<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00295


This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com New Move For HRO Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), presented five Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 44 letters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources (HR) Program during a cere mony on board Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville April 17. The ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR specialists from region headquar ters to major commands on board installations throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mis sion would not be pos sible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each mem ber, especially in the areas of labor employee rela tions, equal employment opportunity, workers compensation, and staff ing and classification for more than 4,000 custom ers in theater. Prior to decentraliza tion, approximately 75 HR specialists through out the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Commands, such as Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. The new Navy-wide model will position HR special ists at each major com mand, whereas CNRSE had previously been ser vicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. The decentralization plan was created last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs with the goal of deliver ing more streamlined and customer-focused support. According to Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources direc tor, the transition comes with distinct benefits. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR professionals will be able to focus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several different com mands at the same time, she said. This focus pro vides the opportunity for better customer service through specific, com mand-focused HR servic ing and better partner ships with customers. The new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logisti cal challenges. It required extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of files and casework, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby expressed his appreciation for each of the program members efforts throughout the process.USS The Sullivans Welcomes New COFrom USS The Sullivans Public AffairsCapt. Wesley A. Smith was relieved by Cmdr. Samuel F. de Castro on April 17 as command ing officer of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) dur ing a pierside ceremony at Naval Station Mayport. Smith reported to The Sullivans as command ing officer in May 2012 and oversaw a high ly successful training cycle and Independent Deployment certifica tion. His next duty assign ment will be as com manding officer of USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). De Castro assumes com mand of the guided mis sile destroyer after serving as her executive officer for the past 18 months. He is a native of Buffalo, New York and graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1996. De Castro began his naval career serv ing aboard USS Ramage (DDG 61) as Communications offi cer. He subsequently served on USS Peterson (DD 969) as Auxiliaries Officer; and as Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer on board USS M ahan (DDG 72). His shore tours include Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security Affairs; an assignment as Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Defense (CBRND) Action officer and Requirements officer within the Surface Warfare Division on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (N86); and on the Joint Staff as Branch Chief for Battle Management Aids at the Joint Integrated Air and Missile Defense Organization (JIAMDO). The Sullivans departs in June 2013 on a Ballistic Missile Defense deploy ment to the Persian Gulf. -Photo courtesy of USS The SullivansCOMDESRON 14 Commodore Paul Flood congratulates Cmdr. Samuel de Castro as he assumes command of USS The Sullivans from Capt. Wesley Smith during a change of command ceremony on April 17. Naval Station Mayport employees can contact HR Representatives Tracy Sawyer, 542-2954 or Kim Walker 542-2282. They are located at NAS Jacksonville in Building 919 on Langley Boulevard.See HR, Page 3 Base Veterinary Clinic Keeps Mayport Pets HealthyNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East Detachment SoutheastWith a staff of one active-duty Soldier and four civilians to carry out its mission, Naval Station Mayports Veterinary Clinic schedule can be a dog-eat-dog world, but the health of the furry four-legged companions is the number one priority for the staff of the clinic. We are a basic clinic that offer preventive ser vices, said Sgt. Bethzabe Delgado, non commis sioned officer in charge Mayports Veterinary Clinic. We treat your pets like our family. I call them my babies. In addition to annual checkups and vaccina tions, Delgado and her staff train the military working dog (MWD) handlers for canine med ical emergencies in the field such as heat stroke, CPR and basic medical checks. When MWDs are stateside the clinic also ensures that the dogs are healthy enough to per form their daily duties. They always give us good training, said Chief Master-atArms James Watkins, Mayports Kennel Master. Anytime our dogs are sick for whatever reason they come in no mat ter what time it is. They really take good care of our dogs, and us. I cant say enough good things about them at the clinic. The Army provides veterinary services to all the components of the Department of Defense, but they also provide services to all active duty members, retirees, reservist and their family members. The Army is the only branch that has a vet erinary corps, so not only do we support the Army but we support the Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as well, said -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSgt. Bethzabe Delgado, noncommissioned officer in charge of Naval Station Mayports Veterinary Clinic gives Electronic Technician 3rd Class Juan Serrets dog, Inti, an ear infection check during an annual check-up. The Mayport Clinic not only helps take care of the military working dogs on Mayport, they also take care of minor issues with pets for active duty and retired service members. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSusan Zur, veterinarian technician for Naval Station Mayport's Veterinary Clinic, holds one of her fourlegged patients still while Dr. Valeri Benham, Doctor of Veterinary Medicine for Mayport's Veterinary Clinic performs an annual check-up. See Vet, Page 3

PAGE 2

2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror April is the month of my sons birth. But dont worry, I wont bore you with a dreaded childbirth story. Everyone thinks their account is unique, but all the stories are basically the same: The Pre-Labor Part; The Decision to Go to the Hospital Part; The Agonizing Pain Part; The Rationale for Using/Not Using Pain Meds Part; and The Actual Birth in Excruciating Detail Part. After listening to a few of these tedious chronicles, Id rather endure a grade three episiotomy than hear another one. Back in the day, I surely annoyed a few friends with the bothersome tales of the births of my three children, but Ive learned my lesson. Nowadays, I only tell the parts of my childbirth sto ries that were totally unex pected. For instance, while pregnant and stationed in Monterey, I religiously read my What to Expect book, meticulously record ing my weight, circumfer ence, bowel movements, mood swings and gas bub bles in the spiral-bound pregnancy journal. Somewhere around the 35th week, I read that my obstetrician would likely perform a breast check to be sure that I would be able to breastfeed my new born. I waddled off to my monthly appointment, fully prepared. At my scheduled visit with Doc Walker, an oldfashioned obstetrician whod seen it all before, he performed his normal evaluation. He asked me to sit up, and as I started to reach around to undo my bra for the breast check, he patted me on the knee, and started to leave the room. But wait! I shouted, Arent you going to check my breasts?! With a smirk, he turned and said, Have you been reading that book again? Completely embarrassed, I nodded. Alright then, lets see em. Mortified, I had to sub mit to the unnecessary exam that I had demand ed, and worried that Doc Walker thought I was either a hypochondriac or a per vert. Despite that shameful scene, I was still determined to have the perfect birth experience. Like many firsttime-soon-to-be-parents, my husband and I attended birthing classes together, eager to learn the LaMaz methodology. When my labor started on the eve ning of April 3, 1993, my Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesTo get help for your child, you must become an advocate for him. Why should you do this? Well, you are a natural advo cate for your child. You were his first teacher, his most important role model, and you have his best interests at heart! Because you will be involved with your child for life, you need to be an active participant in plan ning his education. As your childs advo cate, your first step is to learn as much as you can about the special educa tion services available at your childs school and from the district. You will need to gather informa tion about the processes used to make the deci sions about your child and who are the people making these decisions. Who are the specific individuals in your childs school and at the district office you will work with to secure those services designed to meet your childs special needs? Since your child is enti tled to an appropriate education, not the best education, nor an educa tion that will maximize your childs potential, you must know these individuals, the pro cesses, and the State and Federal laws, especially The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. What do you currently know about your childs disability and educational history? Remember, the district only has to pro vide an appropriate education. Your main goal is to ensure that your child is provided with special education and related services [which are] designed to meet [the childs] unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living 20U.S.C. 1400(d). You will not be able to determine if what they are offering is appropriate if you dont know what has been tried before, whether it worked or not, and if it worked, how well. Another important goal involves building a healthy working relation ship with the school staff. Because you will be work ing with the school staff to design or revise your childs Individualized Educational Program (IEP), you will need your knowledge of special edu cation law, his disability, and his educational his tory. By maintaining a cordial relationship with school personnel, you will find them more willing to listen to your concerns, to discuss issues, and to craft accommodations which specifically address your childs needs, resulting in that appropriate educa tion for your child. Are you the only one advocating for your child? Absolutely not! Teachers, school staff, and schooland district-based administrators are available to provide support to you and your child. But as you know, schools and district special education departments are woefully understaffed. They will evaluate your child and make recommendations to you about educational services. However, these evaluations and resulting recommendations will vary from school to school and from individual to individual as the educational background and training of these individu als is quite varied. A lay advocate can also advocate for your child. These individuals use their specialized knowl edge and expertise to help parents resolve prob lems with schools. They can attend meetings with you, help you craft letters, negotiate for services, and advise you about your legal rights and respon sibilities. If this service sounds like what you need to get help for your special needs child, con tact me at the email or phone below for informa tion about local lay advo cates. Another individu al who can help is the Exceptional Family Member Program Liaison (EFMP) at your installa tion. If you have a spe -Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingHow Do I Get Help For My Special Needs Child. .From School District And Navy?It was a situation that is common to most of us, completing a General Military Training or GMT, part of our annual train ing on SAPR Sexual Assault Prevention and Response. As we gathered to watch elements of the latest SAPR-F video, the instruc tor emphasized the CNOs desire to get to the left of this issue; in other words, to become more proactive and less reac tive to the issue of sexual assault. As I watched the video, I realized that sexual assault always has some element of silence. Warning signs could go unnoticed, bystanders may miss the opportunity to intervene and worst of all, someone may suffer in silence; points which the SAPR-F and SAPR-L bring to light. Getting to the left of sexual assault requires people to enter that difficult terrain of silence and uncomfort able feelings. Perhaps we need to remember that avoid ing conversations, just because they take us out of our comfort level, does not resolve the matter or make them any less com fortable to discuss at a later time. All conversations begin with the different con nections to the topic. As a former hotline advocate, I have been engaged in conversations regarding sexual assault, aftercare, and prevention since 1985. What the Navy has been able to accomplish in nearly three decades is significant, but there is still more work to do. My aim is not to lull people into the desire for a simple fix, or to pro vide a one-size-fits-all, sound-byte theology. This topic requires listening and learning together. Sexual assault has touched the lives of so many people in our world, that even the con versation may open past experiences and hurts. As a Chaplain, this con versation also provides a unique opportunity to look to Scripture. We not only look at the chapters and verses that present various images of God as strong deliverer, law-giver, orderer of the world in the face of chaos, God as the hidden one, God as the compassionate one, especially amidst the storms of feeling alienated, alone, or forsaken. Im sure that we all would like to Get to left of Sexual Assault. We continue to strive to pre vent the pain and chaos this violence can bring to it victims and their fami lies and eradicate this act of violence. As Martin Luther one described the impact of war as how dense the darkness...and the whole chaos of evils which war brings in its train we understand that sexual assault also brings dark ness and chaos to the lives of its victims. crime. Yes, we need to enter the conversation about what sexual assault is and how it has no place in our Navy. As a Chaplain, the people of faith have been engaged in conversa tions of struggle and bro kenness throughout the Churchs history. On March 29, the President issued a Proclamation declaring National Sexual Assault Prevention Month. There has been no better time to open this conversa tion and lend a voice then now. Chap Thomas Bingol Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINShusband rose to the occa sion, coaching me through multiple hee-hee-hoos and holding my hand. But by the seventh hour in the hospital, he was getting tired. And besides, I was delirious. An orderly brought a dinner tray into our room, but I was forbidden to eat anything but ice chips in the event that emer gency surgery was needed. My husband graciously jumped on the grenade and ate the meal himself. As my husband finished his last morsel of carrot cake, a slender young redheaded nurse sauntered in to take her shift on the ward; and our forgotten camcorder which had been placed in the corner of the room to record the labor, regrettably memorialized the following on film: My husband stands, glances at me on the right side of the screen appar ently asleep and then begins to engage in seem ingly flirtatious chitchat with the nurse to the left of the screen. So, where do single folks like you hang out around here? he says. The nurse smiles, checks some medical equipment, and begins to tell him about the local bar scene. As they casually con verse, the bum-bum of the heartbeat monitor grows faster. My eyes open. I reach for the bedrail. Still delirious, I huff and puff alone through waves of painful contractions, unaware that my husband is discussing the best night club for dancing only a few feet away. At the left of the screen, one sees the attractive nurse obliviously throw her head back in laughter at some thing witty my husband has said, while at the right of the screen, I maintain a death grip on the bedrail. Although I faithfully read my What to Expect book, our childbirth stories include some unexpectedly embarrassing twists and turns to include unscheduled breast checks, deliri um, and labor room flirta tions. Despite it all, I deliv ered a beautiful baby boy in the month of April, which was exactly what we were really expecting all along. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesoflife. com.Beginning A Conversation Starts With A WordExpect Unexpected When Youre ExpectingSee School, Page 3

PAGE 3

cial needs child with a current IEP, you should be enrolled in EFMP. Jose Sanchez, EFMP Liaison NS Mayport, has as his role to assist with completion of EFMP enrollment forms; empower families with resource referrals, educational programs, and consultation; provide information on Tricare Extended Healthcare Option (ECHO); coordi nate with military pro grams, medical facilities, and community agen cies to create a network of support for each EFMP family; and connect families with networking and social opportunities with in their area. Joses office is located in Building One (FFSC) and he can be reached at (904) 270-6600 x1713 or by email at jose.sanchez3. ctr@navy.mil. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5864 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. From Page 2SchoolThe World Series And The MarinesWhile reading James Hornfischers Neptunes Inferno: The US Navy at Guadalcanal, I learned that when Lt. Gen. Chesty Pullers Marines were surround ed by enemy forces they signaled a United States Navy destroyer, USS Monssen for assis tance. According to Hornfischer, the Skipper of USS Monssen could not be sure that the signal man was an American. To determine the nationality of the Marine, they simply asked who had won the World Series. W hen the signalman replied correctly, a landing craft was sent ashore and the Marines were res cued. This made me wonder if there was a question you could ask fellow ser vice members today to confirm if they were an American. I did not feel confident there was such a question with the inter net and multiple profes sional sports teams com peting for our attention. To test my theory, I started a simple survey. I asked three popular culture questions to see how many would get it correct and then I asked what question they would ask to confirm someone was an American. A total of 40 service members were polled, 11 percent were Coast Guard and 14 percent were female. The questions were: Who won the 2012 World Series? Who won the last Super Bowl? What movie just won the Oscar for picture of the year? Ninety-five percent of those polled knew who won the last Super Bowl, but only 37 percent knew who had won the 2012 World Series and even less, just 34 percent, knew the picture of the year. After asking what ques tion would you ask if you had to challenge a sig nalman, I got some great responses. What day of the week is the Super Bowl always played? What sport makes March crazy? What Navy SEAL turned professional wrestler later became an American Governor? How many questions did you know, and what would you ask? The U.S. Navys offen sive in Guadalcanal during World War II is remarkable, because there were Navy warships, land-based Marines, Coast Guard and pilots from multiple units and services all attempting to work towards a common goal. J ames Hornfischers book is on the 2013 CNO Professional reading list, you can download the book for free through the NKO website. Until we meet again, keep reading! From Page 1VetThis was obviously no easy feat, as you com pleted the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your every day workload, Scorby said. Were it not for your willingness to work long hours and pay attention to a host of details, this decentralization process would not be possible, and for that, our Navy owes each of you a debt of gratitude. While decentraliza tion is a major transi tion for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian employees should not expect to see many changes in the way they receive services, Overstreet said. HR services will con tinue regardless of the change in the delivery model. There may be a change in the HR pro fessional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new servic ing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each functional area, she said. Most services under the new system will be provided from NAS Jacksonville, but HR pro fessionals will be respon sive to phone calls and e-mails and are available to meet via video telecon ference, she added. Additional information regarding the specific processes and procedures of regional delivery of HR services will be published in the near future.From Page 1HR Warriors Lt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger ATG MayportCpt. Alicia Moreal, offi cer in charge of Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport Veterinary Clinic. With all of the services the clinic provides, their mission is to keep the military families and their pets happy and healthy with preventative mea sures. Good health is impor tant for everyone in the family including those with fur and four legs, said Delgado. The Mayport Vet Clinic helps your pet live a long, fit life. The Mayport Clinic is open Mon.-Fri. from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To sched ule an appointment, call 904-270-7004 or email Mayportvetclinic@gmail. com. Florida Fallen Heroes BanquetThe Timothy J. Seamans Memorial Foundation will host the Florida Fallen Heroes Banquet on May 3 from 5-10 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fire Fighters Association Hall, 618 Stockton Street. Keynote Speaker will be the Honorable Ron De Santis, Congressman, 6th District of Florida, who is also a Reserve Navy JAG Officer and Iraqi War Veteran. Guest Speaker will be retired Col. Carl B. Crumpler, USAF, a Vietnam Veteran and POW. Visit www.florida fallenheroes.org and download the pdf to purchase tickets. Never Quit 2013Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and a red carpet awards ceremony during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event on May 19 from 5:45 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at 904-396-5909 ext 1150. For more information about Navy Quit, go to http://neverquitnever.com/ THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Vicksburg Wins Sports Challenge From StaffOnly 25 points separat ed first and second place, and that was all that USS Vicksburg needed to be named winner of the 2013 MWR Spring Sports Challenge. Scoring an overall 1150 points, Vicksburgs win at Beach Volleyball on Friday afternoon edged U.S. Coast Guard Mayport out of the slot into second place with 1125 points. Third place overall win ner this year was FRCSE Mayport with 950 points. Competing over four days, April 16-19, this sea sons Sports Challenge had more than 400 par ticipants from 22 different commands from Naval Station Mayport and U.S. Coast Guard. The first day opened with a win for HSM Weapons School in the CO/CMC Canoe Race. HSL-48 won the Experienced Canoe Race. USS Vicksburg had its first win of the Challenge in See Challenge, Page 5 -Photos by Paige GnannUSS Vicksburg receives the First Place trophy as the winners of the 2013 MWR Spring Sports Challenge, beating out 21 other commands. A Sailor takes off on the next leg of the Swim Relay competition. A Coastie from Ant Jax tries to make it to first in Kickball. Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 1st Class Jon Zezulka of USS Vicksburg, third from right, is named MVP award winner. He participated in 6 events. HSM Weapons School wins the CO/CMC Canoe Challenge and the right to hang the trophy at the squad ron until the Fall Challenge. Sailors pedal hard and head for the finish line during the Auto Racing competition. HSL-48 took first place in the pedal car event. USS Vicksburg wins Beach Volleyball, taking the overall lead from USCG Mayport and winning the Spring Challenge. USS Vicksburg ends up in Lake Wonderwood during the CO/CMC Canoe Challenge. A Sailor goes for his ball during the 8-Ball event at Beachside Community Center. COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt plays against HSL-48 during 3v3 Soccer.

PAGE 5

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 5 3-Point Basketball Shoot Out as USCG Mayport started its path with a win in Dodgeball. Bowling went to The Sullivans. On day two, USCG Valiant swam to victory in the Swim Relay event, while HSL-48 proved its strength in the Strongman Competition. USS Farragut brought home a win with the new event, Homerun Derby. USCG Mayport brought home the win in Kickball. On day three, USS Vicksburg took the day in Golf and Cricket Darts. ASD ruled the 8-Ball Pool and Cornhole. HSL-60 racked points with Tennis. USCG Ant Jax won 3v3 Soccer. The last day of com petition, USS Vicksburg spiked a win in Volleyball and USCG Mayport pulled out a victory in TugoWar and 4-Person Plank Walk. Balloon Launch was ruled by FRCSE Mayport and HSL48 pedaled to a win in Auto Racing. Points were awarded to HSL-60, USS Vicksburg, HSL-48, USCG Ant Jax and USCG Valiant after an accident during Arm Wrestling caused t he event to be closed Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Jon Zezulka of USS Vicksburg was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. ATG Mayport tries to work together in the 4-Person Plank Walk event, one of the new events added to this years Sports Challenge.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeMembers of Ants Jax try to get out the other team during a round of Dodgeball. Lt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger of ATG Mayport throws a bean bag during a game of Cornhole. Teammembers from USS The Sullivans try to hit their target during Balloon Launch. HSL-60 yells encouragement to its TugoWar team as they pull against USS Vicksburg.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor tries for a spare during Bowling.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor serves to his opponent during Tennis competi tion.From Page 4Challenge -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor tries for a spare during Bowling. A Coast Guard team flips a tire during the Strong Man Competition. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor goes for the shot during the Basketball Shootout.

PAGE 6

Workshops, Classes Available At FFSCFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. April 25, 1-3 p.m., English Tea for Expectant Moms, Chapel April 25, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. April 29, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. April 29-May 3, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. April 29-May 1, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training Building 1, Room 702 April 30, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 April 30, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids? Building 1 Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, devel opment and socialization. Parents need to under stand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already hap pened, but to instill hope that things can change. Operation Praying Mantis Demonstrates Same Priorities Navy Values Today U.S. Navy Public AffairsAn engagement 25 years ago on April 14, 1988 sparked a deter mined and quick response four days later from the U.S., known as Operation Praying Mantis, which demonstrated the same priorities the Navy maintains today. In early 1988, as part of Operation Earnest Will, the U.S. Navy was engaged in maintain ing freedom of naviga tion in the Arabian Gulf as Iraq and Iran contin ued in a bloody war. The USS Enterprise (CVN 65) was operating in the region. Little did any one know that what would happen that day would draw naval forces into action and alter the course of history. Watchstanders aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), Northeast of Qatar, sighted three mines floating approximately one-half mile from the ship. Twenty minutes after the first sight ing, as Samuel B. Roberts was backing clear of the minefield, it struck a submerged mine. The blast injured 10 Sailors and tore a 21-foot hole in the hull, nearly ripping the war ship in half. Quick and determined actions by the crew, who worked for seven hours to stabilize the ship, kept the vessel from sinking. We heard about it right away and very shortly thereafter I was told I was going to fly off to Bahrain to help put a plan together and com mand one of the Surface Action Groups (SAG), said Vice Adm. (Ret.) James B Perkins, III, who was a Surface Action Group (SAG) commander during Operation Praying Mantis. We spent the 17th of April flying from one side of the gulf to the other, briefing the SAG commanders as to what the plan was. Four days after the mine blast, forces, of the now-Joint Task Force Middle East, executed a response Operation Praying Mantis. The operation called for the destruction of two oil platforms used by Iran to coordinate attacks on merchant shipping. The gas-oil platforms were huge structures, said Perkins. What I had in mind were the oil platforms off the coast of Santa Barbra. But These were floating cities with berthing quarters and all that sort of stuff, Perkins recalled. On the morning [of April 18] we called them up and told them, in Farsi and English, that we were getting ready to destroy them and to get off the platforms, said Perkins. There was a lot of run ning around looking for boats to leave the decks. By the end of that day the coalition air and surface units not only destroyed the two oil rigs but also Iranian units attempting to counterattack U.S. forces. Naval aircraft and the destroyer USS Joseph Strauss (DDG 16) sank the Iranian frigate Sahand (F 74) with harpoon mis siles and laser-guided bombs. A laser-guided bomb, dropped from a Navy A-6 Intruder, dis abled frigate Sabalan (F 73), and Standard mis siles launched from the cruiser USS Wainwright (CG 28) and frigates USS Bagley (FF 1069) and USS Simpson (FFG 56) destroyed the 147foot missile patrol boat Joshan (P 225). In further combat, A-6s sank one Bodghammer high-speed patrol boats and neu tralized four more of the speedboats. The air wing from Enterprise did a superb job taking on the Bodghammers, said Perkins. By the end of the opera tion, U.S. air and surface units had sunk, or severe ly damaged, half of Irans operational fleet. This particular exer cise, in my view, fin ished the Iranian Navy in the Arabian Gulf, said Perkins. They were still around but after that operation, they didnt have as active a stance. Operation Praying Mantis proved a mile stone in naval history. For the first time since World War II, U.S. naval forces and supporting aircraft fought a major surface action against a deter mined enemy. The suc cess of Praying Mantis and the broad-based allied naval cooperation during Operation Earnest Will proved the value of joint and combined oper ations in the Gulf and led the way for the mas sive joint coalition effort that occurred during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The operation also demonstrated the impor tance of being ready to fight and win today, of providing offshore options to deter, influ ence and win in an era of uncertainty; and show cased the teamwork, tal ent and imagination of the Navys diverse, capa ble force. It also proved the value of all the training the Navy had done. You have to be ready on a moments notice, Perkins said. You may not always have sufficient time to get prepared, so train hard and often. (In this case) it worked out very well. For more information on Operation Praying Mantis visit Naval History and Heritage Commands website at http:// www.history.navy.mil/ Special%20Highlights/ OperationPrayingMantis/ index.html. For more news from Naval History and Heritage Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/ navhist DC Training On RGB-Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Engineman 3rd Class Joshua Voelker energizing a fire hose with Engineman 2nd Class Edward Burgess backing him up with a PKP fire extinguisher and Chief Gas Turbine Systems Mechanic Jason Washam providing guid ance during hose handling training. Takedown On Hu-Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeFire Controlman 3rd Class Lyndsey Baucom performs a takedown after being sprayed with Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) during force protection training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 7

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 7

PAGE 8

Gettysburg Volunteers Get Shredding USS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) vol unteered at the News 4 Jax studio for the annual Shred Day donation drive. News 4 Jax hosts an annual food and dona tion drive for the local Jacksonville community and Second Harvest Food Bank. Volunteers assist the news station by helping move donated goods from vehicles to the staging area for Second Harvest. Last year, the event grew by more than 1,000 cars and 16 tons of dona tions. The 2013 event saw even greater growth. This year, Gettysburg along with the 125th Fighter Wing of the Florida Air National Guard helped gather 21,077 lbs of food for the Second Harvest Food Bank and $416.25 in cash donations, creating 19,773 meals for families in need in the local Jacksonville area. Gettysburg provided almost 40 volunteers for this event, staging two shifts to bring in the donated goods. Electricians Mate 1st Class Gerrad Denne helped organize Gettysburgs volunteer force including several of his fellow First Class Petty Officers. Gas Turbine Service Technician-Mechanical 1st Class Terence Erroch said he enjoyed the event, because in addi tion to contributing daily through his work on the ship, it was good to get out into the community. Seaman Jessica Wilkens, who volun teers regularly, said she thought this opportunity was unique, because it was with people she knew as part of the Gettysburg family. Shred Day allowed Gettysburg Sailors to give back to the community that has so readily sup ported them. The event processed 4,000 cars over the 12-hour drive, bringing in material that was still being shredded several days later. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSailors assigned to USS Gettysburg (CG 64) volunteer assisting the local community during a Second Harvest food drive and shred day. The event was held by Channel 4 News, Jacksonville (WJXT) and powered by Gettysburg Sailors. Operations Specialist 2nd class Randy Morales assigned to USS Gettysburg (CG 64) volunteers for a Second Harvest food drive and shred day. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 9

NAVADMIN Soliciting Sailors For RDC Duty Naval Service Training Command Public AffairsThe Navy is recruit ing Sailors to become the molders of future Sailors as Recruit Division Commanders (RDC) at Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, and Officer Training Command (OTC) as announced in NAVADMIN 085/13 April 1. Being an RDC is one of the most important jobs that there is in the Navy, said Rear Adm. (Select) Dee L. Mewbourne, com mander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). RDCs are the first Navy leaders our recruits see when they report to RTC to begin their Navy careers. They need to be the best of the best and top Sailors because they are charged with molding a disci plined enlisted Sailor to send out to the fleet. Headquartered in Building 1, the historic clock tower building on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., NSTC oversees 98 percent of initial offi cer and enlisted acces sions training for the Navy. NSTC oversees the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) at more than 160 colleges and universities, OTC on Naval Station Newport, R. I., Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill., and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) and Navy National Defense Cadet Corps (NNDCC) citizen ship development pro grams at more than 600 high schools worldwide. OTC has an average of 18 Chief and Senior Chief RDCs. They pro vide mentorship and physical training in four of the five schoolhouses at the command; Officer Candidate School (OCS), Officer Development School (ODS), Direct Commission Officer Indoctrination Course (DCOIC), and the Naval Science Institute (NSI). We are looking for Chiefs and Senior Chiefs who are physically fit, motivated and want to make a difference in shaping the future of the Navy, said Master Chief Electronics Technician (SW/AW) Matt Anuci, the Senior Enlisted Leader of OTC. Anuci said it is not wellknown around the fleet that RDCs, who most people associate with RTC, are also assigned to OTC. Were such a small command (OTC in Newport), compared to RTC. When nearly 40,000 recruits go through RTC each year the natural assumption is thats the only place where RDCs are stationed, Anuci said. The Navy also sends E-5 and E-6 RDCs to Great Lakes. Newport is com pletely different because our billets are limited to only a select few senior enlisted. Anuci explained that OCS needs senior enlist ed RDCs because of the opportunity to mentor and mold and develop the division-officer-to-chief relationship that is a con stant in the fleet. NAVADMIN 085/13 also applies to any senior enlisted Sailors who might want to become RDCs. After attending RDC C School at RTC, they would then accept orders to OTC in Newport. NAVADMIN 085/13 also states that RDCs are rewarded for their dedication and hard work with the following benefits: $450 per month special duty assignment pay; additional annual cloth ing allowance of $220; free dry cleaning while active ly training a recruit divi sion; opportunity to earn a master training special ist qualification; guar anteed choice of coast assignment (upon com pletion of tour; advance ment rates to chief and senior chief are close to double the Navy-wide averages; award of recruit training service ribbon; participation in the RTC Command Meritorious Advancement Program for second class petty officer. RTCs Command Master Chief Christopher R. Angstead, in a recent NSTC Youtube video (http://www. youtube.com/ watch?v=oqsKHbvkwM), invited potential RDCs to become a member of the RTC team. We have a unique responsibility here at Recruit Training Command to train vol unteers into basicallytrained, physically fit Sailors through screening, equipping, education and military bearing. To meet these training demands we need to increase our Recruit Division Commander manning levels, said Angstead. If you are a highly motivat ed second class, first class, chief or senior chief and want to be a vital part of forging our Navy of the future, consider join ing our Recruit Training Command team. The NAVADMIN also says the RDC assign ment is challenging, but rewarding. It offers a number of significant professional develop ment, diversification, leadership, and career advancement opportuni ties. Hard-charging, dis ciplined Sailors who pro cess strong character, per sonal integrity and want to pursue the most chal lenging duty ashore are encouraged to volunteer for duty as an RDC. Theres a sense of accomplishment being an RDC, said Chief Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) Laura Stout, from Cedarsburg, Fla., who has been an RDC for two years and has pushed five divisions. You get to see these young people go from not knowing anything about the Navy when they first arrive to marching across the drill deck at gradua tion with so much pride and so ready to go out to be part of the Navy. Its a great feeling. The NAVADMIN con tinues to say initial orders are to RDC C School via a three-week intermediate stop at a Navy Instructor Training Course to obtain the 9502 (Military Training Specialist) Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC). The course is conducted at multiple Navy sites and is a prerequisite for RDC duty. Candidates must pass RDC C School which is a 13-week physically challenging, inten sive, hands-on training course that provides pro spective RDCs with the skills, perspective, and physical readiness to suc ceed as an RDC. All can didates will be required to pass the RDC Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) which mandates comple tion of the run portion of the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) during RDC C School. The most common reason for attri tion during training is RDC PFA failure. Interested Sailors should submit a 1306/7 (Enlisted Personnel Action Request), request ing duty as an RDC to their rating detailer. NAVADMIN 085/13 stresses that in order to reach the 100 per cent requirement of 601 RDCs (as of April 2 there were 453 RDC assigned to RTC), openings for approximately 200 RDCs are anticipated each year. Reference A of the NAVADMIN contains screening requirements and instructions for appli cation submissions. Some of the require ments listed in the MILSPERSMAN (Military Personnel Manual) can be waived. Additional information can be found on the Navy Personnel Command (NPC) website at www. public.navy.mil/BUPERS. mil/BUPERS-NPC/ enlisted detailing/shore specialprograms/pages/ RDC.aspx/ or contact Chief Yeoman Lakeshia Patterson, PERS-4010D, at (901) 874-3878/DSN 882 or Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Joshua McCullough at (901) 874-3855/DSN 882. For more news on the Navys only boot camp, visit www.bootcamp.navy. mil. Want to become a Recruit Division Commander? Find out more at the Navy Personnel Command website, www.public.navy.mil/BUPERS.mil/BUPERSNPC/enlisted detailing/shorespecialprograms/ pages/RDC.aspx/ THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 9

PAGE 10

10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 11

HSM-40 Trains Australian PilotsNPASE East det. SEHelicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 is training Royal Australian Navy (RAN) pilots and maintainers of 725 Squadron in the oper ation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. Forty-two Australian pilots and 40 Australian maintenance person nel are being extensively trained in the opera tion and upkeep of the MH-60R. Australian sailors start ed arriving in late January and will continue training with the U.S. Navy until July. The entire interopera bility training process will continue until the RAN is ready to take what they learned back to Australia and continue to establish the 725 Squadron. Essentially were train ing the Australian pilots to fly the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter in prepara tion for them to form their own training squad ron at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, said Cmdr. Mike Hansen, Instructor Pilot, HSM 40. They will operate from there for a couple of years before they ultimately form their own squadron in Australia. This opportunity pro vides the Australian Military members with the chance to gain valu able experience and insight into U.S. Navy Helicopter Operations. At this stage weve done simulator train ing, System training, and I just concluded my sec ond MH-60R flight. The amount of material that the instructors throw at you is extensive, said Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Carey, Royal Australian Navy pilot. This training pro cess here in Mayport and Jacksonville will have a duration of approxi mately two years, stated Executive Officer 725 Squadron, Lt. Cmdr. Todd Gnynn. We talk a common language of aviation. The relationships that were forming with HSM 40 will endure and will far surpass the time that we spend here in America. It is vital that the United States and its allies con tinue to train and fight together in a multina tional environment. The training of the RAN goes a long way to ensure that everyone can communi cate effectively and exe cute the mission, no mat ter where the battle takes place. Lt. Cmdr. Josh Carey of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) completes pre-flight checks on a MH-60R Seahawk helicopter with Lt. Heather Talley of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40. HSM 40 is training 42 RAN pilots and 40 maintenance personnel from RAN 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. -Photos by MC2 Salt CebeChief Naval Air Crewman (Tactical Helicopter) Sean Hughes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 shares a laugh while going over pre-flight inspection points with Chief Glen Watson of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). HSM 40 is training 42 RAN pilots and 40 maintenance personnel from RAN 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 270-5392 May Special: Transmission flush, cool ant flush and fuel injec tion cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rota tion on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and com puters are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 May 12: Mothers Day Bingo12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. 5x $1000 Jackpots, 1x $500 Quinella, free food, extra drawings and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 April 25: Bar Biathlon 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge (after Trivia). Test your skills at darts and billiards in our biathlon. Overall winner takes away a championship trophy. 270-7205 May 1: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 May 3-5: Cinco De Mayo Weekend All Weekend at Castaways Lounge. Break out the sombreros; well be cel ebrating all weekend long with drink specials and more! Take a shot at our piata on Friday Night. 270-7205 May 10: Castaways Comedy Night. Featuring Comedian Cash Levy. 6 pm at Castaways. 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis wel come. May 12: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Mothers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 1 pm at Focsle; Reservations required Bring your favorite lady out for a lovely all you can eat brunch featuring omelet bar, champagne fountain, carving station and more. The first 100 moms will receive a free rose. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket. Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. YAC Drama Club Presents -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyThe Mayport Youth Center Drama Club held a production of Little Rascals on April 18 at the youth center. Members of the He-Man Woman Haters Club lead the audience in the official club oath. Showing Appreciation -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyThe Mayport Auto Skills Center held Customer Appreciation Day on April 19. Customers were able to meet with vendors, have their questions answered, receive free electrical tests and more at this event. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 13

Intramural Sports April 26: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 18. 270-5451. May 6-9: Pre Season Soccer Tournament. Sign up by Apr. 30. 270-5451. May 14: Spring Forward 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 May 12: Mothers Day Family Bowling Special. Moms bowl half-price all day, including family fun bowl. At least one child must accompany mom; bowling must be complet ed by 7 pm. 270-5377 May 27: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Just $12 for 2 hours of bowling, shoe rental, lb hamburger or hot dog with fries, a soda and an ice cream sundae for des sert! Kids 4-5 years old $7; Kids 3 and under FREE. Holiday hours 11 a.m. 5 p.m. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aquatics May 1-7: American Red Cross Certified WSI Certification Course Participants must attend all 30 hours of training to be certified. Cost is $200 for Military/Dependents/ DOD and $250 for Civilians. Sign up at the Base Gym or the Pool. For more information, please call (904) 270-5452 or (904) 270-5101 May 11: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Full hours begin Friday, Jun. 7. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Learn basic kicks, punches and balance moves in this calorie burning, sweat producing knock out of a workout. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR Sports/FitnessThe following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 26: Madden 13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 28: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! April 29: Killer Bunny. Will you win the quest to find the Magic Carrot? 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 30: COD: Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 1: Texas Holdem Tournament. 7 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 2: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 3: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. May 5: Scary Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 6: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 7: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. May 8: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:30 p.m. Sign up deadline May 6. May 10: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. May 13: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! May 17: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. May 18: Halo 4 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 19: Comedy Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 20: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. April 26: Operation Megaphone Worldwide Lock-In 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $15 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. May 24: Outdoor MoviesHotel Transylvania (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 May 31: Outdoor MoviesWreck It Ralph (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The MessdeckBogeys Specials Thursday, April 25 Chicken Caesar Wrap, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 BBQ Pork Salad, $7.95 Friday, April 26 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Monday, April 29 Shrimp Po Boy, $8.50 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $10.95 Tuesday, April 30 Tuna Melt, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.50 Taco Salad, $7.95 Wednesday, May 1 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Smashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet With Ice Tea or Water, $8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 13

PAGE 14

Sexual Assault Awareness MonthHSM-46 Sailor Becomes Mayports First DoD SAVI AdvocateNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastIn 1990, the Chief of Naval Operations formed the Navy Womens Study Group. This group with the support of Navy lead ership formed the Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) Program. Now more than 20 years later Yeoman 1st Class Maria Davidelcruz takes the next step in helping the fight against Sexual Assault, by becoming the first Department of Defense (DoD) SAVI cer tified Sailor stationed aboard Naval Station Mayport. Its awesome that our first DOD certified Sailor is a female, said Amie McKague, Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Support Centers counseling and advocate program advisor. The numbers show that more women are assaulted, but a thing to remember is men can be also. Daviddelcruz is not the first ever-female SAVI at Mayport, however she is the first to receive the DoD SAVI certification. According to the new instruction released Jan. 1, 2013 all Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Victim Advocates must complete the DoD Sexual Assault Advocate Certification Program (D-SAACP) by Oct. 1, 2013. The goal of the SAVI program is to provide a comprehensive, stan dardized, gender-neutral, victim-sensitive system to prevent and respond to sexual assault throughout the Navy. This program has an important role in the nev er-ending battle against an ever-present danger amongst all military per sonnel. One of the things I feel our advocates bring to this program is unique is that they wear the uni form and its someone that is relatable in the military aspects of life that also understand the challeng es in the military, said McKague, but also they are trained to understand sexual assault, so they provide a great balance in the military aspect and sexual assault. According to an NBC News article with former U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, sexual assaults in the military is a problem he believes could be six times greater than reported. Panetta said 3,191 sex assault cases were report ed in the military in 2011, but because so few vic timscome forward, he believes the real num -Photos by MC3 Class Damian BergYeoman 1st Class (AW) Maria Daviddelacruz (left) and Aviation Electrician's Mate 2nd Class (AW/SW) Julemarie Hayes, both from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46, go over the requirements to become Department of Defense Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) advocate. The goal of the SAVI program is to provide a comprehensive, standardized, gender-neutral, victim-sensitive system to prevent and respond, to sexual assault throughout the Navy. This program has an important role in the never-ending battle against an ever-present danger amongst all military personnel. Daviddelacruz dis plays her certification for Department of Defense Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) advo cate. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 15

Dear Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Volunteers; On behalf of the Board of Directors of the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society, thank you for your boundless enthusi asm, heartfelt compassion and enduring devotion to the men and women who wear the uniform of our nations Naval Service. Every day, Im inspired by your example. You listen, educate, men tor and guide Sailors and Marines, as well as their wives and husbands, grieving family mem bers, and widows and widowers. Youre always there with a ready smile, nonjudgmental solace, and the peace of mind that only comes through sound financial counsel. You are military spous es, stay-at-home moms, parents, grandparents, active duty members, retirees, students and patriotic citizens. You are problem solvers, admin istrative experts, finan cial management gurus, retail specialists, artisans and crafters, infant layette providers and crisis man agers. You are the heart and soul of the Society. In 2012, more than 3,700 Society Volunteers gave 300,000 hours of their time. That equates to 7,500 work weeks and over 144 years of service! Collectively, you pre sented 794 Budget for Baby workshops, knitted and crocheted 7,080 baby blankets, helped 108,131 thrift shop customers and provided more than $42 million in financial assistance in the form of inter est-free loans and grants to 63,650 clients. You made a difference every hour of every day! I am honored to pub licly recognize your con tributions and loyal sup port to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society dur ing National Volunteer Week 2013. With deepest gratitude, Admiral Steve Abbot, U.S. Navy (Retired) President and Chief Executive Officer NMCRS Thanks Its VolunteersPhoto by ET3 Michelle MalteseNS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, right in uniform, stands with Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society staff, volunteers and Mayport command representatives during a Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon held at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on April 19. NMCRS is currently conducting its annual funddrive, which directly supports active duty and retired Sailors in the Mayport area. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 15

PAGE 16

Mayport Hosts Triathalon SeriesFrom Beaches Fine Arts SeriesThe Beaches Fine Arts Series is pleased to announce that its major fundraising efforts, the BFAST triathlons, will move in 2013 to the Naval Station Mayport. The 2013 races, scheduled for Saturdays, May 18, June 8 and July 13, feature sprint dis tances for all three dates, in addition to a newly added Olympic distance race for the July race. The sprint distance includes a mile ocean swim, 16.8 mile bike and 3.4 mile run. The Olympic distance is comprised of a .9 mile swim, 25.2 mile bike and 6.2 mile run. The race course is designed to show off the beauty of Mayport Naval Station and its ships. Beaches Fine Arts Series has presented triathlons as its major fundraisers for the past 27 years. The races began in 1986 at the old Sea Turtle Inn in Atlantic Beach. In 1996, the races moved to Micklers Landing in Ponte Vedra Beach, where they remained until 2001, when they took place for a brief 2 year stint in Hanna Park, moving back to Micklers Landing in 2003. Since 2003, the races have always taken place at Micklers Landing. The move to the Naval Station will allow the races to expand. To register for the races, please go to www.active.com/BFAST. To volunteer for any of our races, please access the regis tration website as well, call our offices, or email us at volunteer@beachesfinearts. org. All proceeds from these races benefit the free programs of Beaches Fine Arts Series, which brings world-class artists to the area in concerts and educational outreach pro grams. BFAS is a 501-c3, nonprofit organi zation in its 40th year of operation. Free triathlon clinics will be held to pre pare triathletes for the upcoming series. The first clinic will be held on Tuesday, April 30 from 7-9 p.m. at Mayport USO Center, 2560 Mayport Rd. This clinic will encompass all areas of triathlon competi tion, including race preparation, nutrition and race-day procedures. Call 247-6570 or email Martha@beachesfinearts.org to reserve a space. The next clinic will be the HAMMERHEAD Onsite Triathlon Tutorial on Saturday, May 4 from 7:45-10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion on Naval Station Mayport. This clinic will be a hands-on run through of the sprint triathlon, includ ing swim, bike and run, with transi tions. Please call 904-247-6570 or email Martha@beachesfinearts.org to reserve a space. The Beaches Fine Arts Kids Triathlon will be held on Sunday, June 23. Please contact the office at 904-270-1771 for loca tion information. The triathlon engages children in physical fitness through a swim, bike, run race that is gauged to their abilities, with two levels of participation.Navy Uses Crowdsourcing To Seek Energy FixsFrom Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readi ness DivisionDirector of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division (OPNAV N45), invited the fleet and the general public in February to submit their ideas to improve how the Navy uses and thinks about energy. In a follow-up Navy Live blog entry posted April 17, Rear Adm. Kevin Slates highlighted several of the more than 50 innovative ideas received from the Navy community, indus try and the general public. The ideas ranged from simple personal acts, such as turning off computers and lights at the end of the day, to more complex approaches such as hav ing tiger teams evaluate recently installed energy efficient technologies to ensure they work as advertised. Other ideas included replacing thick manuals aboard ships with tablet devices, and adding hydropower cap ture technologies to exist ing water distribution sys tems to create electricity. Reducing the Navys energy use and footprint improves combat capa bility and aligns with Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus five aggressive energy goals. In pursuit of those goals, the Navy has been working to increase the use of energy-wise technologies and pro cesses ashore and at sea, explore advanced biofuel blends as drop-in replace ments for petroleum, incorporate energy con siderations in the acquisi tion process and increase energy awareness among Navy personnel. Technology is certain ly a piece of the puzzle for becoming a highly energy efficient warfight ing force-but well never solve that puzzle without changing our energy cul ture, said Vice Adm. Phil Cullom, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics (N4). This crowdsourc ing effort can help get creative, culture-bending energy ideas quickly from the deck plate Sailor and outside partners to the right decision makers, and thats what we need. NAVYNEWSFleet-Wide Engagement Harvests PrioritiesBy Navy Warfare Development Command Public AffairsThe Navys central ized program for Fleet Experimentation (FLEX), led by Navy Warfare Development Command (NWDC), held a fleetwide live and virtual event last week to glean the fleets priorities and plans for fiscal year (FY) 2014. Other stakeholder organizations presented planned events that can be leveraged for future experimentation efforts, directly feeding the devel opment of an FY14 execution plan. NWDC invited rep resentatives from each numbered fleet and Warfare Center of Excellence to present their top priorities, and also to share planned events and exercises that could support experimen tation, said Rear Adm. Terry B. Kraft, command er, NWDC. Now more than ever, it is critical to pinpoint overlapping interest areas in order to deliver a comprehensive FLEX plan that will meet the warfighters future needs. The FLEX program, led by NWDC on behalf of U.S. Fleet Forces Command and U.S. Pacific Fleet, designs and executes collaborative, synchronized and rel evant experimentation based on near-term fleet priorities and capability gaps. These experimenta tion events result in tangi ble products for the warfighter, frequently in the form of new and updated doctrine. NWDCs director of Fleet Experimentation Capt. Steve Faggert led the workshop, hosted online to allow partici pation from around the globe with a small foot print at NWDC for com mands located in the vicinity of Norfolk Naval Station. This was an opportu nity for the fleet to tell us directly how our efforts in FY14 can get them one step closer to solving their biggest challenges, Faggert said. The fleets voice in this conversation is crucial. Our ultimate goal is to put a tangible product in the hands of the warfighter where a capability gap once exist ed. FLEX harvests innova tive ideas generated by members of the fleet and other military and gov ernment organizations. Submissions are accept ed for review year-round through a classified Navy website, which is also used to promote aware ness of all Navy experi mentation efforts that involve fleet assets. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 17

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 17 Salute To Floridas Heroes Concert The Camp Blanding Museum will be host ing a concert starring Montgomery Gentry at the Keystone Heights Airport, 1700 Airport Road, Stark, Florida on Saturday, April 27. Gates will open at 11:30 a.m., entertainment starts at noon; NO COOLERS or umbrellas allowed. All children over the age of 3 must have a ticket pur chased. Food and bever age vendors will be avail able for sales. Tickets can be purchased at: www. flheroes.org Chonda Pierces Girl Talk See Chonda Pierces Girl Talk-The queen of clean comedy at the Florida Theatre on Tuesday, April 30 at 7 p.m. To take advantage of the buy one, get one free ticket offer, tickets must be purchased at the Box Office via phone (904) 355-2787 or in person with the password I love the Florida Theatre. You must present your mili tary I.D. at the box office. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Free Tickets Bellamy Brothers In Concert Come see the Bellamy Brothers in concert at The Morocco Shrine Center Auditorium, 3800 Saint Johns Bluff Road, South, Jacksonville on Saturday, April 27, 2013. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Greater Jax Area USO has received a lim ited number of free tick ets that will be available at NOON today at both your Mayport and NAS Jax USO centers. Tickets are first come, first served and are open to Active Duty, Retirees, Reservists, National Guard, and DOD. The show will also be featuring Jacksonvilles singing sensation Rion Page, with Special Guest Linda Davis & Company In the Round. For more information, call 6425200, Ext. 11 or 13. No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on April 29 from 57 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve tacos, refried beans, rice, salad, and dessert. Barking In The Streets Bring the family out and enjoy drinks, music, food and more to sup port K9sForWarriors. The event will be held Sunday, May 5 from 1-6 p.m. at the Adamec Harley-Davidson on Baymeadows Road. For more information on tick ets and K9sForWarriors, visit K9sForWarriors.org. 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Greater Jax USO Zoo Night Wristbands On Sale The Greater Jacksonville USO is hav ing a USO night at the Jacksonville ZOO on Friday, May 3. We will begin selling wristbands today at noon. Enjoy a night at the Jacksonville Zoo with the fam ily on Friday, May 3rd (see attached flyer). Wristbands are $2.50 each; cash only please. Wristbands are open for purchase by Active/ Retired/Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Wristbands can be pur chased at the NS Mayport USO, NAS Jacksonville USO. Wristbands will be sold today from noon till 1pm at the Off-Crew Building onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Military Wives Vendor Show May 4 Join the Mayport USO for another wonderful Military Wives Vendor Show. This event is free and open to the public. There will be raffle tick ets and food for sale. For more information, or to signup as a vendor, email: milwivesbusinessesande vents@gmail.com The Players Military Job Fair-May 5 In partnership with Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition, The Players will welcome active duty, reservists, retired military, veterans, and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass on Sunday, May 5 to participate in its second annual job fair. Information on local educational institutions with veterans programs, career counseling, and resume writing assistance will also be provided. The job fair at The Players will take place in The Turn hospitality venue. Companies interested in participating may contact Bill Hickley at bill.hick ley@incepture.com There is a computer resource center avail able to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Saturday, April 27 Bring your coffee and camera with you and join a park ranger at 6 a.m. to watch the sun rise over the Fort George River, get answers about park resources and get some amazing photos. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. For more information, con tact the Talbot Islands Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. The 37th Annual Pioneer Days Festival is just around the corner. Along with the usual fea tures of Arts and Craft vendors, a great Food Court, Heritage Village, Kids Korral, Shoot-Out Re-enactments and live entertainment, this year we will have the Seminole Indian Dance Circle, a special Railroad history display, a Business Expo and much more. For more information see our web site, www.highsprings. com or call 386-454-3120. Sunday, April 28 The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-2 presents About Boating Safely. Class to be held at Arlington Lions Club. Cost of the class is $20 for individual and $30 for couple. This is a com prehensive boating safe ty class approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators(NASBLA). Successful completion of this course results in a Florida State Boating Education ID Card. Contact Charles Hayes at (904) 652-7767 or e-mail: Charles.s.hayes@gmail. com for more informa tion. The 37th Annual Pioneer Days Festival is just around the corner. Along with the usual fea tures of Arts and Craft vendors, a great Food Court, Heritage Village, Kids Korral, Shoot-Out Re-enactments and live entertainment, this year we will have the Seminole Indian Dance Circle, a special Railroad history display, a Business Expo and much more. Come to High Springs on Saturday, April 27th and Sunday, April 28th and join in the fun! For more information see our web site, www. highsprings.com or call 386-454-3120. Tuesday, April 30 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a free workshop on Spring Irrigation Tune-up at West Regional Library, 1425 Chaffee Road S., Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 6:30 8:30 p.m. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Saturday, May 4 The Jacksonville Public Library invites comic book enthusiasts and nerds -from the super young to the super old to don their favorite super hero costume and come out for three hours of fun and fantasy during the Beaches First Annual ComicCon event at the Beaches Branch Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, from 2-5 p.m. This free event is being held in collaboration with the nearby Superhero Beach comic book shop, 1124 N. 3rd Street, which is spon soring free comic book day during its May the 4th Be With You event. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a presentation and leisurely guided hike through different Florida ecosystems on a quest to characterize tracks left by an assortment of critters. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to inter act with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per person Fort admission. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Sunday, May 5 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per person Fort admission. Tuesday, May 7 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, from 6-8 p.m. Jack Varney will present practical and technical tips on Getting it Sharp in photography. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. For more information www. beachesphotographyclub. orgOut in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Volunteers Help Clean Up St. Johns RiverWater Quality Program ManagerMilitary and civilian personnel at Naval Station Mayport joined with the City of Jacksonville Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission and hun dreds of volunteers at other locations around Duval County when they hit the beach and the Jetties for the 2013 St. Johns River Celebration Cleanup held recently. Volunteers spent two hours picking up trash and debris from these areas resulting in the col lection of many large bags of trash in addition to a multitude of other odds and ends that had washed ashore. The largest group to turn out for the event was the approximately 24 cadets and adult vol unteers from the Navy JROTC at Terry Parker High School. Several other Navy organizations and family groups also came out to participate together in the cleanup. Every year, count less marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, and other animals are sick ened, injured, or killed because of dangerous items that are carried by rain water and wind into rivers and ultimately the ocean. These animals are poi soned, choked, or entan gled by carelessly discard ed trash such as fishing line, Styrofoam, plastic bags and bottles, and cig arette butts. The work of volunteers to remove these items is important and greatly appreciated. A further goal of this event is to help people to understand that when they dont properly dis pose of their trash it poses a long-term hazard to wildlife, people, and the environment. -Photos submittedAbove, a volunteer picks up bags of trash along the jet ties on the north end of Mayports beach. Right, a volun teer and her son join others picking up trash along the Mayport Jetties as part of the St. Johns River Celebration Cean up held recently.

PAGE 18

18 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 19

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013



PAGE 1

Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com New Move For HRO Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), presented five Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 44 letters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources (HR) Program during a cere mony on board Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville April 17. The ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR specialists from region headquar ters to major commands on board installations throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mis sion would not be pos sible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each member, especially in the areas of labor employee rela tions, equal employment opportunity, workers compensation, and staff ing and classification for more than 4,000 custom ers in theater. Prior to decentraliza tion, approximately 75 HR specialists through out the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Commands, such as Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. The new Navy-wide model will position HR special ists at each major com mand, whereas CNRSE had previously been ser vicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. The decentralization plan was created last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs with the goal of deliver ing more streamlined and customer-focused support. According to Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources direc tor, the transition comes with distinct benefits. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR professionals will be able to focus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several different com mands at the same time, she said. This focus pro vides the opportunity for better customer service through specific, com mand-focused HR servic ing and better partner ships with customers. The new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logisti cal challenges. It required extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of files and casework, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby expressed his appreciation for each of the program members efforts throughout the process.USS The Sullivans Welcomes New COFrom USS The Sullivans Public AffairsCapt. Wesley A. Smith was relieved by Cmdr. Samuel F. de Castro on April 17 as command ing officer of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) dur ing a pierside ceremony at Naval Station Mayport. Smith reported to The Sullivans as command ing officer in May 2012 and oversaw a high ly successful training cycle and Independent Deployment certifica tion. His next duty assignment will be as com manding officer of USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). De Castro assumes com mand of the guided mis sile destroyer after serving as her executive officer for the past 18 months. He is a native of Buffalo, New York and graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1996. De Castro began his naval career serv ing aboard USS Ramage (DDG 61) as Communications offi cer. He subsequently served on USS Peterson (DD 969) as Auxiliaries Officer; and as Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer on board USS M ahan (DDG 72). His shore tours include Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security Affairs; an assignment as Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Defense (CBRND) Action officer and Requirements officer within the Surface Warfare Division on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (N86); and on the Joint Staff as Branch Chief for Battle Management Aids at the Joint Integrated Air and Missile Defense Organization (JIAMDO). The Sullivans departs in June 2013 on a Ballistic Missile Defense deploy ment to the Persian Gulf. -Photo courtesy of USS The SullivansCOMDESRON 14 Commodore Paul Flood congratulates Cmdr. Samuel de Castro as he assumes command of USS The Sullivans from Capt. Wesley Smith during a change of command ceremony on April 17. Naval Station Mayport employees can contact HR Representatives Tracy Sawyer, 542-2954 or Kim Walker 542-2282. They are located at NAS Jacksonville in Building 919 on Langley Boulevard.See HR, Page 3 Base Veterinary Clinic Keeps Mayport Pets HealthyNavy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastWith a staff of one active-duty Soldier and four civilians to carry out its mission, Naval Station Mayports Veterinary Clinic schedule can be a dog-eat-dog world, but the health of the furry four-legged companions is the number one priority for the staff of the clinic. We are a basic clinic that offer preventive ser vices, said Sgt. Bethzabe Delgado, non commis sioned officer in charge Mayports Veterinary Clinic. We treat your pets like our family. I call them my babies. In addition to annual checkups and vaccina tions, Delgado and her staff train the military working dog (MWD) handlers for canine medical emergencies in the field such as heat stroke, CPR and basic medical checks. When MWDs are stateside the clinic also ensures that the dogs are healthy enough to per form their daily duties. They always give us good training, said Chief Master-atArms James Watkins, Mayports Kennel Master. Anytime our dogs are sick for whatever reason they come in no mat ter what time it is. They really take good care of our dogs, and us. I cant say enough good things about them at the clinic. The Army provides veterinary services to all the components of the Department of Defense, but they also provide services to all active duty members, retirees, reservist and their family members. The Army is the only branch that has a vet erinary corps, so not only do we support the Army but we support the Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as well, said -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSgt. Bethzabe Delgado, noncommissioned officer in charge of Naval Station Mayports Veterinary Clinic gives Electronic Technician 3rd Class Juan Serrets dog, Inti, an ear infection check during an annual check-up. The Mayport Clinic not only helps take care of the military working dogs on Mayport, they also take care of minor issues with pets for active duty and retired service members. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSusan Zur, veterinarian technician for Naval Station Mayport's Veterinary Clinic, holds one of her fourlegged patients still while Dr. Valeri Benham, Doctor of Veterinary Medicine for Mayport's Veterinary Clinic performs an annual check-up. See Vet, Page 3

PAGE 2

2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 2705212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror April is the month of my sons birth. But dont worry, I wont bore you with a dreaded childbirth story. Everyone thinks their account is unique, but all the stories are basically the same: The Pre-Labor Part; The Decision to Go to the Hospital Part; The Agonizing Pain Part; The Rationale for Using/Not Using Pain Meds Part; and The Actual Birth in Excruciating Detail Part. After listening to a few of these tedious chronicles, Id rather endure a grade three episiotomy than hear another one. Back in the day, I surely annoyed a few friends with the bothersome tales of the births of my three children, but Ive learned my lesson. Nowadays, I only tell the parts of my childbirth sto ries that were totally unex pected. For instance, while pregnant and stationed in Monterey, I religiously read my What to Expect book, meticulously record ing my weight, circumfer ence, bowel movements, mood swings and gas bub bles in the spiral-bound pregnancy journal. Somewhere around the 35th week, I read that my obstetrician would likely perform a breast check to be sure that I would be able to breastfeed my new born. I waddled off to my monthly appointment, fully prepared. At my scheduled visit with Doc Walker, an oldfashioned obstetrician whod seen it all before, he performed his normal evaluation. He asked me to sit up, and as I started to reach around to undo my bra for the breast check, he patted me on the knee, and started to leave the room. But wait! I shouted, Arent you going to check my breasts?! With a smirk, he turned and said, Have you been reading that book again? Completely embarrassed, I nodded. Alright then, lets see em. Mortified, I had to sub mit to the unnecessary exam that I had demand ed, and worried that Doc Walker thought I was either a hypochondriac or a per vert. Despite that shameful scene, I was still determined to have the perfect birth experience. Like many firsttime-soon-to-be-parents, my husband and I attended birthing classes together, eager to learn the LaMaz methodology. When my labor started on the eve ning of April 3, 1993, my Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesTo get help for your child, you must become an advocate for him. Why should you do this? Well, you are a natural advo cate for your child. You were his first teacher, his most important role model, and you have his best interests at heart! Because you will be involved with your child for life, you need to be an active participant in planning his education. As your childs advo cate, your first step is to learn as much as you can about the special educa tion services available at your childs school and from the district. You will need to gather informa tion about the processes used to make the deci sions about your child and who are the people making these decisions. Who are the specific individuals in your childs school and at the district office you will work with to secure those services designed to meet your childs special needs? Since your child is enti tled to an appropriate education, not the best education, nor an educa tion that will maximize your childs potential, you must know these individuals, the pro cesses, and the State and Federal laws, especially The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. What do you currently know about your childs disability and educational history? Remember, the district only has to pro vide an appropriate education. Your main goal is to ensure that your child is provided with special education and related services [which are] designed to meet [the childs] unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living 20U.S.C. 1400(d). You will not be able to determine if what they are offering is appropriate if you dont know what has been tried before, whether it worked or not, and if it worked, how well. Another important goal involves building a healthy working relationship with the school staff. Because you will be working with the school staff to design or revise your childs Individualized Educational Program (IEP), you will need your knowledge of special education law, his disability, and his educational his tory. By maintaining a cordial relationship with school personnel, you will find them more willing to listen to your concerns, to discuss issues, and to craft accommodations which specifically address your childs needs, resulting in that appropriate educa tion for your child. Are you the only one advocating for your child? Absolutely not! Teachers, school staff, and schooland district-based administrators are available to provide support to you and your child. But as you know, schools and district special education departments are woefully understaffed. They will evaluate your child and make recommendations to you about educational services. However, these evaluations and resulting recommendations will vary from school to school and from individual to individual as the educational background and training of these individuals is quite varied. A lay advocate can also advocate for your child. These individuals use their specialized knowl edge and expertise to help parents resolve prob lems with schools. They can attend meetings with you, help you craft letters, negotiate for services, and advise you about your legal rights and respon sibilities. If this service sounds like what you need to get help for your special needs child, con tact me at the email or phone below for information about local lay advo cates. Another individu al who can help is the Exceptional Family Member Program Liaison (EFMP) at your installa tion. If you have a spe -Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingHow Do I Get Help For My Special Needs Child. .From School District And Navy?It was a situation that is common to most of us, completing a General Military Training or GMT, part of our annual train ing on SAPR Sexual Assault Prevention and Response. As we gathered to watch elements of the latest SAPR-F video, the instructor emphasized the CNOs desire to get to the left of this issue; in other words, to become more proactive and less reac tive to the issue of sexual assault. As I watched the video, I realized that sexual assault always has some element of silence. Warning signs could go unnoticed, bystanders may miss the opportunity to intervene and worst of all, someone may suffer in silence; points which the SAPR-F and SAPR-L bring to light. Getting to the left of sexual assault requires people to enter that difficult terrain of silence and uncomfort able feelings. Perhaps we need to remember that avoid ing conversations, just because they take us out of our comfort level, does not resolve the matter or make them any less comfortable to discuss at a later time. All conversations begin with the different con nections to the topic. As a former hotline advocate, I have been engaged in conversations regarding sexual assault, aftercare, and prevention since 1985. What the Navy has been able to accomplish in nearly three decades is significant, but there is still more work to do. My aim is not to lull people into the desire for a simple fix, or to pro vide a one-size-fits-all, sound-byte theology. This topic requires listening and learning together. Sexual assault has touched the lives of so many people in our world, that even the conversation may open past experiences and hurts. As a Chaplain, this con versation also provides a unique opportunity to look to Scripture. We not only look at the chapters and verses that present various images of God as strong deliverer, law-giver, orderer of the world in the face of chaos, God as the hidden one, God as the compassionate one, especially amidst the storms of feeling alienated, alone, or forsaken. Im sure that we all would like to Get to left of Sexual Assault. We continue to strive to pre vent the pain and chaos this violence can bring to it victims and their fami lies and eradicate this act of violence. As Martin Luther one described the impact of war as how dense the darkness...and the whole chaos of evils which war brings in its train we understand that sexual assault also brings dark ness and chaos to the lives of its victims. crime. Yes, we need to enter the conversation about what sexual assault is and how it has no place in our Navy. As a Chaplain, the people of faith have been engaged in conversa tions of struggle and bro kenness throughout the Churchs history. On March 29, the President issued a Proclamation declaring National Sexual Assault Prevention Month. There has been no better time to open this conversa tion and lend a voice then now. Chap Thomas Bingol Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINShusband rose to the occa sion, coaching me through multiple hee-hee-hoos and holding my hand. But by the seventh hour in the hospital, he was getting tired. And besides, I was delirious. An orderly brought a dinner tray into our room, but I was forbidden to eat anything but ice chips in the event that emer gency surgery was needed. My husband graciously jumped on the grenade and ate the meal himself. As my husband finished his last morsel of carrot cake, a slender young redheaded nurse sauntered in to take her shift on the ward; and our forgotten camcorder which had been placed in the corner of the room to record the labor, regrettably memorialized the following on film: My husband stands, glances at me on the right side of the screen appar ently asleep and then begins to engage in seem ingly flirtatious chitchat with the nurse to the left of the screen. So, where do single folks like you hang out around here? he says. The nurse smiles, checks some medical equipment, and begins to tell him about the local bar scene. As they casually con verse, the bum-bum of the heartbeat monitor grows faster. My eyes open. I reach for the bedrail. Still delirious, I huff and puff alone through waves of painful contractions, unaware that my husband is discussing the best night club for dancing only a few feet away. At the left of the screen, one sees the attractive nurse obliviously throw her head back in laughter at some thing witty my husband has said, while at the right of the screen, I maintain a death grip on the bedrail. Although I faithfully read my What to Expect book, our childbirth stories include some unexpectedly embarrassing twists and turns to include unscheduled breast checks, deliri um, and labor room flirta tions. Despite it all, I delivered a beautiful baby boy in the month of April, which was exactly what we were really expecting all along. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesoflife. com.Beginning A Conversation Starts With A WordExpect Unexpected When Youre ExpectingSee School, Page 3

PAGE 3

cial needs child with a current IEP, you should be enrolled in EFMP. Jose Sanchez, EFMP Liaison NS Mayport, has as his role to assist with completion of EFMP enrollment forms; empower families with resource referrals, educational programs, and consultation; provide information on Tricare Extended Healthcare Option (ECHO); coordi nate with military pro grams, medical facilities, and community agen cies to create a network of support for each EFMP family; and connect families with networking and social opportunities within their area. Joses office is located in Building One (FFSC) and he can be reached at (904) 270-6600 x1713 or by email at jose.sanchez3. ctr@navy.mil. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5864 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. From Page 2SchoolThe World Series And The MarinesWhile reading James Hornfischers Neptunes Inferno: The US Navy at Guadalcanal, I learned that when Lt. Gen. Chesty Pullers Marines were surround ed by enemy forces they signaled a United States Navy destroyer, USS Monssen for assis tance. According to Hornfischer, the Skipper of USS Monssen could not be sure that the signal man was an American. To determine the nationality of the Marine, they simply asked who had won the World Series. W hen the signalman replied correctly, a landing craft was sent ashore and the Marines were rescued. This made me wonder if there was a question you could ask fellow ser vice members today to confirm if they were an American. I did not feel confident there was such a question with the inter net and multiple profes sional sports teams com peting for our attention. To test my theory, I started a simple survey. I asked three popular culture questions to see how many would get it correct and then I asked what question they would ask to confirm someone was an American. A total of 40 service members were polled, 11 percent were Coast Guard and 14 percent were female. The questions were: Who won the 2012 World Series? Who won the last Super Bowl? What movie just won the Oscar for picture of the year? Ninety-five percent of those polled knew who won the last Super Bowl, but only 37 percent knew who had won the 2012 World Series and even less, just 34 percent, knew the picture of the year. After asking what ques tion would you ask if you had to challenge a sig nalman, I got some great responses. What day of the week is the Super Bowl always played? What sport makes March crazy? What Navy SEAL turned professional wrestler later became an American Governor? How many questions did you know, and what would you ask? The U.S. Navys offen sive in Guadalcanal during World War II is remarkable, because there were Navy warships, land-based Marines, Coast Guard and pilots from multiple units and services all attempting to work towards a common goal. J ames Hornfischers book is on the 2013 CNO Professional reading list, you can download the book for free through the NKO website. Until we meet again, keep reading! From Page 1VetThis was obviously no easy feat, as you com pleted the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your everyday workload, Scorby said. Were it not for your willingness to work long hours and pay attention to a host of details, this decentralization process would not be possible, and for that, our Navy owes each of you a debt of gratitude. While decentraliza tion is a major transi tion for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian employees should not expect to see many changes in the way they receive services, Overstreet said. HR services will con tinue regardless of the change in the delivery model. There may be a change in the HR pro fessional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new servicing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each functional area, she said. Most services under the new system will be provided from NAS Jacksonville, but HR pro fessionals will be respon sive to phone calls and e-mails and are available to meet via video teleconference, she added. Additional information regarding the specific processes and procedures of regional delivery of HR services will be published in the near future.From Page 1HR Warriors Lt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger ATG MayportCpt. Alicia Moreal, offi cer in charge of Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport Veterinary Clinic. With all of the services the clinic provides, their mission is to keep the military families and their pets happy and healthy with preventative mea sures. Good health is impor tant for everyone in the family including those with fur and four legs, said Delgado. The Mayport Vet Clinic helps your pet live a long, fit life. The Mayport Clinic is open Mon.-Fri. from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To sched ule an appointment, call 904-270-7004 or email Mayportvetclinic@gmail. com. Florida Fallen Heroes BanquetThe Timothy J. Seamans Memorial Foundation will host the Florida Fallen Heroes Banquet on May 3 from 5-10 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fire Fighters Association Hall, 618 Stockton Street. Keynote Speaker will be the Honorable Ron De Santis, Congressman, 6th District of Florida, who is also a Reserve Navy JAG Officer and Iraqi War Veteran. Guest Speaker will be retired Col. Carl B. Crumpler, USAF, a Vietnam Veteran and POW. Visit www.florida fallenheroes.org and download the pdf to purchase tickets. Never Quit 2013Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and a red carpet awards ceremony during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event on May 19 from 5:45 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at 904-396-5909 ext 1150. For more information about Navy Quit, go to http://neverquitnever.com/ THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Vicksburg Wins Sports Challenge From StaffOnly 25 points separated first and second place, and that was all that USS Vicksburg needed to be named winner of the 2013 MWR Spring Sports Challenge. Scoring an overall 1150 points, Vicksburgs win at Beach Volleyball on Friday afternoon edged U.S. Coast Guard Mayport out of the slot into second place with 1125 points. Third place overall win ner this year was FRCSE Mayport with 950 points. Competing over four days, April 16-19, this seasons Sports Challenge had more than 400 par ticipants from 22 different commands from Naval Station Mayport and U.S. Coast Guard. The first day opened with a win for HSM Weapons School in the CO/CMC Canoe Race. HSL-48 won the Experienced Canoe Race. USS Vicksburg had its first win of the Challenge in See Challenge, Page 5 -Photos by Paige GnannUSS Vicksburg receives the First Place trophy as the winners of the 2013 MWR Spring Sports Challenge, beating out 21 other commands. A Sailor takes off on the next leg of the Swim Relay competition. A Coastie from Ant Jax tries to make it to first in Kickball. Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 1st Class Jon Zezulka of USS Vicksburg, third from right, is named MVP award winner. He participated in 6 events. HSM Weapons School wins the CO/CMC Canoe Challenge and the right to hang the trophy at the squadron until the Fall Challenge. Sailors pedal hard and head for the finish line during the Auto Racing competition. HSL-48 took first place in the pedal car event. USS Vicksburg wins Beach Volleyball, taking the overall lead from USCG Mayport and winning the Spring Challenge. USS Vicksburg ends up in Lake Wonderwood during the CO/CMC Canoe Challenge. A Sailor goes for his ball during the 8-Ball event at Beachside Community Center. COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt plays against HSL-48 during 3v3 Soccer.

PAGE 5

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 5 3-Point Basketball Shoot Out as USCG Mayport started its path with a win in Dodgeball. Bowling went to The Sullivans. On day two, USCG Valiant swam to victory in the Swim Relay event, while HSL-48 proved its strength in the Strongman Competition. USS Farragut brought home a win with the new event, Homerun Derby. USCG Mayport brought home the win in Kickball. On day three, USS Vicksburg took the day in Golf and Cricket Darts. ASD ruled the 8-Ball Pool and Cornhole. HSL-60 racked points with Tennis. USCG Ant Jax won 3v3 Soccer. The last day of com petition, USS Vicksburg spiked a win in Volleyball and USCG Mayport pulled out a victory in TugoWar and 4-Person Plank Walk. Balloon Launch was ruled by FRCSE Mayport and HSL48 pedaled to a win in Auto Racing. Points were awarded to HSL-60, USS Vicksburg, HSL-48, USCG Ant Jax and USCG Valiant after an accident during Arm Wrestling caused t he event to be closed Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Jon Zezulka of USS Vicksburg was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. ATG Mayport tries to work together in the 4-Person Plank Walk event, one of the new events added to this years Sports Challenge.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeMembers of Ants Jax try to get out the other team during a round of Dodgeball. Lt.j.g. Patricia Kreuzberger of ATG Mayport throws a bean bag during a game of Cornhole. Teammembers from USS The Sullivans try to hit their target during Balloon Launch. HSL-60 yells encouragement to its TugoWar team as they pull against USS Vicksburg.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor tries for a spare during Bowling.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor serves to his opponent during Tennis competi tion.From Page 4Challenge -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor tries for a spare during Bowling. A Coast Guard team flips a tire during the Strong Man Competition. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeA Sailor goes for the shot during the Basketball Shootout.

PAGE 6

Workshops, Classes Available At FFSCFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. April 25, 1-3 p.m., English Tea for Expectant Moms, Chapel April 25, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. April 29, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. April 29-May 3, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. April 29-May 1, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training Building 1, Room 702 April 30, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 April 30, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids? Building 1 Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, devel opment and socialization. Parents need to under stand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already hap pened, but to instill hope that things can change. Operation Praying Mantis Demonstrates Same Priorities Navy Values Today U.S. Navy Public AffairsAn engagement 25 years ago on April 14, 1988 sparked a deter mined and quick response four days later from the U.S., known as Operation Praying Mantis, which demonstrated the same priorities the Navy maintains today. In early 1988, as part of Operation Earnest Will, the U.S. Navy was engaged in maintain ing freedom of naviga tion in the Arabian Gulf as Iraq and Iran contin ued in a bloody war. The USS Enterprise (CVN 65) was operating in the region. Little did any one know that what would happen that day would draw naval forces into action and alter the course of history. Watchstanders aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), Northeast of Qatar, sighted three mines floating approximately one-half mile from the ship. Twenty minutes after the first sight ing, as Samuel B. Roberts was backing clear of the minefield, it struck a submerged mine. The blast injured 10 Sailors and tore a 21-foot hole in the hull, nearly ripping the war ship in half. Quick and determined actions by the crew, who worked for seven hours to stabilize the ship, kept the vessel from sinking. We heard about it right away and very shortly thereafter I was told I was going to fly off to Bahrain to help put a plan together and com mand one of the Surface Action Groups (SAG), said Vice Adm. (Ret.) James B Perkins, III, who was a Surface Action Group (SAG) commander during Operation Praying Mantis. We spent the 17th of April flying from one side of the gulf to the other, briefing the SAG commanders as to what the plan was. Four days after the mine blast, forces, of the now-Joint Task Force Middle East, executed a response Operation Praying Mantis. The operation called for the destruction of two oil platforms used by Iran to coordinate attacks on merchant shipping. The gas-oil platforms were huge structures, said Perkins. What I had in mind were the oil platforms off the coast of Santa Barbra. But These were floating cities with berthing quarters and all that sort of stuff, Perkins recalled. On the morning [of April 18] we called them up and told them, in Farsi and English, that we were getting ready to destroy them and to get off the platforms, said Perkins. There was a lot of run ning around looking for boats to leave the decks. By the end of that day the coalition air and surface units not only destroyed the two oil rigs but also Iranian units attempting to counterattack U.S. forces. Naval aircraft and the destroyer USS Joseph Strauss (DDG 16) sank the Iranian frigate Sahand (F 74) with harpoon mis siles and laser-guided bombs. A laser-guided bomb, dropped from a Navy A-6 Intruder, dis abled frigate Sabalan (F 73), and Standard mis siles launched from the cruiser USS Wainwright (CG 28) and frigates USS Bagley (FF 1069) and USS Simpson (FFG 56) destroyed the 147foot missile patrol boat Joshan (P 225). In further combat, A-6s sank one Bodghammer high-speed patrol boats and neu tralized four more of the speedboats. The air wing from Enterprise did a superb job taking on the Bodghammers, said Perkins. By the end of the operation, U.S. air and surface units had sunk, or severely damaged, half of Irans operational fleet. This particular exer cise, in my view, fin ished the Iranian Navy in the Arabian Gulf, said Perkins. They were still around but after that operation, they didnt have as active a stance. Operation Praying Mantis proved a mile stone in naval history. For the first time since World War II, U.S. naval forces and supporting aircraft fought a major surface action against a deter mined enemy. The suc cess of Praying Mantis and the broad-based allied naval cooperation during Operation Earnest Will proved the value of joint and combined operations in the Gulf and led the way for the mas sive joint coalition effort that occurred during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The operation also demonstrated the impor tance of being ready to fight and win today, of providing offshore options to deter, influ ence and win in an era of uncertainty; and show cased the teamwork, tal ent and imagination of the Navys diverse, capa ble force. It also proved the value of all the training the Navy had done. You have to be ready on a moments notice, Perkins said. You may not always have sufficient time to get prepared, so train hard and often. (In this case) it worked out very well. For more information on Operation Praying Mantis visit Naval History and Heritage Commands website at http:// www.history.navy.mil/ Special%20Highlights/ OperationPrayingMantis/ index.html. For more news from Naval History and Heritage Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/ navhist DC Training On RGB-Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Engineman 3rd Class Joshua Voelker energizing a fire hose with Engineman 2nd Class Edward Burgess backing him up with a PKP fire extinguisher and Chief Gas Turbine Systems Mechanic Jason Washam providing guidance during hose handling training. Takedown On Hu-Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeFire Controlman 3rd Class Lyndsey Baucom performs a takedown after being sprayed with Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) during force protection training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 7

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 7

PAGE 8

Gettysburg Volunteers Get Shredding USS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) vol unteered at the News 4 Jax studio for the annual Shred Day donation drive. News 4 Jax hosts an annual food and dona tion drive for the local Jacksonville community and Second Harvest Food Bank. Volunteers assist the news station by helping move donated goods from vehicles to the staging area for Second Harvest. Last year, the event grew by more than 1,000 cars and 16 tons of dona tions. The 2013 event saw even greater growth. This year, Gettysburg along with the 125th Fighter Wing of the Florida Air National Guard helped gather 21,077 lbs of food for the Second Harvest Food Bank and $416.25 in cash donations, creating 19,773 meals for families in need in the local Jacksonville area. Gettysburg provided almost 40 volunteers for this event, staging two shifts to bring in the donated goods. Electricians Mate 1st Class Gerrad Denne helped organize Gettysburgs volunteer force including several of his fellow First Class Petty Officers. Gas Turbine Service Technician-Mechanical 1st Class Terence Erroch said he enjoyed the event, because in addi tion to contributing daily through his work on the ship, it was good to get out into the community. Seaman Jessica Wilkens, who volun teers regularly, said she thought this opportunity was unique, because it was with people she knew as part of the Gettysburg family. Shred Day allowed Gettysburg Sailors to give back to the community that has so readily sup ported them. The event processed 4,000 cars over the 12-hour drive, bringing in material that was still being shredded several days later. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSailors assigned to USS Gettysburg (CG 64) volunteer assisting the local community during a Second Harvest food drive and shred day. The event was held by Channel 4 News, Jacksonville (WJXT) and powered by Gettysburg Sailors. Operations Specialist 2nd class Randy Morales assigned to USS Gettysburg (CG 64) volunteers for a Second Harvest food drive and shred day. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 9

NAVADMIN Soliciting Sailors For RDC Duty Naval Service Training Command Public AffairsThe Navy is recruit ing Sailors to become the molders of future Sailors as Recruit Division Commanders (RDC) at Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, and Officer Training Command (OTC) as announced in NAVADMIN 085/13 April 1. Being an RDC is one of the most important jobs that there is in the Navy, said Rear Adm. (Select) Dee L. Mewbourne, com mander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). RDCs are the first Navy leaders our recruits see when they report to RTC to begin their Navy careers. They need to be the best of the best and top Sailors because they are charged with molding a disci plined enlisted Sailor to send out to the fleet. Headquartered in Building 1, the historic clock tower building on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., NSTC oversees 98 percent of initial offi cer and enlisted acces sions training for the Navy. NSTC oversees the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) at more than 160 colleges and universities, OTC on Naval Station Newport, R. I., Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill., and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) and Navy National Defense Cadet Corps (NNDCC) citizen ship development pro grams at more than 600 high schools worldwide. OTC has an average of 18 Chief and Senior Chief RDCs. They pro vide mentorship and physical training in four of the five schoolhouses at the command; Officer Candidate School (OCS), Officer Development School (ODS), Direct Commission Officer Indoctrination Course (DCOIC), and the Naval Science Institute (NSI). We are looking for Chiefs and Senior Chiefs who are physically fit, motivated and want to make a difference in shaping the future of the Navy, said Master Chief Electronics Technician (SW/AW) Matt Anuci, the Senior Enlisted Leader of OTC. Anuci said it is not wellknown around the fleet that RDCs, who most people associate with RTC, are also assigned to OTC. Were such a small command (OTC in Newport), compared to RTC. When nearly 40,000 recruits go through RTC each year the natural assumption is thats the only place where RDCs are stationed, Anuci said. The Navy also sends E-5 and E-6 RDCs to Great Lakes. Newport is com pletely different because our billets are limited to only a select few senior enlisted. Anuci explained that OCS needs senior enlist ed RDCs because of the opportunity to mentor and mold and develop the division-officer-to-chief relationship that is a constant in the fleet. NAVADMIN 085/13 also applies to any senior enlisted Sailors who might want to become RDCs. After attending RDC C School at RTC, they would then accept orders to OTC in Newport. NAVADMIN 085/13 also states that RDCs are rewarded for their dedication and hard work with the following benefits: $450 per month special duty assignment pay; additional annual cloth ing allowance of $220; free dry cleaning while actively training a recruit divi sion; opportunity to earn a master training special ist qualification; guar anteed choice of coast assignment (upon com pletion of tour; advance ment rates to chief and senior chief are close to double the Navy-wide averages; award of recruit training service ribbon; participation in the RTC Command Meritorious Advancement Program for second class petty officer. RTCs Command Master Chief Christopher R. Angstead, in a recent NSTC Youtube video (http://www. youtube.com/ watch?v=oqsKHbvkwM), invited potential RDCs to become a member of the RTC team. We have a unique responsibility here at Recruit Training Command to train vol unteers into basicallytrained, physically fit Sailors through screening, equipping, education and military bearing. To meet these training demands we need to increase our Recruit Division Commander manning levels, said Angstead. If you are a highly motivat ed second class, first class, chief or senior chief and want to be a vital part of forging our Navy of the future, consider join ing our Recruit Training Command team. The NAVADMIN also says the RDC assign ment is challenging, but rewarding. It offers a number of significant professional develop ment, diversification, leadership, and career advancement opportuni ties. Hard-charging, dis ciplined Sailors who pro cess strong character, personal integrity and want to pursue the most chal lenging duty ashore are encouraged to volunteer for duty as an RDC. Theres a sense of accomplishment being an RDC, said Chief Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) Laura Stout, from Cedarsburg, Fla., who has been an RDC for two years and has pushed five divisions. You get to see these young people go from not knowing anything about the Navy when they first arrive to marching across the drill deck at gradua tion with so much pride and so ready to go out to be part of the Navy. Its a great feeling. The NAVADMIN con tinues to say initial orders are to RDC C School via a three-week intermediate stop at a Navy Instructor Training Course to obtain the 9502 (Military Training Specialist) Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC). The course is conducted at multiple Navy sites and is a prerequisite for RDC duty. Candidates must pass RDC C School which is a 13-week physically challenging, inten sive, hands-on training course that provides pro spective RDCs with the skills, perspective, and physical readiness to succeed as an RDC. All can didates will be required to pass the RDC Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) which mandates comple tion of the run portion of the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) during RDC C School. The most common reason for attri tion during training is RDC PFA failure. Interested Sailors should submit a 1306/7 (Enlisted Personnel Action Request), request ing duty as an RDC to their rating detailer. NAVADMIN 085/13 stresses that in order to reach the 100 per cent requirement of 601 RDCs (as of April 2 there were 453 RDC assigned to RTC), openings for approximately 200 RDCs are anticipated each year. Reference A of the NAVADMIN contains screening requirements and instructions for application submissions. Some of the require ments listed in the MILSPERSMAN (Military Personnel Manual) can be waived. Additional information can be found on the Navy Personnel Command (NPC) website at www. public.navy.mil/BUPERS. mil/BUPERS-NPC/ enlisted detailing/shore specialprograms/pages/ RDC.aspx/ or contact Chief Yeoman Lakeshia Patterson, PERS-4010D, at (901) 874-3878/DSN 882 or Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Joshua McCullough at (901) 874-3855/DSN 882. For more news on the Navys only boot camp, visit www.bootcamp.navy. mil. Want to become a Recruit Division Commander? Find out more at the Navy Personnel Command website, www.public.navy.mil/BUPERS.mil/BUPERSNPC/enlisted detailing/shorespecialprograms/ pages/RDC.aspx/ THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 9

PAGE 10

10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 11

HSM-40 Trains Australian PilotsNPASE East det. SEHelicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 is training Royal Australian Navy (RAN) pilots and maintainers of 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. Forty-two Australian pilots and 40 Australian maintenance person nel are being extensively trained in the opera tion and upkeep of the MH-60R. Australian sailors start ed arriving in late January and will continue training with the U.S. Navy until July. The entire interopera bility training process will continue until the RAN is ready to take what they learned back to Australia and continue to establish the 725 Squadron. Essentially were training the Australian pilots to fly the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter in prepara tion for them to form their own training squad ron at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, said Cmdr. Mike Hansen, Instructor Pilot, HSM 40. They will operate from there for a couple of years before they ultimately form their own squadron in Australia. This opportunity pro vides the Australian Military members with the chance to gain valu able experience and insight into U.S. Navy Helicopter Operations. At this stage weve done simulator train ing, System training, and I just concluded my sec ond MH-60R flight. The amount of material that the instructors throw at you is extensive, said Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Carey, Royal Australian Navy pilot. This training pro cess here in Mayport and Jacksonville will have a duration of approxi mately two years, stated Executive Officer 725 Squadron, Lt. Cmdr. Todd Gnynn. We talk a common language of aviation. The relationships that were forming with HSM 40 will endure and will far surpass the time that we spend here in America. It is vital that the United States and its allies con tinue to train and fight together in a multina tional environment. The training of the RAN goes a long way to ensure that everyone can communi cate effectively and exe cute the mission, no matter where the battle takes place. Lt. Cmdr. Josh Carey of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) completes pre-flight checks on a MH-60R Seahawk helicopter with Lt. Heather Talley of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40. HSM 40 is training 42 RAN pilots and 40 maintenance personnel from RAN 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. -Photos by MC2 Salt CebeChief Naval Air Crewman (Tactical Helicopter) Sean Hughes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 shares a laugh while going over pre-flight inspection points with Chief Glen Watson of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). HSM 40 is training 42 RAN pilots and 40 maintenance personnel from RAN 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 270-5392 May Special: Transmission flush, cool ant flush and fuel injec tion cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 May 12: Mothers Day Bingo12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. 5x $1000 Jackpots, 1x $500 Quinella, free food, extra drawings and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 5:30 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 April 25: Bar Biathlon 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge (after Trivia). Test your skills at darts and billiards in our biathlon. Overall winner takes away a championship trophy. 270-7205 May 1: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 May 3-5: Cinco De Mayo Weekend All Weekend at Castaways Lounge. Break out the sombreros; well be cel ebrating all weekend long with drink specials and more! Take a shot at our piata on Friday Night. 270-7205 May 10: Castaways Comedy Night. Featuring Comedian Cash Levy. 6 pm at Castaways. 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis wel come. May 12: Focsle Lounge All-Hands Mothers Day Brunch Seatings at 10 am and 1 pm at Focsle; Reservations required Bring your favorite lady out for a lovely all you can eat brunch featuring omelet bar, champagne fountain, carving station and more. The first 100 moms will receive a free rose. To reserve your spot, please call (904) 270-5431 or (904) 270-5313 ITT Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket. Shipwreck Island Season Passes on Sale: $89.50 per pass. Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 5-6 at Daytona International Speedway. YAC Drama Club Presents -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyThe Mayport Youth Center Drama Club held a production of Little Rascals on April 18 at the youth center. Members of the He-Man Woman Haters Club lead the audience in the official club oath. Showing Appreciation -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyThe Mayport Auto Skills Center held Customer Appreciation Day on April 19. Customers were able to meet with vendors, have their questions answered, receive free electrical tests and more at this event. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 13

Intramural Sports April 26: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 18. 270-5451. May 6-9: Pre Season Soccer Tournament. Sign up by Apr. 30. 270-5451. May 14: Spring Forward 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 May 12: Mothers Day Family Bowling Special. Moms bowl half-price all day, including family fun bowl. At least one child must accompany mom; bowling must be completed by 7 pm. 270-5377 May 27: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Just $12 for 2 hours of bowling, shoe rental, lb hamburger or hot dog with fries, a soda and an ice cream sundae for dessert! Kids 4-5 years old $7; Kids 3 and under FREE. Holiday hours 11 a.m. 5 p.m. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aquatics May 1-7: American Red Cross Certified WSI Certification Course Participants must attend all 30 hours of training to be certified. Cost is $200 for Military/Dependents/ DOD and $250 for Civilians. Sign up at the Base Gym or the Pool. For more information, please call (904) 270-5452 or (904) 270-5101 May 11: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Full hours begin Friday, Jun. 7. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Learn basic kicks, punches and balance moves in this calorie burning, sweat producing knock out of a workout. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR Sports/FitnessThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 26: Madden 13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 28: Action Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! April 29: Killer Bunny. Will you win the quest to find the Magic Carrot? 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 30: COD: Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 1: Texas Holdem Tournament. 7 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 2: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 3: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. May 5: Scary Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 6: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 7: Snag Golf. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. May 8: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:30 p.m. Sign up deadline May 6. May 10: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. May 13: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! May 17: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. May 18: Halo 4 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 19: Comedy Movie Marathon. 2 p.m. at Liberty Center. Free Popcorn! May 20: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. April 26: Operation Megaphone Worldwide Lock-In 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $15 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. May 24: Outdoor MoviesHotel Transylvania (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 May 31: Outdoor MoviesWreck It Ralph (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 On The MessdeckBogeys Specials Thursday, April 25 Chicken Caesar Wrap, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 BBQ Pork Salad, $7.95 Friday, April 26 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Monday, April 29 Shrimp Po Boy, $8.50 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $10.95 Tuesday, April 30 Tuna Melt, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.50 Taco Salad, $7.95 Wednesday, May 1 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Mayport Bowling Center Specials Thursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with let tuce, tomato, onion, pickles, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 Focsle Lounge Smashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet With Ice Tea or Water, $8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 13

PAGE 14

Sexual Assault Awareness MonthHSM-46 Sailor Becomes Mayports First DoD SAVI AdvocateNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastIn 1990, the Chief of Naval Operations formed the Navy Womens Study Group. This group with the support of Navy lead ership formed the Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) Program. Now more than 20 years later Yeoman 1st Class Maria Davidelcruz takes the next step in helping the fight against Sexual Assault, by becoming the first Department of Defense (DoD) SAVI cer tified Sailor stationed aboard Naval Station Mayport. Its awesome that our first DOD certified Sailor is a female, said Amie McKague, Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Support Centers counseling and advocate program advisor. The numbers show that more women are assaulted, but a thing to remember is men can be also. Daviddelcruz is not the first ever-female SAVI at Mayport, however she is the first to receive the DoD SAVI certification. According to the new instruction released Jan. 1, 2013 all Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Victim Advocates must complete the DoD Sexual Assault Advocate Certification Program (D-SAACP) by Oct. 1, 2013. The goal of the SAVI program is to provide a comprehensive, stan dardized, gender-neutral, victim-sensitive system to prevent and respond to sexual assault throughout the Navy. This program has an important role in the never-ending battle against an ever-present danger amongst all military per sonnel. One of the things I feel our advocates bring to this program is unique is that they wear the uniform and its someone that is relatable in the military aspects of life that also understand the challeng es in the military, said McKague, but also they are trained to understand sexual assault, so they provide a great balance in the military aspect and sexual assault. According to an NBC News article with former U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, sexual assaults in the military is a problem he believes could be six times greater than reported. Panetta said 3,191 sex assault cases were reported in the military in 2011, but because so few vic timscome forward, he believes the real num -Photos by MC3 Class Damian BergYeoman 1st Class (AW) Maria Daviddelacruz (left) and Aviation Electrician's Mate 2nd Class (AW/SW) Julemarie Hayes, both from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46, go over the requirements to become Department of Defense Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) advocate. The goal of the SAVI program is to provide a comprehensive, standardized, gender-neutral, victim-sensitive system to prevent and respond, to sexual assault throughout the Navy. This program has an important role in the never-ending battle against an ever-present danger amongst all military personnel. Daviddelacruz dis plays her certification for Department of Defense Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) advo cate. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 15

Dear Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Volunteers; On behalf of the Board of Directors of the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society, thank you for your boundless enthusi asm, heartfelt compassion and enduring devotion to the men and women who wear the uniform of our nations Naval Service. Every day, Im inspired by your example. You listen, educate, men tor and guide Sailors and Marines, as well as their wives and husbands, grieving family mem bers, and widows and widowers. Youre always there with a ready smile, nonjudgmental solace, and the peace of mind that only comes through sound financial counsel. You are military spous es, stay-at-home moms, parents, grandparents, active duty members, retirees, students and patriotic citizens. You are problem solvers, admin istrative experts, finan cial management gurus, retail specialists, artisans and crafters, infant layette providers and crisis man agers. You are the heart and soul of the Society. In 2012, more than 3,700 Society Volunteers gave 300,000 hours of their time. That equates to 7,500 work weeks and over 144 years of service! Collectively, you pre sented 794 Budget for Baby workshops, knitted and crocheted 7,080 baby blankets, helped 108,131 thrift shop customers and provided more than $42 million in financial assistance in the form of interest-free loans and grants to 63,650 clients. You made a difference every hour of every day! I am honored to pub licly recognize your con tributions and loyal sup port to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society dur ing National Volunteer Week 2013. With deepest gratitude, Admiral Steve Abbot, U.S. Navy (Retired) President and Chief Executive Officer NMCRS Thanks Its VolunteersPhoto by ET3 Michelle MalteseNS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, right in uniform, stands with Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society staff, volunteers and Mayport command representatives during a Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon held at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on April 19. NMCRS is currently conducting its annual funddrive, which directly supports active duty and retired Sailors in the Mayport area. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 15

PAGE 16

Mayport Hosts Triathalon SeriesFrom Beaches Fine Arts SeriesThe Beaches Fine Arts Series is pleased to announce that its major fundraising efforts, the BFAST triathlons, will move in 2013 to the Naval Station Mayport. The 2013 races, scheduled for Saturdays, May 18, June 8 and July 13, feature sprint dis tances for all three dates, in addition to a newly added Olympic distance race for the July race. The sprint distance includes a mile ocean swim, 16.8 mile bike and 3.4 mile run. The Olympic distance is comprised of a .9 mile swim, 25.2 mile bike and 6.2 mile run. The race course is designed to show off the beauty of Mayport Naval Station and its ships. Beaches Fine Arts Series has presented triathlons as its major fundraisers for the past 27 years. The races began in 1986 at the old Sea Turtle Inn in Atlantic Beach. In 1996, the races moved to Micklers Landing in Ponte Vedra Beach, where they remained until 2001, when they took place for a brief 2 year stint in Hanna Park, moving back to Micklers Landing in 2003. Since 2003, the races have always taken place at Micklers Landing. The move to the Naval Station will allow the races to expand. To register for the races, please go to www.active.com/BFAST. To volunteer for any of our races, please access the regis tration website as well, call our offices, or email us at volunteer@beachesfinearts. org. All proceeds from these races benefit the free programs of Beaches Fine Arts Series, which brings world-class artists to the area in concerts and educational outreach programs. BFAS is a 501-c3, nonprofit organization in its 40th year of operation. Free triathlon clinics will be held to prepare triathletes for the upcoming series. The first clinic will be held on Tuesday, April 30 from 7-9 p.m. at Mayport USO Center, 2560 Mayport Rd. This clinic will encompass all areas of triathlon competi tion, including race preparation, nutrition and race-day procedures. Call 247-6570 or email Martha@beachesfinearts.org to reserve a space. The next clinic will be the HAMMERHEAD Onsite Triathlon Tutorial on Saturday, May 4 from 7:45-10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion on Naval Station Mayport. This clinic will be a hands-on run through of the sprint triathlon, including swim, bike and run, with transi tions. Please call 904-247-6570 or email Martha@beachesfinearts.org to reserve a space. The Beaches Fine Arts Kids Triathlon will be held on Sunday, June 23. Please contact the office at 904-270-1771 for location information. The triathlon engages children in physical fitness through a swim, bike, run race that is gauged to their abilities, with two levels of participation.Navy Uses Crowdsourcing To Seek Energy FixsFrom Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness DivisionDirector of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division (OPNAV N45), invited the fleet and the general public in February to submit their ideas to improve how the Navy uses and thinks about energy. In a follow-up Navy Live blog entry posted April 17, Rear Adm. Kevin Slates highlighted several of the more than 50 innovative ideas received from the Navy community, indus try and the general public. The ideas ranged from simple personal acts, such as turning off computers and lights at the end of the day, to more complex approaches such as hav ing tiger teams evaluate recently installed energy efficient technologies to ensure they work as advertised. Other ideas included replacing thick manuals aboard ships with tablet devices, and adding hydropower cap ture technologies to existing water distribution systems to create electricity. Reducing the Navys energy use and footprint improves combat capa bility and aligns with Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus five aggressive energy goals. In pursuit of those goals, the Navy has been working to increase the use of energy-wise technologies and pro cesses ashore and at sea, explore advanced biofuel blends as drop-in replacements for petroleum, incorporate energy con siderations in the acquisition process and increase energy awareness among Navy personnel. Technology is certain ly a piece of the puzzle for becoming a highly energy efficient warfight ing force-but well never solve that puzzle without changing our energy cul ture, said Vice Adm. Phil Cullom, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics (N4). This crowdsourc ing effort can help get creative, culture-bending energy ideas quickly from the deck plate Sailor and outside partners to the right decision makers, and thats what we need. NAVYNEWSFleet-Wide Engagement Harvests PrioritiesBy Navy Warfare Development Command Public AffairsThe Navys central ized program for Fleet Experimentation (FLEX), led by Navy Warfare Development Command (NWDC), held a fleetwide live and virtual event last week to glean the fleets priorities and plans for fiscal year (FY) 2014. Other stakeholder organizations presented planned events that can be leveraged for future experimentation efforts, directly feeding the development of an FY14 execution plan. NWDC invited rep resentatives from each numbered fleet and Warfare Center of Excellence to present their top priorities, and also to share planned events and exercises that could support experimentation, said Rear Adm. Terry B. Kraft, command er, NWDC. Now more than ever, it is critical to pinpoint overlapping interest areas in order to deliver a comprehensive FLEX plan that will meet the warfighters future needs. The FLEX program, led by NWDC on behalf of U.S. Fleet Forces Command and U.S. Pacific Fleet, designs and executes collaborative, synchronized and rel evant experimentation based on near-term fleet priorities and capability gaps. These experimenta tion events result in tangible products for the warfighter, frequently in the form of new and updated doctrine. NWDCs director of Fleet Experimentation Capt. Steve Faggert led the workshop, hosted online to allow partici pation from around the globe with a small foot print at NWDC for com mands located in the vicinity of Norfolk Naval Station. This was an opportu nity for the fleet to tell us directly how our efforts in FY14 can get them one step closer to solving their biggest challenges, Faggert said. The fleets voice in this conversation is crucial. Our ultimate goal is to put a tangible product in the hands of the warfighter where a capability gap once exist ed. FLEX harvests innova tive ideas generated by members of the fleet and other military and gov ernment organizations. Submissions are accept ed for review year-round through a classified Navy website, which is also used to promote aware ness of all Navy experi mentation efforts that involve fleet assets. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 17

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 17 Salute To Floridas Heroes Concert The Camp Blanding Museum will be host ing a concert starring Montgomery Gentry at the Keystone Heights Airport, 1700 Airport Road, Stark, Florida on Saturday, April 27. Gates will open at 11:30 a.m., entertainment starts at noon; NO COOLERS or umbrellas allowed. All children over the age of 3 must have a ticket pur chased. Food and bever age vendors will be avail able for sales. Tickets can be purchased at: www. flheroes.org Chonda Pierces Girl Talk See Chonda Pierces Girl Talk-The queen of clean comedy at the Florida Theatre on Tuesday, April 30 at 7 p.m. To take advantage of the buy one, get one free ticket offer, tickets must be purchased at the Box Office via phone (904) 355-2787 or in person with the password I love the Florida Theatre. You must present your mili tary I.D. at the box office. Deweys Spring Concert Series Friday Nights At NAS Jacksonville Enjoy freelive music every Friday night at 7 p.m. at the outside stage at Deweys. Bring your own blankets and chairs and enjoy a night out with the family. No outside food or drinks allowed. For more information, call (904) 542-3900. Free Tickets Bellamy Brothers In Concert Come see the Bellamy Brothers in concert at The Morocco Shrine Center Auditorium, 3800 Saint Johns Bluff Road, South, Jacksonville on Saturday, April 27, 2013. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Greater Jax Area USO has received a lim ited number of free tick ets that will be available at NOON today at both your Mayport and NAS Jax USO centers. Tickets are first come, first served and are open to Active Duty, Retirees, Reservists, National Guard, and DOD. The show will also be featuring Jacksonvilles singing sensation Rion Page, with Special Guest Linda Davis & Company In the Round. For more information, call 6425200, Ext. 11 or 13. No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on April 29 from 57 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve tacos, refried beans, rice, salad, and dessert. Barking In The Streets Bring the family out and enjoy drinks, music, food and more to sup port K9sForWarriors. The event will be held Sunday, May 5 from 1-6 p.m. at the Adamec Harley-Davidson on Baymeadows Road. For more information on tickets and K9sForWarriors, visit K9sForWarriors.org. 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Greater Jax USO Zoo Night Wristbands On Sale The Greater Jacksonville USO is hav ing a USO night at the Jacksonville ZOO on Friday, May 3. We will begin selling wristbands today at noon. Enjoy a night at the Jacksonville Zoo with the fam ily on Friday, May 3rd (see attached flyer). Wristbands are $2.50 each; cash only please. Wristbands are open for purchase by Active/ Retired/Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Wristbands can be pur chased at the NS Mayport USO, NAS Jacksonville USO. Wristbands will be sold today from noon till 1pm at the Off-Crew Building onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Military Wives Vendor Show May 4 Join the Mayport USO for another wonderful Military Wives Vendor Show. This event is free and open to the public. There will be raffle tick ets and food for sale. For more information, or to signup as a vendor, email: milwivesbusinessesande vents@gmail.com The Players Military Job Fair-May 5 In partnership with Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition, The Players will welcome active duty, reservists, retired military, veterans, and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass on Sunday, May 5 to participate in its second annual job fair. Information on local educational institutions with veterans programs, career counseling, and resume writing assistance will also be provided. The job fair at The Players will take place in The Turn hospitality venue. Companies interested in participating may contact Bill Hickley at bill.hick ley@incepture.com There is a computer resource center avail able to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Saturday, April 27 Bring your coffee and camera with you and join a park ranger at 6 a.m. to watch the sun rise over the Fort George River, get answers about park resources and get some amazing photos. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. For more information, con tact the Talbot Islands Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. The 37th Annual Pioneer Days Festival is just around the corner. Along with the usual fea tures of Arts and Craft vendors, a great Food Court, Heritage Village, Kids Korral, Shoot-Out Re-enactments and live entertainment, this year we will have the Seminole Indian Dance Circle, a special Railroad history display, a Business Expo and much more. For more information see our web site, www.highsprings. com or call 386-454-3120. Sunday, April 28 The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-2 presents About Boating Safely. Class to be held at Arlington Lions Club. Cost of the class is $20 for individual and $30 for couple. This is a com prehensive boating safe ty class approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators(NASBLA). Successful completion of this course results in a Florida State Boating Education ID Card. Contact Charles Hayes at (904) 652-7767 or e-mail: Charles.s.hayes@gmail. com for more informa tion. The 37th Annual Pioneer Days Festival is just around the corner. Along with the usual fea tures of Arts and Craft vendors, a great Food Court, Heritage Village, Kids Korral, Shoot-Out Re-enactments and live entertainment, this year we will have the Seminole Indian Dance Circle, a special Railroad history display, a Business Expo and much more. Come to High Springs on Saturday, April 27th and Sunday, April 28th and join in the fun! For more information see our web site, www. highsprings.com or call 386-454-3120. Tuesday, April 30 The Duval County Extension Offices/UF IFAS will be offering a free workshop on Spring Irrigation Tune-up at West Regional Library, 1425 Chaffee Road S., Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 6:30 8:30 p.m. In times of drought be sure your irrigation system is in top shape. Not everyone has in-ground irrigation, so we will cover handwatering tips, plus the city ordinances and more. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj. net with your name and phone number. Saturday, May 4 The Jacksonville Public Library invites comic book enthusiasts and nerds -from the super young to the super old to don their favorite super hero costume and come out for three hours of fun and fantasy during the Beaches First Annual ComicCon event at the Beaches Branch Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, from 2-5 p.m. This free event is being held in collaboration with the nearby Superhero Beach comic book shop, 1124 N. 3rd Street, which is spon soring free comic book day during its May the 4th Be With You event. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a presentation and leisurely guided hike through different Florida ecosystems on a quest to characterize tracks left by an assortment of critters. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per person Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Sunday, May 5 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Florida, will host a Union Garrison event from 9 a.m.-noon. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per person Fort admission. Tuesday, May 7 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, from 6-8 p.m. Jack Varney will present practical and technical tips on Getting it Sharp in photography. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. For more information www. beachesphotographyclub. orgOut in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Volunteers Help Clean Up St. Johns RiverWater Quality Program ManagerMilitary and civilian personnel at Naval Station Mayport joined with the City of Jacksonville Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission and hun dreds of volunteers at other locations around Duval County when they hit the beach and the Jetties for the 2013 St. Johns River Celebration Cleanup held recently. Volunteers spent two hours picking up trash and debris from these areas resulting in the collection of many large bags of trash in addition to a multitude of other odds and ends that had washed ashore. The largest group to turn out for the event was the approximately 24 cadets and adult vol unteers from the Navy JROTC at Terry Parker High School. Several other Navy organizations and family groups also came out to participate together in the cleanup. Every year, count less marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, and other animals are sick ened, injured, or killed because of dangerous items that are carried by rain water and wind into rivers and ultimately the ocean. These animals are poi soned, choked, or entan gled by carelessly discarded trash such as fishing line, Styrofoam, plastic bags and bottles, and cigarette butts. The work of volunteers to remove these items is important and greatly appreciated. A further goal of this event is to help people to understand that when they dont properly dis pose of their trash it poses a long-term hazard to wildlife, people, and the environment. -Photos submittedAbove, a volunteer picks up bags of trash along the jet ties on the north end of Mayports beach. Right, a volunteer and her son join others picking up trash along the Mayport Jetties as part of the St. Johns River Celebration Cean up held recently.

PAGE 18

18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 19

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 25, 2013