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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Mayport Vet Clinic will hold upcoming vaccine clinic on March 16 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 270-7004. Mayport Vet Clinic is located on base at708-B Everglades Court. Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Hagel Is New Defense SecretaryAmerican Forces Press ServiceJust before his private swearing-in ceremony as the 24th secretary of defense, Chuck Hagel and his wife, Lilibet, arrived at the Pentagon Feb. 27 and were greeted by Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Thomas D. Waldhauser, military assistant to the secretary of defense. Hagel, delayed more than 30 minutes by Washington traffic, said hello to waiting mem bers of the Pentagon press corps as he hur ried up the steps of the Pentagons river entrance. From there, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little and other defense officials accom panied him into the building. Family members and his immediate office staff attended the ceremony, during which Hagel was sworn in by Director of Administration and Management Michael L. Rhodes. Hagel then hosted the daily senior staff update meeting attended by DOD civilian and mili tary leaders. In a statement released after Hagels Senate confirmation yesterday, Little said the new sec retary received congratu latory phone calls from his predecessor, Leon E. Panetta, congressional leaders, and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. In his conversation with Secretary Shinseki, Little added, Hagel indi cated his desire to meet as soon as possible to continue and deepen the strong partnership between the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs on common pri orities for serving our troops, veterans and mil itary families. After the staff meet ing, Hagel will speak to service members and civilian Defense Department employ ees in the Pentagon Auditorium. The address will be covered live on the Pentagon Channel. Its scheduled to start at 10:30 a.m. EST. This afternoon, Hagel will meet with the ser vice secretaries and attend meetings at the White House. Yesterday, Vice President Joe Biden said in a statement that hed travelled across the world with Hagel and has seen him in action in the U.S. Senate. Wherever he is, his talent and dedication to our country are clear. He feels a deep commitment Galley Moves Back To Oasis-Photo by ET3 Michelle MalteseCulinary Specialist 3rd Class Dominique Kennedy of USS Underwood and Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Wilmer Ringgold of Oasis Galley pre pare lunches for hungry Sailors during the reopening of Oasis Galley on March 4. The galley has been closed for several month due to extensive renovation and has been serving patrons at the Beachside Community Center instead. The Oasis Galley will be open to serve breakfast from 6-7:30 a.m., lunch from 11-12:30 p.m. and supper from 4-5:30 p.m. A grand opening celebration is planned for later this month.MWR Expo Is For You!From MWRThe 9th annual MWR Expo and Travel Show will be held on March 14 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ocean Breeze Conference and Catering Center. This free, yearly event features all the latest information from regional travel destinations including resorts, hotels and theme parks, along with MWR Mayport programs and services. In addition to travel and recreation informa tion booths, the Expo will also have popular base services on hand such as FFSC, Navy College, NEX, Commissary, Navy Lodge, The Mirror and Navy Federal Credit Union. Event participants will enjoy free food and bev erage samples from over 15 vendors as they visit the various information booths. Giveaway items, to include hotel stays, theme park tickets, rec reation equipment, gift cards and baskets, will be available to those attend ing. Navy Responds To SequestrationU.S. Navy ReleaseThis message was sent to all Navy and Marine units by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. On March 1, sequestration was enacted necessitating the fol lowing actions: Last night, because no bud get deal had been reached, the budget control act required set ting in motion the automatic, government-wide cuts known as sequestration. Given that real ity and the associated impact of budgetary uncertainty imposed by an indefinite continuing resolution, the department of the Navy intends to commence some reductions immediately. Navy plans to: A. Shut down Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) in April. This will initiate the preparations to gradually stand-down flying in at least three additional air wings with two more air wings being reduced to minimum safe flying levels by the end of the year; B. Defer USNS Comfort humanitarian deploy ment to Central and South America, Continuing Promise 2013 including supporting ships, Seabees, and medical units; C. Cancel or defer the deploy ments of up to six ships to vari ous AORS throughout the month of April; D. Lay up four Combat Logistics Force (CLF) units in PACOM starting in April; E. RETURN USS Shoup (DDG 86) to homeport early and not proceed as USS Nimitz (CVN 68) escort to CENTCOM; F. Return USS Thach (FFG 43) to homeport early from deploy ment to SOUTHCOM. We will also immediately: A. Begin negotiating contract modifications to de-obligate efforts for any investment pro grams for which the remain ing unobligated balance will be insufficient after the sequestra tion reduction is applied. Major programs affected include Virginia-class SSN advance procurement, reactor power units and Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV 10); B. Commence final planning to slow Marine Corps Depot maintenance activities, includ ing reductions in the non-per manent workforce; C. Cancel March introductory flight screening for future pilots/ NFOS; D. Announce intent to cancel Blue Angels shows scheduled for April 2013 [four shows: MacDill AFB (Tampa, FL), NAS Corpus Christi,Texas, VIDALIA Ga., MCAS Beaufort S.C.]; E. Cease new USMC enroll ments in voluntary education tuition assistance; F. Cancel March Navy Recruiting media support and reduce the majority of advertis ing contracts as much as pos sible under contractual condi tions. These actions are being taken to preserve support for those forces stationed overseas and currently forward-deployed. Reductions in lower-priority for ward operations, and significant reductions in all other opera tions, training, and maintenance are the results of this selection process. We made these choices carefully, while trying to pre serve our ability to reverse or quickly restore negative effects if and when funding is restored. Actions we have taken to date will continue, to include those affecting the deferral of mainte nance for USS Abraham Lincoln Get Your Teen A MWR JobMWR is open ing up its Summer Teen Employment Program to active duty and retiree dependent teens age 15-17. The program begins on March 20 with the Teen Employment Orientation from 4-5 p.m. at the Teen Center. There will be a Teen Career Launch on March 26 and 27 from 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. Applications must be received by the MWR Personnel Office by April 2. Call (904) 270-5680 for more informationSee Sequestration, Page 3 -Photo by MC1 Chad J. McNeeleyAs his wife Lilibet holds the bible, Chuck Hagel is sworn into office as the 24th Secretary of Defense by Michael L. Rhodes, DoD Director of Administration and Management at the Pentagon, Feb. 27. See Hagel, Page 14

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Running my fingertip along the wrinkled peak of thin, gold foil, I find an edge. I insert a nail under the delicate lip and lift the sheet, hearing it crinkle as it expands like an accor dion. I pause a moment, just long enough to pinch the end of the tiny paper strip, and tug it free from its host. Satisfied that the sheath has been removed intact, I crumple the shiny square of foil and paper strip into a ball, and dis card it. Popping the freed morsel into my mouth, I let it sit on my tongue for a few seconds, and feel my bodys heat react with the sugary drop. As it melts, a fragment of almond is revealed. In a sudden movement of tongue and teeth, I swipe the nut between my molars and feel it crack under pressure. As I swallow the deli cious mixture, my fingers search the bag for my next Hershey Kiss with Almonds. . More than I should, I find myself reaching for chocolate. One might think the rich texture and undeniably delicious fla vor of this popular con -Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesDue to the changes in last years FACT, the num ber of students having to take remediation classes for the portions of FCAT 2.0 increased. If you have a child who will be enter ing middle or high school next year, a score of 1 or 2 could seriously impact the students ability to take elective courses (i.e. band, art, drama, music, etc.). Selection of elective courses will likely be lim ited due to the addition of remediation courses. For example, the fol lowing chart outlines a typical 9th graders high school schedule and the schedule of a 9th grader who scored a 1 or 2 on the FCAT as an 8th grader. 8th Grade Students who score a Level 1 or 2 on FCAT 1. English 1 2. Algebra 1 or Geometry 3. Earthspace Science 4. Intensive Reading 5. Intensive Reading 6. Intensive Math 7. Elective 8th Grade Students who score a Level 3, 4 or 5 on FCAT 1. English 1 or English 1 Honors 2. Algebra 1 or Geometry Honors 3. Earthspace Science or Biology Honors 4. Elective* 5. Elective* 6. Elective* 7. Elective* *May include a World Language, World Geography, HOPE (physi cal education), career academy or magnet class es, AVID classes, or other elective choices. Scores on the 7th and 8th grade FCAT will also impact admissions into Acceleration Programs such as International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge AICE, and AP Honors. Now is the time to talk to your elementary school and/or middle school student about the ramifi cations of not taking the FCAT seriously. Many times students who are not in Grade 3 or Grade 10 do not take the test seriously since it doesnt impact their promotion to the next grade level. This chart demon strates what their school day can look like if they earn a score of 1 or 2. A middle school sched ule will be very similar only the course names will change. For exam ple, English I becomes M/J Language Arts 1 and math becomes M/J Math 1. Again, limited electives can be selected since stu dents will be required to take appropriate remedial courses. If you want your child to do some extra prep for this years FCAT, have him log on to www. soarathome.org, Student Online Achievement Resources program (SOAR). This internetbased program allows students in grades 3 11 to reinforce and review skills, practice what they have learned, and even learn new skills. It is based on the curriculum standards of the state in which you are living. And best of all, this resource is available to military and civilian students 24/7 and its FREE! Students take an assess ment aligned to state standards, and SOAR directs them to individu alized tutorials to improve skills where needed. Parents can monitor their childrens progress from anywhere, and are provided with resource materi als. Log on to www.soara thome.com and register for an account. If you have questions about your individual childs schedule, you should check with the school counselor. This person can make sure you know exactly when the FCAT will be admin istered at your childs school and can provide more detailed responses to course scheduling at the next grade level. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingFCAT Scores Can Impact Students ScheduleThe President of the United States does it, the Prime Minister of Israel does it, and the Queen of England does it. Jews do it. Muslims do it. Hindus do it. Christians do it. Buddhists do it. What is it? It is PRAYER. Prayer could be designated as the first global product of religion. No matter how diverse the religions of the world may be, one common ritual and prac tice that they all embrace is prayer. So begins the Introduction of a book on Prayer by Rev. Dr. Myles Monroe, who incidentally was a college classmate of mine. Dr. Monroe is the founder and president of Bahamas Faith Ministries International. So what is PRAYER? The Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions describes Christian prayer as the ascent of the mind to God, the soul of reli gion, the opening of the heart to God, and a way to know God face to face. Dr. Monroe correctly asserts that prayer in its most elementary form is not just some activity, ritual or obligation that is to be periodically per formed. It is also not begging God to do something for us that we cant accom plish ourselves. Rather, prayer is communion and communication that touches Gods heart. Prayer is meant to be one of the most exciting aspects of our life of faith and our relationship with God. I wonder why that is not the case for so many of the faithful? There are many stories and quotations when it comes to prayer. Here are two funny stories. A severe drought in the south prompted a visit ing pastor to pray for rain. The next day there was a torrential downpour that ruined the crops. Well thats what happens, said one farmer wryly, when you get a pastor that aint familiar with agriculture. Or how about the pas tor who asked a young boy if he said his prayers at night. The boy said yes. The pastor then asked, How about in the morning? The boy answered, No, I am not scared in the daytime. As for a quotation, C.S. Lewis in his Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer, writes Those who do not turn to God in petty trials will have no habit or such resort to help them when the great trials come. So those who have not learned to ask him for childish things will have less readiness to ask him for the great ones. We must not be too high minded. I fancy we may sometimes be deterred from the small prayers by a sense of our own dignity rather than of Gods. Certainly a quotation worthy of reflection and integration. If you are a person of faith, let me ask you brief ly to reflect on your own understanding of prayer. What does prayer mean to you? Is prayer a joy or a burden for you? Let me encourage you to give some thought to the idea of prayer. And perhaps even practice it. Touch Gods heart today!Chap Steve Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSfection tempts me, but I have a different motiva tion for eating chocolate. Like a baby, I crave something soothing and repetitive when Im stressed, tired or bored. Since Gerber doesnt make pacifiers for 46-year-olds, and my husband isnt inclined to rock me in a rocking chair, I opt for sweet treats. Im not talking about gorging on devils food cake, or slurping up Hot Fudge Brownie Delights. While I have been known to indulge in those deli cacies from time to time, I find more comfort in chocolate treats that lend themselves to a prolonged ritualistic enjoyment of the process of eating chocolate. Stressing over deploy ments, PCSes, and new orders always causes a flare up in my need for comfort, so during these military events, I hit the chocolate pretty hard. Hershey Kisses with Almonds have been my recent remedy of choice, mostly because eating each tiny morsel involves several repetitive steps that I find quite soothing. When I cant get my hands on those, Girl Scouts Thin Mints Cookies are a reasonable substitute for my choco late therapy. Regardless of the nutri tion label, Ive found that, an entire sleeve of these delectable disks may be needed to calm the nerves. Extracting a cookie from the top of the stack, I place it on my tongue and allow it to steep. The chocolate coating slowly melts, and then my saliva soaks into the crisp cen ter, dissolving it into a mouthful of minty mush. I chew any remaining crunchy bits and swallow, as I lift another disk from the sleeve. Even as a child, I remember ritualizing my consumption of treats. I never understood a kid who could take a bag of M&Ms, tear open the top, and pour the whole thing into his upturned mouth. What a waste! I, on the other hand, would maximize my enjoyment, spreading the contents of each bag out, and separating the can dies out into their colors (which were, back then, orange, green, yellow, dark brown and light brown.) I would then ana lyze each pile, eating only the most flawed morsels. Those that were mis shapen or had an imper fect M were goners. I continued this process until I had whittled the lot down to one of each color. Those five, the Chosen Ones, would be scooped up together and ceremo niously sacrificed in one final chomp. This may all sound nuts, but in times of stress, everyone turns to something for relief, and I figure that three-quar ters of a bag of Hershey Kisses with Almonds is measurably better for ones mental and physical health than three packs of Camels and a pint of Jose Quervo. So why not dissect a dozen peanut butter cups, nibble the chocolate off the nougat center of a Three Musketeers Bar, or methodically pick apart a pair of Little Debbie Swiss Cake Rolls? It tastes good, it feels good, and stress melts away as fast as a chocolate Kiss on your tongue. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com Hear Roman Catholic Archdiocese For Military Services SpeakFrom NS Mayport ChapelArchbishop Timothy Broglio of the Archdiocese for Military Services, USA, will be the keynote speaker at the second annual Eucharistic Congress Come to the Feast, sponsored by the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine, March 8 and 9, at the Prime Osborn III Convention Center. Approximately 5,000 Catholics from Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia are expected to attend the 2-day event that begins with open ing remarks from Bishop Felipe Estevez of the Diocese of St. Augustine on Friday at 7 p.m. On Saturday at 8 a.m., Bishop Estevez will lead an outdoor procession of the Blessed Sacrament, followed by Mass at 9 a.m., Archbishop Broglio is scheduled to address the group at 10:45 a.m. Programs geared specifically for youth and young adults attending are scheduled, as well as a concert Saturday evening aby Grammynominated singer, Matt Maher. A $5 fee and pre-registration is required for the youth program. Tickets to the Matt Maher con cert are $10 each and can be purchased through Ticketmaster, Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena or at the Eucharistic Congress.

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Navy Calls For Input On LCS Draft EAFrom Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command The U.S. Navy has prepared and released to the public a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) to evalu ate the potential environ mental effects that may result from homeporting up to 14 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) on the East Coast of the United States by 2020. The EA evaluates the potential environmental effects of homeporting 14 LCSs at either Naval Station Norfolk, Va., or 14 LCSs at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Although no final deci sion has yet been made, the Navys preferred alter native is to homeport the initial East Coast Littoral Combat Ships at Naval Station Mayport. This Draft EA will be available for a 30 day public review and comment period until March 29, 2013, and can be accessed at the following website: https://portal.navfac. navy.mil/portal/page/ portal/navfac/navfac_ ww_pp/navfac_navfac midlant_pp/midlant_ps/ environmental_norfolk/ tab3987837. Paper copies of the Draft EA are available for review at the fol lowing libraries: Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, Fla. Library, 303 N Laura St. Jacksonville, Fla. Library, 100 Herb Bauer Drive, St. Marys, Ga. County Public Library, 301 Cunningham Blvd., Havelock, N.C. Anchor Library, 111 W. Ocean View Ave., Norfolk, Va. Central Library, 4100 Virginia Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, Va. Comments may be submitted in writing to: LCS Homeporting EA Project Manager; Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic; Attn: Code EV21/SS 6506 Hampton Blvd. Norfolk, Va., or via e-mail using the following address: navfaclantpao@ navy.mil. Comments must be postmarked no later than March 29, 2012, and should be as specific as possible. The Draft EA includes an evaluation of the environmental effects of con struction of support facili ties at the chosen loca tion and accommodating the required crews and unmanned aerial systems for the LCS. For example, MQ_8B Fire Scouts are proposed to be stored and flight tested at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. The LCS has a modular, mission-focused design that provides the Navy with war fighting capabili ties and operational flex ibility to ensure continued maritime dominance and access. A relatively small sur face combatant, the LCS is designed to operate independently, as part of a Carrier Strike Group or as part of a smaller Surface Action Group. The LCS is designed to operate in shallow coastal waters, and is capable of operating in depths of less than 20 feet. The vessel has two variants, one built by Lockheed Martin and one built by Austal. The EA examined sta tioning up to 21 crews (up to 1,050 ships company crew personnel and up to about 400 mission pack age crew personnel) and about 240 on-installation LCS support personnel at the selected base. This would result in about 1,700 personnel, as well as about 1,900 family members, being added to the local community. There would be up to 21 crews available for the 14 LCSs; however, six ships would be deployed at any given time, leaving eight LCSs and 15 crews in port at any one time.Navy Looks At Potential Effects Of Homeporting LCSs at NS Mayport Or NS Norfolk (CVN 72); the deferral of repair work for USS Miami (SSN 755) and USS Porter (DDG 78); the delayed deployment of USS Harry S Truman (CVN 75) AND USS Gettysburg (CG 64); the civilian hiring freeze; the planning for civilian furloughs; and the reduc tion of all training not related to the readiness of deployed or next-to-deploy forces. Navy department lead ership understands the uncertainty that these and other decisions create both amongst our people and in the defense industry upon which we rely. The lack of a legislative solu tion to avoid sequestration is deeply regrettable. That said, we must endeavor to deal with the situation as we face it, not as we wish it could otherwise be. We will continue to keep the safety and well-being of our people foremost in mind, even as we try hard to keep whole the force structure which supports them. We will also continue to keep the Fleet and Fleet Marine Force fully informed as fol low-on decisions are made. Released by Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy From Page 1SequestrationMarch Is Navy Nutrition MonthFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsMarch is designated as Navy Nutrition Month in conjunction with National Nutrition Month and the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, according to NAVADMIN 051/13 released Feb. 28. The goal is to increase aware ness and transform food envi ronments Navy-wide to facilitate and maintain better food and beverage options, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Nutrition, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Navy Nutrition officials seek to begin meaningful conversations about our food, how our choices impact us and the role we all play in changing the food environ ment. Improved nutrition is a key element to resiliency and Navy readiness will be improved by shifting the availability of foods within our commands. Transforming the Navy food environment to increase access to healthful food choices that are tasty and satisfying, while simul taneously decreasing access to highly-processed, unhealthy foods is the most promising strat egy to improve individual eating habits. Leadership can increase awareness by promoting the healthy choice as the easy choice at events, including commandsponsored picnics, department functions, food sales and even meetings. Commands are encouraged to use this opportunity to increase awareness of healthful eating and nutrition programs. Some of the recommend ed activities include: interac tive workshops, training events, health fairs and healthy cooking competitions. Downloadable nutrition month materials are available on the Navy Nutrition Program Web Page at www.npc.navy.mil/ support/navynutrition/Pages/ default2.aspx. Additional resources are also available through the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/nmcphc/health-promo tion/Pages/default.aspx and from Navy Fitness at www.navy fitness.org/nutrition/. Read NAVADMIN 051/13 at www.npc.navy.mil for more information. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 Mayport CPO 365 Gives Back To Jax By Paige GnannEditorFirst Class and Chief Petty Officers from Naval Station Mayport spent a day away from the office Friday by helping out the Jacksonville Zoo as part of a CPO 365 community relations project. The CPO 365 program is a year round training cycle aimed at preparing first class petty officers to be future chief petty offi cers. More than a dozen Sailors from NS Mayport, DESRON 14, CID LS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay spent the day stuffing Easter eggs with candy or removing trash along the riverbank at the new Dinosaur exhibit. This has been a great experience, said Culinary Specialist 1st (Sw/SCW/ AW) Tara Latham. Were out here working as a team. While were doing things for the community, were having fun at the same time. As part of the group filled garbage bags with tires, discarded bottles and cans, the other group stuffed the eggs for an upcoming Easter egg hunt held at the zoo. Zoo Marketing and Membership Manager, Gina Stiles, said the nonprofit organization relies heavily on volunteers, like the CPO 365 group. As a non-profit, all our dollars go to the care and feeding of the animals and operating expense, Stile said. Special events, education programs we rely very heavily on our volunteers. Its really heartening to see all these people come out because they want to help. Stile said the Zoo also offers special deals for the military, including a 10 percent discount on admission and member ship.-Photos by Paige GnannInformation Systems Technician 1st Class (SW) Rodney Nutter of DESRON 14 and Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/ AW) Wayne Rickerson of Oasis Galley pull out a tire from the river bed as Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW/SCW/AW) Tara Latham of Oasis Galley places a piece of trash in her bag. Religious Programs Specialist Hector L. Feliciano of Base Chapel fills his trash bag up with discarded items clogging the riverbank at the Jacksonville Zoo. Engineman 1st Class (SW) Mark Blasini of Harbor Ops finds a container lid as his wife, Keysha, locates more trash for his bag. CPO 365 trash detail stand with the bags of litter collected at the riverbank of the Jacksonville Zoo. The group found three tires, along with inflatables, bottles and cans. Culinary Specialist 1st (SW/AW) Linda Colter of Oasis Galley fills up her bag during the riverbank walk down for trash. Nutter and Information Systems Technician (SW/AW) Bryan Horanburg, both of DESRON 14, wade through tall grasses to collect debris. Rickerson stops to put a bottle in his bag as team members make their way around an embankment.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 5 The team makes their way through tall grasses along the Asian Gardens area to pick up trash and debris washed ashore from recent rainfalls. Culinary Specialist First Class Petty Officers Mickel LaToya and Tara Latham, both of Oasis Galley, make their way from underneath the pier after picking up sev eral pieces of trash. Ships Serviceman 1st Class Billie Gibson of Base Housing, wades through tall grasses to find pieces of trash and debris during the Mayport CPO 365 community relations project at the Jacksonville Zoo. Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Quincy Jackson of Harbor Ops, Chief Masterat-Arms Keith Elliott of Base Security and Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW) Tony Smith of CID LS Mayport stuff Easter eggs during a community relations project at the Jacksonville Zoo. Chief Electronics Technician (SS/IDW) William Arias of CID LS Kings Bay and his wife, Information Systems Technician Amanda Arias of CID LS Mayport, open candy and plastic Easter eggs to stuff for an upcoming Easter egg hunt scheduled at the Jacksonville Zoo. Above, Information Systems Technician (IDW/ SW/AW) Denisha Hughes of CID LS Mayport works to close a lavender egg. Left, Information System Technician 1st Class (IDW/ SW/AW) Anita Buxton of CID Ls Mayport, a volun teer from the zoo and other CPO 365 volunteers stuff 30,000 plastic Easter eggs with candy during a com munity relations project.

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Mayport Celebrates Black History MonthU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet celebrated Black History Month during a ceremony at the base chapel at Naval Station Mayport Feb. 26. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) was the guest speaker. The celebration of the diversity of all Americans is critically important to our culture. African Americans have served our great nation and her Navy from the Revolutionary War to this very day. The story of patriotic service to our nation is a Navy story, it is an African American story, but most impor tantly it is an American story, Harris said. Harris discussed the important contributions of African Americans to the Navy. From Vice Admiral Sam Gravely to Vice Admiral Michelle Howard...from Gunners Mate Chief John Henry (Dick) Turpin to Fleet Master Chief Chuck Clarke, African Americans have served and will con tinue to serve with honor, courage and commitment to our great country. Late Vice Adm. Samuel Gravely was the first African American to command a warship, the destroyer USS Theodore E. Chandler (DD 717), to command a warship in combat, USS Taussig (DD 746), to command a major warship, USS Jouett (DLG 29) to attain flag rank, to achieve the rank of vice admiral; and to command a numbered fleet (U.S. 3rd Fleet). Vice Adm. Howard, Deputy Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, is the first African-American woman to achieve three star rank in the U.S. Armed Forces, and first to command a U.S. Navy ship. In 1917, John Henry Turpin became the first African American chief petty officer, the Navys highest enlisted rank at the time. A chief gunners mate, he was one of the Navys first divers and was one of the people respon sible for perfecting the underwater cutting torch. The ceremony included singing, by the Edward Waters College Concert Choir, and a solo per formance of Lift Every Voice and Sing from Information Systems Technician 1st Class Faith Elbert from 4th Fleet. I am grateful for this opportunity to sing today, I feel like this is a way to honor our ancestors and their struggle for equal ity. Goodwin said. Black History Month began in 1926 as Black History Week, when historian Carter G. Woodson announced the second week in February Black History Week. The week was chosen because it marks the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln, and Frederick Douglas. Woodson, an African American historian, author and journalist, was the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and history. Carter would become the sec ond African American to earn a Doctorate degree. After a career in teach ing, Carter would devote the remainder of his life to historical research and the preservation of African American histo ry. Today many schools throughout the U.S. are named after Carter, including Carter G. Woodson Elementary in Jacksonville. In 1976 during the Americas bicenten nial, Black History Week was expanded to Black History Month and was recognized by the U.S. Government. COMUSNAVSO/ COMFOURTHFLT sup ports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenInformation Systems Technician 1st Class Faith Elbert sings "Lift Every Voice and Sing" during Naval Station Mayport Black History Month Celebration Feb. 26 at the base cha pel Feb. 26. -Photo by ET3 Michelle Maltese Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris enjoys a special meal prepared by Oasis Galley in recogni tion of Black History Month at Naval Station Mayport. Harris was guest speaker at this years Black History Month Observance held at the base chapel. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailor, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. March 7, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 7, 10-11 a.m., Craft Hour (during Tottle Tyme), USO March 11, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO March 11, 10 a.m.noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an addi tional motivator for end ing the violence and seek ing intervention. March 12, 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Military Spouse 101 Workshop Building 1, Room 702 March 12, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum Building 1, Room 1616 March 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 14, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 18, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 March 18-22, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. March 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. March 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 March 25-29, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. March 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 March 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. FFSC Plans Tea Party For Soon-to-be MomsFrom FFSCThe New Parent Support Program is hosting an English Tea for expectant moms on April 25 from 1-3 p.m. at the base Chapel. The program is honoring these women in rec ognition of Aprils Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is a special opportunity for moms-to-be to meet each other and have a grand day of pamper ing. If you are pregnant, you are invited to come out and enjoy the food, tea and good company. There is no charge for this event, however reg istration is required. There are limited seats avail able. Call FFSC at 270-6600 ext. 1700 to save your seat. Volunteers Needed To Clean RiverFrom EnvironmentalVolunteers are needed to collect lit ter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport for the 18th Annual St. Johns River Celebration Cleanup on March 16. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on March 16 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 11 a.m. volunteers are welcome to par ticipate for part or all of that time frame. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net (key words: St Johns River Celebration) or con tact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 2706781. Pre-registration is not required. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 7

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BBC Spends Time With Locks, Cat In Hat -Photos courtesy of BBCBalfour Beatty Communities, with help from Victorias Hair and Nails, collected 49 ponytails for Locks of Love on Feb. 24 at Ribault Bay Community Center. The pony tails will benefit children who have lost their hair due to a medical condition called alopecia areata or other conditions that result in permanent hair loss. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. -Photos courtesy of BBCCat In the Hat visits with the Child Development Center VPK class on Friday at Ribault Bay Community Center to celebrate author, Dr. Seuss birthday. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 9

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March 15: Freedom FridayRock Your Shamrock. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Wear your green and dance with DJ Derek! Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Employment Orientation. 4-5 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly rec ommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 2705680 March 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process. 270-5680 Bogeys SpecialsThursday, March 7 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 Spinach, Turkey, Avocado Wheat Wrap, $7.95 Chicken Caesar Tortellini, $7.95 Friday, March 8 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, March 11 Chicken Tender BLT Sandwich, $7.95 Bbq Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Tuesday, March 12 Chicken Fajita Quesadilla, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.50 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Wednesday, March 13 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, Roasted Red Potatoes, Broccoli and Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $ 7.95Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6.00 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25. Monday Chicken patty sandwich fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75Focsle LoungeSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive align ment). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of sur prises and an additional $5 off for all active duty military (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge March 8: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 March 15: Luck O the Irish St. Patricks Day Weekend Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 19: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimentary Park-toPark pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID to activate ticket at front gate. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 2705145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orlando From your local ITT office and upgrade for free to a Length of Stay Pass (unlimited vis its within a 14-day con secutive window). FL residents can buy a one day admission ticket at their local ITT office and get the rest of the year for free (formerly called a splash pass)! Unlimited visits good until Dec. 31, 2013; some restrictions may apply, upgrades must be done on first visit of stay. Proof of resi dency must be shown if necessary. 270-5145 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 7: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 4. March 11: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 13: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 4 March 19: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. March 20: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! Free food for all attendees. March 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 18 March 22: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. March 27: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 22 March 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. March 30: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Intramural Sports March 9: Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. All-military teams $40, military/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. March 12: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 16: Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by March 8. 270-5451 March 23: Womens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. Allmilitary teams $40, mili tary/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 20: Command Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Open to all mili tary and civilian employ ees assigned to com mands at NS Mayport. is a Free Bowling Party (up to 120 people) + 100 Instant Party Bowling Coupons (over $2500 value). Teams will play 3 games of bowl ing: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize! Captains Cup Points awarded. Cost is $75 per team. 270-5377. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Command Bowling Challenge Is ComingFrom MWRMayport Bowling Center will host the Command Bowling Challenge on Wednesday, March 20, at 4p.m. All com mands are invited to enter 5-person teams in this fun event aimed at all skill levels. Teams will play 3 games of bowl ing: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Each team will be competing for the grand prize of a command bowling party for up to 120 people. All partici pating teams will also receive 100 Instant Bowling Party vouch ers worth more than $2,500 just for entering the tournament. All Active duty and DOD civil ians assigned to commands are eligible to enter. Registration is just $75.00 per team. To register for this event please stop by the bowling center to complete the entry form. Deadline is March 13, 2013. For more information please call 270-5377 and ask for the center manager. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 11

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New DoD Program for Mobile DevicesAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is rolling out a program that will allow users of a range of mobile devices working any where from remote bat tlefields to the Pentagon to rapidly share classified and protected data across all components. More than 600,000 DOD employees, from soldiers on the front lines to Joint Staff planners, use government-issued mobile devices, most ly BlackBerry phones. Several thousand of the mobile devices in use in DOD are capable of han dling classified data. The goal of the implementation plan announced today is to ensure that mobile devic es throughout the depart ment as well as their apps, email and other functions, and the wire less networks support ing them can operate securely in often hostile and remote environ ments and can adapt to ever-changing technology, even as the number of users expands. Teri Takai, DODs chief information officer, told American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel that the chal lenge for the Defense Department has been to design a unified system capable of fully leveraging the potential of devices that often differ in capa bilities and sophistication in a way that will allow users to communicate in a secure, wireless environment. We will be able to not only use multiple com mercial devices, but we will have a better process for bringing new commer cial devices onto the net work, she added. Takai, along with the Defense Information Systems Agency, is lead ing the effort, which will use commercial carrier networks capable of han dling classified data. This new capabil ity will actually allow us to use secure devices on [DODs classified net work] and give us more flexibility in terms of what those devices are, she said. Takai added that the security of wireless com munication amid increas ingly frequent cyberat tacks on government and corporate networks is chief among her con cerns. The challenge for DOD is to balance the concern of cybersecurity with the need to have the capability of these devices, she said. But given both their ubiquity as well as their rapidly changing technology, Takai said, the Pentagon had to act quickly to develop a com prehensive program. The commercial mobile device market is moving so quickly, we cant wait, she said. If we dont get something in place, we will have multi ple solutions, just because the demand out there to be able to use these devic es is so strong. Officials are planning for a phased implemen tation involving vendor competition for devel opment of a system that Takai suggests, given DODs 3 million plus employees, could prove to be a model for large companies that also need to protect the transmission of both open and confi dential data. We are paving the way for many aspects on both networks, she said.Correcting Credit Report Errors Is EssentialMayport Legal Assistance Office, RLSO SEAre you thinking about borrowing money to buy a home or car? Do you need a line of credit to make home repairs? Have you applied for a new credit card? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, it is important to make sure information on your cred it report is accurate and up to date. Even if you are not planning on borrowing money, your credit report has special importance if you are an active duty military member, DoD civilian employee or con tractor who requires any level of security clearance. If you fall into any of these categories you must undergo a security clear ance background inves tigation which is subject to periodic review. The investigation will identify any adverse information contained in your credit report such as judgments; property repossession; or delinquencies on debts (90 days delinquent or more on current debts and/or 180 days delin quent or more on debts in the previous seven years). You should review your credit report before you submit any credit applica tions and well before your security clearance is up for renewal. Reviewing your credit report in advance will provide an opportunity to cor rect information. Since September 2012, the fed eral government, through the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has been actively monitoring and conducting on-site investigations to assure that the credit reporting agencies are complying with the law. Previously, there was not much fed eral oversight. Now may be the best time to correct any inaccurate informa tion on your credit report. How do you go about correcting errors on your report? You need not hire a credit repair com pany! The first step is to obtain a credit report from each of the three major nationwide cred it reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Each main tain your personal infor mation and individual credit history. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), you are entitled to receive a free report from each credit reporting agency once a year. Since creditors are not required to submit information to all three of the agencies, your credit report from one agency will likely contain different infor mation from the others. Initially, you should request a report from all three. Afterwards, you can stagger your request once every four months to take full advantage of the free report allow ance (for example, you can request a report from Equifax in January, Experian in May, Trans Union in September and Equifax again the follow ing January and so on). To obtain your free report, request it online through www.annualcreditreport. com ( a central website maintained by the three agencies), call 1-877322-8228, or request it by mail by filling out the Annual Credit Report Request form and mail ing it to Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281. Once you receive your reports, closely inspect your personal informa tion and each entry. Although you can make corrections or submit a dispute online, it is rec ommended that you sub mit a dispute in a writ ten letter to the credit reporting agency clearly explaining the dispute and requesting the inac curate information be removed, corrected or updated. It is in your best interest to also include supporting documenta tion. The following are the addresses for the three credit reporting agencies: Equifax 1550 Peachtree Street, NW Atlanta, GA 30309-2468 Experian 701 Experian Parkway Allen, TX 75013 TransUnion 555 West Adams St Chicago, IL 60661 After receiving your let ter, the agency must initi ate an investigation and notify the entity that pro vided them the informa tion of your dispute with a copy of the informa tion you provided. When notified, the entity must conduct its own investi gation. Once complete, that entity must provide the credit reporting agen cy with a report of the outcome. If your dispute results in a change, the agency must provide you with the results along with a free copy of your cred it report. If your dispute is not resolved, you can place a statement of the dispute in your credit file. Taking the time to review your credit reports can save you from a head ache down the road. If you would like help with this process, you can meet with an attorney at the Region Legal Service Office Southeast.Please visit us at http://www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/ rlso/rlso_southeast.htm for more information or to find out the location of the legal assistance office closest to you. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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RGB Performs Crash And Smash Drills USS Robert G. Bradley Public Affairs OfficerUSS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Sailors conduct ed Crash and Smash drills recently to prepare for a helicopter emergency on the flight deck. Bradleymen hold Crash and Smash drills twice a month to ensure that the firefighting party onboard, or Emergency Flight Quarters team, is always ready to respond in the case of an emer gency. Currently, RGB is deployed with HSC-22 Detachment 5, who bring four unmanned aerial vehicles onboard that are called MQ-8B Firescouts. So far the four Firescouts have flown a combined 330 flight hours. Even though the RGB is not deployed with manned helicopters onboard it still helps to hold drills to maintain proficiency especially since the RGB is still capable of performing flight operations with a manned helicopter. RGB, an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate, is homeported out of Mayport, Fla., and is on a scheduled deployment to the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility in the Mediterranean Sea. -Photos by Ensign Matthew RobertsHospitalman 3rd Class Matthew Layton instructs four other Sailors on treating a casualty during the Crash and Smash drill. Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Nicholas Szczepanski and Electronics Technician 2nd Class Cuong Nguyen set up a Ramfan 2000 during Damage Control drills. Sailors on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) race to set up a Ramfan 2000 during Damage Control drills. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 13

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to our men and women in uniform, and as the head of the Pentagon, I know their interests will always be close to his heart, Biden said. Most importantly, he added, I know the presi dent will be able to rely on Chucks sound, unvar nished judgment on any issue where our troops are involved. For that and many more reasons, Im looking forward to work ing with Secretary Hagel.From Page 1HagelFriday, March 8 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is hosting a Garden Concert featur ing the Noel Freidline Quintet as part of Garden Month 2013 from 7 to 9 p.m.. Guests may bring blankets, chairs, food and beverages. The concert is part of Garden Month 2013, a month long celebra tion of the historic gar dens the Cummer family designed over 100 years ago and that are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Events throughout the month of March include Garden Tours, activities and classes for children and adults, lectures, lunches, a Fashion Show and a Farm to Table Moonlight Dinner in the Gardens. General Admission is: Members $20 and Nonmembers $25. Reserved Tables: Includes concert reserva tion and seating for 10. Limited number avail able. Food and beverage not included. Advance ticket purchase is strong ly encouraged. For more information or to pur chase tickets, please call (904) 899-6038 or visit www.cummer.org. Saturday, March 9 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Duval County Staff are offering an irrigation class on water saving tech niques, tuning up your irrigation system and low volume irrigation for gar dens from 9 a.m.-noon at Duval County Extension, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. We are offering a free water savings kit to the first 50 registrants. Call Becky at 255-7450 to pre-register or email her at beckyd@ coj.net with your name and phone number. Cost is $5. You can pay at the door. Orlando HarleyDavidson will host a pair of events benefiting Operation Giveback www. operation-giveback.org to honor the heroic sacrifice of Americas veterans and their families. Starting at 11:45 a.m., a large motor cycle convoy will travel on surface roads from the Orlando Harley-Davidson South Dealership on 192 in Kissimmee to the Orlando HarleyDavidson Historic Factory Dealership. Starting at 1 p.m., hundreds of riders and members of the pub lic will be treated to enter tainment and food. A $10 donation (cash or check) per rider and a $5 dona tion per passenger will be required. All proceeds will benefit wounded war riors, their families and the children of our fallen heroes. For more informa tion, visit www.orlando harley.com The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park is partnering with the Friends of Fort Clinch, Inc., Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission and Fish Florida to conduct a Kids Fishing Clinic from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, to teach lessons on knot tying, fishing ethics, tack le, habitat, casting and more. The clinic is open to children ages four to 16 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. The first 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. For additional information, please contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks.org. Sunday, March 10 Contestant rehears als for the Miss Shrimp Festival 2013 Scholarship Pageant, sponsored by the Hampton Inn & Suites, Amelia Island, will be held weekly, beginning with the organizational meeting and rehearsal at 3 p.m. at the Bean School of Dance, 25 North 3rd Street in Fernandina Beach. Weekly rehearsal will be held every Sunday until the pageant is held on Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m. on the Riverfront Stage. Miss Shrimp Festival 2013 will be awarded a $1,000 Scholarship. The pageant is open to high school level juniors and seniors, who are attend ing public, private, alter native or home schools. Eligible participants must reside in Nassau County, but may attend high school in another county. Contestants will be accepted until April 7, 2013. The 4-part appli cation packet may be downloaded from www. shrimpfestival.com under the Events tab. Questions? please call Barbara Book, Pageant Choreographer at 904583-1770 or Sandy Price, Shrimp Festival Executive Director at 904-206-0756 or email 4info@shrimp festival.com. Tuesday, March 12 The Duval County Extension Office along with Standard Feed & Seed, Dinsmore Feed & Supply and Purina Animal Nutrition is offer ing a Small Scale Poultry Production Workshop from 6-8:30 p.m. This free workshop will cover breed selection, nutrition and feeding, basic manage ment of recycling chicken litter, current regulations and petition update, gen eral tips and an Q & A panel. Everyone in atten dance will receive a cou pon for two free chicks. Light refreshments will be served. To pre-register call Becky at 904-255-7450 or go to http://raising poultry2013.eventbrite. com. This workshop will be located at the Duval County Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Friday, March 15 Duval County Extension is offering a Make and Take Rain Barrel Workshop on from 10 a.m.-noon. The cost is $45. Pre-registration with payment is due by Monday, March 11. Please make check for $45 payable to DCOHAC and mail to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N McDuff Ave. The class is limited in size. Please bring a vehicle big enough to get the 55-gallon plastic drum home. Sorry, no deliver ies. For questions, please call Becky at 904-2557450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Rec Raises $ For Command Events -Photo by ET3 Michelle MalteseMembers of Naval Station Mayports Recreation Committee participate in a Gas N Glass fundraiser last week to benefit the commands holiday party and command picnic.Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday March 11, from 5-7 p.m., the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner sponsored by Mayport Tavern. This is free for active d service members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve Jambalaya, rice, corn bread, and dessert. 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Eric Clapton Ticket Drawing-Enter To Win The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is doing a ticket draw ing for three free pairs of tickets to the Eric Clapton concert on Tuesday, March 26, at the Veterans Memorial Arena but you cant win if you dont enter. The drawing is limited to active duty only with one entry per dual service family. To enter, please send your first and last name, email address, command, and contact number to drawing@ usojax.com. The deadline to enter is Friday, March 15. Disney On Ice TicketsThis Week The Mayport and NAS USO centers is sell ing lower level tickets to the Friday, April 5 per formance of Disney on Ice. Lower level Tickets are $10 each and are cash only. Tickets are open to Active/Retired/ Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Share a great evening with your fam ily. Call the Mayport USO (246-3481) or the NAS USO (778-2821) to reserve your tickets. Sorry, no refunds/exchanges on tickets purchased for the Thursday night perfor mance. Calling All Veterans And Military FamiliesJTA Survey JTA needs your help to complete a Veterans and Military Families Transportation Options survey in connection with a grant for regional transportation assistance. If you havent already, please complete the sur vey at: http://bit.ly/one call-oneclick. The survey deadline is Feb. 28. USO Annual Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on March 22 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Lots of fun, prizes on course and refreshments and food after completion of play. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. We are lim ited to 30 foursomes. 2013 Honda ClassicFree Admission See Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy face off at the 2013 Honda Classic for free. All active duty, reserve, and retirees, as well as dependents receive complimentary admission. You must pre register at https://bird iesforthebrave.sheerid. com/hondaclassic/ to print your voucher for free entry. Also, enjoy compli mentary food and drinks at the Birdies for the Brave Outpost sponsored by Wells Fargo and Sikorsky. Relay For Life-NS Mayport Join Relay For Life and NS Mayport in fighting cancer. NS Mayport will host its first Relay For Life on April 13-14 with the opening ceremo ny beginning at noon. The theme this year is Seek and Destroy. This event is open to family, friends, coworkers, and those wishing to join the fight against cancer. For more information, visit www.relayforlife.org/ MayportFL. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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Mayport Vet Clinic will hold upcoming vaccine clinic on March 16 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 270-7004. Mayport Vet Clinic is located on base at708-B Everglades Court. Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Hagel Is New Defense SecretaryAmerican Forces Press ServiceJust before his private swearing-in ceremony as the 24th secretary of defense, Chuck Hagel and his wife, Lilibet, arrived at the Pentagon Feb. 27 and were greeted by Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Thomas D. Waldhauser, military assistant to the secretary of defense. Hagel, delayed more than 30 minutes by Washington traffic, said hello to waiting mem bers of the Pentagon press corps as he hur ried up the steps of the Pentagons river entrance. From there, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little and other defense officials accompanied him into the building. Family members and his immediate office staff attended the ceremony, during which Hagel was sworn in by Director of Administration and Management Michael L. Rhodes. Hagel then hosted the daily senior staff update meeting attended by DOD civilian and mili tary leaders. In a statement released after Hagels Senate confirmation yesterday, Little said the new sec retary received congratulatory phone calls from his predecessor, Leon E. Panetta, congressional leaders, and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. In his conversation with Secretary Shinseki, Little added, Hagel indicated his desire to meet as soon as possible to continue and deepen the strong partnership between the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs on common pri orities for serving our troops, veterans and military families. After the staff meet ing, Hagel will speak to service members and civilian Defense Department employ ees in the Pentagon Auditorium. The address will be covered live on the Pentagon Channel. Its scheduled to start at 10:30 a.m. EST. This afternoon, Hagel will meet with the ser vice secretaries and attend meetings at the White House. Yesterday, Vice President Joe Biden said in a statement that hed travelled across the world with Hagel and has seen him in action in the U.S. Senate. Wherever he is, his talent and dedication to our country are clear. He feels a deep commitment Galley Moves Back To Oasis-Photo by ET3 Michelle MalteseCulinary Specialist 3rd Class Dominique Kennedy of USS Underwood and Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Wilmer Ringgold of Oasis Galley prepare lunches for hungry Sailors during the reopening of Oasis Galley on March 4. The galley has been closed for several month due to extensive renovation and has been serving patrons at the Beachside Community Center instead. The Oasis Galley will be open to serve breakfast from 6-7:30 a.m., lunch from 11-12:30 p.m. and supper from 4-5:30 p.m. A grand opening celebration is planned for later this month.MWR Expo Is For You!From MWRThe 9th annual MWR Expo and Travel Show will be held on March 14 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ocean Breeze Conference and Catering Center. This free, yearly event features all the latest information from regional travel destinations including resorts, hotels and theme parks, along with MWR Mayport programs and services. In addition to travel and recreation informa tion booths, the Expo will also have popular base services on hand such as FFSC, Navy College, NEX, Commissary, Navy Lodge, The Mirror and Navy Federal Credit Union. Event participants will enjoy free food and bev erage samples from over 15 vendors as they visit the various information booths. Giveaway items, to include hotel stays, theme park tickets, rec reation equipment, gift cards and baskets, will be available to those attend ing. Navy Responds To SequestrationU.S. Navy ReleaseThis message was sent to all Navy and Marine units by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. On March 1, sequestration was enacted necessitating the fol lowing actions: Last night, because no bud get deal had been reached, the budget control act required set ting in motion the automatic, government-wide cuts known as sequestration. Given that real ity and the associated impact of budgetary uncertainty imposed by an indefinite continuing resolution, the department of the Navy intends to commence some reductions immediately. Navy plans to: A. Shut down Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) in April. This will initiate the preparations to gradually stand-down flying in at least three additional air wings with two more air wings being reduced to minimum safe flying levels by the end of the year; B. Defer USNS Comfort humanitarian deploy ment to Central and South America, Continuing Promise 2013 including supporting ships, Seabees, and medical units; C. Cancel or defer the deployments of up to six ships to vari ous AORS throughout the month of April; D. Lay up four Combat Logistics Force (CLF) units in PACOM starting in April; E. RETURN USS Shoup (DDG 86) to homeport early and not proceed as USS Nimitz (CVN 68) escort to CENTCOM; F. Return USS Thach (FFG 43) to homeport early from deploy ment to SOUTHCOM. We will also immediately: A. Begin negotiating contract modifications to de-obligate efforts for any investment pro grams for which the remain ing unobligated balance will be insufficient after the sequestra tion reduction is applied. Major programs affected include Virginia-class SSN advance procurement, reactor power units and Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV 10); B. Commence final planning to slow Marine Corps Depot maintenance activities, includ ing reductions in the non-per manent workforce; C. Cancel March introductory flight screening for future pilots/ NFOS; D. Announce intent to cancel Blue Angels shows scheduled for April 2013 [four shows: MacDill AFB (Tampa, FL), NAS Corpus Christi,Texas, VIDALIA Ga., MCAS Beaufort S.C.]; E. Cease new USMC enroll ments in voluntary education tuition assistance; F. Cancel March Navy Recruiting media support and reduce the majority of advertis ing contracts as much as pos sible under contractual condi tions. These actions are being taken to preserve support for those forces stationed overseas and currently forward-deployed. Reductions in lower-priority forward operations, and significant reductions in all other opera tions, training, and maintenance are the results of this selection process. We made these choices carefully, while trying to pre serve our ability to reverse or quickly restore negative effects if and when funding is restored. Actions we have taken to date will continue, to include those affecting the deferral of mainte nance for USS Abraham Lincoln Get Your Teen A MWR JobMWR is open ing up its Summer Teen Employment Program to active duty and retiree dependent teens age 15-17. The program begins on March 20 with the Teen Employment Orientation from 4-5 p.m. at the Teen Center. There will be a Teen Career Launch on March 26 and 27 from 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. Applications must be received by the MWR Personnel Office by April 2. Call (904) 270-5680 for more informationSee Sequestration, Page 3 -Photo by MC1 Chad J. McNeeleyAs his wife Lilibet holds the bible, Chuck Hagel is sworn into office as the 24th Secretary of Defense by Michael L. Rhodes, DoD Director of Administration and Management at the Pentagon, Feb. 27. See Hagel, Page 14

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Running my fingertip along the wrinkled peak of thin, gold foil, I find an edge. I insert a nail under the delicate lip and lift the sheet, hearing it crinkle as it expands like an accor dion. I pause a moment, just long enough to pinch the end of the tiny paper strip, and tug it free from its host. Satisfied that the sheath has been removed intact, I crumple the shiny square of foil and paper strip into a ball, and dis card it. Popping the freed morsel into my mouth, I let it sit on my tongue for a few seconds, and feel my bodys heat react with the sugary drop. As it melts, a fragment of almond is revealed. In a sudden movement of tongue and teeth, I swipe the nut between my molars and feel it crack under pressure. As I swallow the deli cious mixture, my fingers search the bag for my next Hershey Kiss with Almonds. . More than I should, I find myself reaching for chocolate. One might think the rich texture and undeniably delicious fla vor of this popular con -Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesDue to the changes in last years FACT, the number of students having to take remediation classes for the portions of FCAT 2.0 increased. If you have a child who will be entering middle or high school next year, a score of 1 or 2 could seriously impact the students ability to take elective courses (i.e. band, art, drama, music, etc.). Selection of elective courses will likely be lim ited due to the addition of remediation courses. For example, the fol lowing chart outlines a typical 9th graders high school schedule and the schedule of a 9th grader who scored a 1 or 2 on the FCAT as an 8th grader. 8th Grade Students who score a Level 1 or 2 on FCAT 1. English 1 2. Algebra 1 or Geometry 3. Earthspace Science 4. Intensive Reading 5. Intensive Reading 6. Intensive Math 7. Elective 8th Grade Students who score a Level 3, 4 or 5 on FCAT 1. English 1 or English 1 Honors 2. Algebra 1 or Geometry Honors 3. Earthspace Science or Biology Honors 4. Elective* 5. Elective* 6. Elective* 7. Elective* *May include a World Language, World Geography, HOPE (physical education), career academy or magnet classes, AVID classes, or other elective choices. Scores on the 7th and 8th grade FCAT will also impact admissions into Acceleration Programs such as International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge AICE, and AP Honors. Now is the time to talk to your elementary school and/or middle school student about the ramifi cations of not taking the FCAT seriously. Many times students who are not in Grade 3 or Grade 10 do not take the test seriously since it doesnt impact their promotion to the next grade level. This chart demon strates what their school day can look like if they earn a score of 1 or 2. A middle school sched ule will be very similar only the course names will change. For exam ple, English I becomes M/J Language Arts 1 and math becomes M/J Math 1. Again, limited electives can be selected since students will be required to take appropriate remedial courses. If you want your child to do some extra prep for this years FCAT, have him log on to www. soarathome.org, Student Online Achievement Resources program (SOAR). This internetbased program allows students in grades 3 11 to reinforce and review skills, practice what they have learned, and even learn new skills. It is based on the curriculum standards of the state in which you are living. And best of all, this resource is available to military and civilian students 24/7 and its FREE! Students take an assessment aligned to state standards, and SOAR directs them to individu alized tutorials to improve skills where needed. Parents can monitor their childrens progress from anywhere, and are provided with resource materi als. Log on to www.soarathome.com and register for an account. If you have questions about your individual childs schedule, you should check with the school counselor. This person can make sure you know exactly when the FCAT will be admin istered at your childs school and can provide more detailed responses to course scheduling at the next grade level. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingFCAT Scores Can Impact Students ScheduleThe President of the United States does it, the Prime Minister of Israel does it, and the Queen of England does it. Jews do it. Muslims do it. Hindus do it. Christians do it. Buddhists do it. What is it? It is PRAYER. Prayer could be designated as the first global product of religion. No matter how diverse the religions of the world may be, one common ritual and prac tice that they all embrace is prayer. So begins the Introduction of a book on Prayer by Rev. Dr. Myles Monroe, who incidentally was a college classmate of mine. Dr. Monroe is the founder and president of Bahamas Faith Ministries International. So what is PRAYER? The Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions describes Christian prayer as the ascent of the mind to God, the soul of reli gion, the opening of the heart to God, and a way to know God face to face. Dr. Monroe correctly asserts that prayer in its most elementary form is not just some activity, ritual or obligation that is to be periodically per formed. It is also not begging God to do something for us that we cant accom plish ourselves. Rather, prayer is communion and communication that touches Gods heart. Prayer is meant to be one of the most exciting aspects of our life of faith and our relationship with God. I wonder why that is not the case for so many of the faithful? There are many stories and quotations when it comes to prayer. Here are two funny stories. A severe drought in the south prompted a visit ing pastor to pray for rain. The next day there was a torrential downpour that ruined the crops. Well thats what happens, said one farmer wryly, when you get a pastor that aint familiar with agriculture. Or how about the pas tor who asked a young boy if he said his prayers at night. The boy said yes. The pastor then asked, How about in the morning? The boy answered, No, I am not scared in the daytime. As for a quotation, C.S. Lewis in his Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer, writes Those who do not turn to God in petty trials will have no habit or such resort to help them when the great trials come. So those who have not learned to ask him for childish things will have less readiness to ask him for the great ones. We must not be too high minded. I fancy we may sometimes be deterred from the small prayers by a sense of our own dignity rather than of Gods. Certainly a quotation worthy of reflection and integration. If you are a person of faith, let me ask you briefly to reflect on your own understanding of prayer. What does prayer mean to you? Is prayer a joy or a burden for you? Let me encourage you to give some thought to the idea of prayer. And perhaps even practice it. Touch Gods heart today!Chap Steve Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSfection tempts me, but I have a different motiva tion for eating chocolate. Like a baby, I crave something soothing and repetitive when Im stressed, tired or bored. Since Gerber doesnt make pacifiers for 46-year-olds, and my husband isnt inclined to rock me in a rocking chair, I opt for sweet treats. Im not talking about gorging on devils food cake, or slurping up Hot Fudge Brownie Delights. While I have been known to indulge in those deli cacies from time to time, I find more comfort in chocolate treats that lend themselves to a prolonged ritualistic enjoyment of the process of eating chocolate. Stressing over deploy ments, PCSes, and new orders always causes a flare up in my need for comfort, so during these military events, I hit the chocolate pretty hard. Hershey Kisses with Almonds have been my recent remedy of choice, mostly because eating each tiny morsel involves several repetitive steps that I find quite soothing. When I cant get my hands on those, Girl Scouts Thin Mints Cookies are a reasonable substitute for my choco late therapy. Regardless of the nutri tion label, Ive found that, an entire sleeve of these delectable disks may be needed to calm the nerves. Extracting a cookie from the top of the stack, I place it on my tongue and allow it to steep. The chocolate coating slowly melts, and then my saliva soaks into the crisp cen ter, dissolving it into a mouthful of minty mush. I chew any remaining crunchy bits and swallow, as I lift another disk from the sleeve. Even as a child, I remember ritualizing my consumption of treats. I never understood a kid who could take a bag of M&Ms, tear open the top, and pour the whole thing into his upturned mouth. What a waste! I, on the other hand, would maximize my enjoyment, spreading the contents of each bag out, and separating the can dies out into their colors (which were, back then, orange, green, yellow, dark brown and light brown.) I would then analyze each pile, eating only the most flawed morsels. Those that were mis shapen or had an imper fect M were goners. I continued this process until I had whittled the lot down to one of each color. Those five, the Chosen Ones, would be scooped up together and ceremo niously sacrificed in one final chomp. This may all sound nuts, but in times of stress, everyone turns to something for relief, and I figure that three-quar ters of a bag of Hershey Kisses with Almonds is measurably better for ones mental and physical health than three packs of Camels and a pint of Jose Quervo. So why not dissect a dozen peanut butter cups, nibble the chocolate off the nougat center of a Three Musketeers Bar, or methodically pick apart a pair of Little Debbie Swiss Cake Rolls? It tastes good, it feels good, and stress melts away as fast as a chocolate Kiss on your tongue. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com Hear Roman Catholic Archdiocese For Military Services SpeakFrom NS Mayport ChapelArchbishop Timothy Broglio of the Archdiocese for Military Services, USA, will be the keynote speaker at the second annual Eucharistic Congress Come to the Feast, sponsored by the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine, March 8 and 9, at the Prime Osborn III Convention Center. Approximately 5,000 Catholics from Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia are expected to attend the 2-day event that begins with open ing remarks from Bishop Felipe Estevez of the Diocese of St. Augustine on Friday at 7 p.m. On Saturday at 8 a.m., Bishop Estevez will lead an outdoor procession of the Blessed Sacrament, followed by Mass at 9 a.m., Archbishop Broglio is scheduled to address the group at 10:45 a.m. Programs geared specifically for youth and young adults attending are scheduled, as well as a concert Saturday evening aby Grammynominated singer, Matt Maher. A $5 fee and pre-registration is required for the youth program. Tickets to the Matt Maher con cert are $10 each and can be purchased through Ticketmaster, Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena or at the Eucharistic Congress.

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Navy Calls For Input On LCS Draft EAFrom Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command The U.S. Navy has prepared and released to the public a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environ mental effects that may result from homeporting up to 14 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) on the East Coast of the United States by 2020. The EA evaluates the potential environmental effects of homeporting 14 LCSs at either Naval Station Norfolk, Va., or 14 LCSs at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Although no final deci sion has yet been made, the Navys preferred alternative is to homeport the initial East Coast Littoral Combat Ships at Naval Station Mayport. This Draft EA will be available for a 30 day public review and comment period until March 29, 2013, and can be accessed at the following website: https://portal.navfac. navy.mil/portal/page/ portal/navfac/navfac_ ww_pp/navfac_navfac midlant_pp/midlant_ps/ environmental_norfolk/ tab3987837. Paper copies of the Draft EA are available for review at the fol lowing libraries: Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, Fla. Library, 303 N Laura St. Jacksonville, Fla. Library, 100 Herb Bauer Drive, St. Marys, Ga. County Public Library, 301 Cunningham Blvd., Havelock, N.C. Anchor Library, 111 W. Ocean View Ave., Norfolk, Va. Central Library, 4100 Virginia Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, Va. Comments may be submitted in writing to: LCS Homeporting EA Project Manager; Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic; Attn: Code EV21/SS 6506 Hampton Blvd. Norfolk, Va., or via e-mail using the following address: navfaclantpao@ navy.mil. Comments must be postmarked no later than March 29, 2012, and should be as specific as possible. The Draft EA includes an evaluation of the environmental effects of con struction of support facilities at the chosen loca tion and accommodating the required crews and unmanned aerial systems for the LCS. For example, MQ_8B Fire Scouts are proposed to be stored and flight tested at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. The LCS has a modular, mission-focused design that provides the Navy with war fighting capabilities and operational flex ibility to ensure continued maritime dominance and access. A relatively small sur face combatant, the LCS is designed to operate independently, as part of a Carrier Strike Group or as part of a smaller Surface Action Group. The LCS is designed to operate in shallow coastal waters, and is capable of operating in depths of less than 20 feet. The vessel has two variants, one built by Lockheed Martin and one built by Austal. The EA examined sta tioning up to 21 crews (up to 1,050 ships company crew personnel and up to about 400 mission pack age crew personnel) and about 240 on-installation LCS support personnel at the selected base. This would result in about 1,700 personnel, as well as about 1,900 family members, being added to the local community. There would be up to 21 crews available for the 14 LCSs; however, six ships would be deployed at any given time, leaving eight LCSs and 15 crews in port at any one time.Navy Looks At Potential Effects Of Homeporting LCSs at NS Mayport Or NS Norfolk (CVN 72); the deferral of repair work for USS Miami (SSN 755) and USS Porter (DDG 78); the delayed deployment of USS Harry S Truman (CVN 75) AND USS Gettysburg (CG 64); the civilian hiring freeze; the planning for civilian furloughs; and the reduc tion of all training not related to the readiness of deployed or next-to-deploy forces. Navy department lead ership understands the uncertainty that these and other decisions create both amongst our people and in the defense industry upon which we rely. The lack of a legislative solu tion to avoid sequestration is deeply regrettable. That said, we must endeavor to deal with the situation as we face it, not as we wish it could otherwise be. We will continue to keep the safety and well-being of our people foremost in mind, even as we try hard to keep whole the force structure which supports them. We will also continue to keep the Fleet and Fleet Marine Force fully informed as follow-on decisions are made. Released by Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy From Page 1SequestrationMarch Is Navy Nutrition MonthFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsMarch is designated as Navy Nutrition Month in conjunction with National Nutrition Month and the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, according to NAVADMIN 051/13 released Feb. 28. The goal is to increase awareness and transform food envi ronments Navy-wide to facilitate and maintain better food and beverage options, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Nutrition, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Navy Nutrition officials seek to begin meaningful conversations about our food, how our choices impact us and the role we all play in changing the food environ ment. Improved nutrition is a key element to resiliency and Navy readiness will be improved by shifting the availability of foods within our commands. Transforming the Navy food environment to increase access to healthful food choices that are tasty and satisfying, while simul taneously decreasing access to highly-processed, unhealthy foods is the most promising strategy to improve individual eating habits. Leadership can increase awareness by promoting the healthy choice as the easy choice at events, including commandsponsored picnics, department functions, food sales and even meetings. Commands are encouraged to use this opportunity to increase awareness of healthful eating and nutrition programs. Some of the recommend ed activities include: interac tive workshops, training events, health fairs and healthy cooking competitions. Downloadable nutrition month materials are available on the Navy Nutrition Program Web Page at www.npc.navy.mil/ support/navynutrition/Pages/ default2.aspx. Additional resources are also available through the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/nmcphc/health-promo tion/Pages/default.aspx and from Navy Fitness at www.navy fitness.org/nutrition/. Read NAVADMIN 051/13 at www.npc.navy.mil for more information. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 Mayport CPO 365 Gives Back To Jax By Paige GnannEditorFirst Class and Chief Petty Officers from Naval Station Mayport spent a day away from the office Friday by helping out the Jacksonville Zoo as part of a CPO 365 community relations project. The CPO 365 program is a year round training cycle aimed at preparing first class petty officers to be future chief petty offi cers. More than a dozen Sailors from NS Mayport, DESRON 14, CID LS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay spent the day stuffing Easter eggs with candy or removing trash along the riverbank at the new Dinosaur exhibit. This has been a great experience, said Culinary Specialist 1st (Sw/SCW/ AW) Tara Latham. Were out here working as a team. While were doing things for the community, were having fun at the same time. As part of the group filled garbage bags with tires, discarded bottles and cans, the other group stuffed the eggs for an upcoming Easter egg hunt held at the zoo. Zoo Marketing and Membership Manager, Gina Stiles, said the nonprofit organization relies heavily on volunteers, like the CPO 365 group. As a non-profit, all our dollars go to the care and feeding of the animals and operating expense, Stile said. Special events, education programs we rely very heavily on our volunteers. Its really heartening to see all these people come out because they want to help. Stile said the Zoo also offers special deals for the military, including a 10 percent discount on admission and member ship.-Photos by Paige GnannInformation Systems Technician 1st Class (SW) Rodney Nutter of DESRON 14 and Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/ AW) Wayne Rickerson of Oasis Galley pull out a tire from the river bed as Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW/SCW/AW) Tara Latham of Oasis Galley places a piece of trash in her bag. Religious Programs Specialist Hector L. Feliciano of Base Chapel fills his trash bag up with discarded items clogging the riverbank at the Jacksonville Zoo. Engineman 1st Class (SW) Mark Blasini of Harbor Ops finds a container lid as his wife, Keysha, locates more trash for his bag. CPO 365 trash detail stand with the bags of litter collected at the riverbank of the Jacksonville Zoo. The group found three tires, along with inflatables, bottles and cans. Culinary Specialist 1st (SW/AW) Linda Colter of Oasis Galley fills up her bag during the riverbank walk down for trash. Nutter and Information Systems Technician (SW/AW) Bryan Horanburg, both of DESRON 14, wade through tall grasses to collect debris. Rickerson stops to put a bottle in his bag as team members make their way around an embankment.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 5 The team makes their way through tall grasses along the Asian Gardens area to pick up trash and debris washed ashore from recent rainfalls. Culinary Specialist First Class Petty Officers Mickel LaToya and Tara Latham, both of Oasis Galley, make their way from underneath the pier after picking up several pieces of trash. Ships Serviceman 1st Class Billie Gibson of Base Housing, wades through tall grasses to find pieces of trash and debris during the Mayport CPO 365 community relations project at the Jacksonville Zoo. Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Quincy Jackson of Harbor Ops, Chief Masterat-Arms Keith Elliott of Base Security and Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW) Tony Smith of CID LS Mayport stuff Easter eggs during a community relations project at the Jacksonville Zoo. Chief Electronics Technician (SS/IDW) William Arias of CID LS Kings Bay and his wife, Information Systems Technician Amanda Arias of CID LS Mayport, open candy and plastic Easter eggs to stuff for an upcoming Easter egg hunt scheduled at the Jacksonville Zoo. Above, Information Systems Technician (IDW/ SW/AW) Denisha Hughes of CID LS Mayport works to close a lavender egg. Left, Information System Technician 1st Class (IDW/ SW/AW) Anita Buxton of CID Ls Mayport, a volun teer from the zoo and other CPO 365 volunteers stuff 30,000 plastic Easter eggs with candy during a com munity relations project.

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Mayport Celebrates Black History MonthU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet celebrated Black History Month during a ceremony at the base chapel at Naval Station Mayport Feb. 26. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) was the guest speaker. The celebration of the diversity of all Americans is critically important to our culture. African Americans have served our great nation and her Navy from the Revolutionary War to this very day. The story of patriotic service to our nation is a Navy story, it is an African American story, but most impor tantly it is an American story, Harris said. Harris discussed the important contributions of African Americans to the Navy. From Vice Admiral Sam Gravely to Vice Admiral Michelle Howard...from Gunners Mate Chief John Henry (Dick) Turpin to Fleet Master Chief Chuck Clarke, African Americans have served and will continue to serve with honor, courage and commitment to our great country. Late Vice Adm. Samuel Gravely was the first African American to command a warship, the destroyer USS Theodore E. Chandler (DD 717), to command a warship in combat, USS Taussig (DD 746), to command a major warship, USS Jouett (DLG 29) to attain flag rank, to achieve the rank of vice admiral; and to command a numbered fleet (U.S. 3rd Fleet). Vice Adm. Howard, Deputy Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, is the first African-American woman to achieve three star rank in the U.S. Armed Forces, and first to command a U.S. Navy ship. In 1917, John Henry Turpin became the first African American chief petty officer, the Navys highest enlisted rank at the time. A chief gunners mate, he was one of the Navys first divers and was one of the people responsible for perfecting the underwater cutting torch. The ceremony included singing, by the Edward Waters College Concert Choir, and a solo per formance of Lift Every Voice and Sing from Information Systems Technician 1st Class Faith Elbert from 4th Fleet. I am grateful for this opportunity to sing today, I feel like this is a way to honor our ancestors and their struggle for equal ity. Goodwin said. Black History Month began in 1926 as Black History Week, when historian Carter G. Woodson announced the second week in February Black History Week. The week was chosen because it marks the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln, and Frederick Douglas. Woodson, an African American historian, author and journalist, was the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and history. Carter would become the sec ond African American to earn a Doctorate degree. After a career in teach ing, Carter would devote the remainder of his life to historical research and the preservation of African American histo ry. Today many schools throughout the U.S. are named after Carter, including Carter G. Woodson Elementary in Jacksonville. In 1976 during the Americas bicenten nial, Black History Week was expanded to Black History Month and was recognized by the U.S. Government. COMUSNAVSO/ COMFOURTHFLT sup ports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenInformation Systems Technician 1st Class Faith Elbert sings "Lift Every Voice and Sing" during Naval Station Mayport Black History Month Celebration Feb. 26 at the base chapel Feb. 26. -Photo by ET3 Michelle Maltese Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris enjoys a special meal prepared by Oasis Galley in recogni tion of Black History Month at Naval Station Mayport. Harris was guest speaker at this years Black History Month Observance held at the base chapel. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailor, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. March 7, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 7, 10-11 a.m., Craft Hour (during Tottle Tyme), USO March 11, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO March 11, 10 a.m.noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. March 12, 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Military Spouse 101 Workshop Building 1, Room 702 March 12, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum Building 1, Room 1616 March 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 14, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 18, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 March 18-22, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. March 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. March 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. March 25, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 March 25-29, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. March 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 March 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 March 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. FFSC Plans Tea Party For Soon-to-be MomsFrom FFSCThe New Parent Support Program is hosting an English Tea for expectant moms on April 25 from 1-3 p.m. at the base Chapel. The program is honoring these women in rec ognition of Aprils Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is a special opportunity for moms-to-be to meet each other and have a grand day of pampering. If you are pregnant, you are invited to come out and enjoy the food, tea and good company. There is no charge for this event, however reg istration is required. There are limited seats available. Call FFSC at 270-6600 ext. 1700 to save your seat. Volunteers Needed To Clean RiverFrom EnvironmentalVolunteers are needed to collect lit ter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport for the 18th Annual St. Johns River Celebration Cleanup on March 16. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on March 16 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 11 a.m. volunteers are welcome to par ticipate for part or all of that time frame. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net (key words: St Johns River Celebration) or con tact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 2706781. Pre-registration is not required. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 7

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BBC Spends Time With Locks, Cat In Hat -Photos courtesy of BBCBalfour Beatty Communities, with help from Victorias Hair and Nails, collected 49 ponytails for Locks of Love on Feb. 24 at Ribault Bay Community Center. The ponytails will benefit children who have lost their hair due to a medical condition called alopecia areata or other conditions that result in permanent hair loss. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. -Photos courtesy of BBCCat In the Hat visits with the Child Development Center VPK class on Friday at Ribault Bay Community Center to celebrate author, Dr. Seuss birthday. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 9

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March 15: Freedom FridayRock Your Shamrock. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Wear your green and dance with DJ Derek! Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Employment Orientation. 4-5 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 2705680 March 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process. 270-5680 Bogeys SpecialsThursday, March 7 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 Spinach, Turkey, Avocado Wheat Wrap, $7.95 Chicken Caesar Tortellini, $7.95 Friday, March 8 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, March 11 Chicken Tender BLT Sandwich, $7.95 Bbq Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Tuesday, March 12 Chicken Fajita Quesadilla, $7.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.50 Chicken Cobb Salad, $7.95 Wednesday, March 13 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, Roasted Red Potatoes, Broccoli and Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $ 7.95Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6.00 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25. Monday Chicken patty sandwich fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75Focsle LoungeSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive align ment). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty military (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge March 8: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 March 15: Luck O the Irish St. Patricks Day Weekend Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 19: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimentary Park-toPark pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID to activate ticket at front gate. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 2705145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orlando From your local ITT office and upgrade for free to a Length of Stay Pass (unlimited visits within a 14-day con secutive window). FL residents can buy a one day admission ticket at their local ITT office and get the rest of the year for free (formerly called a splash pass)! Unlimited visits good until Dec. 31, 2013; some restrictions may apply, upgrades must be done on first visit of stay. Proof of residency must be shown if necessary. 270-5145 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 7: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 4. March 11: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 13: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 4 March 19: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. March 20: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Stop by and bring your ideas! Free food for all attendees. March 21: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 18 March 22: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. March 27: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 22 March 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. March 30: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Intramural Sports March 9: Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. All-military teams $40, military/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. March 12: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 16: Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by March 8. 270-5451 March 23: Womens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. Allmilitary teams $40, mili tary/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 20: Command Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Open to all mili tary and civilian employ ees assigned to com mands at NS Mayport. is a Free Bowling Party (up to 120 people) + 100 Instant Party Bowling Coupons (over $2500 value). Teams will play 3 games of bowling: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize! Captains Cup Points awarded. Cost is $75 per team. 270-5377. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Command Bowling Challenge Is ComingFrom MWRMayport Bowling Center will host the Command Bowling Challenge on Wednesday, March 20, at 4p.m. All com mands are invited to enter 5-person teams in this fun event aimed at all skill levels. Teams will play 3 games of bowling: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Each team will be competing for the grand prize of a command bowling party for up to 120 people. All partici pating teams will also receive 100 Instant Bowling Party vouch ers worth more than $2,500 just for entering the tournament. All Active duty and DOD civil ians assigned to commands are eligible to enter. Registration is just $75.00 per team. To register for this event please stop by the bowling center to complete the entry form. Deadline is March 13, 2013. For more information please call 270-5377 and ask for the center manager. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 11

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New DoD Program for Mobile DevicesAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is rolling out a program that will allow users of a range of mobile devices working any where from remote bat tlefields to the Pentagon to rapidly share classified and protected data across all components. More than 600,000 DOD employees, from soldiers on the front lines to Joint Staff planners, use government-issued mobile devices, most ly BlackBerry phones. Several thousand of the mobile devices in use in DOD are capable of han dling classified data. The goal of the implementation plan announced today is to ensure that mobile devic es throughout the department as well as their apps, email and other functions, and the wire less networks support ing them can operate securely in often hostile and remote environ ments and can adapt to ever-changing technology, even as the number of users expands. Teri Takai, DODs chief information officer, told American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel that the chal lenge for the Defense Department has been to design a unified system capable of fully leveraging the potential of devices that often differ in capa bilities and sophistication in a way that will allow users to communicate in a secure, wireless environment. We will be able to not only use multiple com mercial devices, but we will have a better process for bringing new commercial devices onto the net work, she added. Takai, along with the Defense Information Systems Agency, is lead ing the effort, which will use commercial carrier networks capable of handling classified data. This new capabil ity will actually allow us to use secure devices on [DODs classified net work] and give us more flexibility in terms of what those devices are, she said. Takai added that the security of wireless com munication amid increasingly frequent cyberat tacks on government and corporate networks is chief among her con cerns. The challenge for DOD is to balance the concern of cybersecurity with the need to have the capability of these devices, she said. But given both their ubiquity as well as their rapidly changing technology, Takai said, the Pentagon had to act quickly to develop a comprehensive program. The commercial mobile device market is moving so quickly, we cant wait, she said. If we dont get something in place, we will have multiple solutions, just because the demand out there to be able to use these devices is so strong. Officials are planning for a phased implemen tation involving vendor competition for devel opment of a system that Takai suggests, given DODs 3 million plus employees, could prove to be a model for large companies that also need to protect the transmission of both open and confi dential data. We are paving the way for many aspects on both networks, she said.Correcting Credit Report Errors Is EssentialMayport Legal Assistance Office, RLSO SEAre you thinking about borrowing money to buy a home or car? Do you need a line of credit to make home repairs? Have you applied for a new credit card? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, it is important to make sure information on your credit report is accurate and up to date. Even if you are not planning on borrowing money, your credit report has special importance if you are an active duty military member, DoD civilian employee or con tractor who requires any level of security clearance. If you fall into any of these categories you must undergo a security clear ance background inves tigation which is subject to periodic review. The investigation will identify any adverse information contained in your credit report such as judgments; property repossession; or delinquencies on debts (90 days delinquent or more on current debts and/or 180 days delin quent or more on debts in the previous seven years). You should review your credit report before you submit any credit applications and well before your security clearance is up for renewal. Reviewing your credit report in advance will provide an opportunity to cor rect information. Since September 2012, the fed eral government, through the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has been actively monitoring and conducting on-site investigations to assure that the credit reporting agencies are complying with the law. Previously, there was not much fed eral oversight. Now may be the best time to correct any inaccurate informa tion on your credit report. How do you go about correcting errors on your report? You need not hire a credit repair com pany! The first step is to obtain a credit report from each of the three major nationwide cred it reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Each maintain your personal infor mation and individual credit history. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), you are entitled to receive a free report from each credit reporting agency once a year. Since creditors are not required to submit information to all three of the agencies, your credit report from one agency will likely contain different infor mation from the others. Initially, you should request a report from all three. Afterwards, you can stagger your request once every four months to take full advantage of the free report allow ance (for example, you can request a report from Equifax in January, Experian in May, Trans Union in September and Equifax again the follow ing January and so on). To obtain your free report, request it online through www.annualcreditreport. com ( a central website maintained by the three agencies), call 1-877322-8228, or request it by mail by filling out the Annual Credit Report Request form and mail ing it to Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281. Once you receive your reports, closely inspect your personal informa tion and each entry. Although you can make corrections or submit a dispute online, it is rec ommended that you sub mit a dispute in a writ ten letter to the credit reporting agency clearly explaining the dispute and requesting the inac curate information be removed, corrected or updated. It is in your best interest to also include supporting documenta tion. The following are the addresses for the three credit reporting agencies: Equifax 1550 Peachtree Street, NW Atlanta, GA 30309-2468 Experian 701 Experian Parkway Allen, TX 75013 TransUnion 555 West Adams St Chicago, IL 60661 After receiving your letter, the agency must initiate an investigation and notify the entity that provided them the informa tion of your dispute with a copy of the informa tion you provided. When notified, the entity must conduct its own investi gation. Once complete, that entity must provide the credit reporting agen cy with a report of the outcome. If your dispute results in a change, the agency must provide you with the results along with a free copy of your cred it report. If your dispute is not resolved, you can place a statement of the dispute in your credit file. Taking the time to review your credit reports can save you from a headache down the road. If you would like help with this process, you can meet with an attorney at the Region Legal Service Office Southeast.Please visit us at http://www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/ rlso/rlso_southeast.htm for more information or to find out the location of the legal assistance office closest to you. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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RGB Performs Crash And Smash Drills USS Robert G. Bradley Public Affairs OfficerUSS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Sailors conduct ed Crash and Smash drills recently to prepare for a helicopter emergency on the flight deck. Bradleymen hold Crash and Smash drills twice a month to ensure that the firefighting party onboard, or Emergency Flight Quarters team, is always ready to respond in the case of an emer gency. Currently, RGB is deployed with HSC-22 Detachment 5, who bring four unmanned aerial vehicles onboard that are called MQ-8B Firescouts. So far the four Firescouts have flown a combined 330 flight hours. Even though the RGB is not deployed with manned helicopters onboard it still helps to hold drills to maintain proficiency especially since the RGB is still capable of performing flight operations with a manned helicopter. RGB, an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate, is homeported out of Mayport, Fla., and is on a scheduled deployment to the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility in the Mediterranean Sea. -Photos by Ensign Matthew RobertsHospitalman 3rd Class Matthew Layton instructs four other Sailors on treating a casualty during the Crash and Smash drill. Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Nicholas Szczepanski and Electronics Technician 2nd Class Cuong Nguyen set up a Ramfan 2000 during Damage Control drills. Sailors on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) race to set up a Ramfan 2000 during Damage Control drills. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013 13

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to our men and women in uniform, and as the head of the Pentagon, I know their interests will always be close to his heart, Biden said. Most importantly, he added, I know the presi dent will be able to rely on Chucks sound, unvar nished judgment on any issue where our troops are involved. For that and many more reasons, Im looking forward to work ing with Secretary Hagel.From Page 1HagelFriday, March 8 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is hosting a Garden Concert featur ing the Noel Freidline Quintet as part of Garden Month 2013 from 7 to 9 p.m.. Guests may bring blankets, chairs, food and beverages. The concert is part of Garden Month 2013, a month long celebra tion of the historic gar dens the Cummer family designed over 100 years ago and that are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Events throughout the month of March include Garden Tours, activities and classes for children and adults, lectures, lunches, a Fashion Show and a Farm to Table Moonlight Dinner in the Gardens. General Admission is: Members $20 and Nonmembers $25. Reserved Tables: Includes concert reserva tion and seating for 10. Limited number avail able. Food and beverage not included. Advance ticket purchase is strong ly encouraged. For more information or to pur chase tickets, please call (904) 899-6038 or visit www.cummer.org. Saturday, March 9 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Duval County Staff are offering an irrigation class on water saving tech niques, tuning up your irrigation system and low volume irrigation for gar dens from 9 a.m.-noon at Duval County Extension, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. We are offering a free water savings kit to the first 50 registrants. Call Becky at 255-7450 to pre-register or email her at beckyd@ coj.net with your name and phone number. Cost is $5. You can pay at the door. Orlando HarleyDavidson will host a pair of events benefiting Operation Giveback www. operation-giveback.org to honor the heroic sacrifice of Americas veterans and their families. Starting at 11:45 a.m., a large motor cycle convoy will travel on surface roads from the Orlando Harley-Davidson South Dealership on 192 in Kissimmee to the Orlando HarleyDavidson Historic Factory Dealership. Starting at 1 p.m., hundreds of riders and members of the public will be treated to entertainment and food. A $10 donation (cash or check) per rider and a $5 dona tion per passenger will be required. All proceeds will benefit wounded warriors, their families and the children of our fallen heroes. For more information, visit www.orlando harley.com The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park is partnering with the Friends of Fort Clinch, Inc., Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission and Fish Florida to conduct a Kids Fishing Clinic from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, to teach lessons on knot tying, fishing ethics, tack le, habitat, casting and more. The clinic is open to children ages four to 16 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. The first 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. For additional information, please contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks.org. Sunday, March 10 Contestant rehears als for the Miss Shrimp Festival 2013 Scholarship Pageant, sponsored by the Hampton Inn & Suites, Amelia Island, will be held weekly, beginning with the organizational meeting and rehearsal at 3 p.m. at the Bean School of Dance, 25 North 3rd Street in Fernandina Beach. Weekly rehearsal will be held every Sunday until the pageant is held on Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m. on the Riverfront Stage. Miss Shrimp Festival 2013 will be awarded a $1,000 Scholarship. The pageant is open to high school level juniors and seniors, who are attend ing public, private, alter native or home schools. Eligible participants must reside in Nassau County, but may attend high school in another county. Contestants will be accepted until April 7, 2013. The 4-part appli cation packet may be downloaded from www. shrimpfestival.com under the Events tab. Questions? please call Barbara Book, Pageant Choreographer at 904583-1770 or Sandy Price, Shrimp Festival Executive Director at 904-206-0756 or email 4info@shrimp festival.com. Tuesday, March 12 The Duval County Extension Office along with Standard Feed & Seed, Dinsmore Feed & Supply and Purina Animal Nutrition is offer ing a Small Scale Poultry Production Workshop from 6-8:30 p.m. This free workshop will cover breed selection, nutrition and feeding, basic manage ment of recycling chicken litter, current regulations and petition update, gen eral tips and an Q & A panel. Everyone in atten dance will receive a cou pon for two free chicks. Light refreshments will be served. To pre-register call Becky at 904-255-7450 or go to http://raising poultry2013.eventbrite. com. This workshop will be located at the Duval County Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Friday, March 15 Duval County Extension is offering a Make and Take Rain Barrel Workshop on from 10 a.m.-noon. The cost is $45. Pre-registration with payment is due by Monday, March 11. Please make check for $45 payable to DCOHAC and mail to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N McDuff Ave. The class is limited in size. Please bring a vehicle big enough to get the 55-gallon plastic drum home. Sorry, no deliver ies. For questions, please call Becky at 904-2557450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Rec Raises $ For Command Events -Photo by ET3 Michelle MalteseMembers of Naval Station Mayports Recreation Committee participate in a Gas N Glass fundraiser last week to benefit the commands holiday party and command picnic.Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday March 11, from 5-7 p.m., the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner sponsored by Mayport Tavern. This is free for active d service members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve Jambalaya, rice, corn bread, and dessert. 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Eric Clapton Ticket Drawing-Enter To Win The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is doing a ticket draw ing for three free pairs of tickets to the Eric Clapton concert on Tuesday, March 26, at the Veterans Memorial Arena but you cant win if you dont enter. The drawing is limited to active duty only with one entry per dual service family. To enter, please send your first and last name, email address, command, and contact number to drawing@ usojax.com. The deadline to enter is Friday, March 15. Disney On Ice TicketsThis Week The Mayport and NAS USO centers is sell ing lower level tickets to the Friday, April 5 per formance of Disney on Ice. Lower level Tickets are $10 each and are cash only. Tickets are open to Active/Retired/ Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Share a great evening with your fam ily. Call the Mayport USO (246-3481) or the NAS USO (778-2821) to reserve your tickets. Sorry, no refunds/exchanges on tickets purchased for the Thursday night perfor mance. Calling All Veterans And Military FamiliesJTA Survey JTA needs your help to complete a Veterans and Military Families Transportation Options survey in connection with a grant for regional transportation assistance. If you havent already, please complete the sur vey at: http://bit.ly/one call-oneclick. The survey deadline is Feb. 28. USO Annual Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on March 22 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Lots of fun, prizes on course and refreshments and food after completion of play. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. We are limited to 30 foursomes. 2013 Honda ClassicFree Admission See Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy face off at the 2013 Honda Classic for free. All active duty, reserve, and retirees, as well as dependents receive complimentary admission. You must pre register at https://bird iesforthebrave.sheerid. com/hondaclassic/ to print your voucher for free entry. Also, enjoy complimentary food and drinks at the Birdies for the Brave Outpost sponsored by Wells Fargo and Sikorsky. Relay For Life-NS Mayport Join Relay For Life and NS Mayport in fighting cancer. NS Mayport will host its first Relay For Life on April 13-14 with the opening ceremo ny beginning at noon. The theme this year is Seek and Destroy. This event is open to family, friends, coworkers, and those wishing to join the fight against cancer. For more information, visit www.relayforlife.org/ MayportFL. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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