministry of First Missionary Baptist Church presents Women Conference 2013 at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. at 810 Third Avenue South Jacksonville Beach with Rev. Marvin McQueen, II, Pastor and Rev. Dr. Marvin McQueen, I, Overseer. The Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida will host a Memorial Day Weekend program from 9 a.m. 2 p.m. to honor the men and women who served in World War II. Visitors can explore military dis plays, view memorabilia and learn about the uni forms, weapons, vehicles and lifestyle of those who were part of the war dur ing the 1940s. Admission to the park is $6 per vehi cle at the front gate and $2 per person to enter the fort. Children under 6 are free. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks. org Tuesday, May 28 The Duval County Extension Offices/ UF IFAS will be offer ing a free workshop on Do it Yourself Irrigation Repairs to Save Money at 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Argyle Branch Library, 7973 Old Middleburg Road., Jacksonville, Fl. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Learn handson ideas. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Saturday, June 1 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Sunday, June 2 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Saturday, June 8 Rethreaded, a nonprofit that provides job train ing and employment for women emerging from lives of addiction, vio lence, human trafficking and prostitution, won the top crowd fund vote at One Spark Festival, the five-day festival for creators and innovators. To celebrate, the organi zation is hosting a Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration from 2 p.m.9 p.m. at the Rethreaded warehouse located at 820 Barnett Street Jacksonville, FL 32209. To learn more about Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration or to get involved with Rethreaded, please visit, http://www.rethreaded. com/. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 17 Navy Accepting STA-21 ApplicationsFrom Naval Service Training Command Public AffairsThe Seaman-toAdmiral (STA-21) com missioning program, which provides an oppor tunity for qualified Sailors to receive college educa tions and Navy commis sions, is soliciting applica tions for fiscal year 2014. The deadline for sub mitting application pack ages is July 1. We are proud of the STA-21 program and the amazing Sailors who receive their com missions through it, said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). STA21 officer candidates and their families benefit from the educational opportunity afforded them at our nations premier univer sities. Completing their degree in 36 months, they remain on active duty with full pay and allow ances and the Navy pays up to $10,000 per year in support of their tuition, fees and books. STA-21 is truly an investment in Sailors as it shapes our officer corps of the future. Application packages must be postmarked on or before the July 1 dead line date. Early submis sion is preferred, as this will allow feedback to the Sailor for submission of missing or illegible docu ments. The deadline for submission of addition al documentation to an applicants package is August 1. Before earning their degrees, STA-21 appli cants must attend the Naval Science Institute (NSI) course at Officer Training Command (OTC), Naval Station Newport, R.I., prior to beginning college stud ies at an NROTC-affiliated college or university. STA-21/NSI is an eightweek course of intense officer preparation and indoctrination. Course enrollment is timed to allow college entrance during summer or fall semesters/quarters after selection. I assessed what I could do in my rate as a Machinists Mate com pared to what I could do as an officer and I felt I could contribute the most to the Navy by join ing the officer ranks, said Officer Candidate and former Machinists Mate 3rd Class Joseph Page, 21, from Indianapolis. I thought becoming an officer would maximize my qualities and my poten tial and thats how I could give the most to the Navy. Page, who came from Nuclear Prototype School in Charleston, S. C., plans on attending the Citadel Military College in Charleston and then join the Navys submarine community. This has been a great learning experience for me, said Page. I havent been out in the fleet yet but STA-21 and NSI has been a great place to gath er information from those in my class that came from the fleet. I received a lot of valuable input from my classmates and received a feel for what Ill need to do once I get to the fleet as an officer. Both Page and Electronics Technician 3rd Class and Officer Candidate Brianna Smith, 22, from Erie, Pa., were put in charge of their class of 50 officer candidates. It was an amazing opportunity and has been a great experience and will help prepare us for whats to come, said Smith. You get your col lege education while learning about leadership roles. Smith plans on attend ing North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C., and then looks to be a Nuclear Warfare Officer on a ship or sub marine out of Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Smith also attended Nuclear Prototype School but in Ballston Spa, N. Y., before attending STA-21/NSI in Newport. The STA-21 program benefits Sailors as well as the Navy. The average candidate has at least two years and in most cases more than four years of observed performance which assists in the pro cess of selecting the most qualified Sailors to receive a commission. Additionally, STA-21 candidates are on aver age older than most midshipmen, bringing a maturity directly reflect ed in the more than 90 percent completion rate STA-21 program candi dates boast. Many Sailors involved in the STA-21 program already have some college credit, and some candidates finish ahead of the three years allotted to earn a degree. Students reporting for NSI should expect an intense academic pro gram, said Lt. Jason Gilmore, assistant opera tions officer and head of this years STA-21/ NSI class. In eight short weeks they will complete six curriculum modules. It would be real easy for a student to fall behind if they dont arrive ready to hit the books. Our intent at NSI is not only to pro vide these students with a solid basis in Naval Science, but to also estab lish a foundation of good study habits in an intense academic environment as these students adjust from life in the fleet to life at a University. In the STA-21 program, as it is in many competitive selec tion processes, it is often a candidates extra efforts which can result in selec tion. Lt. Justin Neff, a division officer and NSI instruc tor at OTC, called the the STA-21 program an awesome opportunity for motivated Sailors that are looking to get an educa tion, and advance their career. Neff, who was in one of the first STA-21 class at OTC Newport in March 2003 and commissioned after graduating from Old Dominion University in May 2006 also said, One of the best things about STA-21 is that it is your job to go to school. You dont have to worry about pay or housing or standing watches on a ship or sub. You go to school and in three years (or less) you can earn your degree and a commission. Neff was a Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 1st Class when he applied for STA-21. I wanted to get the most out of my Navy career and for me, Seaman-to-Admiral was the best way to go, said Neff. STA-21 has opened the door for a wealth of opportunities for me. Reporting seniors who feel they have a Sailor with the potential to be selected by STA-21 should comment on their lead ership skills and poten tial in their performance evaluations early in their career. These comments are highly regarded by the boards, even in junior Sailors whos time on board, time in grade or peer ranking will not allow their evaluations to be fully consistent with the comments. Selectees will be announced by a NAVADMIN in October 2013. Questions concern ing this program should be directed to com mand career counselors or to the NSTC Officer Development directorate at (850) 452-9563. Headquartered on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., Mewbourne and NSTC oversees 98 percent of initial officer and enlisted accessions training for the Navy. This includes the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) at more than 160 colleges and uni versities, Officer Training Command (OTC) on Naval Station Newport, R.I., Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill., and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) and Navy National Defense Cadet Corps (NNDCC) citizen ship development pro grams at more than 600 high schools worldwide. For more information, visit https://www.sta-21. navy.mil. NavyNEWS Make Moving Plans Now To Avoid StressNAVSUP Global Logistics Sup port Once again, the sum mer months herald the busiest move sea son of the year as hun dreds of thousands of Department of Defense (DoD) and U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) service men and women receive orders to new assign ments across the nation and worldwide. NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS) Household Goods Program Analyst Deloma Miley advises those transferring to book their moves early. The period of May 15 through August 31 is the annual peak move sea son, she said. More than 65 percent of moves occur during peak sea son. Dont wait, Miley said. With the decline in moving companies capacity, Department of Defense budget cuts, and even a possible gov ernment furlough, the sooner you start working with the local Personal Property Office the great er your chance of get ting the desired pack out date. Dont wait until a week or two before the desired pack out date to complete the pro cess in www.move.mil, said Miley. Begin now it takes approximately three weeks to process all required paperwork to book your move. Enter all your data and paper work now. For Navy information on getting started with the move process, go to www. navsup.navy.mil/house hold.> Another tip is to orga nize your house and belongings, Miley said. Go through all your rooms and boxes from the last move to make sure you still need the items. If it hasnt been worn or used in the last year, do you still need it? Sort your items by the type of shipment: household shipment; unac companied baggage, if authorized; professional gear and what is going in your suitcase or car. By sorting you may find out what needs to be sold, donated or disposed of. Keep in mind, if you exceed your authorized weight allowance it can be expensive! No one wants to get a bill for being overweight on their shipment, Miley said. DoD and the USCG book an estimated 200,000 household goods shipments each summer, Miley said. In addition to these moves, many federal civilian employees also choose to schedule their moves during the summer, since most schools are out of session and the relocation will be less disruptive for children. Service members have two options for mov ing their household goods. They can choose a Government arranged move, in which a con tractor packs and ships their household goods, or they may perform a Personally Procured Move (PPM) former ly known as a DITY move, where the cus tomer arranges to rent a truck or trailer, or uses their own vehicle to move their items. Here are some helpful terms for you to know: Household shipment is your main shipment: furniture, dishes, wash er/dryer, BBQ grill, out door furniture, childrens play furniture, majority of your clothes, etc. Unaccompanied bag gage, if authorized: this is the small shipment of items that you will need to survive until your big household good ship ment arrives. This is nor mally only authorized with overseas orders. Items to include would be enough kitchen ware/ dishes to use daily (not your china), crib, clothes, some uniforms, some DVDs not your entire library, etc. Professional gear: Professional books and equipment (PBP&E) includes Household goods in a members possession needed for the performance of offi cial duties at the next or a later destination. Service members pro fessional gear could be: work manuals, awards, specialty work uniforms (Band uniforms, navy divers, flight suits, hel mets, chaplains vest ments and other specialized apparel), reference materials, instruments, tools, and equipment peculiar to technicians, mechanics. Spouse professional gear: may be authorized for a licensed profes sion, i.e. doctor, dentist, lawyer or community support activities at the next or a later destina tion, example would be a command Ombudsman. Any other profession may be considered if the appropriate documen tation can be provided. Selling Avon or Pamper Chef does not count as licensed profession. Excluded from profes sional gear: commercial products for sale/resale used in conducting business, sports equipment, and office, household, or shop fixtures or furni ture (such as bookcases, study/computer desks, file cabinets, and racks) of any kind even though it may be used in con junction with profession al gear. For more information on either option and to start the move process, customers should go to www.move.mil. For questions or concerns about moving custom ers may e-mail house holdgoods@navy.mil or call 1-855-HHG-MOVE (1-855-444-6683) for assistance or contact their local personal property shipping office. NAVSUP GLS is com prised of more than 6,600 military and civil ian logistics profession als operating from 110 locations worldwide providing an extensive array of integrated global logistics and contracting services to Navy, Marine Corps, joint operational units, and allied forces across all warfare enter prises. Safety Handbook Launched For TrainingNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsNaval Education and Training Command (NETC) aboard Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola announced the launch of a safety handbook, May 14, which will be used by collateral duty safety personnel at training com mands around the world. NETC has had a 68 percent reduc tion in on-duty lost time cases and a 58 percent off-duty lost time case reduc tion, the lowest case rate in more than five years for the domain, through the efforts of the collateral duty personnel throughout the training domain. Cynthia Vargas, a safety specialist at NETC, credits educating the staff on known risk events for on-duty and off-duty activities such traffic safety, recreation and the motorcycle safety program as a factor for the reduction of safety incidents. Being proactive prior to any holi days, during Sailors liberty and leave periods and during off duty recreation al activities has made a huge impact in the thought process a Sailor makes in ensuring they make good risk choices, said Vargas. To further help personnel, the hand book was created with the combined input from other safety professionals including collateral duty person nel within NETC and information from Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) and the Naval Safety Center. The CDSL handbook will serve as a pass-down to those who volunteer as a Collateral Duty Safety Liaison. Too often volunteers receive little to no turn-over from their predeces sor and gaps within the organization occur to increase this problem, says Vargas. The handbook provides a good foundation on which to build, and outlines their responsibilities to ensure successful operation of the Navys Occupational Safety and Health programs. It identifies the four core elements necessary for a successful program: Mishap Reduction Efforts, Communication, Organization, and Compliance. In order to continue decreasing the number of safety incidents, Vargas says communication is the important. We have to continue to provide information before major holidays, said Vargas. Mentor young Sailors as you communicate with them daily, and ensure everyone has a capability to communicate safety shortfalls. The Collateral Duty Safety Liaison (CDSL) handbook was developed by several safety specialists and collat eral duty safety personnel through out the NETC domain and is avail able to NETC staff through the Safety and Occupational Health webpage on the Enterprise Safety Applications Management System (ESAMS) website https://esams.cnic.navy.mil/ESAMS_ GEN_2/LoginESAMS.aspx.

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Going The Distance -Photo by Paige GnannLt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger of ATG Mayport completes the swim portion of the Beaches Fine Arts Series triathalon May 18 held on board Naval Station Mayport. Hundreds of athletes to participate in the first of three triathalon events held on the base. The event included a mile ocean swim, 16.8 mile bike and 3.4 mile run. The next triathalon will be held on June 8. There will be an Olympic distance race on July 13, comprised of a .9 mile swim, 25.2 mile bike and 6.2 mile run. The Beaches Fine Arts Kids Triathlon will be held on Sunday, June 23. Please contact the office at 904-270-1771 for location information. -Photo by Paige GnannUSS The Sullivans Color Guard parades the Colors as members of the St. Augustine Navy League, Cmdr. Sam DeCastro, The Sullivans commanding officer, and Chaplain Buster Williams stand for the National Anthem during a ship adoption ceremony on May 20.Navy League Adopts USS The Sullivans CrewThe Mirror editorMembers of the St. Augustine Navy League and the crew of USS The Sullivans gathered on the ships flight deck May 20 for an adoption ceremo ny that continues a long tradition of fellowship between the organization and Mayports waterfront. Also on hand for the ceremony were repre sentatives from Senator Marco Rubio, Senator Bill Nelson and Congressman Ron DeSantis offices. Adoption of a ship by the Navy League is a bond, much like a mar riage, said guest speaker Bill Dudley, guest speaker and former St. Augustine and North East Florida Navy League presi dent. The St. Augustine Council has long his tory of adopting ships [thoughtout NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville and Coast Guard]. We are proud to be a part of The Sullivans family. We will stick together. As there first act of support, the council took a moment to recognize the ships Sailors of the Year. I am fortunate to be attached to a ship which has already and will con tinue to experience the hospitality of the Navy League, said Cmdr. Samuel DeCastro, com manding officer of USS New CO At ATG MayportCmdr. Adam M. Aycock took command of Afloat Training Group Mayport on May 14. Aycock was born and raised in Warren County, Tennessee. He graduated from Warren County High School. Aycock spent a year at Vanderbilt University before heading to the United States Naval Academy, where he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Oceanography. After commissioning, Aycock headed to the vast Western Pacific, taking orders to Forward Deployed Naval Forces warships USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60), as Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer, Damage Control Assistant, Chief Engineer, and Communications Officer, and USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), as Assistant Operations Officer. Next, he took orders to stateside warships as the Operations Officer in both USS Stethem (DDG 63) and USS Princeton (CG 59). After Princeton, he reported to the Naval Bureau of Personnel as the assistant SWO Community Manager and the Second Tour Department Head Detailer. He headed to the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College as a student, where he earned a Masters Degree in Military Studies. He went back to sea to command the iron crew MCM Crew Reaper, and the great wooden warships USS Gladiator (MCM 11), forward deployed to Bahrain, and USS Sentry (MCM 3), homeported in Ingleside, Texas. His next assignment was onshore again when he reported to the Joint Staff, J34 Anti-terrorism/ Homeland Defense, as the Maritime SME and the Joint Staffs MOTR Coordinator and Interagency MOTR COIT member. Concurrently, he attended the Joint Forces Staff College as a student of the Joint & Combined Warfighting School, earning JPME Phase II and ulti mately his Joint Qualified Officer designation. Aycock relieved Cmdr. Roy Love as commanding officer. Cmdr. Adam Aycock ATG Mayport COSee The Sullivans, Page 6

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror When the alarm goes off in the morning, and your brains cells begin to stir, a myriad of possible first thoughts might pop into your head. The minivan needs gas for the morning car pool. Should I forgive my husband for the fight we had last night? Dont forget to get something for Fathers Day. I won der if Junior will pass his Calculus exam. None of these early morning contemplations can accurately predict the course of the rest of your day, but there is one par ticular first thought that is a definite Red Flag. If you wake up in the morning, and think, I need a nap, you can bet your overpriced wrinkle cream that the rest of your day is pretty much gonna blow. I know this, because that is exactly what Ive been thinking lately. Ive been dragging my weary bones out of bed all week, when all I want to do is crawl back under the covers and hide from the inevitable calamity of my unmanageable schedule. Is it the exams, events and final grade panic of the end of the school year thats got me want ing to stay in bed? Well, not quite. Is it my sons Eagle Scout Ceremony, which we insanely decid ed to host at our house this weekend for more than 50 people? Well, not exactly. Is it the fact that my husband is being Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesVPK stands for the Voluntary Prekindergarten Education Program. If you live in Florida, and your child turns 4 four years of age by September 1, your child is eligible to participate in Floridas FREE Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) education program. Transportation is not provided for this program NS Mayports Child Development Center (CDC), Finegan Elementary, and Mayport Elementary will be offer ing VPK for 2013-2014. All three sites will offer the FREE portion of the program from 8:30-11:30 am, Monday through Friday. A fee-based Extended Day program from 11:30 am to 3:00 pm is also available at all of these sites. There is no registration fee for either program at Finegan Elementary or Mayport Elementary. Students currently enrolled at the CDC have first choice for placement in their sites VPK. Other children will be placed on a waiting list. In addition to the Extended Day program, there is a WrapAround program which allows a child to attend from as early as 6 AM to as late as 6 PM. For those parents who wish to enroll the child in the Extended Day or WrapAround program, there will be a $60 enrollment fee which is then deduct ed from the first months bill. This Pre-K program prepares children to be ready for school. Children who participate in highquality early childhood education programs develop better language skills, score higher in school-readiness tests and have better social skills and fewer behav ioral problems once they enter school. They are also better prepared for Kindergarten, especially in the areas of pre-read ing, pre-math and social skills. The early years are the learning years. A childs ability to be attentive and to follow directions emerges in these early years. Therefore, a structured early learning fos ters these abilities for later success in school and in life. And Pre-K pro motes a love of learning in children. Additionally it enhances what a child learns at home and instills a love of life-long learn ing. With reading and writ ing skills the focus of VPK, it is important the class sizes are small. In the program ratios are one instructor to ten children. Class size must not exceed 18 children in the school-year program. The VPK program will better prepare Floridas young children for a suc cessful Kindergarten experience by focus ing the Department of Educations efforts on early literacy. This legis lation assigns responsi bilities for the day-to-day management of the pro gram to the Office of Early Learning (OEL); licensing and credentialing to the Department of Children and Families (DCF); and the creation of standards, curriculum, and account ability to the Department of Education (DOE). All three agencies are work ing together to provide leadership and support to the local early learning coalitions and school districts to ensure the suc cessful implementation of effective prekindergar ten education programs for Floridas four-year-old children. The Early Learning Coalition (ELC) was des ignated by Department of Education to lead the program in Duval County. ELC has created a partnership with Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) to support learn ing from the earliest stage of a childs development and continues through secondary education. DCPS is confident that this partnership will help eliminate the problem of children starting kinder garten unable to read and provide children with the necessary knowledge to succeed from day one in school. To register your child for VPK, go to ELC office near est you (http://elcofduval. org or 904.208.2044 for locations/application), complete VPK appli cation, receive VPK Certificate of Eligibility, take VPK Certificate of Eligibility to school of choice, complete DCPS regis tration form at Finegan or Mayport, have school office place student of ELC VPK Enrollment Roster Form, review with school staff member the VPK Parent Letter and Handbook, and sign and receive a copy of the Parent Letter. If you have additional questions, you can con tact the CDC at 904-2477740 or 904-241-4507; Finegan Elementary School at 904.247.5999 or Mayport Elementary School at 904-247-5988 or visit Mayport Elementary on May 23 from 6-7:30 p.m. for Coastal Sciences Family Night. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingFall VPK Offered At CDC, Finegan & MayportRemember the days of old; consider the gen erations long past. Ask your father and he will tell you, your elders and they will explain to you (Deuteronomy 32:7, NKJV). A few weeks ago, a friend posted on Facebook about an incident on a plane that upset him. The plane was about to land, and the pilot came on the speaker and asked all passengers to remain in their seats even when plane comes to a complete stop. The pilot went on to explain that the plane was carrying the body of a U.S. Service member and to show respect, if the passengers would remain in their seats while the casket was being taken off the plane. Much to the surprise and disappointment of my friend, as soon as the plane stopped, a sig nificant number of his fellow passengers stood up and began gather their things in anticipation of deplaning. Although many remain seated in silent observance of the Captains request, enough people stood up to dis rupt the sacred moment. I m certain one could find several compelling reason why several of the passengers chose to ignore the pilots request. Perhaps they were late and afraid to miss a connecting flight. But I am afraid; its possible, that they simply did not care. So many things have shifted in our culture, that as a people, we may be losing our sense of the sacred. I hope not. In the next few days we will be observing Memorial Day. This is a day our country sets aside to honor the men and women of our Armed Forces who have given the last full measure of devotion to their coun try by dying in service to our country. Initially observed as Decoration Day to honor Union and Confederate military who died in the Civil War, it has since come to be a day to honor all the dead from all of our nations wars and conflicts. Unfortunately, if you were to look at a televi sion ad, you might come to easily believe that Memorial Day is larg est car sales event of the year. You can easily pick up on conversations that speak of long drives, vacations, cook-outs, and par ties, and because that is what many people will likely do, you will hear at a Navy safety stand down that Memorial Day is the beginning of the 100 days of summer. While there is nothing wrong with pur chasing a bargain on a car this weekend, and teach ing Sailors safety and risk management is crucial for a long holiday weekend, Memorial Day is a sacred day that should compel all Americans, regardless of political persuasion, to at least take a moment to pause, reflect, pray and acknowledge our nations war dead. This Memorial Day, I encourage you and your family to participate at a number of events that are being held in our area. The City of Jacksonville is hold ing its Annual Memorial Day Observance at 0900 at Memorial Wall, adja cent to the west parking lot of Everbank Field. The Beaches Memorial Day Program will be held at 1400 at American Legion Post 316 in Atlantic Beach. If you cant make it to make one of these events, at least take some time to pause, reflect, and pray by yourself or with your family. It is, after all, a sacred moment. I invite you now to join with me in this prayer for Memorial Day found in the Book of Common Prayer: ALMIGHTY God, our heavenly Father, in whose hands are the living and the dead; We give thee thanks for all those thy servants who have laid down their lives in the service of our country. Grant to them thy mercy and the light of thy pres ence, that the good work which thou hast begun in them may be perfected; through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord. Amen.Chap Jerome R. Cayangyang Command Chaplain CHAPLAINSMemorial Day: A Sacred Moment Worth TakingGive Me Liberty Or Give Me NapsIm fortunate enough to have an office window that overlooks Massey Avenue here on the Naval Station. But, through that window daily I see things that are disturbing. No, its not the speeders going well over the 25 mph limit. My concern lies in the behavior demonstrat ed by both drivers and personnel outside when we honor our country with morning colors. Drivers must be head ed to some emergency because most of them do not stop their vehi cles when our National Anthem is being played maybe someone in the line has the radio volume below 25 and eventually hears the Anthem being played and stops, forc ing the rest of the traffic behind them to also stop. Those outside or walking may or may not stop and render appropriate hon ors. Some simply continue walking to get inside or quickly get back in their car. Some simply stop and stare. A few do face the nearest flag and salute or place their hand over their heart. Its disheartening that we have become so busy so as to not take a few minutes to honor our country. We profess to love and fight for freedom and then we often dem onstrate so little appreciation for the very freedom and country we profess to defend and honor. Take a minute tomor row and participate proudly in morning col ors. David C. Phillips SERMC LetterSee Naps, Page 3

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wined and dined all week while on a work trip in South America while I am left driving this runaway train? Well, yes, but not entirely. Or could it be that we are moving to Rhode Island in less than a month, and were nowhere near ready? Well, yeah, maybe. Or is it the fact that I am frantically scribbling this col umn on a legal pad at Starbucks, because I just killed my laptop when I knocked my coffee onto the keyboard 12 minutes ago, and fear that I might have to use my thumbs to tap this thing into my Smartphone to get it to the editors? Hell yes, truth be told. But its not any one thing that has me dream ing of naps. Its the total ity of my circumstances as a middle-aged Navy wife and mother of three teens. Recently, I was lament ing my to my neighbor, a 25-year Navy wife with two grown boys, when she validated my malaise. Yea, I remember when the boys were in high school, she said, and I told my husband one day, Im exhausted. He told me to go take a nap, and I told him, No, I mean, Im globally tired after 18 years of raising kids. Thirty minutes of shut eye aint gonna cut it. Ironically, now that her boys have flown the coop and shes an empty nester, shes napping more than ever, just because she can. The rest of us middleaged moms must keep slogging along, waiting for the day when our sched ules ease up enough that we can enjoy the luxury of a delicious afternoon nap. In the meantime, we can take comfort in the [slightly modified] immortal words of poet Emma Lazarus, thought fully inscribed on the base of our Statue of Liberty: Give me your tired, your poor, Your befuddled housewives yearn ing to break free, With wretched refuse in their teeming heads. Send these, the napless, tempest-tost to me, And Ill tuck them all into their comfy beds! Get more wit from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2NapsEverybody Has A Sea Story To TellWe have all heard sea stories; and I think it is safe to say we all want to have a sea story that would be worth telling our children one day. Even better, we all want a story our kids will actually want to hear. I have only been in the Navy a little under four years and I do not yet have a sea story worth telling. I have time, but I still worry I will not do anything noteworthy during my career. In the Shadow of Greatness, tells the sto ries of the United States Naval Academy Class of 2002. In 2011, President Barak Obama suggested that the current military force is the next Greatest Generation, referenc ing back to the World War II generation of ser vice members as the first greatest. When the class of 2002 signed up to serve in 1998, they had no idea that months before becoming commissioned officers that the U.S. would go to war. These officers, seven years my senior also struggle with my same question, what will be my contribution? How do we live up to the title of greatest genera tion? The stories include Marines on the ground, jet pilots in the sky, and at-sea rescues. These sto ries may have a ring of familiarity to some, but they will move you and leave you feeling proud to serve our country. The reality is that the military will take you places that you never expected or even wanted to go. Surface Warfare Officers go to Iraq; Submarine Officers go on peacekeeping missions in Africa; Marines lose comrades; and others get out of the military and do great things in the civilian world. Those experiences are how our sea stories are born. Read a few sto ries from this book and I bet you will discover that you will have your own sea story; and when you find it, write it down. You never know who might want to read it one day. In the Shadow of Greatness is on the Chief of Naval Operations reading list, under the list for books to Be Ready. Until we meet again, keep reading. Warriors Lt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger ATG MayportMemorial Day Program at ParkFrom BVMPThe Beaches Veterans will hold a Memorial Day Program honoring our fallen Veterans and those Chaplains who died sup porting them in combat since the Revolutionary War at the Beaches Veterans Memorial Park at the intersection of Mayport Road and Atlantic Boulevard. The event will begin at 1:30 p.m. with a High School Drill Team Exhibition, followed by the Memorial program at 2 p.m. The Right Reverend Charles Lovett Keyser, Past Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Forces of the United States, will dedicate The Chaplains Memorial Garden to those brave men who gave their lives for their God and Country. Please bring chairs or blankets since seating is limited and share your time in commemorating this year of remembrance for our lost family members and the conflicts in which they gave their lives. The program will pro ceed in the American Legion 316 Great Hall in case of in climate weather. From StaffNaval Station Mayport Employee of the Quarter (2nd quarter) luncheon/ presentation will be held at Ocean Breeze on May 29 at 11 a.m. Please come out and support the nominees. Pay $8 at the door. Nominees are as fol lows: Ella Hamilton, Housing Susan Rucker, FFSC Tom Burow, IT Tawana Davis, MWR Ronnie Barnes, Housing William Vermeulen, Air Ops Roy Lewis, PWD/ NAVFAC Michael Lewis, NGIS You must RVSP to Sandra Barrett by Friday, May 24 to ensure you have a seat.EOQ Lunch Set THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Mayport Holds 26th Annual Stark MemorialFrom StaffMore than 100 civil ians and service members gathered at Naval Station Mayports Memorial Park Friday for the 26th anni versary of the attack on USS Stark (FFG 31). On May 17, 1987, 37 Sailors aboard USS Stark were killed after the frig ate was struck by two Iraqi missiles while it was deplooyed on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. Despite the severe damage, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Guest speaker, retired Rear Adm. George Huchting talked about the close relationship Sailors develop as they work, eat, and live together on a ship. Our lives depend on each other and there is a closeness and a bond that forms and it is unique to being a Sailor and being at sea, he said. Shipmates -they are faces. They are flesh and blood. They are laughter. They are common experiences. And all of you old Sailors know, they are sea stories. The service featured accounts of some of the events that occurred during the attack and also events that followed. During the somber ceremony, the names of those killed at sea were read aloud by a fellow shipmate and a bell tolled for each one; 37 strikes of a bell and a 21-gun salute honored the Sailors who lost their lives. Stark was decommis sioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to pre serve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Mayports Memorial Park was established Aug. 1, 1987, with the dedication of the Stark monument. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSailors from Naval Station Mayport perform a 21-gun salute for the 37 lost Sailors of the USS Stark (FFG 31) on its 26th anniversary. The event took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial. -Photo by Paige GnannFormer USS Stark crewmembers and survivors of the 1987 attack gather at the Stark Memorial after the ceremony on May 17.-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the Orange Park JROTC Color Guard participated in this years memorial ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannNavy Region Southeast Navy Band performs Taps during the ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannFinegan Elementary students sing Proud To Be An American during the program.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 5 -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeParticipants of the USS Stark (FFG 31) remembrance ceremony place a wreath at the Stark Memorial plaque. The event took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFormer Crew member Clifford Cellars of the USS Stark (FFG 31) rings one bell for each of his 37 fallen shipmates who were lost 26 years ago. The Stark remembrance ceremony took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeRetired Rear Adm. George Hutching speaks during a remembrance ceremony for USS Stark (FFG 31). The event took place at the Naval Station Mayport Stark Memorial.-Photo by Paige GnannMore than 100 civilians and service members attend the 26th anniversary of the attack of USS Stark.-Photo by Paige GnannShips Serviceman 2nd Class Jose Rivera salutes during the wreath laying portion of the service. The Second Class Petty Officer Association joined Naval Order in organizing this years event.-Photo by Paige GnannA former USS Stark crewmember bows his head in prayer during the benediction.

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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Auto Skills Center May Special: Transmission flush, cool ant flush and fuel injec tion cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long plus free brake inspection all through June. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 May 12: Mothers Day Bingo12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. 5x $1000 Jackpots, 1x $500 Quinella, free food, extra drawings and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Free Pool Fridays: Play Pool for FREE every Friday night in June. Enjoy our great specials, tournaments, prizes and more. 270-7205 June 5: Poker Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 June 7: Live Music by Sha Davis. 8 p.m. at Castaways. Celebrate summer with a free live concert, giveaways and lots of summer fun. 2707205 June 15: UFC 161-Bararo vs Wineland. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 June 19: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Community Events June 29: Freedom Fest 2013 4-8 p.m. at Seagull Pavilion (next to the CPO Club); Come out and enjoy fun for the entire family: games, rides, live band, inflata bles and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 June 16: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Fathers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 12 pm at Focsle; Reservations required. Celebrate Dad with an all you can eat brunch fea turing omelet bar, cham pagne fountain, carv ing station and more. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while sup plies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID. Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Passholders receive unlimited access to Shipwreck Island at Adventure Landing Jacksonville Beach as well as daily deals throughout the week and special dis counts on off-season and holiday events. 270-5145 Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $31.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 5 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 24: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. May 26: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 28: COD: Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 31: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Every Tuesday in June: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 2: Horror Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 7: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 8: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 9: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! June 10: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! June 12: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line June 10. June 14: Movie Trip: Man of Steel. Van departs 6 p.m. June 15: UFC 161Barao vs. Eddie. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE June 17: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 19: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 21: Movie Trip: World War Z. Van departs 6 p.m. June 22: Angry Birds. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 24: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. June 25: Ping Pong Tournament. Lets see what youve learned. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 28: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. June 30: Thriller Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 24: Outdoor MoviesHotel Transylvania (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 May 31: Outdoor MoviesWreck It Ralph (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 7: Outdoor MoviesTwilight Saga: Breaking Dawn pt 2 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 14: Outdoor MoviesParental Guidance (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 21: Outdoor MoviesRise of the Guardians (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Outdoor MoviesEscape from Planet Earth (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The MessdeckMayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with fries and soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Smashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet With Ice Tea or Water, $8 NEX Rewards Students For Good GradesFrom NEXCOM The NEX wants to help its customers finance their childrens college edu cation through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarter ly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of May 2013. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and mili tary retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. The Sullivans. We are fortunate you have decided to select us. Welcome aboard and thank you for adopting this ship and crew. We are grateful to you for all you do for our country, our Navy and now our ship. The Navy League plays such a big role supporting the sea services, he said. The Navy League has a long history with The Sullivans stemming back to their relationship with the first The Sullivans (DD 537). As a reslt of the efforts of many Navy Leagueers, the ship was brought to Buffalo, NY in 1975, where I grew up. It was DD 537 as well as the mentorship of family and friends who belonged to the Navy League, that inspired DeSantis to join the Navy, he said. [DD 537] contin ues to serve today as a museum which pays trib ute to a family that has become a national sym bol of commitment, loy alty and sacrifice....The ship is used every sum mer to train Sea Cadets. She also serves as the home of ship reunions, which helps maintain important ties between shipmates and fami lies who served together in this great Navy. All of this helps recruit future members of our Navy who are inspired by the great example provided by patriots who form todays Navy League.From Page 1The Sullivans

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Intramural Sports June 6: Mini Biathalon (Swim & Run). 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. 270-5451. June 11: Summer Beach 5K Run / 3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. June 11: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. Season begins June. 24; season ends Aug. 22. 270-5451. Aquatics June 10-13: American Red Cross Certified WSI Certification Course Participants must attend all 30 hours of training to be certified. Cost is $200 for Military/Dependents/ DOD and $250 for Civilians. Sign up at the Base Gym or the Pool. For more information, please call (904) 270-5452 or (904) 270-5101 June 7: Pool Open for Full Summer Hours. Saturdays, Sunday and Holidays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 2705377 May 27: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Just $12 for 2 hours of bowling, shoe rental, lb hamburger or hot dog with fries, a soda and an ice cream sundae for des sert! Kids 4-5 years old $7; Kids 3 and under FREE. Holiday hours 11 a.m. 5 p.m. 270-5377 June 5: NS Mayport Base Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Everyone can enter; recruit your friends Grand prize is a Free Bowling Party (up to 120 people). Each bowl er on the winning team will receive a bragging rights championship t-shirt, a round of golf for 4 at Windy Harbor and 2 rounds of mini golf at Adventure Landing. Teams will play 3 games of bowling: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize!. Cost is $15 per person. Early registration dead line is May 29; register by the deadline and receive a t-shirt and 50 instant party coupons. 270-5377. June 16: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. $6.00 for 90 minutes of bowling and shoe rental, plus Colored Headpin Bowling. Hot Dog and French fries $2.75. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Open to all AD, retirees, reservists, DOD and their dependents with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $25; includes banquet and awards ceremony. Sign up deadline is June 3 at the Pro-Shop. 270-5380 Surfside Fitness: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga Come experience the many physical, emotional and spiritual benefits of developing a yoga prac tice. This class focuses on the basics for those entirely new to yoga; it also provides a review for anyone who wants to deepen their understanding of align ment and participate in a slower paced yoga regi men. This class focuses on introductory poses to stretch and strengthen all major muscles and joints, as well as develop greater relaxation in the entire body. 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional programming that will take your work out to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Learn how to train using the unique and inno vative TRX Suspension Training System. This class is reserved for those entirely new to TRX training. This class will result in increased strength, coordination, balance and CORE-power. Class size limited to 25. Class is held at Mayport Sandbox. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general infor mation on exercise and fitness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR Sports/Fitness MWR Has Fun On The Run-Photo by Sarah Barthlemy More than 60 runners took part in the Armed Forces 5K/10K on May 14. MWR sponsors Fun Runs every second Tuesday at the month starting at 8 a.m. in front of the Base Gym. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 7

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Continuing Promise Gift Helps American Vets COMUSNAVSO/COMFOURTHFLT Communication Synchronization Public AffairsWhen the Navy can celled Continuing Promise 2013 deployment due to sequestration, 280 brand-new wheelchairs from The Wheelchair Foundation, provided for the deployment mis sion to 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility. (AOR), no longer had a final destination. Turns out these wheel chairs were just what some American Veterans needed for their visit to the World War II Memorial in Washington D.C. The Tallahassee, Florida, Chapter of the Honor Flight Networ was planning a trip for Veterans from the Tallahassee area, but needed wheelchairs for the mission. The Honor Flight Network is a non-profit organization that trans ports American Veterans to Washigton D.C. to visit their memorials, with the priority being to senior Veterans such as World War II survivors. We need wheel chairs because the youngest of our World War II Veterans is 85 years old, said Captain Scott Barry, Special Operations Director for the Leon County Florida Emergency Management Service. The wheelchairs allow us to safely trans port many of the Veterans and help keep them comfortable as they go from place to place. Capt. Barry contacted the Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Chapter of the Wheelchair Foundation, who had provided the 280 wheel chairs to U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet (USNAVSO/ FOURTHFLT) for Continuing Promise 2013. After a few phone calls and emails, the wheel chairs, located in Norfolk, Virginia, were redirect ed to the Honor Flight Network. But one hurdle remained how to get the wheelchairs loaded onto trucks in Norfolk and taken to Tallahassee in time for the Veterans trip to Washington, D.C. Thats where a group of Fleet Logistic Center Norfolk volunteers con tributed their time and talents to palletize the wheelchairs and stage them for shipment. Approximately 20 Sailors and civilians loaded approximately 35 Pallets on two United Parcel Service semi-trucks for the trip to Tallahassee. On May 11, 79 Veterans made the trip to Washington, D.C. Volunteers from the Honor Flight Network, greeted the Veterans at the Tallahassee and Baltimore airports, and provided a police escort to and from the Memorial, all to say thank you for their service. Many of the Veterans told me this was one, if not best day of their lives, said Capt. Barry. Not only did they get to visit the Memorial but also made connections with other Vets in our area and now will continue to support each other in their final years. We are pleased that we were able to play a small role in helping these American heroes see their Memorial, said Rear Admiral Sinclair Harris, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet. Harris went on to say. We like to say that we do real work to help real people to make a real difference, and in this instance, we were for tunate to have just what the Honor Flight Network needed for a memorable day. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. To learn more about the Veterans Trip to Washington, D.C. on May 11, visit the Tallahassee Democrats Website at www.tallahassee.com. For more information about the Honor Flight Network please visit www.honor flight.org> Midway Dinner Tix On SaleFrom Navy Leagu MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is hosting the 71st Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years event, which will be held June 1, at the Renaissance Resort Hotel, World Golf Village in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Adm. William E. Gortney, USN, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Numerous Veterans of the Battle of Midway and several widows of these Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the mili tary have been invited to attend this years din ner. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $65. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civil ian is black tie or busi ness attire. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner Tickets may be purchased from the fol lowing locations: Bob Price, Phone 904-718-2118; email: bpricex4@comcast.net 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Navy Embraces Inclusion During 2013 Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage MonthBy Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy joins our nation in celebrating the contributions of gen erations of patriots dur ing Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month throughout May. The Navy announced April 29 in NAVADMIN 115/13, this years national theme is Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion, Inclusion is a recog nition that diversity of ideas, experiences, areas of expertise, and back grounds contribute sig nificantly to the Navys ability to fulfill its variety of missions both today and in the future. USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) exempli fied this years theme of embracing cultural values and inclusion by utiliz ing the talents, language skills, and cultural back grounds of three Sailors to further their mission in the US Navys first bilat eral anti-piracy exercise with Chinas Peoples Liberation Army (Navy) (PLA(N)). In September 2012, USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and the Chinese Frigate Yi Yang (FF 548) conducted visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) drills near the Horn of Africa to enhance cooperative antipiracy efforts. During the exercise, three Churchill Sailors were utilized as translators. Ships Serviceman 2nd Class Junwen Liang, Ships Serviceman Seaman Qing Su, and Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Guo Rui Liu, all Chinese immigrants, played an integral role in the success of the exer cise by bridging both the language and the cultur al gaps between the two crews. Liang, who immigrated to the United States from China at age 20, said he came to America speak ing almost no English and joined the Navy after pursuing further education in New York. During the exercise, Liang performed as translator for Cmdr. Chris D. Stone, com manding officer of USS Winston S. Churchill. This is a unique opportunity to use both my native and adopted languages in service of my country, said Liang. According to Stone, On-site translation and briefing on customs helped ensure solid com munication between U.S. Navy and PLA(N) Sailors, along with aiding us in understanding the cultur al nuances that help both sides better understand each other. My opportunity to take part in this exchange, and in the Navy itself, reminds me that I serve a country that accepts people from many different parts of the world, said Liang. No matter where and how I serve, Im still serving for my freedom and my country. Asians and Pacific Islanders of various nationalities and ances try have been serving in our Navy since the early 19th century. Asians and Pacific Islanders have continued to be at the forefront as leaders in every aspect of American life, including Senator Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaiis first Congressman and the first Japanese American to serve in Congress. Having enlisted in the US Army at age 17 and serving during the Second World War, Senator Inouye was a great champion of all the armed forces throughout his career. He received the Medal of Honor for his extraordinary heroism and indomitable leader ship during an engage ment in World War II. On Dec 17, 2012 Senator Inouye passed away, leaving behind a noted legacy of leadership and a drive to enhance inclusion in our Armed Forces and across our country. In 2013, Sailors of Asian and Pacific Islander heri tage comprise 6.5 per cent of our active duty Naval force. Over 20,000 active duty Sailors, 4,000 Reservists, and 18,900 Navy civilian employ ees identify as Asian American or Pacific Islander, including 10 flag officers, 9 members of the Senior Executive Service (SES), and 176 master chief petty officers. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders encompass over 50 ethnic and language groups, representing a vast array of cultures, nationalities, and histori cal roots. Directed by Congress in 1978 and established by Presidential Proclamation in 1979, Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week was first observed the week of May 4, 1979. In 1990, President George H. W. Bush expanded the observance to encompass the entire month, and in 1992, Congress passed a law permanently des ignating May as Asian/ Pacific American Heritage Month. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute provides print able posters, presen tations, guidance for organizing observance, and educational facts on their website, http:// www.deomi.org/ under the section Special Observances. For more information about the history of Asian and Pacific Islanders and their numerous contri butions to the Navy, visit http://www.history.navy. mil/special%20high lights/asian/asian-index. htm.From StaffHurricane season is just around the corner and there are several things you can do now to be prepared. during a hurricane watch (36 to 24 hours prior to the arrival of hurricane conditions). -monitor radio and television reports regularly. The intensity and track of tropical storms and hurricanes can change quickly. If you do not own a NOAA weather alert radio, get one. -inspect your surviv al kit ensuring you have everything you might need. Ensure medications and food/water have not reached expiration dates. Have cash on hand; small bills, $1s, $5s and lots of coins. ATM withdrawals and debit card purchases may not be available. -ensure your vehicle has a full tank of gas, regardless of whether you plan to leave the area, go to a local shelter, or ride out the storm at home. Gas may be difficult to obtain during an evacua tion and gas stations may be out of service after a storm strikes. -prepare your house. Move items indoor that can become deadly air borne missile hazards in strong winds causing injury and damage (gar bage cans, lawn furniture, garden equipment, toys, etc.). Items too heavy to move should be tied down. Lower antennas, brace garage doors and board up or close shut ters on glass doors and windows. Move valuables to upstairs, inner rooms. Ensure gas and propane tanks for emergency gen erators, chain saws and cookers are full. -if a mandatory evacu ation order is in effect, leave the area immediately. Traveling during day light hours is preferred, but dont delay your departure when a mandatory evacuation order is issued. Remember to lock windows and doors, turn off water, gas and electricity at the main breaker. Plug sink drains to pre vent backup. Fill bathtubs for use as flushing water when you return. If time permits, elevate furniture to protect from flooding or move upstairs. Again, a full tank of gas is essential for a proper evacua tion. Roads will be very crowded and it may take many hours to get out of the area. -as time allows, check on your neighbors, espe cially the elderly and families of those deployed, assist as you can in their preparations and/or evacuation. during a hurricane warn ing (24 hours or less prior to the arrival of hurricane conditions). -closely monitor radio and television for updates and official instructions. -if in a mobile home, check tie-downs and evacuate immediately. A mobile home is not suit able shelter for riding out a hurricane. -if you choose to remain at home, store drink ing water in sanitized containers. Fill bathtubs and larger containers for cleaning and flush ing water. Unplug appli ances with the exception of the refrigerator set it on maximum cold and if power is lost only open when necessary. Close all interior doors and brace external doors. If you are unable to evacuate, seek shelter in an interior room away from doors and windows on the lowest floor level. Large appliances will support debris if roof or wall collapse occurs. Avoid the temptation to go outside during the brief calm when the Eye of the storm passes over. after the storm. -the orderly return of personnel and their families back to an area of evacuation shall be conducted only when directed by federal, state, or local authorities. Dont try to come back to the ar ea before local emer gency management offi cials have issued the all clear. Watch for closed roads if you come upon a barricade or a flood ed road, turn around, dont drown. be patient, remember everyone else is eager to return home too. Proof of residency may be required (re-entry pass, drivers license, recent utility bill, etc). Call ahead to obtain road conditions and to determine the availability of servic es. It is best to wait a few days to allow emergency personnel to clean up and restore conditions to normal. Ensure you keep your gas tank full gas may be difficult To get as you get closer to the area. -enter your home with caution. Although it may appear to be structurally sound, water and wind damage could be exten sive. Use a flashlight to inspect for damage; never use an open flame. Check the gas, electrical and water lines for damage. Dont use water from the tap or re-energize electri cal main breaker or gas sources until declared safe by local authorities. -contact your command leadership and monitor local news for informa tion on when you will be required to report back to your command. -be patient. Following a hurricane, it may take several weeks to restore services and clear roads, and months to remove all the debris from neigh borhoods, especially in outlying, rural areas. As able, assist neighbors and shipmates in their return to the area and recovery efforts. ability. -the past few years has seen tremendous effort throughout the Navy to ensure programs and procedures are in place to account and care for the Navy family after a crisis. Personnel accountability clearly remains both a command and an indi vidual responsibility. All commands are responsi ble for implementing and administering procedures for determining the status and whereabouts of Navy family members follow ing a catastrophic event and for training their Navy family members on these procedures. Furthermore, these procedures must be robust enough to cover when the unit is at home, away for a few days of training or on extended deployment, and apply equally to when the member and/or family is at home or on vacation anywhere around the world. -at the heart of this effort is the individu al Navy family mem ber the active duty and reserve Sailor, the civilian employee (to include NAF and NEX employees), and their family members. At the most basic level, all Navy family members must: (1) know their com mands emergency reporting procedures, including how to contact their parent command. (2) know their com mands coop site, (3) know their coordi nating unit (if assigned), (4) know their person nel accountability points of contact, or naval per sonnel commands emer gency communications center [NPC ECC] and the necessity to report your status via the most expe ditious means available. (5) ensure up-to-date recall information is pro vided to your chain of command and kept cur rent. (6) ensure emergency contact information (page 2) is current. (7) update and vali date dependency data in DEERS, etc. (8) we rely on you to reinforce personnel accountability and emer gency preparedness with your Sailors and civilian employees. The only way we can achieve quick and accurate person nel accountability dur ing a catastrophic event is by training person nel to report their sta tus and whereabouts to their command; famil iarize them with NFAAS (https://www.Navyfamily. Navy.mil). Commands should generate and dis tribute emergency wal let information cards to all personnel and their family members. A tem plate sample of this card is available on the CNIC portal web site in the n37/ operations prepare tool kit.Are you Ready For Hurricane Season To Begin? 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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CNRMC Visits SERMC Mayport, Acknowledges Contribution To FleetSoutheast Regional Maintenance Center Public AffairsRear Adm. David J. Gale, Commander of the Navy Regional Maintenance Command (CNRMC) visited the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) in Jacksonville, Fla. May 6 8. During his visit, Admiral Gale held an all hands meeting, thanked everyone for their hard work, and congratulat ed SERMC for recently winning the Regional Maintenance Center Excellence Award for the second year in a row. SERMC has provided exceptional support to the fleet, not only here in Mayport, but also in areas scattered across the world and that support is recognized and greatly appre ciated by the fleet, said Gale. Additionally, during his visit, the Admiral was able to recognize 24 graduates of the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) pro gram at SERMC. The NAMTS pro gram trains Sailors to obtain particular Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) codes, provid ing important skillsets to Sailors allowing them to be proficient journey men and a valuable, selfsufficient asset to the fleet, said Osbert TeekaSingh, SERMCs NAMTS Coordinator. NAMTS is providing better trained Sailors to the fleet, and I look for ward to seeing the pro gram continue to grow, said Admiral Gale. Currently, SERMC has 114 Sailors enrolled in the NAMTS program and has seen a steady increase in participation ever since the program was recon stituted a couple of years ago. It is nice to have the recognition and support from the Admiral for the NAMTS program. As a graduate now, I look for ward to taking what Ive learned and putting it to good use for the Navy, said Machinist Mate 2nd Class Francisco Carrillo, assigned to SERMCs valve shop division and who received an NEC in valve repair. For more information about Southeast Regional Maintenance Center, visit: http://www.navsea.navy. mil/CNRMC/SERMC/ default.aspx For more news from Naval Regional Maintenance Command, visit: http://www.nav sea.navy.mil/CNRMC/ default.aspx -Photo courtesy of SERMCRear Admiral David Gale presents a Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) certificate to Machinist Mate 2nd Class Francisco Carrillo. Petty Officer Carrillo is assigned to SERMCs valve shop division and received a Navy Enlisted Code in valve repair through the NAMTS program at SERMC.Navys Newest Department Heads Graduate SWOSSurface Warfare Officers School Command Public AffairsThe Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS) graduated Department Head Class 221 in the Pringle Auditorium at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., May 2. The class, consisting of 50 Surface Warfare Officers, completed the 27-week course designed to prepare officers for duty as chief engineers, combat systems and weapons officers, opera tions officers on all classes of ships, and as first lieu tenants on amphibious ships. The course is divided into two major subdivi sions Tactical Action Officer (TAO), which focuses on areas such as undersea warfare, air defense, and surface warfare, and Operations, Readiness, Training, and Engineering (ORTE), which explores the specifics of each students pro spective job assignments. The length of the SWOS Department Head course, a full six months, is indicative of the investment the Navy has made in the future readiness of the students and in their importance to the mission of the ship, said Capt. Richard Brown, SWOS commanding officer. A significant graduation ceremony is merited to acknowledge these facts and to note each officers passage from student to ships officer. The guest of honor for the ceremony, Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, thanked the families and friends of the gradu ates for witnessing this major achievement in their careers. After con gratulating the gradu ates, Sweeney reminded them of the importance of the demanding roles they were about to undertake and how they will be relied upon as leaders on their ships. The duties and responsibilities of the shipboard department head are significant and reflect a great degree of authority, said Sweeney. As fully-trained sur face warriors, your com manding officers will be counting on you to lead your respective depart ments and to provide advice on key command decisions; so make sure you are up to the task. Do what is right and trust your instincts. Those things will keep you out of trouble and on the path to success we are counting on you. Lt. Ryan Pierce, pro spective operations officer for the guidedmissile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) received the Arleigh Burke award for the graduate recognized by class mates as the individual possessing the strongest leadership, industry and perseverance; best exemplifying the fighting spirit of Admiral Burkes famous squadron, the Little Beavers Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 23. The course was more challenging than I expected, said Pierce. It was also a huge honor to be chosen by my classmates for this award. Lt. Eric Duffield, pro spective weapons officer for the guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) received the City of Newport award for demonstrating the high est qualities of profes sionalism and leadership, as reflected by his overall contributions to the class. Other awardees hon ored during the gradu ation ceremony were Lt. James Drennan, and Lt. Paul Tranbarger. Drennan, the prospec tive weapons officer for the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) earned the Top Gunner award for having the highest overall grade point average for the tactical action officer portion of the course. Drennan also received the Newport Navy League award for academic excellence as the top graduate for department head class 221. Tranbarger earned the Top Snipe award for having the highest over all grade point average for the engineering portion of the course. The graduates will report to their next assignments aboard ships around the world in the coming months. After more than 50 years, the Department Head course remains the flagship course at SWOS. Approximately 275 students attend the course each year. SWOS is headquartered in Newport, R.I. and oversees nine learning sites, which provide more than 1,000 courses a year to more than 67,000 Sailors. SWOS uses a mix of blended-learning tech niques comprised of instructor-led classes, hands-on labs, simula tion and computer-based training. Courses include specialized training sup porting all enlisted engi neering ratings, and Surface Warfare Officers at every level. Building maritime partnerships, the command also pro vides training to many international students.2013 Memorial Day Weekend Safety Tips From StaffMemorial Day is a time of remembrance of those who have died in service to our great nation. Pause for a moment this holiday to observe and honor the sacrifices those before us made so we can truly appreciate our freedoms and liber ties. Memorial Day weekend marks the beginning of the Live to Play Play to Live Summer 2013 Safety Campaign which runs through Labor Day, designed to heighten awareness to activities in which Marines and Sailors are most often injured or killed, specifi cally: crashes; Water activities; Cookouts; Firearms and Alcohol Overindulgence Safety Tips: quately rested prior to travel. Wear your seatbelt and obey speed limits. Dont tailgate or text while driving. Check forecasts and complete a TRiPS assessment. Know riptide signs. Dont combine alcohol and water activities. Ensure someone knows your whereabouts, and esti mated return time. lighter fluids on grills or camp fires. Keep grills a safe distance from any thing flammable. Dispose of foods left unattended. safety rules for firearms. Avoid handling firearms if under the influence. drink drink responsi bly. Drinking and driving comes with many conse quences. Have a plan and remember, keep what you earned. on the phone while driv ing are distractions. At-Risk Factors: Distractions; No Seatbelt; Poor Planning; Lack of Focus; Excessive Alcohol Consequences: and suffering of family and friends; Vehicle damage or impounded; Ticket; Fines; Court/Lawyer fees; Loss of License; Jail time; Insurance premium increase; Potential of injuring oth ers; Degradation of mis sion readiness and unit morale. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Present Honors The Past At Ship Reunion ATG Mayport PAOAfloat Training Group (ATG) Mayports new Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Adam Aycock delivered the keynote speech Friday night at USS Willard Keith (DD 775) annual ship reunion. Willard Keith is a World War II Destroyer escort. The reunion was held at the Crowne Plaza in downtown Jacksonville. We were hon ored to have a fellow Destroyerman currently serving come speak to us, said retired Capt. Jay OConnell, former execu tive officer of DD 775, who serves as president and host of the event. Aycocks speech high lighted how todays Navy is ever changing with technology; adapting to the world around it, but still remembering and honoring the past. Technology enables the Navy to accomplish its missions with fewer ships and Sailors, Aycock said. Unmanned helicopters now fly off the decks of frigates and engineering plants can be run by computers. But the Navys strength will always rely on the fighting spirit of those on the deckplates All Sailors recall the heroes of our past and wear the uniform with pride. I sure am glad I dont have to follow up that! That was great, said Joe Mitchell, who served aboard DD 775 as a lieu tenant junior grade. Along with Aycock, Gunners Mate 1st Class Amy Hamilton, ATGs Sailor of the Year, and Chief Logistics Specialist Geordane Deleon proudly represented the Mayport basin and ATG. Attending the event was an assort ment of Sailors who served aboard Willard Keith ranging from 1942 to 1972, including a Pearl Harbor survivor. After dinner, Willard Keith board of directors shared the ships history and accomplishments with ATGs Sailors. Attending USS Willard Keith (DD-775) reunion this past Friday was an awesome experience and an eye opener, Deleon said. It was an honor for me to meet some of the heroes from our ear lier Navy, who have set the path for what we are today. The ceremony was heart touching, especially the recognition of fallen heroes. I now have a dif ferent view of what camaraderie really is. Seeing prior Sailors from differ ent parts of the country come together to keep history alive is just hum bling to me. Im glad I was offered the opportunity to spend some time with such an elite group of citizens; would be glad to do it again. -Photos by Ensign Will DrummondNew ATG Mayport Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Adam Aycock speaks at USS Willard Keith annual ship reunion. ATG Mayport Chief Logistics Specialist Geordane Deleon poses for a picture with for mer crewmembers of USS Willard Keith during the ships annual reunion. Pictured from left retired Capt. Jay OConnell, Deleon, Mary Lou OConnell, Casey Jones, and Joe Mitchell. USS Phil Sea Enjoys Ship Picnic At Sea Otter -Photos by ET1 Marty ParsonsUSS Philippine Sea Commanding Officer, Capt. Steve Shinego, gets ready for the next pitch and a swim in the dunk booth during a command picnic at Sea Otter Pavilion. Logistics Specialist Seaman Rebensky swinging the hammer to ring the bell. Engineman 2nd Class(SW) Joseph throws a beanbag in a game of cornhole. Phil Sea sailors enjoying some chow during the picnic. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 13

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RGB Completes Deployment In Sixth Fleet USS Robert G. Bradley Public AffairsThe commander of Destroyer Squadron 60 (DESRON 60), Capt. John Esposito, visited USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) as it made its last port of call in the U.S. 6th Fleet in Souda Bay, Greece, May 10. Robert G. Bradley, homeported out of Mayport, Fl., is at the end of a seven-month deployment in support of mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. During his visit, Esposito congratulated the crew on their successful deployment, focus ing on the ships ability to remain at sea for long periods to allow for con tinuous operations in support of maritime security. You all have done a great job, said Esposito. Even though some days may have been long, you pulled through and your service to the Navy and nation has been admira ble. The Commodore also presented awards to several Sailors for their exemplary performance during the deploy ment. He awarded four Navy Commendation Medals and seven Navy Achievement Medals. It was great to be rec ognized for doing hard work and to receive my first award from a Captain in the Navy, said Gas Turbine Systems Technician Electrical 3rd Class Terrence Tucker, one of the Sailors who received a Navy Achievement Medal from the Commodore. For Esposito, handing out the awards gave him a first hand view of those who had kept the ship steaming at a high operational level. It is great to personally extend these awards to Robert G. Bradley Sailors, said Esposito during his All-Hands Call. It lets me know about all the great things you are doing out here. The guided-missile frigate Robert G. Bradley will now head to its homeport of Mayport, Fla., as it concludes its deployment. -Photo by D. L. Farley Three Sailors bird nest a mooring line onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) while RGB is in its last port of call in U.S. Sixth Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by D. L. Farley Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Kayle Rivers supervises Information Systems Technician Seaman Zachery Jeffcoat and Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Corey Wisdom as they clean an antenna on board USS Robert G. Bradley. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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FFSC Hosts Workshops For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 23, 1 3 p.m., Troops to Teachers Building 1 Room 702 May 28, 6 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 May 29, 9 a.m. noon, Resume Writing Workshop Building 1 Room 719 This workshop is for those who are develop ing a rough resume and for those who are close to the perfecting theirs. We will work in a small group format to review and provide input on participants resumes. This unique learning method helps participants real ize that we can all be experts and that we can get great input from our peers. FFSC Staff will participate and provide input on individual resumes. A completed rough resume will be required. May 30, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Adventure Landing Night The annual USO night at Adventure Landing (Jacksonville Beach) will be held on Wednesday, June 12 from 6-11 p.m. Wristbands for our annual fun evening at Adventure Landing will go on sale Today beginning at NOON. Wristbands will be on sale for $2 each and will be available for pur chase by ACTIVE DUTY and families only (Guard and Reserves on active orders eligible). They will be on sale at your Mayport USO, NAS Jax USO and a limited num ber at Kings Bay ITT. Save the date for this annual sold out event! Barbecue For The Troops Stop by the Mulligans Pub at the Hilton Garden Inn-Jacksonville/Ponte Vedra located at 43 PGA Tour Blvd., Ponte Vedra Beach on Monday, May 27 at 2 p.m. for a bar becue to support the troops. The barbecue is $5.00 for active military and dependents with ID and $15 for civilians. The menu includes CajaChina roasted pig, corn on the cob, coleslaw, potato salad, and apple pie. See attached flyer for more information. The Rascals In ConcertTicket Drawing For the first time in 40 years, The Rascals are back together. Want to see The Rascals Once Upon a Dream con cert May 31 at the Times Union Center Moran Theater? Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is conducting a drawing for two pairs of tickets. The drawing is open to Active Duty (including those on active duty orders) only. The deadline to enter is Wednesday, May 22. To enter, email drawing@ usojax.com with the fol lowing information: LAST NAME, FIRST, MI, COMMAND, EMAIL ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER. USO Military Appreciation Night At The Jax Zoo Rescheduled Due to inclement weather Friday, May 3rd, Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo has been rescheduled to July 26 from 6-9 p.m. Free Cat Spay/Neuter Program Duval County Residents First Coast No More Homeless Pets is offer ing free cat spay/neuter services for Duval County residents for a limited time. The program is free for pet and stray cats. For more information, call (904) 425-0005 and visit www.fcnmhp.org. For The Troops Salsa Campaign The Greater Jacksonville USO and For the Troops, Inc. is proud to announce the For the Troops Salsa Campaign. $1 from each jar of deli cious For the Troops Salsa sold through Aug. 31 will be donated directly to the Greater Jacksonville USO. See attached flyer and visit www.forthetroops. com for more informa tion. JAXEX RUNWAY 5K The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) will host its Inaugural JAXEX RUNWAY 5K at Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport (JAXEX) on Saturday, June 8. Net proceeds will benefit The Greater Jacksonville Area USO. The event will fea ture a 5K run beginning at 7:30 a.m. and a onemile Fun Run at 8:30 a.m. A portion of both race courses will include the airport runway at JAXEX (which will be closed to air traffic dur ing the event). To register, visit www.jaxexrunway5k. com. Register before June 1 for the early bird entry fee of $20 for the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run. The 5K registration fee will increase to $30 the day of the race. Space is limited. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, provide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Friday, May 24 Women Ministry of First Missionary Baptist Church presents Women Conference 2013 at 7 p.m. at 810 Third Avenue South Jacksonville Beach with Rev. Marvin McQueen, II, Pastor and Rev. Dr. Marvin McQueen, I, Overseer. JU Marine Science Research Institute to host sixth annual Ripples on the River. The event will feature live music; a fish ing clinic by TV personality Capt. Don Dingman; tours of the beauti ful new W.C. and Susan Gentry Boardwalk and Nature Preserve; SeaBest Seafood and hot dogs, chips and slaw for for lunch; Sweetwater Beer samples; a critter touch tank by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; DeleteRiver Taxi boat rides courtesy of the St. Johns Riverkeeper; and tours of the MSRI. Cost is $10 per adult, children free; payable at the door (cash and checks). The MSRI is the premier biological and environ mental research and education facility on the St. Johns River. The twostory, 32,000-square-foot certified-green build ing has classrooms, labo ratories, offices for the St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and areas for teaching Duval County public school students. RSVP by May 10 to Lauren at (904) 256-7095. Saturday, May 25 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. The pro gram will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reservations are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. The Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida will host a Memorial Day Weekend program from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. to honor the men and women who served in World War II. Visitors can explore military dis plays, view memorabilia and learn about the uni forms, weapons, vehicles and lifestyle of those who were part of the war dur ing the 1940s. Admission to the park is $6 per vehicle at the front gate and $2 per person to enter the fort. Children under 6 are free. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks. org. Sunday, May 26 Drowning Pool will be live at Brewsters Megaplex located at 845 University Blvd North, Jacksonville, Florida 32211. All active duty military members get in free. For further information please contact Brewsters Megaplex at (904) 2239850 Women Ministry of First Missionary Baptist Church presents Women Conference 2013 at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. at 810 Third Avenue South Jacksonville Beach with Rev. Marvin McQueen, II, Pastor and Rev. Dr. Marvin McQueen, I, Overseer. The Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida will host a Memorial Day Weekend program from 9 a.m. 2 p.m. to honor the men and women who served in World War II. Visitors can explore military dis plays, view memorabilia and learn about the uni forms, weapons, vehicles and lifestyle of those who were part of the war dur ing the 1940s. Admission to the park is $6 per vehicle at the front gate and $2 per person to enter the fort. Children under 6 are free. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks. org. Tuesday, May 28 The Duval County Extension Offices/ UF IFAS will be offer ing a free workshop on Do it Yourself Irrigation Repairs to Save Money at 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Argyle Branch Library, 7973 Old Middleburg Road., Jacksonville, Fl. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Learn handson ideas. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Saturday, June 1 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Sunday, June 2 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Saturday, June 8 Rethreaded, a nonprofit that provides job train ing and employment for women emerging from lives of addiction, vio lence, human trafficking and prostitution, won the top crowd fund vote at One Spark Festival, the five-day festival for creators and innovators. To celebrate, the organi zation is hosting a Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration from 2 p.m.9 p.m. at the Rethreaded warehouse located at 820 Barnett Street Jacksonville, FL 32209. To learn more about Shop for Freedom: One Spark Celebration or to get involved with Rethreaded, please visit, http://www.rethreaded. com/. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 23, 2013 17 Navy Accepting STA-21 ApplicationsFrom Naval Service Training Command Public AffairsThe Seaman-toAdmiral (STA-21) com missioning program, which provides an opportunity for qualified Sailors to receive college educa tions and Navy commissions, is soliciting applications for fiscal year 2014. The deadline for sub mitting application pack ages is July 1. We are proud of the STA-21 program and the amazing Sailors who receive their com missions through it, said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). STA21 officer candidates and their families benefit from the educational opportunity afforded them at our nations premier univer sities. Completing their degree in 36 months, they remain on active duty with full pay and allow ances and the Navy pays up to $10,000 per year in support of their tuition, fees and books. STA-21 is truly an investment in Sailors as it shapes our officer corps of the future. Application packages must be postmarked on or before the July 1 dead line date. Early submis sion is preferred, as this will allow feedback to the Sailor for submission of missing or illegible docu ments. The deadline for submission of addition al documentation to an applicants package is August 1. Before earning their degrees, STA-21 appli cants must attend the Naval Science Institute (NSI) course at Officer Training Command (OTC), Naval Station Newport, R.I., prior to beginning college stud ies at an NROTC-affiliated college or university. STA-21/NSI is an eightweek course of intense officer preparation and indoctrination. Course enrollment is timed to allow college entrance during summer or fall semesters/quarters after selection. I assessed what I could do in my rate as a Machinists Mate com pared to what I could do as an officer and I felt I could contribute the most to the Navy by join ing the officer ranks, said Officer Candidate and former Machinists Mate 3rd Class Joseph Page, 21, from Indianapolis. I thought becoming an officer would maximize my qualities and my poten tial and thats how I could give the most to the Navy. Page, who came from Nuclear Prototype School in Charleston, S. C., plans on attending the Citadel Military College in Charleston and then join the Navys submarine community. This has been a great learning experience for me, said Page. I havent been out in the fleet yet but STA-21 and NSI has been a great place to gather information from those in my class that came from the fleet. I received a lot of valuable input from my classmates and received a feel for what Ill need to do once I get to the fleet as an officer. Both Page and Electronics Technician 3rd Class and Officer Candidate Brianna Smith, 22, from Erie, Pa., were put in charge of their class of 50 officer candidates. It was an amazing opportunity and has been a great experience and will help prepare us for whats to come, said Smith. You get your col lege education while learning about leadership roles. Smith plans on attend ing North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C., and then looks to be a Nuclear Warfare Officer on a ship or sub marine out of Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Smith also attended Nuclear Prototype School but in Ballston Spa, N. Y., before attending STA-21/NSI in Newport. The STA-21 program benefits Sailors as well as the Navy. The average candidate has at least two years and in most cases more than four years of observed performance which assists in the pro cess of selecting the most qualified Sailors to receive a commission. Additionally, STA-21 candidates are on aver age older than most midshipmen, bringing a maturity directly reflect ed in the more than 90 percent completion rate STA-21 program candi dates boast. Many Sailors involved in the STA-21 program already have some college credit, and some candidates finish ahead of the three years allotted to earn a degree. Students reporting for NSI should expect an intense academic pro gram, said Lt. Jason Gilmore, assistant opera tions officer and head of this years STA-21/ NSI class. In eight short weeks they will complete six curriculum modules. It would be real easy for a student to fall behind if they dont arrive ready to hit the books. Our intent at NSI is not only to pro vide these students with a solid basis in Naval Science, but to also establish a foundation of good study habits in an intense academic environment as these students adjust from life in the fleet to life at a University. In the STA-21 program, as it is in many competitive selec tion processes, it is often a candidates extra efforts which can result in selec tion. Lt. Justin Neff, a division officer and NSI instruc tor at OTC, called the the STA-21 program an awesome opportunity for motivated Sailors that are looking to get an educa tion, and advance their career. Neff, who was in one of the first STA-21 class at OTC Newport in March 2003 and commissioned after graduating from Old Dominion University in May 2006 also said, One of the best things about STA-21 is that it is your job to go to school. You dont have to worry about pay or housing or standing watches on a ship or sub. You go to school and in three years (or less) you can earn your degree and a commission. Neff was a Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 1st Class when he applied for STA-21. I wanted to get the most out of my Navy career and for me, Seaman-to-Admiral was the best way to go, said Neff. STA-21 has opened the door for a wealth of opportunities for me. Reporting seniors who feel they have a Sailor with the potential to be selected by STA-21 should comment on their lead ership skills and poten tial in their performance evaluations early in their career. These comments are highly regarded by the boards, even in junior Sailors whos time on board, time in grade or peer ranking will not allow their evaluations to be fully consistent with the comments. Selectees will be announced by a NAVADMIN in October 2013. Questions concern ing this program should be directed to com mand career counselors or to the NSTC Officer Development directorate at (850) 452-9563. Headquartered on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., Mewbourne and NSTC oversees 98 percent of initial officer and enlisted accessions training for the Navy. This includes the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) at more than 160 colleges and universities, Officer Training Command (OTC) on Naval Station Newport, R.I., Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill., and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) and Navy National Defense Cadet Corps (NNDCC) citizen ship development pro grams at more than 600 high schools worldwide. For more information, visit https://www.sta-21. navy.mil. NavyNEWS Make Moving Plans Now To Avoid StressNAVSUP Global Logistics Support Once again, the sum mer months herald the busiest move sea son of the year as hun dreds of thousands of Department of Defense (DoD) and U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) service men and women receive orders to new assign ments across the nation and worldwide. NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS) Household Goods Program Analyst Deloma Miley advises those transferring to book their moves early. The period of May 15 through August 31 is the annual peak move sea son, she said. More than 65 percent of moves occur during peak sea son. Dont wait, Miley said. With the decline in moving companies capacity, Department of Defense budget cuts, and even a possible government furlough, the sooner you start working with the local Personal Property Office the greater your chance of get ting the desired pack out date. Dont wait until a week or two before the desired pack out date to complete the pro cess in www.move.mil, said Miley. Begin now it takes approximately three weeks to process all required paperwork to book your move. Enter all your data and paper work now. For Navy information on getting started with the move process, go to www. navsup.navy.mil/house hold.> Another tip is to organize your house and belongings, Miley said. Go through all your rooms and boxes from the last move to make sure you still need the items. If it hasnt been worn or used in the last year, do you still need it? Sort your items by the type of shipment: household shipment; unac companied baggage, if authorized; professional gear and what is going in your suitcase or car. By sorting you may find out what needs to be sold, donated or disposed of. Keep in mind, if you exceed your authorized weight allowance it can be expensive! No one wants to get a bill for being overweight on their shipment, Miley said. DoD and the USCG book an estimated 200,000 household goods shipments each summer, Miley said. In addition to these moves, many federal civilian employees also choose to schedule their moves during the summer, since most schools are out of session and the relocation will be less disruptive for children. Service members have two options for mov ing their household goods. They can choose a Government arranged move, in which a con tractor packs and ships their household goods, or they may perform a Personally Procured Move (PPM) former ly known as a DITY move, where the cus tomer arranges to rent a truck or trailer, or uses their own vehicle to move their items. Here are some helpful terms for you to know: Household shipment is your main shipment: furniture, dishes, wash er/dryer, BBQ grill, out door furniture, childrens play furniture, majority of your clothes, etc. Unaccompanied bag gage, if authorized: this is the small shipment of items that you will need to survive until your big household good ship ment arrives. This is normally only authorized with overseas orders. Items to include would be enough kitchen ware/ dishes to use daily (not your china), crib, clothes, some uniforms, some DVDs not your entire library, etc. Professional gear: Professional books and equipment (PBP&E) includes Household goods in a members possession needed for the performance of offi cial duties at the next or a later destination. Service members pro fessional gear could be: work manuals, awards, specialty work uniforms (Band uniforms, navy divers, flight suits, hel mets, chaplains vest ments and other specialized apparel), reference materials, instruments, tools, and equipment peculiar to technicians, mechanics. Spouse professional gear: may be authorized for a licensed profes sion, i.e. doctor, dentist, lawyer or community support activities at the next or a later destina tion, example would be a command Ombudsman. Any other profession may be considered if the appropriate documen tation can be provided. Selling Avon or Pamper Chef does not count as licensed profession. Excluded from profes sional gear: commercial products for sale/resale used in conducting business, sports equipment, and office, household, or shop fixtures or furniture (such as bookcases, study/computer desks, file cabinets, and racks) of any kind even though it may be used in con junction with professional gear. For more information on either option and to start the move process, customers should go to www.move.mil. For questions or concerns about moving custom ers may e-mail house holdgoods@navy.mil or call 1-855-HHG-MOVE (1-855-444-6683) for assistance or contact their local personal property shipping office. NAVSUP GLS is com prised of more than 6,600 military and civil ian logistics profession als operating from 110 locations worldwide providing an extensive array of integrated global logistics and contracting services to Navy, Marine Corps, joint operational units, and allied forces across all warfare enter prises. Safety Handbook Launched For TrainingNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsNaval Education and Training Command (NETC) aboard Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola announced the launch of a safety handbook, May 14, which will be used by collateral duty safety personnel at training com mands around the world. NETC has had a 68 percent reduc tion in on-duty lost time cases and a 58 percent off-duty lost time case reduc tion, the lowest case rate in more than five years for the domain, through the efforts of the collateral duty personnel throughout the training domain. Cynthia Vargas, a safety specialist at NETC, credits educating the staff on known risk events for on-duty and off-duty activities such traffic safety, recreation and the motorcycle safety program as a factor for the reduction of safety incidents. Being proactive prior to any holi days, during Sailors liberty and leave periods and during off duty recreational activities has made a huge impact in the thought process a Sailor makes in ensuring they make good risk choices, said Vargas. To further help personnel, the handbook was created with the combined input from other safety professionals including collateral duty person nel within NETC and information from Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) and the Naval Safety Center. The CDSL handbook will serve as a pass-down to those who volunteer as a Collateral Duty Safety Liaison. Too often volunteers receive little to no turn-over from their predeces sor and gaps within the organization occur to increase this problem, says Vargas. The handbook provides a good foundation on which to build, and outlines their responsibilities to ensure successful operation of the Navys Occupational Safety and Health programs. It identifies the four core elements necessary for a successful program: Mishap Reduction Efforts, Communication, Organization, and Compliance. In order to continue decreasing the number of safety incidents, Vargas says communication is the important. We have to continue to provide information before major holidays, said Vargas. Mentor young Sailors as you communicate with them daily, and ensure everyone has a capability to communicate safety shortfalls. The Collateral Duty Safety Liaison (CDSL) handbook was developed by several safety specialists and collat eral duty safety personnel through out the NETC domain and is avail able to NETC staff through the Safety and Occupational Health webpage on the Enterprise Safety Applications Management System (ESAMS) website https://esams.cnic.navy.mil/ESAMS_ GEN_2/LoginESAMS.aspx.

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