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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00290


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The Mayport Commissary will be open on Easter Sunday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. hours only. Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com TSP Cut?American Forces Press ServiceFederal civilian employ ees could see their Thrift Savings Plan contribu tions reduced if furloughs take effect. The Thrift Savings Plan is a retirement sav ings and investment plan for federal employees and members of the uni formed services, includ ing the Ready Reserve. Employees who have selected their TSP contri bution to be a percentage of their pay will see small er contributions during the furlough period due to their reduced pay, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Defense Department spokeswom an. For example, an employee who earns $1,000 of basic pay every two-week pay period and contributes 10 percent of it to the TSP would make a $100 TSP contribu tion during a normal pay period. However, if the employee is furloughed for two days per pay peri od, his or her basic pay would decrease to $800. As a result, the TSP contri bution would be $80 per pay period. Employees who con tribute a set dollar amount wont see that amount change with a reduction in pay, HullRyde said. For this rea son, now is a good time to review TSP contribu tion amounts to see if they are appropriate, Thrift Savings Plan officials said. Basic pay reductions also will affect the match ing funds contributed by the Defense Department and other agencies. According to a Thrift Savings Plan news release, any reduction in pay will proportionally decrease the matching funds con tribution, regardless of whether employees con tribute a percentage of their pay or a set dollar amount. The furloughs may cause financial hardship for some employees, and in those cases they may consider making a hard ship withdrawal from their TSP fund. Such withdrawals have several restrictions: If you take a hardship withdrawal, you will not beable to make any TSP contributions for six months after having received your funds. You may withdraw only your contributions and the earnings associ ated with them, and the total amount cannot MWR Expo Informs Sailors Of Local Deals -Photo by MC3 Damian BergLt. Luke Wilson, a Chaplain for Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic Ministry Center Mayport, receives information about travel and tours from Jordan Munns during the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Expo and Travel Show on Naval Station Mayport. MWR offers several support and leisure services to active duty military, their families, Department of Defense civilian and contract employees, military retirees and other eligible participants.Civilians May See Reduction If FurloughedSee TSP, Page 9 New Detour For ImprovementsFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will close a portion of Bailey Avenue in front of the Mayport Gym start ing March 25 for curb improvements to the roadway. According to Public Works Supervisory Engineering Technician Milton Harris, the project will include the instal lation of new concrete curbs and sidewalks along the road. Expected to continue through March 29, Harris said the road will be closed to traffic from Bon Homme Richard and just before the Uniform Shop/Subway/Taco Bell parking ingress. The parking area will remain open and accessible, as will the parking area for the Mayport Gym and Oasis Galley. JTA bus service will also be rerouted during the improvement proj ect. There are two stops on Bailey Avenue that are temporarily suspended during the construc tion. Bus riders can catch a JTA bus on Massey Avenue instead. Signs have been posted at the Bailey bus routes to noti fy riders of the upcoming change. Detour signs will be in place along Bailey Avenue to help direct the traffic flow. Once the construction is com plete, the road will be reopened. Mayport drivers have also been impacted by detours due to construc tion on the first phase of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project. Since January, the intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore Street has been closed to vehicular traffic. The interesection is being reconstructed into a roundabout, a type of circular intersection in which road traffic flows in one direction around a central island. Completion time has been pushed back to April. During the construc tion, the Hanna Park/ Seminole Gate has also been closed for inbound and outbound traffic. Meritorious Civilian Service Award Given To NAVFAC ManagerFrom NAVFACSENaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus presented the Meritorious Civilian Service Award to Bruce Pastorini, senior con struction manager, in front of his family and co-workers March 11. Pastorini was rec ognized for outstand ing performance while serving as NAVFAC Southeasts Senior Construction Manager in the Capital Improvements Business Line Core, Construction Management Branch at Naval Air Station Jacksonville from March 2008 through September 2012. Pastorini devel oped a plan to provide the required training to NAVFAC Southeasts construction managers (CMs) and construc tion engineering techni cians (ETs), developing a cooperative agree ment with the University of North Florida (UNF) to teach the eight hour Construction Quality Management for Contractors (CQMC) course, which is a requirement for the principals of NAVFACs Construction Contractor Partners as well as our CMs and ETs, said Capt. Christopher Kiwus, NAVFAC commanding officer. Pastorini also facili tated the current Egg Hunt At Base ChapelFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport Chapel is inviting Mayport families to enjoy a day of food, games and Easter cel ebration on March 30 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Chapel grounds on Massey Avenue. The Easter Bunny will be hopping in to visit with children and take photos. There will also be a Moonwalk, crafts, games and free food available at the event. There will be an Easter egg hunt for children ages infant through 10 years old starting at 2 p.m. This years event will take the place of MWRs Easter Eggstravaganza which was cancelled. -Photo by MC1 Erica R. GardnerBruce B. Pastorini, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast senior construction manager is presented the Meritorious Civilian Service Award by NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus March 11. Hydrant TestingFrom StaffFirst Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services, Mayport Division will conduct annual inspec tion and testing of fire hydrants in base hous ing from April 1-19, except weekends. Housing residents are encouraged to refrain from perform ing household laundry during these periods to preclude accidental damage to clothing as a result of disturbed sedi ment in the water sys tem. Inspection dates and times for each gen eralized housing area are: Officer Housing (housing east of Lake Wonderwood) 1-5 April 1-5, 1-4 p.m. Enlisted Housing (housing west of Lake Wonderwood) April 8-12, 1-4 p.m. Ribault Bay Housing April 15-19, 1-4 p.m. If you have any ques tions, contact the duty Assistant Fire Chief at 904-270-5334 ext. 19.See Service, Page 8

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Welcome to Subway, may I take your order? Sure, Ill take a tuna on wheat, toasted, please. While the polite, but pierced teen prepared my favorite sub, I chatted with my husband, who was next up. So Hon, did you like that new club deli meat I put in your lunch today? That sandwich had meat in it? he asked sar castically. Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesSpring has sprung! We are finally getting some nice weather, our yards desperately need help, and spring fever is about to be caught by students all over. Is your child starting to show signs? Forgetting to do his homework? Didnt know he had a test on Chapter 21? Tardies and absences are increasing? Hmm! Sounds like a serious case of spring fever. Are you at your wits end? How can you deal with this? Of course, as a parent, you recognize the value and importance of education to your childs future. Spring fever can be a complicated issue, however, and generally no amount of lecturing, pleading, or threatening will change a childs point of view. First and fore most, then, you need to understand the causes of the disease. Causes of the Disease 1. Tiredness With the time change and the longer days, stu dents may not be get ting the rest they really need to be successful in school. Students today are involved in a myriad of activities in addition to school, including youth sports; dance, music, or karate classes; cheerlead ing, band, or JROTC prac tice; faith-based youth activities; and home com puter games. Older stu dents work many hours a week to assist with car and insurance payments. With physical tiredness comes weariness with the same old school stuff. 2. Boredom It has been a long year. Homework, handouts, and hurry to get them all done correctly and on time week after week have taken their toll. After 27 weeks of school doing the same thing over and over with no end, they believe, in sight, they begin to think, Whats the point? 3. Frustration Students who have been making Ds and Fs all year and cant seem to change that test grade or report card grade no matter how hard they study or how many extra credit assignments they turn in are more apt to tune out, stop trying, and fail. Their somewhat pos itive attitude turns to frus tration this time of year since they keep getting the same grade over and over. Parents and teachers may pile on saying, Why dont you study harder? Why dont you ask for help when that may be exactly what the students thought they were doing. Cures for the Disease 1. Provide an Encouraging and Secure Home Environment Children need to feel that their parents value them and their efforts. To do this you need to have some quiet no yelling or blaming dialogue about the problem. During the discussion you will prob ably hear many of the above excuses: tiredness, boredom, and frustra tion. Be an active listener. Genuinely express sym pathy for the causes. You just may be in those same shoes at your job! 2. Work Together to Develop a Plan Find an area in which your child remains moti vated and focus on it. If he can determine why he still loves computer games or dancing or playing base ball, brainstorm with him to figure out what aspects of that activity continue to motivate him. Perhaps you and your child will be able to formulate a recipe for success and apply the ingredients to school. For homework help consider using www.tutor.com/ navy This website is free for active duty military and their dependents. A carefully screened tutor will assist your child with any type of homework live. 3. Use Rewards Carefully Students who possess intrinsic motivation take on activities because of the feelings of enjoyment and accomplishment they evoke. Students who pos sess extrinsic motivation perform to gain a reward or avoid a punishment. Students with extrinsic motivation will gener ally put out the minimal amount of effort to com plete tasks in the easiest way possible. In addition, external motivation only exists as long as there is external compensation. In other words, extrin sic motivation is likely to result in limited prog ress that vanishes when the reward disappears. So be careful when offering rewards for school suc cess. 4. Avoid Power Struggles Choose your battles wisely. Make a clearcut list of unacceptable behaviors and result ing consequences. For instance, a failing grade in a class might result in the loss of a favorite privilege until the grade is raised. Resist the temptation to ground your child indefi nitely or to take away all prized possessions. If you do not follow through on the promised conse quences, your child will quickly realize that you are not serious about school success and he will remain unchanged. Students do want to succeed, but as children they arent always able to see the light at the end of the tunnel. With patience and understanding, you can help your child work through a case of spring fever and enjoy academic success. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingMotivating The Student With Spring FeverHomelessness is a very complex issue to under stand. According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness (TNAEH), some of the variables of homelessness include poverty, lack of affordable housing, and mental/ physical disabilities. To fully appreciate this epidemic it should be understood that there are 633,782 people experienc ing homelessness each night in the United States. An analysis of this figure reveals that 233,403 are families and 392,945 are individuals. Veterans comprise approximately 10 percent, or 62,000, of the home less population in our country. Additionally, 16 percent of the homeless population is considered chronically homeless, which involves either long-term and/or repeat ed bouts of homelessness coupled with disability (physical or mental). As you can see, this issue affects families, youth, and veterans. Having nowhere to live is a very serious issue in our country. It is an issue that should provoke us to help anyway we can. It should also mute our complaints and aid us in adopting a heart of thanksgiving and an attitude of content ment. There is a spiritual par allel/lesson that flows from our Messiahs life concerning this issue of homelessness. Luke 9:57-58 reads, As they were walking along the road, a man said to him, I will follow you wherever you go. Jesus replied, Foxes have dens and birds have nests, but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head. In Matthew 8:18-19, which is the parallel of this passage, we learn that the man reported by Luke was actually a teacher of the law. Nonetheless, both Gospels report that the Son of Man has no place to lay his head. The key to interpreting what Jesus said begins first with the examination of what provoked him to speak. If you look closely at this passage, you will notice that prior to Jesus making the statement about having no place to lay his head, a man person/teacher of the law stated that he would follow Jesus wherever he would go. I am not sure if the man was caught up in the moment, but there does not appear to be any justification for his proc lamation. To his proclamation, Jesus response is unusu al. Notice that he does not say, Well thank you or I am glad to know you will be here with me. Instead, Jesus says to this person, you need to know that there is a hefty price tag attached to those words. In other words, following Jesus could mean a life of challenges and discomfort. The good news is Jesus has promised to be with us every step of the way (Hebrews 13:5). Additionally, the larger context of this passage suggests another impor tant aspect of following Jesus (Luke 9:59-62). That is, once we decide to follow Jesus, we must guard our hearts and minds against distractions. Do you currently have any distractions in your life? Here are a few ques tions to help you contem plate and identify possible distractions. Are there any comforts in my life precluding me from fol lowing Jesus? What about conveniences? How about recent choices? Once we decide to fol low Jesus, then we must commit to staying the course of our faith. Thus, becoming a child of God begins with simple faith but matures as we spend time in prayer and the Word of God. Militarily speaking, Gods end state for us is disciple ship (Matthew 28:19).Chap Calvin B. Gardner Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSWhat are you talking about? I made you a nice big sandwich with that new club deli meat I got at the commissary. You know, the one made of both ham and turkey with bacon wrapped around it. Geeze, I thought youd like it! I declared incred ulously. Well, Hon, it was kind of hard to taste anything inside the sandwich because the strong flavor of the two heels of bread you gave me overpowered everything else. I grumbled, but he was right. After making the kids sandwiches that morning, I noticed that two heels of bread were left. I couldve opened a new loaf and thrown the heels away, but my moth er had instilled a certain frugality in me. I thought my husband would appreciate the fact that I was not wasting two perfectly edible bread heels that his hard-earned military salary had pur chased. Besides, I thought, he must be grateful that Im the kind of wife that gets up every morning and packs him a nice lunch, right? What would you like on your tuna, Maam? As I selected toppings that were salty, sour, crunchy and spicy, all I could taste was bitterness. Thats it, I ruminated. He can make his own stinking sandwiches from now on. As my sub was being salt-and-peppered, I remembered a conversa tion Id had with a saltand-pepper-haired lady in the YMCA locker room two tours ago in Virginia. We had just finished our morning exercise classes To Heel, Or Not To Heel, That Is The SandwichLenten, Easter Schedule At ChapelRoman Catholic Schedule Stations of the Cross: All Fridays of Lent (Small Chapel), 6:30 p.m., followed by a potluck in the Fellowship Hall Passion (Palm) Sunday, March 24: Mass at 8:45 a.m. Holy Thursday, March 28: Mass of the Lords Supper at 7:30 p.m. Good Friday, March 29: Good Friday of the Lords Passion at 3 p.m. with fish fry following service Holy Saturday, March 30: Easter Vigil Mass at 8 p.m. Easter Sunday, March 31: Resurrection of the Lord Mass at 7 a.m. at Sea Gull Pavilion with breakfast fol lowing at Oasis Galley; Mass at the Main Chapel at 9 a.m. Protestant Schedule Palm Sunday, March 24 at 10:30 a.m. Maundy Thursday, March 28 at 6 p.m. Good Friday Service, March 29 at noon Easter Sunrise Service, March 31 behind Ocean Breeze at 7 a.m. with a breakfast following at Oasis Galley Easter morning service and Cantata at 10:30 a.m. There will be a Spring Festival & Easter Egg Hunt on March 30 at 11 a.m. There will be an egg hunt for chil dren ages infant through 10 years old starting at 2 p.m.See Heel, Page 16

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Celebrating 2013 Womens History MonthNavy Office of Womens PolicyThe Navy joins the nation in celebrating Womens History Month during the month of March, as announced in Naval Administrative message 039/13, released Feb. 22. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contri butions of women to our Navy and nation by cel ebrating the national Womens History Month theme, Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) through pro grams, exhibits, publica tions, and participation in military and community events. One Navy STEM pio neer includes Grace Murray Hopper, who wanted to put her Ph.D. in Mathematics to use for her nation in the midst of World War II. In 1943, she joined the Naval Reserves and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1944. During World War II she worked at the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University and at the end of the war joined the Harvard faculty. Retiring as a rear admiral, Hopper, was recog nized as a pioneer com puter programmer, the co-inventor of Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL), and for coining the term bug for computer malfunc tions. Hopper was bur ied at Arlington National Cemetery in 1992. USS Hopper (DDG 70) was commissioned as her namesake in 1997; this was only the second Navy warship to be named after a woman. Also during World War II, the Navy launched the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) program. Along with Hopper, more than 85,000 WAVES worked in STEM fields as air traffic controllers, cryptologists, draftsmen, meteorologists, and trans lators during World War II. In December 2012, history was made in the Navys nuclear commu nity when Lieutenant Junior Grade Marquette Leveque, assigned to the gold crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), and Lieutenants Junior Grade Amber Cowan and Jennifer Noonan of USS Maine (SSBN 741) blue crew became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in submarines and receive their Submarine Warfare Insignia, also known as dolphins. Today in the Navy, female officers fill 10 per cent of STEM positions, including engineering duty officers and infor mation warfare profes sionals. Female enlisted Sailors make up 22 per cent of the cryptology and intelligence community and 21 percent of opera tional ratings, including aviation warfare systems operators and sonar tech nicians. Female Sailors continue to excel both ashore and afloat, serving in various STEM related fields. More than 54,000 active duty women and more than 10,000 female Reservists are serving in the Navy. They make up 17.3 percent of the force and make indispensable con tributions to our mission and operations. Nearly 59,000 women serve in a wide range of special ties as Navy civilians. The current Navy Total Force includes 33 active and Reserve female flag officers, 67 female senior executive service mem bers, 56 female com mand master chiefs, and 6 female command senior chiefs leading from the front. Currently, the top three highest-ranking female officers in the Navy are Vice Adm. Carol Pottenger, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, and Vice Adm. Robin Braun. Pottenger, a sur face warfare officer, was one of the first women selected for sea duty and went on to become the third commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. Howard, also a surface warfare officer, was the first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took com mand of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), and in 2012 she became the first African-American woman to receive a third star in flag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Braun, a career naval aviator and for mer commanding officer of VR-48, has more than 5,800 flight hours in Navy aircraft. The top three highestranking female enlisted leaders in the Navy are Fleet Master Chief Joann Ortloff, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, and Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth. Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys first female African American Fleet Master Chief when she assumes her position as the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) fleet master chief later this month. The Navys 67-strong Senior Executive Service also has a strong STEM presence amongst its seniormost women. Carla Lucchino, Department of Navy Assistant for Administration is the top female civilian SES. Steffanie Easter, execu tive director for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office, holds a bache lors degree in chemical engineering and mas ters degree in engineer ing management. Easter is currently leading the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program, the Department of Defenses initiative for defining affordable and sustainable fifth-genera tion strike aircraft. For more information about the history of women and their numerous contributions to the Navy, visit http:// www.history.navy.mil/ special%20highlights/ women/women-index. htm. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Navy Office of Womens Policy, visit http://www. npc.navy.mil/AboutUs/ BUPERS/WomensPolicy. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity U.S. Navy PhotoMayports first WAVES, Lt. Anita Withrell and Ensign Irene Poole, helped pave the way for women in the military. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 6th Fleet Commander Visits Hu City USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. 6th Fleet visited Sailors aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), USS Hu City (CG 66) and the German navy frigate FGS Hamburg (F220), while the ships were conducting operations in the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility March 12. Vice Adm. Frank C. Pandolfes visit to Hamburg included meeting with the ships commanding officer, German navy Cmdr. Ralf Kuchler, and touring the ship. Having a German ship accompany an American strike group on deployment is a unique event. It is a rare honor for me to visit a German war ship at sea conducting its mission, said Pandolfe. Your ship is an integral part of this carrier strike group. We have tremen dous faith and confidence in the capabilities of this ship, and we are very proud to sail alongside you. Pandolfe also vis ited Sailors aboard Eisenhower. After meet ing with Rear Adm. Mike Manazir, commander, Carrier Strike Croup (CSG) 8, and senior lead ership, he addressed the crew. I thank you for your successful engagements in France and Spain, where you represented the Navy very well, said Vice Adm. Pandolfe. We wish you every success as you sail forward to 5th Fleet and look forward to your return. During his visit to Hu City, Pandolfe addressed the ships wardroom and chiefs mess, and spoke to the crew from the bridge, where he expressed his gratitude for the crews hard work on backto-back deployments. Hu City, along with Eisenhower, had returned early from a previously scheduled nine-month deployment in order to make preparations to redeploy in late February for additional operations in the U.S. 5th and U.S. 6th Fleet. We appreciate your hard work in getting ready for the deployment, said Pandolfe. No strike group is more capable or more prepared. Dwight D. Eisenhower, homeported in Norfolk, Va., and Hu City home ported in Mayport, Fl., along with the German frigate FGS Hamburg, from Kiel, Germany, are on a scheduled deploy ment in support of mari time security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Rear Adm. Mike Manazir, right, commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, speaks with Charest during a visit to the ship. Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) switch nozzle handlers during a mock fire on the flight deck during damage control crash and salvage training. Command Master Chief of USS Hu City (CG 66), Master Chief Raymond F. Charest (left), discusses mission readiness with Sailors after a division uniform inspection on the ships fantail. -Photos by MC2 Matthew R. ColeVice Adm. Frank Pandolfe, commander of the U.S. 6th Fleet, meets with Sailors assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) in the ships pilot house during a tour of the ship. Hu City is on a deployment to support maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Quartermaster 2nd Class Armen Taymazyan assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) uses a parallel motion protector to plot a course update while on the bridge. Seaman Anna M. Collins assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) steers the ship as it steams through the Atlantic ocean.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 5 Sailors fight a mock fire on the flight deck during damage control crash and salvage training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Damage Controlman 1st Class Larry D. Ellington instructs Sailors on the flight deck how to check for hot spots on a downed helicopter during damage control crash and sal vage training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) fight a mock fire on the flight deck during damage control crash and salvage training. Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) fight a mock fire on the flight deck during damage controal crash and salvage training. Seaman Brenti L. Franklin (left) and Seaman Moses Aseda assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) continue ship efforts preservation by painting on the fore castle. Sailors assigned to the crash and salvage team aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) rescue sur vivors of a simulated downed SH-60B helicopter on the ship's flight deck during a drill. Hull Technician 2nd Class William Shevlin, assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), puts on crash and salvage gear in the hangar bay during a drill. Seaman Natt K. Slober uses a disc sander to remove rust and chipped paint before repainting a bulkhead aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Seaman Caleb Duarte assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) uses binoculars observing the surrounding area while standing watch on the bridgewing.

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Early Career Transition Program SuspendedFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Navy announced suspension of the Early Career Transition Program (ECTP) in a Navy message released March 14. According to NAVADMIN 063/13 Navy Personnel Command (NPC) will no longer accept requests to tran sition to the Selected Reserve under this pro gram. Requests submitted and received at NPC prior to March 14 will be accepted and processed. Requests received after March 14 will be returned with out action. Previously approved requests are unaffected. Established in 2011, ECTP allowed active duty and Full Time Support (FTS) Sailors with at least two, but less than 16 years of service to leave active duty and affiliate with the Selected Reserve to finish out the remainder of their Navy contract. It provided Sailors an early transition oppor tunity to continue their Naval service and pursue educational or personal goals at a time when the Navy was experiencing record high retention and low attrition. When the program was activated, active duty Navy had 35 over manned ratings while the Selected Reserve had 22 undermanned ratings, so the ECTP helped reduce overmanning in the active component while fill ing the Selected Reserve ranks with highly trained and qualified Sailors. Since 2011, the Navy has made significant progress in balancing the force, eliminating the cur rent need for the ECTP voluntary early separation program. ECTP may be reinstated in the future as required. For more information, read the NAVADMIN 063/13 at the NPC website www.npc.navy.milCountry Singer Dierks Bentley Helps Honor Military For THE PLAYERS ChampionshipFrom THE PLAYERS ChampionshipContinuing a PGA TOUR tradition of honor ing men and women in uniform, THE PLAYERS Championship unveiled a full slate of activities and programs that will take place during the 2013 event as part of Birdies for the Brave, a military out reach initiative proudly supported by the PGA TOUR. Highlighting the mili tary appreciation activi ties in the tradition of years past, THE PLAYERS announced, along with Capitol Records Nashville, that country music star Dierks Bentley will give a special performance on Wednesday, May 8, dur ing Military Appreciation Day, as the tournament returns to THE PLAYERS Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass, May 6-12. On Wednesday, May 8, Bentley will be a part of the Military Appreciation Day ceremony, this year themed, A Salute to the United States Navy. The program on the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse Lawn will include pag eantry by military per sonnel, performance by the Jacksonville Childrens Chorus, as well as remarks from PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem and other digni taries. Multi-platinum selling singer/songwriter Dierks Bentley has forged his own brand of country music, combining clas sic country songwriting, influences of bluegrass instrumentation and the energy of rock n roll. Bentleys sixth studio album, Home, released in 2012, debuted at No. 1 and has spawned three consecutive chart-top ping hits, marking 10 career No. 1 songs for Bentley as a singer and songwriter. His five pre vious studio albums have sold more than 5 mil lion copies, garnered 11 GRAMMY nominations and earned him an invita tion to join the Grand Ole Opry. Bentley is current ly out on the road with Miranda Lambert for their Miranda Lambert and Dierks Bentley: Locked & Reloaded Tour through October. In addition to the per formance, THE PLAYERS will provide all active duty, retired, and Reserve military personnel along with their dependents with complimentary admission to the tour nament all week. THE PLAYERS also offers dis counted admission to veterans. Military mem bers who are interested in the complimentary admission should go to PGATOUR.COM/THE PLAYERS and click on the ticket link for instructions about how to gain com plimentary access to the tournament, which is a different process than the past. Non-career military veterans should also log on to PGATOUR.COM/ THE PLAYERS and find instructions about how to obtain discounted tickets to the tournament. Also as part of Birdies for the Brave, THE PLAYERS will once again host an Operation Shower group baby shower for 30 military moms-tobe whose spouses are deployed members of the U.S. military on Saturday, May 4, from 24 p.m. in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost located on the 18th fairway of THE PLAYERS Stadium Course. This private event will feature lunch, an opportunity for the moms to share stories and gain comfort from other mili tary moms who are experiencing pregnancy dur ing deployment, and the highlight of the event, the distribution of Operation Showers signature Showers In A Box -gifts of high-quality products for the babies and moms that have been donated by sponsors and supporters. Holly Finchem, wife of PGA TOUR Commssioner Tim Finchem, and Tabitha Furyk, wife of PGA TOUR player Jim Furyk, will be hosting the event, with Navy Admiral Jack Scorby, Commander of Navy Region Southeast, and his wife, Chris, among the special guests who will be attending. On Sunday, May 5, THE PLAYERS will host the second annual Military Veterans Job Fair from noon to 3 p.m. in The Turn hospital ity structure located to players left on the hill next to the 18th green of THE PLAYERS Stadium Course. Conducted in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition, the event is open to active duty, retired and Reserve military members, military spouses and veterans, with 50 local companies expected to participate -doubling the number who participated in 2012. Companies with hiring opportunities who are interested in participating in the job fair may contact Bill Hickey at (904) 363-4651 or bill.hickey@ incepture.com. On Wednesday, Military Appreciation Day, THE PLAYERS will kick off the opening of the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost military hospitality chalet with an opening ceremony at 11:00 am that will include the presenta tion of an honorary TPC membership to a wound ed warrior. The Patriots Outpost will provide mili tary guests with compli mentary food and bever ages and a relaxing place to view all of the tourna ment action from 11:30 a.m. to the end of play each day from Wednesday through Sunday. On-site parking is free (for all fans) MondayWednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Fans can take advantage of the Four For Free park ing incentive this year, in which any car with four or more passen gers is admitted free of charge. Fans must have a voucher to park for the Four for Free program. Visit PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS for more information about down loading a free parking voucher. More information about THE PLAYERS is available at PGATOUR.COM/the players. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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Mayport Goes To War The Call-up BeginsFormer Station LibrarianEditors note: The fol lowing article is a reprint of a June 22, 1990 article that chronicles the history of Naval Station Mayport over the past several decades. Beneath an overcast sky, the division stepped out into the line-ofmarch and paraded east on Forsyth Street, which was flanked by a sea of humanity that had turned out to honor the nations dead of previous wars. Stars and Stripes Forever was played by the U.S. Army band fol lowing close behind. Wearing winter blues, white leggings and hats, the men of the division were one of the smart est looking units that Armistice Day parade of 50 years ago. Several of the men were veterans of World War I. They were proud. They were ready. They were United States Navy. They were 92 officers and enlisted personnel marching behind their new commanding offi cer, Lt. Cmdr. Maynard R. Sanders. They were the Organized Second Division from the United States naval Reserve Armory at Southside in Jacksonville. The international situ ation looked none too good on that November day in 1940. Sanders had been called to active duty the month before and assigned to Southside, where he relieved Lt. Cmdr. R. Malcolm Fortson as commanding officer. The recent call-up of the nations organized Reserves and National Guard forces, followed by the Selective Training and Service Act passed by Congress on Sept. 16, the first in peacetime history, was a portent of things to come. Except for two neutral countries, Switzerland and Sweden, all of Europe had fallen before the mighty blitzkrieg of Hitlers air and land forc es. The initial call-up of personnel in the Organized Second Division was selective. Several vacant billets existed that had to be filled prior to the general activation of the Unit. The initial call to active duty was of individuals who were trained and experi enced veterans of World War I, men who were retired from the Navy, or reservists in the unit who had achieved petty officer status in their fields. Many of these men would later find themselves assigned to Mayport as a training cadre shipfitters, radio men, carpenters and elec tricians, security personnel, and last, but not least, subchaser, patrol boat and minesweeper skip pers and crewmen. The selective call-up of individuals began with Chief Petty Officer J.W. Nunn and Petty Officer 1st. Class W. Frank McGrath in August 1940. Both men were immedi ately assigned to recruit ing duty, during which time they enlisted 40 men into the ranks of the Second Division. One of these men, Petty Officer 3rd class Edward C. Hoban, would later dis tinguish himself as one of a five-man gun crew and win the Silver Star. Hoban, Petty Officer 3rd Class T.J. Dixon, Petty Officer 1st Class E.P. Decottes, Petty Officer 3rd Class G.W. Schill, and Coxswain E.B. Sea Gull Newman, all local boys, were called to active duty in December 1940. In the summer of 1941, these men, none of whom served at Mayport, were sent to the Armed Guard Training School. They were reassigned to the Armed Guard forces and were the first of the gun crews in World War II. By spring of 1942, when the U-boats were decimating North Atlantic convoys, the five men were fighting submarines, aircraft and torpedo-laden destroyers of the Third Reich. Chief Petty Officer James N. Williams enlist ed in the Navy in 1915, served in World War I and retired from the Navy on Sept. 7, 1936. On Nov. 26, 1940, Williams was called to active duty, and found himself at Southside the following month. He was reassigned to Mayport in December 1941, where he was stationed throughout the war. Naval Reserve Lt. William M. Gordon received the call in October 1940, and, at first, reported to Naval Air Station Jacksonville. He was reassigned to Mayport as the resident officer in charge of con struction. Reserve Lt. Karl H. Anderson, an electrical engineer, received his marching orders to report to Southside in late 1940. Anderson was reassigned to Mayport in early 1941, where he played a major role in the construc tion of the base. He, too, remained at Mayport for the duration of the war. One day in December 1940, Sanders had 100 officers and enlisted men of the unit march out to the parade field at Southside where he pro ceeded to read the com missioning orders for the new Frontier Section Base at Mayport. Meanwhile, more reservists were being called to active duty and assigned to the Second Division. By the close of 1940, all of the divisions vacant billets had been filled. If war was to come, the unit would be ready. They didnt have long to wait the call-up came on Dec. 26, 1940. The next article in this series on the history of the Naval Station will cover the activities of the divi sion at Southside and the nucleus of men sent to Mayport during the ini tial stages of construction. Time was of the essence. When the attack on Pearl Harbor came a year later, Mayport went to war. -Photo by Leo WittSailors work outside of the U.S. Naval Reserve Armory, home of the Organized Second Division. Many of these men were destined to lose their lives defending their ships against German Submarine and Japanese kamikaze attacks dur ing WWII. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 7

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Construction Community of Practice (CoP) meet ings that help tie con struction field offices together by using best practices and lessons learned in the pursuit of common construction business practices. During this time, Pastorini was inte gral to rebuild ing the Construction Management Branch staff while going through the BRAC process when NAVFAC Southern Division, Navy Public Works Center Jacksonville and the Engineering Field Activity Jacksonville disestablished and NAVFAC Southeast was established, said Doug Dangerfield, NAVFAC Southeast Capital Improvements Business Line Coordinator and Chief Engineer. Pastorinis initiative, professionalism, and dedication to duty reflect great credit upon him and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Navy. NAVFAC is the Systems Command that deliv ers and maintains qual ity, sustainable facilities, acquires and manages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, provides con tingency engineering response, and enables energy security and envi ronmental stewardship. From Page 1ServiceNavy Lays Keel For PCU John WarnerBy Team Submarine Public AffairsThe Navy celebrated the keel laying of PreCommissioning Unit (PCU) John Warner (SSN 785) at Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding (HII -NNS) in Newport News, Va., March 16. The submarine is named for former fiveterm U.S. Senator from Virginia and Secretary of the Navy John Warner. In a time-honored Navy tradition, the initials of Jeanne Warner, the sub marines sponsor, were welded onto a steel plate that will be permanent ly affixed to the subma rines hull. Mrs. Warner is a long-time supporter of military families and is active in many local Virginia-based charities. Making the ceremony unique, the submarines namesake also had his initials welded onto the plate. The Navy and the submarine force are honored to have Mrs. Warner serve as the sponsor for the future USS John Warner, said Capt. David Goggins, Virginia-class program manager. The event marks the first major construction milestone for the submarine and helps forge a special bond between Mrs. Warner, her submarine, and her crew that will last for years to come. John Warners keel lay ing is the submarines first major event since it began construction in March 2010. The submarine is on track to continue the Virginia-class programs trend of delivering sub marines early to their contract delivery dates and meeting the incred ibly stringent standards expected of U.S. subma rines. John Warners keel laying is a special day for our Navy, the Commonwealth of Virginia and our ship building partners, said Rear Adm. David Johnson, Program Executive Officer for Submarines. Building the Virginia class is a team effort and the skill and commitment of the entire shipbuilding team is evident in the first-time quality and operational successes of these frontline platforms. John Warner is the 12th submarine of the Virginia class and the second of the block III construc tion contract. Virginiaclass submarines are built under a unique construc tion contract between HII-NNS and General Dynamics Electric Boat. Warners keel laying is the first of several major shipbuilding milestones for the Virginia-class program in 2013. PCU Minnesotas (SSN 783) commissioning is sched uled for Sept. 7 and PCU North Dakotas (SSN 784) christening is expected this fall. PCU Delaware (SSN 791) will begin con struction Sept. 2. Virginia Class sub marines are designed to dominate the worlds lit toral and deep waters while conducting antisubmarine warfare; antisurface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operation forces support; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance; irregular warfare; and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility, and firepower directly enable them to support five of the six Maritime Strategy Core Capabilities sea control, power projection, forward presence, mari time security, and deter rence. -Photo by MCSN Scott BarnesCommander, Submarine Forces Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Newport News Shipbuilding employee Mathew Shilling, President of Newport News Shipbuilding Matt Mulherin, former Sen. John Warner and his wife Jeanne Warner stand behind a welded steel plate bearing the initials of the submarine's namesake and sponsor during the keel laying ceremony for Pre-Commissioning Unit John Warner (SSN 785). John Warner is the 12th Virginia-class attack submarine and the sixth to be delivered to the U.S. Navy by Newport News Shipbuilding. DoD Requires More Base ClosingsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department has more real estate than it needs in the United States and abroad, a senior DoD official told a House panel March 14. Another round of base realignments and closings should be an essential part of any overall strategy for reshaping the military, John Conger, the acting deputy undersecretary of defense for installa tions and environment, told the House Armed Services Committee in prepared testimony. Force structure is declining relative to that which existed in 2005, thereby continuing to add to aggregate excess capacity, Conger said, noting that the U.S. Army is reducing its active duty end strength from 570,000 to 490,000 by 2020, and the Marine Corps from about 202,000 to 182,000. If we assume our bases were either appropriately loaded or were carrying excess capacity, he said, these force reductions will increase that surplus. In last years budget request, the Pentagon asked Congress for permission to initiate two more rounds of base clos ings, under what is known as BRAC, the Base Realignment and Closure author ity. Conger said the last round of BRAC closings, in 2005, produced $4 billion in annual recurring savings. He stopped short of saying whether a request for another round will be includ ed in the Obama Administrations FY14 budget, which is expected to be deliv ered to Congress in the coming days, but left no doubt he believes there is excess installation capacity. By law, under the BRAC process, an independent commission submits to Congress a list of military installations it believes should be closed or realigned, with lawmakers and the president then required to approve or reject the recom mendations without change. Conger referred to a 2004 DOD study which he said found the military had 24 percent excess capacity and that the BRAC 2005 recommendations reduced capacity by only 3.4 percent. The Defense Department is examining further reductions in U.S. military bases in Europe, where Conger said more than 100 sites have already been returned to host governments since 2003, and where no authority from Congress is required for recommending additional closures. By the end of this year, we plan to conclude with a fully vetted list of options from which the Secretary [of Defense] can make strategic decisions for eliminating excess, preserving and even enhancing our ability to meet stra tegic and operational commitments, Conger said in his prepared remarks. The U.S. Army already plans to close 33 additional sites in Europe associat ed with the decision to reduce brigade combat teams based on the continent. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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exceed your financial hardship. You must pay income tax on the taxable portion of any withdrawal, and you may also be subject to a 10 percent early with drawal penalty tax. If you are a Federal Employees Retirement System participant, you will not receive agency matching contributions. A hardship withdraw al cannot be repaid, so your TSP account is per manently reduced by the amount of your withdraw al. A better option may be taking a loan against your TSP, officials said. Loans can be repaid plus inter est but the account continues to accrue earnings as the loan is paid back. TSP officials recom mend that employees think carefully before decreasing or stopping their traditional TSP con tributions. Those contri butions are subtracted from pre-tax income, and terminating the contri butions could increase income tax liability. Roth TSP contributions are subtracted from employ ees after-tax income, and changes will not affect tax liability. One of the great things about your TSP contri butions, no matter how small, is that the earnings compound over time. If you stop your contributions, even for a short time, youll miss this opportunity altogether, the news release said. Federal Employees Retirement System par ticipants would, in effect, be losing free money by stopping their contribu tions, because matching contributions also would stop, officials said.From Page 1TSPMemorial Held For Fallen Navy DiversBy EOD Group Two Public AffairsMobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 held a memorial ser vice for two navy div ers aboard Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story March 14. The ceremony honored Navy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio, and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., who both died while conducting dive opera tions at Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland last month. Reyher and Harris died while diving at Aberdeen Proving Grounds Underwater Explosion Test Facility also known as the Super Pond, Feb. 26. Cmdr. Michael Runkle, commanding offi cer, MDSU 2, spoke of the challenges Navy Divers face and offered words of comfort to the crowd of more than 400 service members, civilians, fami lies and friends. We come together to honor ND1 James Reyher and ND2 Ryan Harris, two extraordinary men who made the ultimate sacrifice serving as Navy div ers, said Runkle. These heroes and those like them understand and accepted dangers, not for fame or fortune, but for their friends, for their families, and for their country. The memorial includ ed remembrances and sea stories of Reyher and Harris from fellow Navy Divers and concluded with the playing of taps. An investigation to determine the cause of the accident is currently ongoing and is being conducted by Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2. MDSU 2 is an expedi tionary mobile diving unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach, Va. and has suc cessfully conducted sal vage operations to sup port TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, and the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor.-Photo by MC2 Steven C. HoskinsCmdr. Michael Runkle, commanding officer of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, delivers remarks during a memorial service at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story for Navy Diver 1st Class James Reyher and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, from MDSU-2, who died Feb. 26. MDSU-2 is an expeditionary mobile diving unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft Story and has successfully conducted salvage operations to support TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Colombia. Mayport To Remember Battle Of Iwo JimaFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will hold a Battle of Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipients Memorial today (March 21) at the Memorial Park, corner of Maine Street and Moale Avenue. Bob Buehn, adjunct professor with the U.S. Naval War College, retired Navy captain and former chief of Military Affairs with the city of Jacksonville, will be guest speaker at the event. Dress is uniform of the day/appropriate civilian attire. The memorial will begin at 10 a.m. The Battle of Iwo Jima was fought from Feb. 19-March 25, 1945 and was a major operation fought by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps against the Japanese Empire in World War II.DLA Disposition Services Jax Closed For Training By StaffDefense Logistics Agency (DLA) Disposition Services Jacksonville, located on Roosevelt Blvd. near Collins Road, will be closed April 1 12 to prepare for a systems upgrade. The facility is scheduled to reopen April 15 as training continues and the computer system is deployed. The organization is replacing its lega cy computer system, known as DAISY, with its Reutilization Business Integration (RBI) solution. RBI is expected to pro vide real-time asset vis ibility throughout the Defense Logistics Agency supply chain. There is little or no delay between when data is entered and when it is available to other users. Items available for reutiliza tion, transfer, donation and sales will also have increased visibility. Military units that use DLA Disposition Services save their units and tax payers millions of dollars each year. Excess proper ty and material turned in from the military services is first offered for reuse within the Department of Defense at no cost and with free shipping. Remaining items can be transferred to federal agencies or donated to state and local govern ments and other quali fied agencies or used to aid humanitarian relief efforts. Safe and appropriate items can be sold to the general public. DLA Disposition Services also provides disposal solu tions for hazardous waste and other materials. For more information about this closure or questions pertaining to the disposition ser vices available at DLA Jacksonville, contact Leroy Flynn at 542-3411 x110 or at the website http://www.disposition services.dla.mil/. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 9

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USS Farragut Visits MontenegroUSS Farragut Public AffairsThe guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) visited Bar, Montenegro, for a port visit March 11-14. Sailors had the oppor tunity to experience Montenegros culture and spend time engag ing with the community, including sporting events with Montenegrin sail ors, tours of the towns of Perast, Kotor and Skadar Lake, and a tour of Montenegros vineyards. Montenegro is a beautiful country, said Seaman Christian Riendeau. The towns were full of old architec ture, and the mountains were amazing. It really gave me a sense of seren ity. Farragut also sent sev eral of their Sailors to observe a boarding exer cise with Montenegrin sailors. I was extremely impressed by the pro fessionalism and train ing displayed by the Montenegrin navy, said Farraguts command ing officer, Cmdr. Glen B. Quast. I look forward to conducting more joint operations in the future. Farragut Sailors plant ed trees in two commu nity engagement projects while in Bar, one event was held in a sporting complex and the other at a local elementary school. Both projects were joint efforts between the U.S. and Montenegrin navies. Over the three-day port visit, Sailors pro vided shipboard tours for the U.S. Ambassador to Montenegro, the Honorable Sue K. Brown and ambassadors from Hungary, Romania and Slovenia, as well as Montenegrin military and civilians. The tours pro vided visitors the oppor tunity to explore the ship with Sailors while learn ing about the U.S. Navy. Farragut, homeported out of Mayport, Fla., is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security coopera tion efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibil ity. -Photo by MC2 A.J. JonesEnsign Bianca Lovdahl uses a Pelorus to find a relative bearing as she stands the con ning officer watch on the bridge of the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security coopera tion efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.Farragut Sails Thru Suez CanalUSS Farragut Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) transited the Suez Canal departing the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility March 8. Farragut was on station for six months conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom, while serv ing as part of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group then the John. C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group. Farragut also served as an escort for special mission ships and conducted several engagements with coali tion and partner nations. It is incredible to reflect upon the various missions weve completed in the time Farragut was assigned to 5th Fleet, said Cmdr. Glen B. Quast, Farragut commanding officer. I am extremely proud of all of our Sailors for a job well done this deployment, and I know that our ship has had a positive impact on ensur ing the seas remain free and safe for all mariners. In December, Farragut was assigned to be the flagship for Combined Task Force (CTF) 151, a coalition task force con cerned with maritime security and counter-piracy in the region. During this time, the Commander of CTF 151, Pakistani Rear Adm. Muhammad Hisham, and 16 members of his international staff were embarked aboard the U.S. destroy er. Farragut also worked closely with other forc es including the Royal Australian Navy and other regional naval forces to ensure safety of naviga tion throughout the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, and Gulf of Aden. I am very proud of the multifaceted mis sions that we accom plished, said Lt. James Gensheimer, Farragut public affairs officer. During this deployment we proved that a DDG is capable of performing in an array of missions, and we all take pride in the positive impact we made on this very important region of the world. In addition, Farragut gathered information to help predict, identify, and disrupt smuggling and piracy, took part in rescue and assistance oper ations for two vessels in distress, patrolled for sus picious maritime activity, and made port visits to Bahrain; Jebel Ali, U.A.E.; and Muscat, Oman. Farragut is now operat ing in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 11

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive alignment). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and com puters are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13 per pack. 2707204 March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge March 15: Luck O the Irish St. Patricks Day Weekend Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 19: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while sup plies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID to activate ticket at front gate. 2705145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 2705145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orlando From your local ITT office and upgrade for free to a Length of Stay Pass (unlimited vis its within a 14-day con secutive window). FL resi dents can buy a one day admission ticket at their local ITT office and get the rest of the year for free (formerly called a splash pass)! Unlimited visits good until Dec. 31, 2013; some restrictions may apply, upgrades must be done on first visit of stay. Proof of residency must be shown if necessary. 270-5145Liberty CallThe following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 18 March 22: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. March 27: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 22 March 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. March 30: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Kid ZoneMarch 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly recommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 270-5680 -Photo by Paige GnannMCC William Townsend and ET3 Michelle Maltese judge photos taken by youth in the Photography Club at YAC. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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On The MessdeckBogeys SpecialsThursday, March 21 Chicken Caesar Wrap, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 Spinach, Turkey, Avocado Wheat Wrap, $7.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Chicken & Rice Friday, March 22 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, March 25 California Chicken Club Sandwich with a Side, $8.95 Chicken Caesar Wrap, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Beef Noodle Tuesday, March 26 Shrimp Chicken Caesar Wrap with Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Chili Wednesday, March 27 8 Oz NY Strip Steak Teriyaki, Rice, Stir Fried Vegetables & Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $ 10.95 Soup: Potato Bacon Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25. Monday hicken patty sand wich with lettuce, tomato, onion, pick les, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water March 23: Womens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. Allmilitary teams $40, mili tary/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWR Sports/FitnessBig Changes To MWR Fitness ScheduleNaval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Learn basic kicks, punches and balance moves in this calorie burning, sweat producing knock out of a workout. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga Come experience the many physical, emotional and spiritual benefits of developing a yoga prac tice. This class focuses on the basics for those entirely new to yoga; it also provides a review for anyone who wants to deepen their understand ing of alignment and par ticipate in a slower paced yoga regimen. This class focuses on introduc tory poses to stretch and strengthen all major mus cles and joints, as well as develop greater relaxation in the entire body. 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp Take your entire com mand to the next level, oceanfront! This com mand class is packed full of challenging cardio drills, muscular resistance training and explosive intervals. Meets at the Sandbox and can accom modate 200+ person nel, weather permitting. Hooyah Mayport! 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Learn how to train using the unique and innovative TRX Suspension Training System. This class is reserved for those entire ly new to TRX training. This class will result in increased strength, coor dination, balance and CORE-power. Class size limited to 25. Class is held at Mayport Sandbox behind Surfside Fitness Center; weather permit ting. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor This incentive program develops muscu lar strength and power needed to attain the Steel Anchor Award. Structured and progres sive training targets muscles to increase your bench press, squat, and dead-lift. Participants will utilize multiple pieces of free weight, selectorized and plate loaded strength equipment in the gym. Workouts will be tracked to provide motivation, guidance and award determination. Steel Anchor award includes a shirt and plaque recogni tion. 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., RowingMWR Hosts Mens Volleyball TournamentMWR Sports CoordinatorSaturday Castaways hosted their first Mens Beach Volleyball tour nament with nine teams participating in the oneday event. Two person teams from SERMC Divers, NAS JAX, Branch Medical, Coast Guard, and a civilian team entered the tournament. First up were Coast Guard (Hairy Men) versus NAS Jax (Off Constantly). The teams went into a tiebreak set where Hairy Men overcame Off Constantly with a 15-13 final to win the match. Branch Medical team (Berdecia/Mueller) swept the Coast Guard (Dirty Oars) in two straight sets. SERMC (Top Gun) vol leyed up against SERMC (Base Housing) taking on three sets for a 15-10 Top Gun victory. NAS Jax (Hot Tamales) spiked the match in two straight games against Hairy Men. The Civilian (Dirty Seamen) served up their first win against SERMC (Forklifts and Unicorns) in their two set match. Dirty Oars won their next two matches against Off Constantly 15-12 in three sets and Base Housing in two straight sets moving them up in the tourna ment. Berdecia/Mueller came up with their second win, beating Top Gun and sending them into the loser bracket. Dirty Seamen turned up the heat against Hot Tamales beating them in two close matches 22-20 and 21-19. Hairy Men got a streak going after their first loss and beat Forklifts and Unicorns in three sets and Top Gun in two sets, moving them up in the ladder. Hot Tamales ended the winning streaks of the Hairy Men, Dirty Oars to put them into the semifinals against Berdecia/ Mueller. The match ended in two sets with Hot Tamales taking the win and Berdecia/Mueller taking third place. This put Hot Tamales back up against Dirty Seamen in the finals. Both teams played hard and had a lot of long points, but Dirty Seamen finished the tournament undefeated with a final score of 21-14, 21-18 to win the event. The Womens Beach Volleyball tournament is scheduled for March 23. The two-person team event is open to anyone ages 18 and up. If you are interested in participat ing in this exciting event please contact Rita at the gym at 904-270-5451. -Photo courtesy of MWRTeams go head to head during MWRs first Mens Beach Volleyball tournament held March 9. A Womens Beach Volleyball tournament is scheduled for March 23. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 13

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Mayport Runs For Pot O Gold -Photos courtesy of MWRAbove, runners sign up to participate in MWRs Catch A Leprechaun 5K/3k Fun Run Walk on March 12. Right, fast est runner, Anthony Vasquez receives his pot o gold from lepre chaun Kristin Lokken, manager at Beachside Community Center. Each month, MWR sponsors a Fun Run and Walk beginning at 8:10 a.m. on Bailey Avenue, in front of the Mayport Gym. The next run is scheduled for April 9.Navy Looks For Recipes For New CookbookFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Navy is looking for recipes that are easy, healthy and created with Sailors living in bachelor quarters in mind. To inspire a little healthy competition, Navy Nutrition is holding a rec ipe contest to compile an online barracks cookbook officials said March 6. This cookbook con test is meant to be a fun way to encourage Sailors to showcase the creative ways they eat well with limited resources, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, a dietitian with the Navy Physical Readiness Office. Many Sailors are find ing ways to make easy and tasty meals, without a full size kitchen and pan try. We want you to share these ideas. The goal of the contest is to compile a collection of recipes that are com patible with barracks life. A recipe may con sist of cooking foods in a microwave or as simple as assembling ingredients. If you are making it and it is healthful, we want it in the cookbook. Each recipe may only be sub mitted once, but you may enter as many recipes as you like. The rules include a limit on the number of ingredients, pieces of equipment and recipe steps. If you live in the bar racks, you have limited storage space, limited utensils and, in compli ance with housing rules, a microwave for a heat ing element. explained Wallinger. With the recipe con test running in conjunc tion with Navy Nutrition Month, there is also focus on nutritional value. The number of ingre dients will be limited, but there is no limit to the fla vor, herbs and spices are encouraged Wallinger continued. We are just limiting added compo nents such as sodium, which affects many prone to high blood pressure, and fat to keep in line with dietary guidelines. We have included an explanation on how to determine the amount of sodium and fat for each recipe in the rules. Entries to the contest will be accepted in seven categories, which are bro ken down by when you are likely to eat them, for instance; breakfast, sand wich/wrap, snack, vege tables, starchy side, main course (entre) and sweet treat. The contest will run from now until 31 March at 11:59 p.m. Eastern time zone. For more informa tion and contest rules visit http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/ navynutrition/Pages/ default2.aspx.Ask Kate Your Energy ??Dear Kate, How much energy do you think I can really save from habit changes? Signed, Skeptical Dear Skeptical, I hate to say it because it sounds unpa triotic, but frankly, Americans waste a lot of energy. Studies show that 50% of the energy that is delivered to the home via electricity wires or natural gas lines is wasted. For example, how many times have you had lights on in a room with no one in it? Thats waste! So, we find that 10% savings from habit changes is not hard to achieve. Many of our customers actually save 20% or more each month. Sometimes, visitors stay with you or there is a heat wave, but 10 20% average savings over a year is really doable. Time to get started! Kate Do you have a question for Kate? Email her at askkate@watton.com. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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USS Gary, CG, Seize Ton of Cocaine Worth $81 MilUSS Gary Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class Frigate USS Gary (FFG-51) and embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment Team (LEDET) recently seized more than 2,200 lbs of cocaine in the Eastern Pacific Ocean in support of the ongoing Operation Martillo. The seizure is the largest made by Gary while operat ing in U.S, 4th Fleet area of operations and is worth an estimated street value of $81 Million. It was a complex operation involving a law enforce ment boarding, boat and helicopter searches, precision driving, detainee handling, and multiple deck opera tions, but Garys crew proved they were fully capable of handling it and scored a big win, said Garys Navigator, Lieutenant Junior Grade Christian Gotcher. This was a great day for USS Gary. Everyone on board did their part in making this a successful inter diction. Each department helped in one way or anoth er, from finding the suspect vessel to confiscating the contraband. The men and women of Gary will continue to work hard while we are assigned to Fourth Fleet and hopefully get a few more busts before we return to San Diego, said the ships Executive Officer, Lt. Drew Greenlees. Gary is homeported in San Diego, and is currently deployed to Central and South America in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. Fourth Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traf ficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). Overall coordination of counter-drug patrols and surveillance in the Eastern Pacific is done by the Joint Interagency Task Force, South (JIATF-S) a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), headquar tered in Key West, Fla. U.S. maritime law enforcement and the interdiction phase of operations in the region occur under the tactical control of the 11th Coast Guard District headquartered in Alameda, Calif. Operation Martillo is part of the U.S. governments coordinated regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transnational orga nized crime and the U.S. Central America Security Initiative.USS Arlington Makes Port Visit -Photo by Lt. Sonny Lorrius The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Arlington (LPD 24), arrives at Naval Station Mayport. Arlington, the third ship in the U.S. Navy history is named after Arlington, Virginia, the location of the Pentagon, makes a scheduled stop at Mayport Fla., before continuing to Naval Station Norfolk for its commis sioning date of April 6, 2013.Is Your Pet Microchipped?From Mayport Vet ClinicWhat is a microchip? The microchip is a tiny computer chip, similar in size to a grain of rice, pro grammed with an identifi cation number. Once an animal has been has been micro chipped, it can be iden tified through out its life with this unique number. How is the microchip implanted? Microchips are implant ed with a sterile hypoder mic needle beneath the skin between the shoul der blades. Anesthesia is not required or recom mended. How does the micro chip identification work? A special scanner is used to read the identifi cation number. The num ber is displayed on the scanner, and the person reading the scanner can contact the national regis try to find out who the pet belongs to. What are the benefits of microchipping my pet? Lost or stolen pets can be identified and reunited with their owners. Microchips are required for most overseas travel. For more information on microchipping or to schedule an appoint ment for your pet, call the Mayport Veterinary Treatment Facility at 2702004. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 15

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Friday, March 22 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is host ing a Fashion Show and Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. as part of Garden Month 2013. Preview the hottest Spring looks for men and women as Krista Eberle Boutique presents Nicole Miller and Timo Weiland. In addition, there will also be on display sev eral organic or up-cycled pieces by local designers. The fashion show is part of Garden Month 2013, a month long celebra tion of the historic gar dens the Cummer family designed over 100 years ago and that are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Events throughout the month of March include Garden Tours, activities and class es for children and adults, lectures, lunches and a Farm to Table Moonlight Dinner in the Gardens. Cost is $65 for members and $70 for non-members. For more informa tion or to purchase tick ets, please call (904) 8996038 or visit www.cum mer.org. Saturday, March 23 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association #290 will hold a benefit BBQ dinner at 2 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Road. Donations are $8. Take out orders welcome. The dinner is open to the public. For more information, call 246-6855. Why are we fascinated with monsters and the mysterious? They creep into our dreams and thoughts; we seek out souvenirs and keep our eyes on the horizon for a glimpse of them. Come learn about these mysteri ous creatures of the deep with a Park Ranger. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a discussion on the dif ferent types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Wednesday, March 27 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is host ing its first Farm to Table Dinner in the Gardens as part of Garden Month 2013. Join us from 6 to 9 p.m. as we feature locally sourced and sea sonal fresh foods that will showcase some of Jacksonvilles best chefs. The collaboration between North Florida farms, local fisheries, artisans and some of the citys most talented chefs will make for an unforget table dining experience. Cost is $150 for members and $160 for non-mem bers. For more informa tion or to purchase tick ets, please call (904) 8996038 or visit www.cum mer.org. Saturday, March 30 Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m. through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, April 6 and Sunday, April 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Garrison event on. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Wednesday, April 10 Duval County Extension staff are offering a work shop on spring garden ing from 10 a.m. p.m. at Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Rd. Learn about the Good, Bad and Ugly Insects, Landscape Tips and Keeping Tools in Shape. This is a free program. Pre-registration requested to beckyd@coj. net or 904-255-7450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR I, advanced step; she, senior water aerobics and the womens locker room was steamy and abuzz with conversation. I regularly got a chuck le out of listening to the water aerobics group as they pulled on their sup port hose, stretch gabar dine pants and embroi dered tops. All the old women would cackle away about their ailments, medica tions, aches and pains. I always noticed that the salt-and-pepper-haired lady would listen and show concern for her friends self-absorbed grievances, but never complained herself. I thought she was a real class act, and made a mental note to myself to try to become that kind of old lady, rather than the kind that went on and on about things like glucos amine and condroitin. On this particular day, she and I found ourselves simultaneously brush ing our hair at the shared vanity. Are there any decent car washes around here? I asked, after some cur sory remarks about the weather. Well, she started, with that Old World throwback southern accent common in Richmond and Norfolk, I must admit Im not very famil iar with automotive ser vices around here. You see, she went on, my husband died last fall, and dont you know, during our entire 45 years together, I never once put gas in my own car. It took me a minute to process the significance of what this tasteful elderly lady had just said. Wait, you mean he always put gas in the car for you? Why yes, he certainly did, she said, somewhat melancholy. Of course, my imme diate reaction was to get mad at my own husband, who never put gas in my minivan. Just as I was mentally making plans for real doozy of a husbandwife argument, the saltand-pepper-haired lady continued: I never asked him; he wanted to do that for me, so he did. And there were things I always did for him cooking his meals, gar dening, and such. I must say, we loved taking care of each other. I stood, mouth half agape, staring at the lady in the shared mirror. Like a scene from Cocoon, it was as if she had just bestowed upon me the secret to a happy mar riage. Will that be all? the bolt-studded Subway employee said, jolting me back to the present. I realized that making my husbands sandwich every day didnt render me sub servient to him. It was something I did to take care of him because he takes care of me. With a fresh outlook on my marriage and a fresh tuna sub in my hand, I decided that there was no reason for me to dig my heels in. Id continue making my husband sandwiches for the rest of our lives, and hopefully hell endure a heel or two along the way. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2HeelDOD, VA Make Progress In Integrating Health RecordsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense and Veterans Affairs departments are making progress on integrating the health records of service members and veterans, senior government officials told the House Veterans Affairs Committee yesterday. President Barack Obama direct ed the two departments to create a seamless system of integration for medical records. The direction was clear: When a member of the armed forces sepa rates from the military, their elec tronic records, medical, personnel and benefits will transition and remain with them forever, said Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secre tary of defense for health affairs. Woodson detailed the tasks the two departments need to complete. First, they need to integrate health data for individuals into a single electronic health record. Second, they need to modernize the depart ments legacy health information systems. We have made tangible progress on a number of critical elements necessary to achieve our vision on the integrated record, Woodson said. This includes creating a joint health data dictionary, ensuring the two departments use the same precise language to describe health data elements and fields in the combined health record system. It also means moving VA data centers to the Defense Information System Agency. Woodson called this an important step for efficiency in operations and creating a single repository of data. The two depart ments also selected a single DODVA joint single sign-on and contact management solution that accu rately identifies clients in both sys tems, he reported. Finally, Woodson said, the two Cabinet agencies are implementing a joint graphical user interface that displays information from both the DOD and VA systems at the same time. We also completed an initial life-cycle cost estimate for the inte grated electronic health record, Woodson said. The cost estimate was significant. And given the increasingly constrained federal budget environment, our secretary has directed us to re-evaluate the planned approach and consider alternatives that could accelerate timelines for interoperability at reduced cost and reduced risk. The scope of this project is huge. Valerie C. Melvin, the Government Accounting Offices director of information management and tech nology resources issues, said the records are projected to provide coverage to about 9.6 million ser vice members and their beneficia ries and to 6.3 million veterans. VAs and DODs systems have many common business needs for providing health care coverage to these individuals, Melvin told the representatives. Toward this end, the two departments have an exten sive history of working to achieve shared health care resources. Our work has examined the depart ments efforts over the last 15 years to share data between their individ ual systems and to develop interop erable electronic health record capabilities. They have made progress, but problems remain, she acknowl edged. Overall, VA and DOD have relied on a patchwork of initiatives involving their separate health information systems to achieve varying degrees of electronic health record interoperability, Melvin said. Circumstances require decisive action, Woodson said, and delay would only increase the cost and risk of this program. We believe the path we have chosen best serves the depart ments, the special populations whom we jointly are responsible for, and the American taxpayer, he said. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailor, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. March 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. March 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 March 25-29, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. March 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 March 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. FFSC Plans Tea Party For Soon-to-be MomsFrom FFSCThe New Parent Support Program is hosting an English Tea for expectant moms on April 25 from 1-3 p.m. at the base Chapel. The program is honoring these women in rec ognition of Aprils Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is a special opportunity for moms-to-be to meet each other and have a grand day of pamper ing. If you are pregnant, you are invited to come out and enjoy the food, tea and good company. There is no charge for this event, however reg istration is required. There are limited seats avail able. Call FFSC at 270-6600 ext. 1700 to save your seat. Learn How To Market Yourself For Next CareerFrom FFSCThe Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transi tion here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be presented by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Thursday, April 4, 2013, at 9 a.m. in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center. This top-shelf presentation is a great professional development opportunity. Transition is of course ultimately a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retire ment in one to five years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular officer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transi tion, they should be edu cated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contem plating or going through their transitions. This executive sum mary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great fit for any com mander, officer, or senior enlisted supervisor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by retired Capt. Jim OKeefe, deputy direc tor of transition services on MOAAs national staff. The presentation, given annually at over 150 mili tary installations of all Services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-to-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see . It includes compre hensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer percep tions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary nego tiation, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition top ics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. Spouses are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures compan ion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-inone resource for the tran sition process. For further information, contact Stephanie Hoppe at stephanie.hoppe.ctr@ navy.mil for call 904-2706600 ext. 1604. Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday March 25, from 5-7 p.m., the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for active d ser vice members and their immediate families. On the menu is turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, roll and des sert. 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Greater Jax USO Zoo Night Wristbands On Sale Save the date! The Greater Jacksonville USO is having a USO night at the Jacksonville ZOO on Friday, May 3rd. We will begin sell ing wristbands today at noon. Enjoy a night at the Jacksonville Zoo with the family on Friday, May 3rd (see attached flyer). Wristbands are $2.50 each; cash only please. Wristbands are open for purchase by Active/ Retired/Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Wristbands can be pur chased at the NS Mayport USO, NAS Jacksonville USO. Wristbands will be sold today from noon till 1pm at the Off-Crew Building onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Daytona Spring Turket Run Military members receive $2 off a single day ticket or $5 off a two-day ticket for the 24th Annual Daytona Spring Turkey Run, the most popular car show in the country at the Daytona International Speedway on March 23-24. This special offer is valid for 2 admissions per military ID at the ticket booth. See thousand of classic cars and stroll through a massive swap meet. Enjoy actionpacked activities for the whole family. For more information, visit www. daytonabeachcarshows. com. Buy One Get, One Free Ticket Offers Florida Theatre Looking for a deal on a night out? The Florida Theatre is offering buy one, get one free ticket deals on the following shows: March 21-America ($45/40) March 22One Night of Queen with Gary Mullen and The Works ($35) *All tickets must be purchased at the Florida Theatre box office, 128 E. Forsyth, Monday-Friday and day of show, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 904-355-2787, with a Military I.D. www.florida theatre.com USO Yard Sale April 13 Have some things youd like to get off your hands? The Mayport USO is hav ing a yard sale Saturday, April 13th from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Space is limited so call the Mayport USO at (904) 246-2481 today to reserve your table. Tables are $10 for an inside table and $5 for an outside table. Table setup begins at 7 a.m. Hawaiian Tropic Sunscreen Free At The USO Protect your skin this summer. Stop by the NAS Jax and Mayport USO centers for your free bag of Hawaiian Tropic sun screen and after sun prod ucts. Liberty Mutual Legends Of Golf Free Admission For Military Enjoy complimentary admission for all active duty, retirees, reservists, and dependents with military ID to the Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf Tournament in April at The Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa. Military Wives Vendor Show May 4 Join the Mayport USO for another wonderful Military Wives Vendor Show. This event is free and open to the public. There will be raffle tick ets and food for sale. For more information, or to signup as a vendor, email: milwivesbusinessesande vents@gmail.com Disney On Ice TicketsThis Week The Mayport and NAS USO centers is sell ing lower level tickets to the Friday, April 5 per formance of Disney on Ice. Lower level Tickets are $10 each and are cash only. Tickets are open to Active/Retired/ Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Share a great evening with your fam ily. Call the Mayport USO (246-3481) or the NAS USO (778-2821) to reserve your tickets. Sorry, no refunds/exchanges on tickets purchased for the Thursday night perfor mance. USO Annual Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on March 22 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Lots of fun, prizes on course and refreshments and food after completion of play. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. We are lim ited to 30 foursomes. Relay For Life-NS Mayport Join Relay For Life and NS Mayport in fighting cancer. NS Mayport will host its first Relay For Life on April 13-14 with the opening ceremo ny beginning at noon. The theme this year is Seek and Destroy. This event is open to family, friends, coworkers, and those wishing to join the fight against cancer. For more information, visit www.relayforlife.org/ MayportFL. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS USO Looks For New Executive DirectorFrom USOLooking for a recently retired or soon to retire Senior Military Leader to assume the oversight, administra tive and fund raising functions for 3 USO centers of operations, 6-8 full time employees and many volunteers who serve 250,000 service members and families annually. The position requires a visionary who is an energetic self-starter, with substantial relationship management and networking skills and passionate enthusiasm in supporting our active duty and dependent military com munity. This position further requires a high level of comfort in meeting with executives of small and large orga nizations in support of USO func tions and funding needs. Further, this organization is governed both tactically and strategically by a diverse board of community citizens and this position will report directly to this board. Substantial hands-on work in connection with USO spon sored events is a daily requirement of this rewarding position and week end work and long hours should be expected. Specific skill requirements include: Fundraising, Budget devel opment and control, Business plan ning; People management and, pub lic speaking. Salary range of $72,000-$80,000 based on qualifications with bonus potential based on performance. Application must be submit ted to the NAS Jax USO, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Bldg. 1050; P.O. Box 108, Jacksonville, Florida 322120108 by no later than April 15, 2013. Applications may be hand delivered in person or emailed to Mr. Bob Ross at bross@usojax.com. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 17

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The Mayport Commissary will be open on Easter Sunday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. hours only. Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com TSP Cut?American Forces Press ServiceFederal civilian employees could see their Thrift Savings Plan contribu tions reduced if furloughs take effect. The Thrift Savings Plan is a retirement sav ings and investment plan for federal employees and members of the uni formed services, includ ing the Ready Reserve. Employees who have selected their TSP contri bution to be a percentage of their pay will see smaller contributions during the furlough period due to their reduced pay, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Defense Department spokeswom an. For example, an employee who earns $1,000 of basic pay every two-week pay period and contributes 10 percent of it to the TSP would make a $100 TSP contribu tion during a normal pay period. However, if the employee is furloughed for two days per pay period, his or her basic pay would decrease to $800. As a result, the TSP contribution would be $80 per pay period. Employees who con tribute a set dollar amount wont see that amount change with a reduction in pay, HullRyde said. For this rea son, now is a good time to review TSP contribu tion amounts to see if they are appropriate, Thrift Savings Plan officials said. Basic pay reductions also will affect the matching funds contributed by the Defense Department and other agencies. According to a Thrift Savings Plan news release, any reduction in pay will proportionally decrease the matching funds con tribution, regardless of whether employees con tribute a percentage of their pay or a set dollar amount. The furloughs may cause financial hardship for some employees, and in those cases they may consider making a hard ship withdrawal from their TSP fund. Such withdrawals have several restrictions: If you take a hardship withdrawal, you will not beable to make any TSP contributions for six months after having received your funds. You may withdraw only your contributions and the earnings associ ated with them, and the total amount cannot MWR Expo Informs Sailors Of Local Deals -Photo by MC3 Damian BergLt. Luke Wilson, a Chaplain for Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic Ministry Center Mayport, receives information about travel and tours from Jordan Munns during the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Expo and Travel Show on Naval Station Mayport. MWR offers several support and leisure services to active duty military, their families, Department of Defense civilian and contract employees, military retirees and other eligible participants.Civilians May See Reduction If FurloughedSee TSP, Page 9 New Detour For ImprovementsFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will close a portion of Bailey Avenue in front of the Mayport Gym start ing March 25 for curb improvements to the roadway. According to Public Works Supervisory Engineering Technician Milton Harris, the project will include the instal lation of new concrete curbs and sidewalks along the road. Expected to continue through March 29, Harris said the road will be closed to traffic from Bon Homme Richard and just before the Uniform Shop/Subway/Taco Bell parking ingress. The parking area will remain open and accessible, as will the parking area for the Mayport Gym and Oasis Galley. JTA bus service will also be rerouted during the improvement proj ect. There are two stops on Bailey Avenue that are temporarily suspended during the construc tion. Bus riders can catch a JTA bus on Massey Avenue instead. Signs have been posted at the Bailey bus routes to notify riders of the upcoming change. Detour signs will be in place along Bailey Avenue to help direct the traffic flow. Once the construction is com plete, the road will be reopened. Mayport drivers have also been impacted by detours due to construc tion on the first phase of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project. Since January, the intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore Street has been closed to vehicular traffic. The interesection is being reconstructed into a roundabout, a type of circular intersection in which road traffic flows in one direction around a central island. Completion time has been pushed back to April. During the construc tion, the Hanna Park/ Seminole Gate has also been closed for inbound and outbound traffic. Meritorious Civilian Service Award Given To NAVFAC ManagerFrom NAVFACSENaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus presented the Meritorious Civilian Service Award to Bruce Pastorini, senior con struction manager, in front of his family and co-workers March 11. Pastorini was rec ognized for outstand ing performance while serving as NAVFAC Southeasts Senior Construction Manager in the Capital Improvements Business Line Core, Construction Management Branch at Naval Air Station Jacksonville from March 2008 through September 2012. Pastorini devel oped a plan to provide the required training to NAVFAC Southeasts construction managers (CMs) and construc tion engineering techni cians (ETs), developing a cooperative agree ment with the University of North Florida (UNF) to teach the eight hour Construction Quality Management for Contractors (CQMC) course, which is a requirement for the principals of NAVFACs Construction Contractor Partners as well as our CMs and ETs, said Capt. Christopher Kiwus, NAVFAC commanding officer. Pastorini also facili tated the current Egg Hunt At Base ChapelFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport Chapel is inviting Mayport families to enjoy a day of food, games and Easter cel ebration on March 30 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Chapel grounds on Massey Avenue. The Easter Bunny will be hopping in to visit with children and take photos. There will also be a Moonwalk, crafts, games and free food available at the event. There will be an Easter egg hunt for children ages infant through 10 years old starting at 2 p.m. This years event will take the place of MWRs Easter Eggstravaganza which was cancelled. -Photo by MC1 Erica R. GardnerBruce B. Pastorini, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast senior construction manager is presented the Meritorious Civilian Service Award by NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus March 11. Hydrant TestingFrom StaffFirst Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services, Mayport Division will conduct annual inspec tion and testing of fire hydrants in base hous ing from April 1-19, except weekends. Housing residents are encouraged to refrain from perform ing household laundry during these periods to preclude accidental damage to clothing as a result of disturbed sedi ment in the water sys tem. Inspection dates and times for each gen eralized housing area are: Officer Housing (housing east of Lake Wonderwood) 1-5 April 1-5, 1-4 p.m. Enlisted Housing (housing west of Lake Wonderwood) April 8-12, 1-4 p.m. Ribault Bay Housing April 15-19, 1-4 p.m. If you have any ques tions, contact the duty Assistant Fire Chief at 904-270-5334 ext. 19.See Service, Page 8

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Welcome to Subway, may I take your order? Sure, Ill take a tuna on wheat, toasted, please. While the polite, but pierced teen prepared my favorite sub, I chatted with my husband, who was next up. So Hon, did you like that new club deli meat I put in your lunch today? That sandwich had meat in it? he asked sar castically. Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesSpring has sprung! We are finally getting some nice weather, our yards desperately need help, and spring fever is about to be caught by students all over. Is your child starting to show signs? Forgetting to do his homework? Didnt know he had a test on Chapter 21? Tardies and absences are increasing? Hmm! Sounds like a serious case of spring fever. Are you at your wits end? How can you deal with this? Of course, as a parent, you recognize the value and importance of education to your childs future. Spring fever can be a complicated issue, however, and generally no amount of lecturing, pleading, or threatening will change a childs point of view. First and fore most, then, you need to understand the causes of the disease. Causes of the Disease 1. Tiredness With the time change and the longer days, stu dents may not be get ting the rest they really need to be successful in school. Students today are involved in a myriad of activities in addition to school, including youth sports; dance, music, or karate classes; cheerlead ing, band, or JROTC practice; faith-based youth activities; and home computer games. Older stu dents work many hours a week to assist with car and insurance payments. With physical tiredness comes weariness with the same old school stuff. 2. Boredom It has been a long year. Homework, handouts, and hurry to get them all done correctly and on time week after week have taken their toll. After 27 weeks of school doing the same thing over and over with no end, they believe, in sight, they begin to think, Whats the point? 3. Frustration Students who have been making Ds and Fs all year and cant seem to change that test grade or report card grade no matter how hard they study or how many extra credit assignments they turn in are more apt to tune out, stop trying, and fail. Their somewhat positive attitude turns to frustration this time of year since they keep getting the same grade over and over. Parents and teachers may pile on saying, Why dont you study harder? Why dont you ask for help when that may be exactly what the students thought they were doing. Cures for the Disease 1. Provide an Encouraging and Secure Home Environment Children need to feel that their parents value them and their efforts. To do this you need to have some quiet no yelling or blaming dialogue about the problem. During the discussion you will prob ably hear many of the above excuses: tiredness, boredom, and frustra tion. Be an active listener. Genuinely express sym pathy for the causes. You just may be in those same shoes at your job! 2. Work Together to Develop a Plan Find an area in which your child remains moti vated and focus on it. If he can determine why he still loves computer games or dancing or playing base ball, brainstorm with him to figure out what aspects of that activity continue to motivate him. Perhaps you and your child will be able to formulate a recipe for success and apply the ingredients to school. For homework help consider using www.tutor.com/ navy This website is free for active duty military and their dependents. A carefully screened tutor will assist your child with any type of homework live. 3. Use Rewards Carefully Students who possess intrinsic motivation take on activities because of the feelings of enjoyment and accomplishment they evoke. Students who pos sess extrinsic motivation perform to gain a reward or avoid a punishment. Students with extrinsic motivation will gener ally put out the minimal amount of effort to com plete tasks in the easiest way possible. In addition, external motivation only exists as long as there is external compensation. In other words, extrin sic motivation is likely to result in limited prog ress that vanishes when the reward disappears. So be careful when offering rewards for school suc cess. 4. Avoid Power Struggles Choose your battles wisely. Make a clearcut list of unacceptable behaviors and result ing consequences. For instance, a failing grade in a class might result in the loss of a favorite privilege until the grade is raised. Resist the temptation to ground your child indefi nitely or to take away all prized possessions. If you do not follow through on the promised conse quences, your child will quickly realize that you are not serious about school success and he will remain unchanged. Students do want to succeed, but as children they arent always able to see the light at the end of the tunnel. With patience and understanding, you can help your child work through a case of spring fever and enjoy academic success. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingMotivating The Student With Spring FeverHomelessness is a very complex issue to under stand. According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness (TNAEH), some of the variables of homelessness include poverty, lack of affordable housing, and mental/ physical disabilities. To fully appreciate this epidemic it should be understood that there are 633,782 people experiencing homelessness each night in the United States. An analysis of this figure reveals that 233,403 are families and 392,945 are individuals. Veterans comprise approximately 10 percent, or 62,000, of the home less population in our country. Additionally, 16 percent of the homeless population is considered chronically homeless, which involves either long-term and/or repeat ed bouts of homelessness coupled with disability (physical or mental). As you can see, this issue affects families, youth, and veterans. Having nowhere to live is a very serious issue in our country. It is an issue that should provoke us to help anyway we can. It should also mute our complaints and aid us in adopting a heart of thanksgiving and an attitude of content ment. There is a spiritual parallel/lesson that flows from our Messiahs life concerning this issue of homelessness. Luke 9:57-58 reads, As they were walking along the road, a man said to him, I will follow you wherever you go. Jesus replied, Foxes have dens and birds have nests, but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head. In Matthew 8:18-19, which is the parallel of this passage, we learn that the man reported by Luke was actually a teacher of the law. Nonetheless, both Gospels report that the Son of Man has no place to lay his head. The key to interpreting what Jesus said begins first with the examination of what provoked him to speak. If you look closely at this passage, you will notice that prior to Jesus making the statement about having no place to lay his head, a man person/teacher of the law stated that he would follow Jesus wherever he would go. I am not sure if the man was caught up in the moment, but there does not appear to be any justification for his proc lamation. To his proclamation, Jesus response is unusu al. Notice that he does not say, Well thank you or I am glad to know you will be here with me. Instead, Jesus says to this person, you need to know that there is a hefty price tag attached to those words. In other words, following Jesus could mean a life of challenges and discomfort. The good news is Jesus has promised to be with us every step of the way (Hebrews 13:5). Additionally, the larger context of this passage suggests another impor tant aspect of following Jesus (Luke 9:59-62). That is, once we decide to follow Jesus, we must guard our hearts and minds against distractions. Do you currently have any distractions in your life? Here are a few questions to help you contemplate and identify possible distractions. Are there any comforts in my life precluding me from fol lowing Jesus? What about conveniences? How about recent choices? Once we decide to fol low Jesus, then we must commit to staying the course of our faith. Thus, becoming a child of God begins with simple faith but matures as we spend time in prayer and the Word of God. Militarily speaking, Gods end state for us is disciple ship (Matthew 28:19).Chap Calvin B. Gardner Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSWhat are you talking about? I made you a nice big sandwich with that new club deli meat I got at the commissary. You know, the one made of both ham and turkey with bacon wrapped around it. Geeze, I thought youd like it! I declared incred ulously. Well, Hon, it was kind of hard to taste anything inside the sandwich because the strong flavor of the two heels of bread you gave me overpowered everything else. I grumbled, but he was right. After making the kids sandwiches that morning, I noticed that two heels of bread were left. I couldve opened a new loaf and thrown the heels away, but my mother had instilled a certain frugality in me. I thought my husband would appreciate the fact that I was not wasting two perfectly edible bread heels that his hard-earned military salary had pur chased. Besides, I thought, he must be grateful that Im the kind of wife that gets up every morning and packs him a nice lunch, right? What would you like on your tuna, Maam? As I selected toppings that were salty, sour, crunchy and spicy, all I could taste was bitterness. Thats it, I ruminated. He can make his own stinking sandwiches from now on. As my sub was being salt-and-peppered, I remembered a conversa tion Id had with a saltand-pepper-haired lady in the YMCA locker room two tours ago in Virginia. We had just finished our morning exercise classes To Heel, Or Not To Heel, That Is The SandwichLenten, Easter Schedule At ChapelRoman Catholic Schedule Stations of the Cross: All Fridays of Lent (Small Chapel), 6:30 p.m., followed by a potluck in the Fellowship Hall Passion (Palm) Sunday, March 24: Mass at 8:45 a.m. Holy Thursday, March 28: Mass of the Lords Supper at 7:30 p.m. Good Friday, March 29: Good Friday of the Lords Passion at 3 p.m. with fish fry following service Holy Saturday, March 30: Easter Vigil Mass at 8 p.m. Easter Sunday, March 31: Resurrection of the Lord Mass at 7 a.m. at Sea Gull Pavilion with breakfast fol lowing at Oasis Galley; Mass at the Main Chapel at 9 a.m. Protestant Schedule Palm Sunday, March 24 at 10:30 a.m. Maundy Thursday, March 28 at 6 p.m. Good Friday Service, March 29 at noon Easter Sunrise Service, March 31 behind Ocean Breeze at 7 a.m. with a breakfast following at Oasis Galley Easter morning service and Cantata at 10:30 a.m. There will be a Spring Festival & Easter Egg Hunt on March 30 at 11 a.m. There will be an egg hunt for children ages infant through 10 years old starting at 2 p.m.See Heel, Page 16

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Celebrating 2013 Womens History MonthNavy Office of Womens PolicyThe Navy joins the nation in celebrating Womens History Month during the month of March, as announced in Naval Administrative message 039/13, released Feb. 22. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contri butions of women to our Navy and nation by cel ebrating the national Womens History Month theme, Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) through pro grams, exhibits, publica tions, and participation in military and community events. One Navy STEM pio neer includes Grace Murray Hopper, who wanted to put her Ph.D. in Mathematics to use for her nation in the midst of World War II. In 1943, she joined the Naval Reserves and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1944. During World War II she worked at the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University and at the end of the war joined the Harvard faculty. Retiring as a rear admiral, Hopper, was recog nized as a pioneer com puter programmer, the co-inventor of Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL), and for coining the term bug for computer malfunc tions. Hopper was bur ied at Arlington National Cemetery in 1992. USS Hopper (DDG 70) was commissioned as her namesake in 1997; this was only the second Navy warship to be named after a woman. Also during World War II, the Navy launched the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) program. Along with Hopper, more than 85,000 WAVES worked in STEM fields as air traffic controllers, cryptologists, draftsmen, meteorologists, and translators during World War II. In December 2012, history was made in the Navys nuclear commu nity when Lieutenant Junior Grade Marquette Leveque, assigned to the gold crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), and Lieutenants Junior Grade Amber Cowan and Jennifer Noonan of USS Maine (SSBN 741) blue crew became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in submarines and receive their Submarine Warfare Insignia, also known as dolphins. Today in the Navy, female officers fill 10 per cent of STEM positions, including engineering duty officers and infor mation warfare profes sionals. Female enlisted Sailors make up 22 per cent of the cryptology and intelligence community and 21 percent of opera tional ratings, including aviation warfare systems operators and sonar technicians. Female Sailors continue to excel both ashore and afloat, serving in various STEM related fields. More than 54,000 active duty women and more than 10,000 female Reservists are serving in the Navy. They make up 17.3 percent of the force and make indispensable con tributions to our mission and operations. Nearly 59,000 women serve in a wide range of special ties as Navy civilians. The current Navy Total Force includes 33 active and Reserve female flag officers, 67 female senior executive service mem bers, 56 female com mand master chiefs, and 6 female command senior chiefs leading from the front. Currently, the top three highest-ranking female officers in the Navy are Vice Adm. Carol Pottenger, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, and Vice Adm. Robin Braun. Pottenger, a sur face warfare officer, was one of the first women selected for sea duty and went on to become the third commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. Howard, also a surface warfare officer, was the first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took com mand of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), and in 2012 she became the first African-American woman to receive a third star in flag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Braun, a career naval aviator and for mer commanding officer of VR-48, has more than 5,800 flight hours in Navy aircraft. The top three highestranking female enlisted leaders in the Navy are Fleet Master Chief Joann Ortloff, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, and Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth. Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys first female African American Fleet Master Chief when she assumes her position as the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) fleet master chief later this month. The Navys 67-strong Senior Executive Service also has a strong STEM presence amongst its seniormost women. Carla Lucchino, Department of Navy Assistant for Administration is the top female civilian SES. Steffanie Easter, execu tive director for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office, holds a bache lors degree in chemical engineering and mas ters degree in engineer ing management. Easter is currently leading the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program, the Department of Defenses initiative for defining affordable and sustainable fifth-genera tion strike aircraft. For more information about the history of women and their numerous contributions to the Navy, visit http:// www.history.navy.mil/ special%20highlights/ women/women-index. htm. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Navy Office of Womens Policy, visit http://www. npc.navy.mil/AboutUs/ BUPERS/WomensPolicy. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity U.S. Navy PhotoMayports first WAVES, Lt. Anita Withrell and Ensign Irene Poole, helped pave the way for women in the military. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 6th Fleet Commander Visits Hu City USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. 6th Fleet visited Sailors aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), USS Hu City (CG 66) and the German navy frigate FGS Hamburg (F220), while the ships were conducting operations in the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility March 12. Vice Adm. Frank C. Pandolfes visit to Hamburg included meeting with the ships commanding officer, German navy Cmdr. Ralf Kuchler, and touring the ship. Having a German ship accompany an American strike group on deployment is a unique event. It is a rare honor for me to visit a German warship at sea conducting its mission, said Pandolfe. Your ship is an integral part of this carrier strike group. We have tremen dous faith and confidence in the capabilities of this ship, and we are very proud to sail alongside you. Pandolfe also vis ited Sailors aboard Eisenhower. After meet ing with Rear Adm. Mike Manazir, commander, Carrier Strike Croup (CSG) 8, and senior lead ership, he addressed the crew. I thank you for your successful engagements in France and Spain, where you represented the Navy very well, said Vice Adm. Pandolfe. We wish you every success as you sail forward to 5th Fleet and look forward to your return. During his visit to Hu City, Pandolfe addressed the ships wardroom and chiefs mess, and spoke to the crew from the bridge, where he expressed his gratitude for the crews hard work on backto-back deployments. Hu City, along with Eisenhower, had returned early from a previously scheduled nine-month deployment in order to make preparations to redeploy in late February for additional operations in the U.S. 5th and U.S. 6th Fleet. We appreciate your hard work in getting ready for the deployment, said Pandolfe. No strike group is more capable or more prepared. Dwight D. Eisenhower, homeported in Norfolk, Va., and Hu City home ported in Mayport, Fl., along with the German frigate FGS Hamburg, from Kiel, Germany, are on a scheduled deploy ment in support of mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Rear Adm. Mike Manazir, right, commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, speaks with Charest during a visit to the ship. Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) switch nozzle handlers during a mock fire on the flight deck during damage control crash and salvage training. Command Master Chief of USS Hu City (CG 66), Master Chief Raymond F. Charest (left), discusses mission readiness with Sailors after a division uniform inspection on the ships fantail. -Photos by MC2 Matthew R. ColeVice Adm. Frank Pandolfe, commander of the U.S. 6th Fleet, meets with Sailors assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) in the ships pilothouse during a tour of the ship. Hu City is on a deployment to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Quartermaster 2nd Class Armen Taymazyan assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) uses a parallel motion protector to plot a course update while on the bridge. Seaman Anna M. Collins assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) steers the ship as it steams through the Atlantic ocean.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 5 Sailors fight a mock fire on the flight deck during damage control crash and salvage training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Damage Controlman 1st Class Larry D. Ellington instructs Sailors on the flight deck how to check for hot spots on a downed helicopter during damage control crash and salvage training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) fight a mock fire on the flight deck during damage control crash and salvage training. Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) fight a mock fire on the flight deck during damage controal crash and salvage training. Seaman Brenti L. Franklin (left) and Seaman Moses Aseda assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) continue ship efforts preservation by painting on the forecastle. Sailors assigned to the crash and salvage team aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) rescue survivors of a simulated downed SH-60B helicopter on the ship's flight deck during a drill. Hull Technician 2nd Class William Shevlin, assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), puts on crash and salvage gear in the hangar bay during a drill. Seaman Natt K. Slober uses a disc sander to remove rust and chipped paint before repainting a bulkhead aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Seaman Caleb Duarte assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) uses binoculars observing the surrounding area while standing watch on the bridgewing.

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Early Career Transition Program SuspendedFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Navy announced suspension of the Early Career Transition Program (ECTP) in a Navy message released March 14. According to NAVADMIN 063/13 Navy Personnel Command (NPC) will no longer accept requests to tran sition to the Selected Reserve under this pro gram. Requests submitted and received at NPC prior to March 14 will be accepted and processed. Requests received after March 14 will be returned with out action. Previously approved requests are unaffected. Established in 2011, ECTP allowed active duty and Full Time Support (FTS) Sailors with at least two, but less than 16 years of service to leave active duty and affiliate with the Selected Reserve to finish out the remainder of their Navy contract. It provided Sailors an early transition oppor tunity to continue their Naval service and pursue educational or personal goals at a time when the Navy was experiencing record high retention and low attrition. When the program was activated, active duty Navy had 35 over manned ratings while the Selected Reserve had 22 undermanned ratings, so the ECTP helped reduce overmanning in the active component while fill ing the Selected Reserve ranks with highly trained and qualified Sailors. Since 2011, the Navy has made significant progress in balancing the force, eliminating the current need for the ECTP voluntary early separation program. ECTP may be reinstated in the future as required. For more information, read the NAVADMIN 063/13 at the NPC website www.npc.navy.milCountry Singer Dierks Bentley Helps Honor Military For THE PLAYERS ChampionshipFrom THE PLAYERS ChampionshipContinuing a PGA TOUR tradition of honor ing men and women in uniform, THE PLAYERS Championship unveiled a full slate of activities and programs that will take place during the 2013 event as part of Birdies for the Brave, a military out reach initiative proudly supported by the PGA TOUR. Highlighting the mili tary appreciation activi ties in the tradition of years past, THE PLAYERS announced, along with Capitol Records Nashville, that country music star Dierks Bentley will give a special performance on Wednesday, May 8, dur ing Military Appreciation Day, as the tournament returns to THE PLAYERS Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass, May 6-12. On Wednesday, May 8, Bentley will be a part of the Military Appreciation Day ceremony, this year themed, A Salute to the United States Navy. The program on the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse Lawn will include pag eantry by military per sonnel, performance by the Jacksonville Childrens Chorus, as well as remarks from PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem and other dignitaries. Multi-platinum selling singer/songwriter Dierks Bentley has forged his own brand of country music, combining clas sic country songwriting, influences of bluegrass instrumentation and the energy of rock n roll. Bentleys sixth studio album, Home, released in 2012, debuted at No. 1 and has spawned three consecutive chart-top ping hits, marking 10 career No. 1 songs for Bentley as a singer and songwriter. His five pre vious studio albums have sold more than 5 mil lion copies, garnered 11 GRAMMY nominations and earned him an invitation to join the Grand Ole Opry. Bentley is current ly out on the road with Miranda Lambert for their Miranda Lambert and Dierks Bentley: Locked & Reloaded Tour through October. In addition to the per formance, THE PLAYERS will provide all active duty, retired, and Reserve military personnel along with their dependents with complimentary admission to the tour nament all week. THE PLAYERS also offers dis counted admission to veterans. Military mem bers who are interested in the complimentary admission should go to PGATOUR.COM/THE PLAYERS and click on the ticket link for instructions about how to gain com plimentary access to the tournament, which is a different process than the past. Non-career military veterans should also log on to PGATOUR.COM/ THE PLAYERS and find instructions about how to obtain discounted tickets to the tournament. Also as part of Birdies for the Brave, THE PLAYERS will once again host an Operation Shower group baby shower for 30 military moms-tobe whose spouses are deployed members of the U.S. military on Saturday, May 4, from 24 p.m. in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost located on the 18th fairway of THE PLAYERS Stadium Course. This private event will feature lunch, an opportunity for the moms to share stories and gain comfort from other mili tary moms who are experiencing pregnancy dur ing deployment, and the highlight of the event, the distribution of Operation Showers signature Showers In A Box -gifts of high-quality products for the babies and moms that have been donated by sponsors and supporters. Holly Finchem, wife of PGA TOUR Commssioner Tim Finchem, and Tabitha Furyk, wife of PGA TOUR player Jim Furyk, will be hosting the event, with Navy Admiral Jack Scorby, Commander of Navy Region Southeast, and his wife, Chris, among the special guests who will be attending. On Sunday, May 5, THE PLAYERS will host the second annual Military Veterans Job Fair from noon to 3 p.m. in The Turn hospital ity structure located to players left on the hill next to the 18th green of THE PLAYERS Stadium Course. Conducted in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition, the event is open to active duty, retired and Reserve military members, military spouses and veterans, with 50 local companies expected to participate -doubling the number who participated in 2012. Companies with hiring opportunities who are interested in participating in the job fair may contact Bill Hickey at (904) 363-4651 or bill.hickey@ incepture.com. On Wednesday, Military Appreciation Day, THE PLAYERS will kick off the opening of the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost military hospitality chalet with an opening ceremony at 11:00 am that will include the presenta tion of an honorary TPC membership to a wounded warrior. The Patriots Outpost will provide military guests with compli mentary food and bever ages and a relaxing place to view all of the tourna ment action from 11:30 a.m. to the end of play each day from Wednesday through Sunday. On-site parking is free (for all fans) MondayWednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Fans can take advantage of the Four For Free park ing incentive this year, in which any car with four or more passen gers is admitted free of charge. Fans must have a voucher to park for the Four for Free program. Visit PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS for more information about down loading a free parking voucher. More information about THE PLAYERS is available at PGATOUR.COM/the players. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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Mayport Goes To War The Call-up BeginsFormer Station LibrarianEditors note: The fol lowing article is a reprint of a June 22, 1990 article that chronicles the history of Naval Station Mayport over the past several decades. Beneath an overcast sky, the division stepped out into the line-ofmarch and paraded east on Forsyth Street, which was flanked by a sea of humanity that had turned out to honor the nations dead of previous wars. Stars and Stripes Forever was played by the U.S. Army band fol lowing close behind. Wearing winter blues, white leggings and hats, the men of the division were one of the smart est looking units that Armistice Day parade of 50 years ago. Several of the men were veterans of World War I. They were proud. They were ready. They were United States Navy. They were 92 officers and enlisted personnel marching behind their new commanding offi cer, Lt. Cmdr. Maynard R. Sanders. They were the Organized Second Division from the United States naval Reserve Armory at Southside in Jacksonville. The international situ ation looked none too good on that November day in 1940. Sanders had been called to active duty the month before and assigned to Southside, where he relieved Lt. Cmdr. R. Malcolm Fortson as commanding officer. The recent call-up of the nations organized Reserves and National Guard forces, followed by the Selective Training and Service Act passed by Congress on Sept. 16, the first in peacetime history, was a portent of things to come. Except for two neutral countries, Switzerland and Sweden, all of Europe had fallen before the mighty blitzkrieg of Hitlers air and land forc es. The initial call-up of personnel in the Organized Second Division was selective. Several vacant billets existed that had to be filled prior to the general activation of the Unit. The initial call to active duty was of individuals who were trained and experi enced veterans of World War I, men who were retired from the Navy, or reservists in the unit who had achieved petty officer status in their fields. Many of these men would later find themselves assigned to Mayport as a training cadre shipfitters, radio men, carpenters and electricians, security personnel, and last, but not least, subchaser, patrol boat and minesweeper skip pers and crewmen. The selective call-up of individuals began with Chief Petty Officer J.W. Nunn and Petty Officer 1st. Class W. Frank McGrath in August 1940. Both men were immedi ately assigned to recruit ing duty, during which time they enlisted 40 men into the ranks of the Second Division. One of these men, Petty Officer 3rd class Edward C. Hoban, would later dis tinguish himself as one of a five-man gun crew and win the Silver Star. Hoban, Petty Officer 3rd Class T.J. Dixon, Petty Officer 1st Class E.P. Decottes, Petty Officer 3rd Class G.W. Schill, and Coxswain E.B. Sea Gull Newman, all local boys, were called to active duty in December 1940. In the summer of 1941, these men, none of whom served at Mayport, were sent to the Armed Guard Training School. They were reassigned to the Armed Guard forces and were the first of the gun crews in World War II. By spring of 1942, when the U-boats were decimating North Atlantic convoys, the five men were fighting submarines, aircraft and torpedo-laden destroyers of the Third Reich. Chief Petty Officer James N. Williams enlist ed in the Navy in 1915, served in World War I and retired from the Navy on Sept. 7, 1936. On Nov. 26, 1940, Williams was called to active duty, and found himself at Southside the following month. He was reassigned to Mayport in December 1941, where he was stationed throughout the war. Naval Reserve Lt. William M. Gordon received the call in October 1940, and, at first, reported to Naval Air Station Jacksonville. He was reassigned to Mayport as the resident officer in charge of con struction. Reserve Lt. Karl H. Anderson, an electrical engineer, received his marching orders to report to Southside in late 1940. Anderson was reassigned to Mayport in early 1941, where he played a major role in the construc tion of the base. He, too, remained at Mayport for the duration of the war. One day in December 1940, Sanders had 100 officers and enlisted men of the unit march out to the parade field at Southside where he pro ceeded to read the com missioning orders for the new Frontier Section Base at Mayport. Meanwhile, more reservists were being called to active duty and assigned to the Second Division. By the close of 1940, all of the divisions vacant billets had been filled. If war was to come, the unit would be ready. They didnt have long to wait the call-up came on Dec. 26, 1940. The next article in this series on the history of the Naval Station will cover the activities of the divi sion at Southside and the nucleus of men sent to Mayport during the ini tial stages of construction. Time was of the essence. When the attack on Pearl Harbor came a year later, Mayport went to war. -Photo by Leo WittSailors work outside of the U.S. Naval Reserve Armory, home of the Organized Second Division. Many of these men were destined to lose their lives defending their ships against German Submarine and Japanese kamikaze attacks during WWII. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 7

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Construction Community of Practice (CoP) meet ings that help tie con struction field offices together by using best practices and lessons learned in the pursuit of common construction business practices. During this time, Pastorini was inte gral to rebuild ing the Construction Management Branch staff while going through the BRAC process when NAVFAC Southern Division, Navy Public Works Center Jacksonville and the Engineering Field Activity Jacksonville disestablished and NAVFAC Southeast was established, said Doug Dangerfield, NAVFAC Southeast Capital Improvements Business Line Coordinator and Chief Engineer. Pastorinis initiative, professionalism, and dedication to duty reflect great credit upon him and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Navy. NAVFAC is the Systems Command that deliv ers and maintains qual ity, sustainable facilities, acquires and manages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, provides con tingency engineering response, and enables energy security and envi ronmental stewardship. From Page 1ServiceNavy Lays Keel For PCU John WarnerBy Team Submarine Public AffairsThe Navy celebrated the keel laying of PreCommissioning Unit (PCU) John Warner (SSN 785) at Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding (HII -NNS) in Newport News, Va., March 16. The submarine is named for former fiveterm U.S. Senator from Virginia and Secretary of the Navy John Warner. In a time-honored Navy tradition, the initials of Jeanne Warner, the sub marines sponsor, were welded onto a steel plate that will be permanent ly affixed to the subma rines hull. Mrs. Warner is a long-time supporter of military families and is active in many local Virginia-based charities. Making the ceremony unique, the submarines namesake also had his initials welded onto the plate. The Navy and the submarine force are honored to have Mrs. Warner serve as the sponsor for the future USS John Warner, said Capt. David Goggins, Virginia-class program manager. The event marks the first major construction milestone for the submarine and helps forge a special bond between Mrs. Warner, her submarine, and her crew that will last for years to come. John Warners keel lay ing is the submarines first major event since it began construction in March 2010. The submarine is on track to continue the Virginia-class programs trend of delivering sub marines early to their contract delivery dates and meeting the incred ibly stringent standards expected of U.S. subma rines. John Warners keel laying is a special day for our Navy, the Commonwealth of Virginia and our ship building partners, said Rear Adm. David Johnson, Program Executive Officer for Submarines. Building the Virginia class is a team effort and the skill and commitment of the entire shipbuilding team is evident in the first-time quality and operational successes of these frontline platforms. John Warner is the 12th submarine of the Virginia class and the second of the block III construc tion contract. Virginiaclass submarines are built under a unique construc tion contract between HII-NNS and General Dynamics Electric Boat. Warners keel laying is the first of several major shipbuilding milestones for the Virginia-class program in 2013. PCU Minnesotas (SSN 783) commissioning is sched uled for Sept. 7 and PCU North Dakotas (SSN 784) christening is expected this fall. PCU Delaware (SSN 791) will begin con struction Sept. 2. Virginia Class sub marines are designed to dominate the worlds lit toral and deep waters while conducting antisubmarine warfare; antisurface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operation forces support; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance; irregular warfare; and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility, and firepower directly enable them to support five of the six Maritime Strategy Core Capabilities sea control, power projection, forward presence, mari time security, and deter rence. -Photo by MCSN Scott BarnesCommander, Submarine Forces Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Newport News Shipbuilding employee Mathew Shilling, President of Newport News Shipbuilding Matt Mulherin, former Sen. John Warner and his wife Jeanne Warner stand behind a welded steel plate bearing the initials of the submarine's namesake and sponsor during the keel laying ceremony for Pre-Commissioning Unit John Warner (SSN 785). John Warner is the 12th Virginia-class attack submarine and the sixth to be delivered to the U.S. Navy by Newport News Shipbuilding. DoD Requires More Base ClosingsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department has more real estate than it needs in the United States and abroad, a senior DoD official told a House panel March 14. Another round of base realignments and closings should be an essential part of any overall strategy for reshaping the military, John Conger, the acting deputy undersecretary of defense for installa tions and environment, told the House Armed Services Committee in prepared testimony. Force structure is declining relative to that which existed in 2005, thereby continuing to add to aggregate excess capacity, Conger said, noting that the U.S. Army is reducing its active duty end strength from 570,000 to 490,000 by 2020, and the Marine Corps from about 202,000 to 182,000. If we assume our bases were either appropriately loaded or were carrying excess capacity, he said, these force reductions will increase that surplus. In last years budget request, the Pentagon asked Congress for permission to initiate two more rounds of base closings, under what is known as BRAC, the Base Realignment and Closure author ity. Conger said the last round of BRAC closings, in 2005, produced $4 billion in annual recurring savings. He stopped short of saying whether a request for another round will be included in the Obama Administrations FY14 budget, which is expected to be deliv ered to Congress in the coming days, but left no doubt he believes there is excess installation capacity. By law, under the BRAC process, an independent commission submits to Congress a list of military installations it believes should be closed or realigned, with lawmakers and the president then required to approve or reject the recommendations without change. Conger referred to a 2004 DOD study which he said found the military had 24 percent excess capacity and that the BRAC 2005 recommendations reduced capacity by only 3.4 percent. The Defense Department is examining further reductions in U.S. military bases in Europe, where Conger said more than 100 sites have already been returned to host governments since 2003, and where no authority from Congress is required for recommending additional closures. By the end of this year, we plan to conclude with a fully vetted list of options from which the Secretary [of Defense] can make strategic decisions for eliminating excess, preserving and even enhancing our ability to meet strategic and operational commitments, Conger said in his prepared remarks. The U.S. Army already plans to close 33 additional sites in Europe associat ed with the decision to reduce brigade combat teams based on the continent. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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exceed your financial hardship. You must pay income tax on the taxable portion of any withdrawal, and you may also be subject to a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty tax. If you are a Federal Employees Retirement System participant, you will not receive agency matching contributions. A hardship withdraw al cannot be repaid, so your TSP account is per manently reduced by the amount of your withdrawal. A better option may be taking a loan against your TSP, officials said. Loans can be repaid plus interest but the account continues to accrue earnings as the loan is paid back. TSP officials recom mend that employees think carefully before decreasing or stopping their traditional TSP con tributions. Those contri butions are subtracted from pre-tax income, and terminating the contri butions could increase income tax liability. Roth TSP contributions are subtracted from employ ees after-tax income, and changes will not affect tax liability. One of the great things about your TSP contri butions, no matter how small, is that the earnings compound over time. If you stop your contributions, even for a short time, youll miss this opportunity altogether, the news release said. Federal Employees Retirement System par ticipants would, in effect, be losing free money by stopping their contribu tions, because matching contributions also would stop, officials said.From Page 1TSPMemorial Held For Fallen Navy DiversBy EOD Group Two Public AffairsMobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 held a memorial ser vice for two navy div ers aboard Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story March 14. The ceremony honored Navy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio, and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., who both died while conducting dive opera tions at Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland last month. Reyher and Harris died while diving at Aberdeen Proving Grounds Underwater Explosion Test Facility also known as the Super Pond, Feb. 26. Cmdr. Michael Runkle, commanding officer, MDSU 2, spoke of the challenges Navy Divers face and offered words of comfort to the crowd of more than 400 service members, civilians, fami lies and friends. We come together to honor ND1 James Reyher and ND2 Ryan Harris, two extraordinary men who made the ultimate sacrifice serving as Navy div ers, said Runkle. These heroes and those like them understand and accepted dangers, not for fame or fortune, but for their friends, for their families, and for their country. The memorial includ ed remembrances and sea stories of Reyher and Harris from fellow Navy Divers and concluded with the playing of taps. An investigation to determine the cause of the accident is currently ongoing and is being conducted by Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2. MDSU 2 is an expedi tionary mobile diving unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach, Va. and has suc cessfully conducted sal vage operations to sup port TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, and the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor.-Photo by MC2 Steven C. HoskinsCmdr. Michael Runkle, commanding officer of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, delivers remarks during a memorial service at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story for Navy Diver 1st Class James Reyher and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, from MDSU-2, who died Feb. 26. MDSU-2 is an expeditionary mobile diving unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft Story and has successfully conducted salvage operations to support TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Colombia. Mayport To Remember Battle Of Iwo JimaFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will hold a Battle of Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipients Memorial today (March 21) at the Memorial Park, corner of Maine Street and Moale Avenue. Bob Buehn, adjunct professor with the U.S. Naval War College, retired Navy captain and former chief of Military Affairs with the city of Jacksonville, will be guest speaker at the event. Dress is uniform of the day/appropriate civilian attire. The memorial will begin at 10 a.m. The Battle of Iwo Jima was fought from Feb. 19-March 25, 1945 and was a major operation fought by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps against the Japanese Empire in World War II.DLA Disposition Services Jax Closed For Training By StaffDefense Logistics Agency (DLA) Disposition Services Jacksonville, located on Roosevelt Blvd. near Collins Road, will be closed April 1 12 to prepare for a systems upgrade. The facility is scheduled to reopen April 15 as training continues and the computer system is deployed. The organization is replacing its lega cy computer system, known as DAISY, with its Reutilization Business Integration (RBI) solution. RBI is expected to pro vide real-time asset vis ibility throughout the Defense Logistics Agency supply chain. There is little or no delay between when data is entered and when it is available to other users. Items available for reutiliza tion, transfer, donation and sales will also have increased visibility. Military units that use DLA Disposition Services save their units and tax payers millions of dollars each year. Excess property and material turned in from the military services is first offered for reuse within the Department of Defense at no cost and with free shipping. Remaining items can be transferred to federal agencies or donated to state and local govern ments and other quali fied agencies or used to aid humanitarian relief efforts. Safe and appropriate items can be sold to the general public. DLA Disposition Services also provides disposal solu tions for hazardous waste and other materials. For more information about this closure or questions pertaining to the disposition ser vices available at DLA Jacksonville, contact Leroy Flynn at 542-3411 x110 or at the website http://www.disposition services.dla.mil/. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 9

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USS Farragut Visits MontenegroUSS Farragut Public AffairsThe guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) visited Bar, Montenegro, for a port visit March 11-14. Sailors had the oppor tunity to experience Montenegros culture and spend time engag ing with the community, including sporting events with Montenegrin sail ors, tours of the towns of Perast, Kotor and Skadar Lake, and a tour of Montenegros vineyards. Montenegro is a beautiful country, said Seaman Christian Riendeau. The towns were full of old architec ture, and the mountains were amazing. It really gave me a sense of serenity. Farragut also sent sev eral of their Sailors to observe a boarding exer cise with Montenegrin sailors. I was extremely impressed by the pro fessionalism and train ing displayed by the Montenegrin navy, said Farraguts command ing officer, Cmdr. Glen B. Quast. I look forward to conducting more joint operations in the future. Farragut Sailors plant ed trees in two commu nity engagement projects while in Bar, one event was held in a sporting complex and the other at a local elementary school. Both projects were joint efforts between the U.S. and Montenegrin navies. Over the three-day port visit, Sailors pro vided shipboard tours for the U.S. Ambassador to Montenegro, the Honorable Sue K. Brown and ambassadors from Hungary, Romania and Slovenia, as well as Montenegrin military and civilians. The tours pro vided visitors the oppor tunity to explore the ship with Sailors while learn ing about the U.S. Navy. Farragut, homeported out of Mayport, Fla., is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security coopera tion efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibil ity. -Photo by MC2 A.J. JonesEnsign Bianca Lovdahl uses a Pelorus to find a relative bearing as she stands the conning officer watch on the bridge of the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.Farragut Sails Thru Suez CanalUSS Farragut Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) transited the Suez Canal departing the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility March 8. Farragut was on station for six months conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom, while serv ing as part of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group then the John. C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group. Farragut also served as an escort for special mission ships and conducted several engagements with coali tion and partner nations. It is incredible to reflect upon the various missions weve completed in the time Farragut was assigned to 5th Fleet, said Cmdr. Glen B. Quast, Farragut commanding officer. I am extremely proud of all of our Sailors for a job well done this deployment, and I know that our ship has had a positive impact on ensuring the seas remain free and safe for all mariners. In December, Farragut was assigned to be the flagship for Combined Task Force (CTF) 151, a coalition task force con cerned with maritime security and counter-piracy in the region. During this time, the Commander of CTF 151, Pakistani Rear Adm. Muhammad Hisham, and 16 members of his international staff were embarked aboard the U.S. destroy er. Farragut also worked closely with other forc es including the Royal Australian Navy and other regional naval forces to ensure safety of naviga tion throughout the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, and Gulf of Aden. I am very proud of the multifaceted mis sions that we accom plished, said Lt. James Gensheimer, Farragut public affairs officer. During this deployment we proved that a DDG is capable of performing in an array of missions, and we all take pride in the positive impact we made on this very important region of the world. In addition, Farragut gathered information to help predict, identify, and disrupt smuggling and piracy, took part in rescue and assistance oper ations for two vessels in distress, patrolled for suspicious maritime activity, and made port visits to Bahrain; Jebel Ali, U.A.E.; and Muscat, Oman. Farragut is now operating in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 11

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive alignment). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty mili tary (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13 per pack. 2707204 March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge March 15: Luck O the Irish St. Patricks Day Weekend Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 19: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimen tary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while sup plies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID to activate ticket at front gate. 2705145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 2705145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orlando From your local ITT office and upgrade for free to a Length of Stay Pass (unlimited vis its within a 14-day con secutive window). FL residents can buy a one day admission ticket at their local ITT office and get the rest of the year for free (formerly called a splash pass)! Unlimited visits good until Dec. 31, 2013; some restrictions may apply, upgrades must be done on first visit of stay. Proof of residency must be shown if necessary. 270-5145Liberty CallThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 18 March 22: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. March 27: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 22 March 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. March 30: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Kid ZoneMarch 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly recommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 270-5680 -Photo by Paige GnannMCC William Townsend and ET3 Michelle Maltese judge photos taken by youth in the Photography Club at YAC. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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On The MessdeckBogeys SpecialsThursday, March 21 Chicken Caesar Wrap, $ 7.95 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 Spinach, Turkey, Avocado Wheat Wrap, $7.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Chicken & Rice Friday, March 22 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, March 25 California Chicken Club Sandwich with a Side, $8.95 Chicken Caesar Wrap, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Beef Noodle Tuesday, March 26 Shrimp Chicken Caesar Wrap with Side, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Soup: Chili Wednesday, March 27 8 Oz NY Strip Steak Teriyaki, Rice, Stir Fried Vegetables & Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $ 10.95 Soup: Potato Bacon Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25. Monday hicken patty sand wich with lettuce, tomato, onion, pick les, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sand wich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75Focsle Lounge Spring SpecialsSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8 Include Ice Tea or Water March 23: Womens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. Allmilitary teams $40, mili tary/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWR Sports/FitnessBig Changes To MWR Fitness ScheduleNaval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Learn basic kicks, punches and balance moves in this calorie burning, sweat producing knock out of a workout. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga Come experience the many physical, emotional and spiritual benefits of developing a yoga prac tice. This class focuses on the basics for those entirely new to yoga; it also provides a review for anyone who wants to deepen their understanding of alignment and par ticipate in a slower paced yoga regimen. This class focuses on introduc tory poses to stretch and strengthen all major muscles and joints, as well as develop greater relaxation in the entire body. 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp Take your entire com mand to the next level, oceanfront! This com mand class is packed full of challenging cardio drills, muscular resistance training and explosive intervals. Meets at the Sandbox and can accom modate 200+ person nel, weather permitting. Hooyah Mayport! 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Learn how to train using the unique and innovative TRX Suspension Training System. This class is reserved for those entire ly new to TRX training. This class will result in increased strength, coor dination, balance and CORE-power. Class size limited to 25. Class is held at Mayport Sandbox behind Surfside Fitness Center; weather permit ting. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor This incentive program develops muscu lar strength and power needed to attain the Steel Anchor Award. Structured and progres sive training targets muscles to increase your bench press, squat, and dead-lift. Participants will utilize multiple pieces of free weight, selectorized and plate loaded strength equipment in the gym. Workouts will be tracked to provide motivation, guidance and award determination. Steel Anchor award includes a shirt and plaque recogni tion. 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., RowingMWR Hosts Mens Volleyball TournamentMWR Sports CoordinatorSaturday Castaways hosted their first Mens Beach Volleyball tour nament with nine teams participating in the oneday event. Two person teams from SERMC Divers, NAS JAX, Branch Medical, Coast Guard, and a civilian team entered the tournament. First up were Coast Guard (Hairy Men) versus NAS Jax (Off Constantly). The teams went into a tiebreak set where Hairy Men overcame Off Constantly with a 15-13 final to win the match. Branch Medical team (Berdecia/Mueller) swept the Coast Guard (Dirty Oars) in two straight sets. SERMC (Top Gun) vol leyed up against SERMC (Base Housing) taking on three sets for a 15-10 Top Gun victory. NAS Jax (Hot Tamales) spiked the match in two straight games against Hairy Men. The Civilian (Dirty Seamen) served up their first win against SERMC (Forklifts and Unicorns) in their two set match. Dirty Oars won their next two matches against Off Constantly 15-12 in three sets and Base Housing in two straight sets moving them up in the tourna ment. Berdecia/Mueller came up with their second win, beating Top Gun and sending them into the loser bracket. Dirty Seamen turned up the heat against Hot Tamales beating them in two close matches 22-20 and 21-19. Hairy Men got a streak going after their first loss and beat Forklifts and Unicorns in three sets and Top Gun in two sets, moving them up in the ladder. Hot Tamales ended the winning streaks of the Hairy Men, Dirty Oars to put them into the semifinals against Berdecia/ Mueller. The match ended in two sets with Hot Tamales taking the win and Berdecia/Mueller taking third place. This put Hot Tamales back up against Dirty Seamen in the finals. Both teams played hard and had a lot of long points, but Dirty Seamen finished the tournament undefeated with a final score of 21-14, 21-18 to win the event. The Womens Beach Volleyball tournament is scheduled for March 23. The two-person team event is open to anyone ages 18 and up. If you are interested in participat ing in this exciting event please contact Rita at the gym at 904-270-5451. -Photo courtesy of MWRTeams go head to head during MWRs first Mens Beach Volleyball tournament held March 9. A Womens Beach Volleyball tournament is scheduled for March 23. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 13

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Mayport Runs For Pot O Gold -Photos courtesy of MWRAbove, runners sign up to participate in MWRs Catch A Leprechaun 5K/3k Fun Run Walk on March 12. Right, fast est runner, Anthony Vasquez receives his pot o gold from lepre chaun Kristin Lokken, manager at Beachside Community Center. Each month, MWR sponsors a Fun Run and Walk beginning at 8:10 a.m. on Bailey Avenue, in front of the Mayport Gym. The next run is scheduled for April 9.Navy Looks For Recipes For New CookbookFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Navy is looking for recipes that are easy, healthy and created with Sailors living in bachelor quarters in mind. To inspire a little healthy competition, Navy Nutrition is holding a recipe contest to compile an online barracks cookbook officials said March 6. This cookbook con test is meant to be a fun way to encourage Sailors to showcase the creative ways they eat well with limited resources, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, a dietitian with the Navy Physical Readiness Office. Many Sailors are find ing ways to make easy and tasty meals, without a full size kitchen and pantry. We want you to share these ideas. The goal of the contest is to compile a collection of recipes that are com patible with barracks life. A recipe may con sist of cooking foods in a microwave or as simple as assembling ingredients. If you are making it and it is healthful, we want it in the cookbook. Each recipe may only be sub mitted once, but you may enter as many recipes as you like. The rules include a limit on the number of ingredients, pieces of equipment and recipe steps. If you live in the bar racks, you have limited storage space, limited utensils and, in compli ance with housing rules, a microwave for a heat ing element. explained Wallinger. With the recipe con test running in conjunc tion with Navy Nutrition Month, there is also focus on nutritional value. The number of ingre dients will be limited, but there is no limit to the flavor, herbs and spices are encouraged Wallinger continued. We are just limiting added compo nents such as sodium, which affects many prone to high blood pressure, and fat to keep in line with dietary guidelines. We have included an explanation on how to determine the amount of sodium and fat for each recipe in the rules. Entries to the contest will be accepted in seven categories, which are broken down by when you are likely to eat them, for instance; breakfast, sand wich/wrap, snack, vege tables, starchy side, main course (entre) and sweet treat. The contest will run from now until 31 March at 11:59 p.m. Eastern time zone. For more informa tion and contest rules visit http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/ navynutrition/Pages/ default2.aspx.Ask Kate Your Energy ??Dear Kate, How much energy do you think I can really save from habit changes? Signed, Skeptical Dear Skeptical, I hate to say it because it sounds unpatriotic, but frankly, Americans waste a lot of energy. Studies show that 50% of the energy that is delivered to the home via electricity wires or natural gas lines is wasted. For example, how many times have you had lights on in a room with no one in it? Thats waste! So, we find that 10% savings from habit changes is not hard to achieve. Many of our customers actually save 20% or more each month. Sometimes, visitors stay with you or there is a heat wave, but 10 20% average savings over a year is really doable. Time to get started! Kate Do you have a question for Kate? Email her at askkate@watton.com. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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USS Gary, CG, Seize Ton of Cocaine Worth $81 MilUSS Gary Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class Frigate USS Gary (FFG-51) and embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment Team (LEDET) recently seized more than 2,200 lbs of cocaine in the Eastern Pacific Ocean in support of the ongoing Operation Martillo. The seizure is the largest made by Gary while operating in U.S, 4th Fleet area of operations and is worth an estimated street value of $81 Million. It was a complex operation involving a law enforcement boarding, boat and helicopter searches, precision driving, detainee handling, and multiple deck opera tions, but Garys crew proved they were fully capable of handling it and scored a big win, said Garys Navigator, Lieutenant Junior Grade Christian Gotcher. This was a great day for USS Gary. Everyone on board did their part in making this a successful inter diction. Each department helped in one way or another, from finding the suspect vessel to confiscating the contraband. The men and women of Gary will continue to work hard while we are assigned to Fourth Fleet and hopefully get a few more busts before we return to San Diego, said the ships Executive Officer, Lt. Drew Greenlees. Gary is homeported in San Diego, and is currently deployed to Central and South America in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. Fourth Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traf ficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). Overall coordination of counter-drug patrols and surveillance in the Eastern Pacific is done by the Joint Interagency Task Force, South (JIATF-S) a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), headquartered in Key West, Fla. U.S. maritime law enforcement and the interdiction phase of operations in the region occur under the tactical control of the 11th Coast Guard District headquartered in Alameda, Calif. Operation Martillo is part of the U.S. governments coordinated regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transnational orga nized crime and the U.S. Central America Security Initiative.USS Arlington Makes Port Visit -Photo by Lt. Sonny Lorrius The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Arlington (LPD 24), arrives at Naval Station Mayport. Arlington, the third ship in the U.S. Navy history is named after Arlington, Virginia, the location of the Pentagon, makes a scheduled stop at Mayport Fla., before continuing to Naval Station Norfolk for its commissioning date of April 6, 2013.Is Your Pet Microchipped?From Mayport Vet ClinicWhat is a microchip? The microchip is a tiny computer chip, similar in size to a grain of rice, programmed with an identification number. Once an animal has been has been micro chipped, it can be iden tified through out its life with this unique number. How is the microchip implanted? Microchips are implanted with a sterile hypodermic needle beneath the skin between the shoul der blades. Anesthesia is not required or recom mended. How does the micro chip identification work? A special scanner is used to read the identifi cation number. The number is displayed on the scanner, and the person reading the scanner can contact the national registry to find out who the pet belongs to. What are the benefits of microchipping my pet? Lost or stolen pets can be identified and reunited with their owners. Microchips are required for most overseas travel. For more information on microchipping or to schedule an appoint ment for your pet, call the Mayport Veterinary Treatment Facility at 2702004. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 15

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Friday, March 22 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is host ing a Fashion Show and Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. as part of Garden Month 2013. Preview the hottest Spring looks for men and women as Krista Eberle Boutique presents Nicole Miller and Timo Weiland. In addition, there will also be on display sev eral organic or up-cycled pieces by local designers. The fashion show is part of Garden Month 2013, a month long celebra tion of the historic gar dens the Cummer family designed over 100 years ago and that are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Events throughout the month of March include Garden Tours, activities and classes for children and adults, lectures, lunches and a Farm to Table Moonlight Dinner in the Gardens. Cost is $65 for members and $70 for non-members. For more informa tion or to purchase tick ets, please call (904) 8996038 or visit www.cum mer.org. Saturday, March 23 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association #290 will hold a benefit BBQ dinner at 2 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Road. Donations are $8. Take out orders welcome. The dinner is open to the public. For more information, call 246-6855. Why are we fascinated with monsters and the mysterious? They creep into our dreams and thoughts; we seek out souvenirs and keep our eyes on the horizon for a glimpse of them. Come learn about these mysterious creatures of the deep with a Park Ranger. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a discussion on the dif ferent types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Wednesday, March 27 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is host ing its first Farm to Table Dinner in the Gardens as part of Garden Month 2013. Join us from 6 to 9 p.m. as we feature locally sourced and sea sonal fresh foods that will showcase some of Jacksonvilles best chefs. The collaboration between North Florida farms, local fisheries, artisans and some of the citys most talented chefs will make for an unforgettable dining experience. Cost is $150 for members and $160 for non-mem bers. For more informa tion or to purchase tick ets, please call (904) 8996038 or visit www.cum mer.org. Saturday, March 30 Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m. through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Saturday, April 6 and Sunday, April 7 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Garrison event on. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Wednesday, April 10 Duval County Extension staff are offering a work shop on spring garden ing from 10 a.m. p.m. at Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Rd. Learn about the Good, Bad and Ugly Insects, Landscape Tips and Keeping Tools in Shape. This is a free program. Pre-registration requested to beckyd@coj. net or 904-255-7450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR I, advanced step; she, senior water aerobics and the womens locker room was steamy and abuzz with conversation. I regularly got a chuck le out of listening to the water aerobics group as they pulled on their sup port hose, stretch gabar dine pants and embroi dered tops. All the old women would cackle away about their ailments, medica tions, aches and pains. I always noticed that the salt-and-pepper-haired lady would listen and show concern for her friends self-absorbed grievances, but never complained herself. I thought she was a real class act, and made a mental note to myself to try to become that kind of old lady, rather than the kind that went on and on about things like glucos amine and condroitin. On this particular day, she and I found ourselves simultaneously brush ing our hair at the shared vanity. Are there any decent car washes around here? I asked, after some cur sory remarks about the weather. Well, she started, with that Old World throwback southern accent common in Richmond and Norfolk, I must admit Im not very famil iar with automotive ser vices around here. You see, she went on, my husband died last fall, and dont you know, during our entire 45 years together, I never once put gas in my own car. It took me a minute to process the significance of what this tasteful elderly lady had just said. Wait, you mean he always put gas in the car for you? Why yes, he certainly did, she said, somewhat melancholy. Of course, my imme diate reaction was to get mad at my own husband, who never put gas in my minivan. Just as I was mentally making plans for real doozy of a husbandwife argument, the saltand-pepper-haired lady continued: I never asked him; he wanted to do that for me, so he did. And there were things I always did for him cooking his meals, gar dening, and such. I must say, we loved taking care of each other. I stood, mouth half agape, staring at the lady in the shared mirror. Like a scene from Cocoon, it was as if she had just bestowed upon me the secret to a happy mar riage. Will that be all? the bolt-studded Subway employee said, jolting me back to the present. I realized that making my husbands sandwich every day didnt render me subservient to him. It was something I did to take care of him because he takes care of me. With a fresh outlook on my marriage and a fresh tuna sub in my hand, I decided that there was no reason for me to dig my heels in. Id continue making my husband sandwiches for the rest of our lives, and hopefully hell endure a heel or two along the way. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2HeelDOD, VA Make Progress In Integrating Health RecordsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense and Veterans Affairs departments are making progress on integrating the health records of service members and veterans, senior government officials told the House Veterans Affairs Committee yesterday. President Barack Obama direct ed the two departments to create a seamless system of integration for medical records. The direction was clear: When a member of the armed forces sepa rates from the military, their elec tronic records, medical, personnel and benefits will transition and remain with them forever, said Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. Woodson detailed the tasks the two departments need to complete. First, they need to integrate health data for individuals into a single electronic health record. Second, they need to modernize the departments legacy health information systems. We have made tangible progress on a number of critical elements necessary to achieve our vision on the integrated record, Woodson said. This includes creating a joint health data dictionary, ensuring the two departments use the same precise language to describe health data elements and fields in the combined health record system. It also means moving VA data centers to the Defense Information System Agency. Woodson called this an important step for efficiency in operations and creating a single repository of data. The two depart ments also selected a single DODVA joint single sign-on and contact management solution that accu rately identifies clients in both sys tems, he reported. Finally, Woodson said, the two Cabinet agencies are implementing a joint graphical user interface that displays information from both the DOD and VA systems at the same time. We also completed an initial life-cycle cost estimate for the integrated electronic health record, Woodson said. The cost estimate was significant. And given the increasingly constrained federal budget environment, our secretary has directed us to re-evaluate the planned approach and consider alternatives that could accelerate timelines for interoperability at reduced cost and reduced risk. The scope of this project is huge. Valerie C. Melvin, the Government Accounting Offices director of information management and technology resources issues, said the records are projected to provide coverage to about 9.6 million ser vice members and their beneficia ries and to 6.3 million veterans. VAs and DODs systems have many common business needs for providing health care coverage to these individuals, Melvin told the representatives. Toward this end, the two departments have an extensive history of working to achieve shared health care resources. Our work has examined the depart ments efforts over the last 15 years to share data between their individual systems and to develop interoperable electronic health record capabilities. They have made progress, but problems remain, she acknowl edged. Overall, VA and DOD have relied on a patchwork of initiatives involving their separate health information systems to achieve varying degrees of electronic health record interoperability, Melvin said. Circumstances require decisive action, Woodson said, and delay would only increase the cost and risk of this program. We believe the path we have chosen best serves the depart ments, the special populations whom we jointly are responsible for, and the American taxpayer, he said. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013

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FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailor, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. March 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. March 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 March 25-29, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. March 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 March 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. FFSC Plans Tea Party For Soon-to-be MomsFrom FFSCThe New Parent Support Program is hosting an English Tea for expectant moms on April 25 from 1-3 p.m. at the base Chapel. The program is honoring these women in rec ognition of Aprils Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is a special opportunity for moms-to-be to meet each other and have a grand day of pampering. If you are pregnant, you are invited to come out and enjoy the food, tea and good company. There is no charge for this event, however reg istration is required. There are limited seats available. Call FFSC at 270-6600 ext. 1700 to save your seat. Learn How To Market Yourself For Next CareerFrom FFSCThe Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transi tion here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be presented by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Thursday, April 4, 2013, at 9 a.m. in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center. This top-shelf presentation is a great professional development opportunity. Transition is of course ultimately a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retire ment in one to five years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular officer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transi tion, they should be edu cated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. This executive sum mary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlisted supervisor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by retired Capt. Jim OKeefe, deputy direc tor of transition services on MOAAs national staff. The presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-to-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see . It includes compre hensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer percep tions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary nego tiation, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition top ics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. Spouses are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures compan ion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-inone resource for the transition process. For further information, contact Stephanie Hoppe at stephanie.hoppe.ctr@ navy.mil for call 904-2706600 ext. 1604. Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday March 25, from 5-7 p.m., the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for active d ser vice members and their immediate families. On the menu is turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, roll and dessert. 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Greater Jax USO Zoo Night Wristbands On Sale Save the date! The Greater Jacksonville USO is having a USO night at the Jacksonville ZOO on Friday, May 3rd. We will begin sell ing wristbands today at noon. Enjoy a night at the Jacksonville Zoo with the family on Friday, May 3rd (see attached flyer). Wristbands are $2.50 each; cash only please. Wristbands are open for purchase by Active/ Retired/Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Wristbands can be pur chased at the NS Mayport USO, NAS Jacksonville USO. Wristbands will be sold today from noon till 1pm at the Off-Crew Building onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Daytona Spring Turket Run Military members receive $2 off a single day ticket or $5 off a two-day ticket for the 24th Annual Daytona Spring Turkey Run, the most popular car show in the country at the Daytona International Speedway on March 23-24. This special offer is valid for 2 admissions per military ID at the ticket booth. See thousand of classic cars and stroll through a massive swap meet. Enjoy actionpacked activities for the whole family. For more information, visit www. daytonabeachcarshows. com. Buy One Get, One Free Ticket Offers Florida Theatre Looking for a deal on a night out? The Florida Theatre is offering buy one, get one free ticket deals on the following shows: March 21-America ($45/40) March 22One Night of Queen with Gary Mullen and The Works ($35) *All tickets must be purchased at the Florida Theatre box office, 128 E. Forsyth, Monday-Friday and day of show, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 904-355-2787, with a Military I.D. www.florida theatre.com USO Yard Sale April 13 Have some things youd like to get off your hands? The Mayport USO is hav ing a yard sale Saturday, April 13th from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Space is limited so call the Mayport USO at (904) 246-2481 today to reserve your table. Tables are $10 for an inside table and $5 for an outside table. Table setup begins at 7 a.m. Hawaiian Tropic Sunscreen Free At The USO Protect your skin this summer. Stop by the NAS Jax and Mayport USO centers for your free bag of Hawaiian Tropic sun screen and after sun products. Liberty Mutual Legends Of Golf Free Admission For Military Enjoy complimentary admission for all active duty, retirees, reservists, and dependents with military ID to the Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf Tournament in April at The Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa. Military Wives Vendor Show May 4 Join the Mayport USO for another wonderful Military Wives Vendor Show. This event is free and open to the public. There will be raffle tick ets and food for sale. For more information, or to signup as a vendor, email: milwivesbusinessesande vents@gmail.com Disney On Ice TicketsThis Week The Mayport and NAS USO centers is sell ing lower level tickets to the Friday, April 5 per formance of Disney on Ice. Lower level Tickets are $10 each and are cash only. Tickets are open to Active/Retired/ Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Share a great evening with your fam ily. Call the Mayport USO (246-3481) or the NAS USO (778-2821) to reserve your tickets. Sorry, no refunds/exchanges on tickets purchased for the Thursday night perfor mance. USO Annual Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on March 22 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Lots of fun, prizes on course and refreshments and food after completion of play. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. We are limited to 30 foursomes. Relay For Life-NS Mayport Join Relay For Life and NS Mayport in fighting cancer. NS Mayport will host its first Relay For Life on April 13-14 with the opening ceremo ny beginning at noon. The theme this year is Seek and Destroy. This event is open to family, friends, coworkers, and those wishing to join the fight against cancer. For more information, visit www.relayforlife.org/ MayportFL. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem b ers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS USO Looks For New Executive DirectorFrom USOLooking for a recently retired or soon to retire Senior Military Leader to assume the oversight, administrative and fund raising functions for 3 USO centers of operations, 6-8 full time employees and many volunteers who serve 250,000 service members and families annually. The position requires a visionary who is an energetic self-starter, with substantial relationship management and networking skills and passionate enthusiasm in supporting our active duty and dependent military com munity. This position further requires a high level of comfort in meeting with executives of small and large orga nizations in support of USO func tions and funding needs. Further, this organization is governed both tactically and strategically by a diverse board of community citizens and this position will report directly to this board. Substantial hands-on work in connection with USO spon sored events is a daily requirement of this rewarding position and week end work and long hours should be expected. Specific skill requirements include: Fundraising, Budget devel opment and control, Business plan ning; People management and, pub lic speaking. Salary range of $72,000-$80,000 based on qualifications with bonus potential based on performance. Application must be submit ted to the NAS Jax USO, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Bldg. 1050; P.O. Box 108, Jacksonville, Florida 322120108 by no later than April 15, 2013. Applications may be hand delivered in person or emailed to Mr. Bob Ross at bross@usojax.com. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 21, 2013 17

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