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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00287


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com SERMC Reaches ExcellenceCommander, Navy Regional Main tenance Center Public AffairsCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) Rear Adm. David Gale select ed Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) as the 2012 Regional Maintenance Center Excellence Award winner Feb. 13 in Norfolk. SERMC is located on Naval Station Mayport and provides surface ship maintenance and repair support to U.S. Navy ships in the southeast region of the United States, ships visiting the region, and to those in need of emergent repair support as directed by CNRMC. SERMCs performance exceeded expectations and milestones through out 2012, said Gale. The command provided southeast region ships and visiting ships with outstanding maintenance availabilities, fleet techni cal assistance and emer gent repairs. An availability is a scheduled event during which a ship undergoes repairs, maintenance and/or modernization. Throughout 2012, SERMC completed seven Chief of Naval Operation (CNO) avail abilities, 34 surface ship Continuous Maintenance Availabilities (CMAVs) and two decommission ing availabilities. In August 2012, after USS Porter (DDG 78) collided with a large Japaneseowned merchant vessel near the Strait of Hormuz, SERMCs Commanding Officer, Capt. Ron Cook and his Chief Engineer Phil Schmid quickly responded to support Gale, who led damage assessments and initial repairs. The repair team arrived in Dubai on Aug. 15, which gave them vir tually no advance notifi cation to prepare for this effort. Despite the inher ent challenges, their abil ity to arrive and immedi ately help assess damage and support repair rec ommendations was com mendable, said Gale. Last July, SERMCs Engineering and Production shops teamed with ships force on the USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) to perform a Total Ship Readiness Assessment (TSRA) in preparation for the ships Inspection and Survey (INSURV). During the assess ment, SERMC identified and assisted ships force in working nearly 900 jobs. Typically, these jobs would be given to the crew to write ship main tenance forms known as 2-Kilo reports, which they would then use to plan, document and perform the work themselves. Rather than handing over the immense number of jobs identified dur ing the TSRA for ships force to work, SERMC partnered with them and provided the sup port of their Engineering and Production (Code 200/900) shops. INSURVs are extreme ly challenging for ships force, and can be equally demanding for the RMC. Im very proud of the way SERMC and the leader ship and crew of USS Robert G. Bradley part nered in the weeks lead ing up to their INSURV to prepare for a successful inspection, said Gale. USS Hu City Deploys With IKE CSG The Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKECSG), with nearly 4,500 Sailors, deployed from Naval Station Norfolk and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Feb. 21, to support opera tions in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleets. The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), commanded by Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock, along with German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220), commanded by Commander Ralf Kuchler, departed from Naval Station Norfolk, and the guided mis sile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), commanded by Capt. Dan Uhls, from Naval Station Mayport. Eisenhower and Hu City returned three months earli er than previously scheduled in order to resurface its flight deck prior to a planned rede ployment. The IKECSG is redeploying to support carrier strike group presence requirements in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet area of operations. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, the IKECSG Sailors will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This strike group is test ed and always ready for the next mission, said Rear Adm. Michael C. Manazir, CSG 8 commander. Im proud of the versatility and flexibil ity of every Sailor in this strike group. They have proven that we can meet all tasks set out for us by our fleet command ers. I look forward to once again playing a part in ensur ing the security of interna tional waterways and build ing partnerships around the world, Manazin added. For this deployment, IKECSG is comprised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN69), embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220) and USS Hu City (CG 66). Aircraft squadrons of CVW-7 include strike fighter squad rons VFA-143 Pukin Dogs, VFA-131 Wildcats, VFA-83 Rampagers and VFA-103 Jolly Rogers, tactical elec tronics warfare squadron VAQ-140 Patriots, carrier air borne early warning squad ron VAW-121 Bluetails, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Rawhides and heli copter anti-submarine squad ron HS-5 Nightdippers. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenMeagan Usry waves goodbye as the Ticonderoga Class guided-missle cruiser USS Hu City (CG-66) departs Naval Station Mayport Feb. 21. Usry's husband Sonar Technician Surface Seaman Keith Ursy serves on board Hu City. Hu City joins the USS Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group on a six-month deployment. Read more on USS Hu City, Page 18. New Skipper For HSL-48From HSL-48Cmdr. T. T. Bart Simpson was relieved by Cmdr. Eric J. Bower on Feb. 22 as commanding officer of HSL48 (Vipers) during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Station Mayport. Simpson reported to the Vipers in July 2010 and upon taking command, he sent an unprecedented seven helicopters detachments to sea during CY 2012, totaling more than 7,000 flight hours during his tenure. Simpson will report to the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower to assume duties as the Navigation officer. Bower assumed the duties as commanding officer after serving as executive officer since November 2011. -Photo by Lt. Justin CooperCmdr. Tyrone Simpson, outgoing commanding officer of HSL-48, speaks at the change of command ceremony before handing over command to Cmdr. Eric Bower. Are You Saving?From American Forces Press ServiceDefense Department officials have designated this week as Military Saves Week to highlight the need for military families to reduce debt and save for the future, a key to force readiness. The event is part of the yearlong Military Saves campaign, an opportunity for leaders to stress the importance of good financial habits to all members of the force and their families to encour age saving, reducing debt and building wealth, officials said. Visit http://www.militarysaves.org for more information about Military Saves or call FFSC at 270-6600 for classes.

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Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror To everyday civilians, the pursuit of happi ness typically involves career, home, love, and family. Its no different for military families, with one important exception: ORDERS. Unlike their civilian counterparts, active duty servicepersons must pursue their happiness within the strict confines of written military orders, which are lengthy docu ments that appear to be written in alien code. Military orders seem riddled with gibberish, and might be easily rep licated as follows: Sit on a computer keyboard for about ten minutes, peri odically shifting posi tions. Once enough XXXXXXXXs and UUUUUUs have been typed, print out about 15 pages; staple. Trust me, even the most seasoned soldier or Sailor wouldnt immediately notice the difference. However, buried amongst the seem ingly nonsensical ver biage are key phrases such as Report no later than August 2013 and Newport, Rhode Island, which, although embed ded in gobbledygook, are important mandatory instructions regarding the next couple of years in a servicepersons life. We are a Navy family whos seen our share of military orders. Our most recent writ ten orders arrived a month ago. Besides RTTUZYUW and UUUU--RHMCSUU my husbands orders indi cate that this summer, he must report to a new job at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. Our last orders instruct ed my husband to report to Naval Station Mayport, Florida in March 2011, and before that to Africa Command, Stuttgart, Germany in July 2008. Before that Djibouti, East Africa. Before that Norfolk, Virginia. Before that Molesworth, England. Before that, Monterey California. And so on, and so on. I cant prove it with out the assistance of an experienced cryptogra pher, but I think that our orders might also contain mandates such as /// GET OVER IT/// or /// NO WHINING--YOURE IN THE MILITARY///. We must follow mili tary orders regardless of inconvenience or hard ship, like moving your son before his senior year, or leaving the church that you like so much, or separating your youngest after she finally made a new best friend. None of that matters. We are at the mercy of the U.S. Navy. Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesFor the past several weeks I have written arti cles about students with special needs, students struggling academically, and students who need financial aid. This week the focus is on academi cally advanced elemen tary and middle school students. Whether your child has been identified as gifted or not, Duke Universitys TIP Program may be just the ticket you need to help you better under stand, motivate, enrich, and academically chal lenge your child. The Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) identifies gifted students and pro vides resources to nur ture the development of these exceptionally bright youngsters. Because giftedness is greatly misunderstood, students with advanced intellectual and academ ic abilities confuse and challenge educators and, especially, their parents. Duke TIP is committed to serving this unique group of students by providing services and programs beyond what is offered in the classroom. Through Duke TIP a whole range of activities and programs are accessible to parents and teachers to meet the individual needs of gifted children. For a variety of reasons, many gifted children sim ply do not reach their full potential. Exceptionally bright students often go unrecognized because they hide their talents, underachieve, or exhibit behavioral problems. In addition, a dispropor tionately large number of minority group students, youngsters from fami lies where English is not the primary spoken lan guage in the home and children from less afflu ent families are at risk for not being identified as gifted. Beginning at criti cal points in education, Duke TIP gives students a chance to learn more about their abilities. Qualifying fourth and fifth grade students may participate in Duke TIPs 4th/5th Grade Talent Search (formerly MAP) program and may take advantage of its option al above-level testing. Through Duke TIPs 7th Grade Talent Search pro gram, which focuses on the identification, rec ognition, and support of high-ability students, qualifying seventh grade students take college entrance exams alongside high school students. A large number of 7th grade Talent Search participants outscore many high school students. To learn more about this very special program, check with your school counselor or go to www. tip.duke.edu/7benefits. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingSpecial Program Planned For Academically Advanced Elementary, Middle School StudentsWe all have wounds sometimes, whether they are emotional, physical, or spiritual. Some may be small and relatively easy to get over. But other wounds can be big, seri ous, and deep. These wounds may hurt for days, weeks, months, or even years. Wounds like this can become a part of us and impact our life. So what should we do when we are hurt by others? Should we try to get even? Should we forgive? We learn from Scripture to not condemn and we will not be condemned, and to forgive and we will be forgiven (Luke 6:37). If we insist on getting even and seek revenge, I wonder if that is like saying that we can handle this bet ter than God. Scripture also teaches us that God will do the judging, that God will take care of it (Romans 12:19). The question is do we trust that God will ultimately take care of everything? Are any of us perfect? No. That means that all of us at times have wound ed someone and been wounded by someone. So there are times when we all need to forgive and be forgiven. So what is forgiveness? It is impor tant to understand what forgiveness is and what it is not. Forgiving does not always mean forget ting. Forgiveness does not mean that there are no consequences. Its not the same as pretend ing that unacceptable behavior is acceptable. If we forgive someone, it doesnt mean that we no longer feel pain or that we are finished griev ing. Forgiveness does not always immediately lead to trust and recon ciliation. So, what does it mean to forgive some one? Forgiveness is like a cancelled debt. It means giving up the perceived right to get even, giving up the attitude that you owe me. Of course, this is all easier said than done. For minor mistakes and offenses, we might be able to forgive quick ly. We can try to accept others imperfections and remember our own flaws. But for more major offenses and betrayals, we might need to go slowly and get help and sup port from others to work towards forgiving some one. We can remind our selves that the relation ship with our loved one or friend is more important than the offense. We can also remember the times we have needed forgive ness and seek to develop compassion for the other person. We should take the time we need, patient ly work through any painful feelings, and then strive to forgive and move forward. Forgiveness is really more about the one for giving than the one being forgiven. There are many benefits to forgiving oth ers. Forgiveness over comes bitterness and helps us move beyond pain. Forgiveness can increase our capacity for love and make reconcili ation possible. When we forgive someone and set them free, its like were really setting ourselves free. There has been a great deal of research about for giveness, not only from a spiritual perspective but also in the context of counseling and educa tion. Research has shown that forgiveness inter ventions in counseling are successful in treating many problems, includ ing substance abuse and addiction, anger and depression, and relation ship problems. Research indicates that some of the benefits of forgive ness are: 1) happier mar riages and families, 2) better emotional and physical health, 3) lower levels of anger and hos tility, and 4) reduction in stress responses and other behaviors related to cardiovascular disease. Forgiving leads to personal growth and progression in many ways. Forgiveness takes cour age and strength. When we forgive, we try to see things from the others perspective and to devel op increased empathy and understanding. Also, even though forgiving is not the same as forgetting, we try to stop dwelling on the past. Although we may still remember that we were wronged, we no longer hold it against the other person. We choose to let it go. Forgiveness is a liberating gift we can give to the other person and to ourselves. Is there someone in your life you need to forgive? My hope and prayer is that each of us Chap Luke Wilson Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSForgiveness Is A Very Powerful ThingSo why do we con tinue to let ourselves get ordered around? In todays unstable eco nomic climate, one might think that mere job secu rity is what motivates military families to keep following orders, and with all the news of fiscal cliffs and sequestration there is some truth to this. However, regardless of job security, a deep attachment to a military culture develops. With each successive move, military families not only become more resilient, but also cultivate a strong identity and pride in their unique lifestyle. Believe it or not, we become so accustomed to being ordered to go somewhere new, we often look for ward to it after being in one place for a couple of years. I must admit, Ive won dered if our affection for military life might be a twinge of Stockholm syndrome. Or maybe its rooted in fear of whats on the outside, like longterm prisoners who are afraid to be released. Or maybe its a compulsion, like Pacinos Michael Corleone in Godfather III (Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!) Truly, I know our affin ity for this lifestyle is rooted in honor, duty, courage, loyalty, patrio tism and sacrifice for others. These concepts have become muddled in todays society, so we feel fortunate to raise our kids in a military environment where those virtues are emphasized. We live and work with other mili tary families who have a common understanding of good and evil, right and wrong. We dont need a permanent hometown its the similar sense of values and camaraderie with fellow military fami lies that make us feel at home. No doubt about it: nonmilitary families are fortu nate to put down roots in one place where they can make close friendships and foster stable school, family and commu nity ties. They might not understand how a family like mine could be happy about moving to Rhode Island after less than two years in Florida. But we are happy about our ninth move in 20 years, because its part and parcel of our military lifestyle. To quote a com mon saying which adorns many a Sailors front door, Home is where the Navy sends us. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comSee Chapel, Page 3 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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can remember when we have needed forgiveness from God and others, that we can forgive as we have been forgiven, that we can give to others what has been given to us, and that we can set someone free and in the process set ourselves free too.From Page 2Chapel Importance Of Civilians To Navy MissionFrom CNO Jonathan GreenertShipmates, I am re-purposing a memo I signed [Feb. 20] about the Importance of Civilians to ourNavy Mission that is being released to all our Navy Civilians: Navy Civilians are essential to what we do as a Navy. You repair and maintain our ships, aircraft and combat sys tems; plan and manage our budgets; and design and engineer our future force. Your efforts remain absolutely essential to our ability to be ready to fight and win today while preparing for tomorrows challenges. Today, 186,000 Navy Civilians serve in every state and 20 countries overseas. I have seen first hand your dedication, pride and unwavering commitment and I appreciate your steadfastness through this challenging time. As we prepare for potential budget short falls, I remain focused on supporting our Sailors, Civilians and their Families and funding our most important mis sions. Today the Defense Department notified Congress that it plans to furlough Civilian person nel if sequestration goes into effect. If sequestra tion begins March 1, fur loughs would begin in late April. Information on the furlough process and your rights and benefits is at: http://www.navy.mil/ docs/CivilianFurloughsIn foImpacts_19FEB13.ppt I will do everything possible to keep you informed and direct you to resourc es available to you and your families. The Navy will remain on the front line of our nations efforts in war and in peace. Navy Civilians will continue to play a critical role in those efforts, even in the face of budget uncertainty and fiscal challenges. Thank you for the incred ible work you do each and every day, and for car rying forward our more than two-century tradi tion of warfighting excel lence and resilience.DOD Preparing For Civilian FurloughsAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has notified Congress that the Defense Department is prepared to implement furloughs for civilian personnel in response to the threat of sequestration. In a memo to all employees, Panetta vowed to continue work ing with Congress to avoid sequestration, which would add $470 billion to the $487 billion in defense spending cuts the depart ment already is making over the next 10 years. If Congress cannot agree on an alternative deficit reduction plan, the cuts go into effect March 1. Panetta and every other defense leader have called the cuts dangerous. They would come on top of cuts imposed by operat ing under a continuing resolution. For fiscal year 2013, the effect will be fur ther magnified, because the cuts must be done in the final six months of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. In the event of seques tration, we will do every thing we can to be able to continue to perform our core mission of provid ing for the security of the United States, Panetta wrote in the memo, but there is no mistaking that the rigid nature of the cuts forced upon this depart ment, and their scale, will result in a serious erosion of readiness across the force. Panetta and DOD lead ers long have expressed deep concern about the direct impact sequestra tion will have on mili tary personnel, civilian employees and families. Flexibility in sequestra tion is limited, the sec retary said in his memo, noting that while military personnel are exempt from direct impact, ser vices on bases will dete riorate, and families may feel the pinch in other ways. Civilian employees will be furloughed if seques tration is triggered. Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter said last week that civilian employees could lose 20 percent of their normal income through September. I can assure you that, if we have to implement furloughs, all affected employees will be pro vided at least 30 days notice prior to executing a furlough, and your ben efits will be protected to the maximum extent pos sible, Panetta wrote. DOD will work to ensure furloughs are executed in a consistent and appropriate manner, the secretary said, and Pentagon officials also will continue work with employee unions. Our most important asset at the department is our world-class person nel, Panetta wrote. You are fighting every day to keep our country strong and secure, and rest assured that the leaders of this department will con tinue to fight with you and for you.Lunch Time Class With ERAUFrom ERAUEmbry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) will be organiz ing a series of Lunch Time classes if a minimum of students show inter est. The requirements to launch this project is a minimum of seven stu dents. All classes offered will be business core related and could be used in any general education core. We will like to begin these classes in the spring term on May 31 in Building 1553 (FRC) near the base helicopter squadrons. Classes will run from Monday to Thursday from 11 a.m.-noon in the train ing room. There are some general requirements that need to be completed if you are not currently enrolled in ERAU. Please contact us if you have any questions or need more information at 904-249-6700/may port@erau.edu Bring in a new student referral and you could be eligible for a textbook reimburse ment of up to $50. Go to http://worldwide.erau. edu/admissions/finance/ scholarships/index.html for current scholarships available. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 3

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Navy Updates Hazing Reporting PoliciesFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy initiated new measures to track and prevent cases of hazing, as announced in Naval Administrative message 137/13, released Feb. 20. Hazing occurs when a service member causes another to be exposed to cruel, abusive, humiliat ing, oppressive, demean ing, or harmful activities. Hazing can be physical, verbal, or psychological in nature. This behavior is contrary to the Navys core values of honor, courage, and commit ment, as expressed by Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of Naval Personnel. Hazing has no place within the Navys culture of dignity and respect for every Sailor, said Van Buskirk. It diminishes our Sailors trust in their Shipmates, their unit and our organization, it affects readiness, and it will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and deckplate leader to both reject and report hazing. The NAVADMIN estab lishes the Navy Office of Hazing Prevention (OPNAV N137) as the lead entity for hazing policy and tracking sub stantiated cases. Within each command, hazing is tracked by assigned com mand managed equal opportunity (CMEO) program managers, equal opportunity advi sors, and equal opportu nity program managers, who will then work with commanding officers to ensure timely reporting of incidents. Reporting proce dures are outlined in the NAVADMIN. The Navy Office of Hazing Prevention is working to expand the Military Equal Opportunity Network (MEONet) database to include tracking informa tion on hazing incidents. MEONet is a standalone online web-based pro gram that standardizes, tracks and reports administrative actions associ ated with the primary duties of EO advisors and CMEO program manag ers. Tracking substantiated hazing events is vital to determining the extent to which these events are occurring and the nature of such events, as well as analyzing trends. Incidents of haz ing will be reported by the Navy Office of Hazing Prevention to the Chief of Naval Personnel quar terly. The full Department of Navy policy on hazing can be found in SECNAVINST 1610.2A. For more news from the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit http:// www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/ diversity. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity KnowingMonitor Sailors To Be Interred At ArlingtonNavy Office of InformationSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced that remains recovered from the USS Monitor will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery. A ceremony will be held March 8 to honor the two unknown Sailors. The specific date of the inter ment was chosen to honor Monitors role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington, said Mabus. Its important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the sig nificant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course for our modern Navy. The Brooklyn-built Monitor, the nations first ironclad warship, made nautical history after being designed and assembled in 118 days. Commissioned Feb. 25, 1862, the Monitor fought in the first battle between two ironclads when it engaged CSS Virginia in the Battle of Hampton Roads March 9, 1862. The battle marked the first time iron-armored ships clashed in naval warfare and signaled the end of the era of wooden ships. Though the Monitors confrontation with the Virginia ended in a draw, the Monitor prevented the Virginia from gaining control of Hampton Roads and thus preserved the Federal blockade of the Norfolk-area. Months later, 16 Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 in a storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C. Her wreck was discovered in 1974 was designated the nations first national marine sanctuary, man aged by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Starting in 1998, the Navy, NOAA and the Mariners Museum in Newport News, Va., began working together to recover artifacts from Monitor. During the summer of 2002, while attempting to recover the ships 150-ton gun turret, Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. The remains were transported to Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) in Hawaii for possible iden tification. JPAC, with the assis tance of the Navy Casualty Office and NOAA, con ducted a comprehen sive effort to identify the remains of the unknown Sailors, to include timedemanding and detailed genealogical research. Given the age of the remains, efforts to iden tify them were unsuc cessful. However, JPAC was able to narrow down possible descendents of the unknown Sailors to 30 family members from 10 different families. The decision to lay these heroes to rest in Arlington, honors not only these two men but all those who died the night Monitor sank and reminds us, that the sac rifices made a hundred and fifty years ago, will never be forgotten by this nation, said David Alberg, Superintendent of NOAAs Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. -Photo by MC2 Gina K. MorrissetteThe facial reconstruction of two Sailors whose remains were discovered inside the gun turret of the USS Monitor after it was raised from the ocean floor in 2002 are revealed during a ceremony sponsored by the U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation. The ceremony is part of the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads on March 8 and 9, 1862, when Monitor and CSS Merrimac fought in the first ironclad battle in naval history. Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras, N.C. later that year. While much has been learned about the physical characteristics of the two Sailors, their identi ties remain a mystery. 4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Ensure Your Awards Are In Your RecordNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsChanges to how the Navy pro cesses awards makes it easier for Sailors to confirm their per sonal decorations and medals are reflected in their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), officials said Jan. 29. NAVADMIN 016/13 out lines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reflected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service (NDAWS) and their OMPF. All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. In the past, award cita tions or certificates received directly from the member for the OMPF were not accepted, since they were required to be mailed from the command authorized to enter the award into NDAWS, said Jim Giger, head of Records Management Policy Branch (PERS-313), Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Sailors will now be able to send in copies of their own award citations or certificates for their OMPF if the award is accurately reflected in NDAWS. Before a Sailor requests a missing award citation or cer tificate be added to their OMPF, they should verify the award is recorded in NDAWS by visiting the U.S. Navy Awards website at https://awards.navy.mil and launching the Personal Awards Query. If a Sailors award is record ed in NDAWS, but missing in their OMPF, they should mail a legible, clean copy of the signed award citation, or cer tificate in the case of Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals, with the service members full social security number printed in the upper right hand corner, to PERS-313 at: Navy Personnel Command PERS-313 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN 38055-3130 According to Giger, if a Sailors award is not reflected in the NDAWS database, the citation will not be accepted by NPC for entry into the ser vice members OMPF. To resolve this conflict, a Sailor must contact their commands NDAWS coordinator, since only NDAWS coordinators can enter approved awards into the NDAWS database. The NDAWS coordinator will need an original copy of the award citation/certificate and, if available, a copy of the orders from the service or joint approval authorities. Once and award is entered and reflected in the database, the NDAWS coordinator will then submit the award citation or certificate to NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. Awarding authorities must submit a completed OPNAV Form 1650/3 and award cita tions or certificates to their NDAWS coordinator for entry into NDAWS. A list of NDAWS coordinators is available on the U.S. Navy Awards website. It is important that only authorized personal awards are reflected in both NDAWS and in a service members OMPF, said Giger. And ensuring only those award citations or certificates that are accurately reflecting in NDAWS are included in the OMPF will increase the integrity of both NDAWS and the OMPF. Per NAVADMIN 016/13, Sailors submitting a selec tion board package with an award citation or certificate not already in their OMPF, but recorded in NDAWS, will auto matically have the award added to their OMPF. Those Sailors can expect to see the award citation added to their OMPF four to six weeks after the selec tion board has adjourned, said Giger. Sailors can access their OMPF anytime online for the most upto-date service record informa tion by visiting BUPERS Online (BOL) at https://www.bol.navy. mil. For more information, read NAVADMIN 016/13, visit the NDAWS Web Page on the NPC website at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/ recordsmanagement/pages/ awddecormedal.aspx or call the NPC Customer Service Center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC or 1-866827-5672. For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/npc/. Taking Road Less Travelled -Photo by MCC Sam ShaversSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus observes training at Naval Special Warfare Center Detachment Kodiak. Additionally, Mabus officiated a promo tion and awards ceremony and held all-hands call in which he thanked the Sailors for their service and sacrifice and discussed issues currently affecting the fleet including operational and personnel issues and the potential impacts of sequestration and the Continuing Resolution on the Navy. All Hands Magazine ReLaunched OnlineDefense Media Activity NavyThe Navy relaunched its flagship magazine, All Hands Magazine, for Sailors and their families as an online publication at www.ah.mil. The new online version will feature stories, photos and videos about topics that are relevant to Sailors and their families. The magazine will highlight Navy culture and heri tage, and it will aim to be an informative and enter taining resource Sailors and their families can use to make decisions regarding their Navy careers. All Hands Magazine is a Web publication for Sailors by Sailors, said Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Navy chief of information. For almost 90 years, the print version of All Hands Magazine greeted Sailors everywhere. It started as a typewritten news bulle tin, but over its lifespan it grew in style and stature. The Navy stopped print ing a physical monthly version of the magazine in Dec. 2011. My intent is to bring that same sense of pur pose and tradition for ward with this online magazine, said Kirby. The first issue will fea ture stories about how sequestration and the continuing resolution will affect the Navy if they occur; recruit divi sion commander duty; changes to the Navys enlisted detailing process and more. Additionally, the website will allow readers to comment and share content across vari ous popular social media channels. According to its mission statement, the goal of All Hands Magazine is to include articles, information, imagery and videos that are relevant to Sailors and their families. It will explore issues that are of concern to Sailors and provide information that Sailors and their families can use to make deci sions regarding their Navy careers. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 5

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6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 NS Mayport Puts Its Shield UpFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport joined naval bases throughout the Continental U.S. in con ducting the annual an annual Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism (FP/ AT) exercise Citadel Shield (CS) 2013 February 19-23. The annual exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security forces to respond to threats to installations and units. The CS 2013 exercise tested different areas of the Navys anti-terrorism program and naval secu rity force personnels ability to respond to realworld threats. Thursday and Friday, the Security teams responded to real world scenarios including a IED hidden in a truck and a hostage situation in the old Bank of America building near the Mayport Gym. Security coordinated efforts with Mayports Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6, as well as Mayport Fire & Emergency Services, NCIS, FBI and The Salvation Army. As with every exercise, its great to get all the first responders together and practice in an integrated and controlled environ ment, said Naval Station Mayport Security Officer, CWO4 Chuck Mogle. We had the good fortune of going outside the instal lation and working with the FBI. This will help us if there ever was an unfortunate real-life event. Although we were con strained this year with limited funding, we were still able to maximize our training efforts and gain a lot of lessoned learned from the scenarios we enacted, Mogle added. -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at-Arms 2nd Class Shawn Shirley, and Master-at-Arms Seaman Robert Marshall hold down bad guy Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Nicholas Converso after MA2 Bohannon and his military working dog Milko apprehend the suspect during Citadel Shield 2013. -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Security team observes as Officer Michael Cokus inspects a vehicle with suspect Converso during a simulated IED scenario as part of the Citadel Shield exercise. Master-at-Arms Seaman Genesis Garibay works with military working dog Axel to locate explosives during a Citadel Shield training exercise Thursday. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergFBI Agents participate in an active shooter drill during Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. Citadel Shield is an annual Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism exercise conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. -Photo by Paige GnannA Citadel Shield participant unloads his weapon into a clearing barrel during one of the scenarios as Chief Gunners Mate Heather Scott checks the process.-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Security participates in an active duty shooter drill as the observance teams watch their manuevers during the Citadel Shield exercsie.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 7 -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at-Arms 1st Class Jos Pacheco and Officer Kathleen Duncan stake out the old Bank of America building after a hostage situation is reported during the Citadel Shield exercise held last week at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at-Arms 2nd Class Christopher Hernandez has his gear checked by a safety observer during Citadel Shield exercise on Friday. The Salvation Army also participated in the event to train their crew on disaster situations. -Photo by Paige GnannExplosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Zach Phillips sends out a robot to check for potential explosives during one of the anti-terrorist/force protection exercises conducted during Citadel Shield 2013 at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by MC3 Damian BergMaster-at-Arms 3rd Class Robert Blanton and his mili tary working dog Rudy participate in an active shooter drill for Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSailors from Naval Station Mayport participate in an active shooter drill for Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergAn FBI Agent briefs Sailors from Naval Station Mayport on the status of the event during an active shooter drill for exercise Citadel Shield 2013. Citadel Shield is an annual Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism exercise conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States.

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NEX Accepts Manufacturers CouponsFrom NEXCOMCustomers know they can save money every day by shopping their NEX. In addition to the average 21 percent savings and no sales tax, customers can also save money by using manufacturers cents off coupons on their NEX purchases. Redeeming coupons provides our custom ers another way to save money when shopping at their NEX, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Senior Vice President Store Operations. Coupons are a great way to save even more when shopping for the necessities your fam ily needs. In fiscal year 2012, NEXs accepted nearly 1.6 million manufactur ers coupons that gener ated just over $2 million in additional savings to customers. NEXs accept current valid manufacturers cou pons for the item featured on the coupon, subject to its terms and conditions. This includes on-line Internet coupons, except for those coupons offering free products, coupons for Proctor & Gamble (P&G) products or those deter mined to be fraudulent. The NEX does not dou ble or triple the face value of a manufacturers coupon. The NEX accepts scratch-off, percent and cents-off cou pons from the Army Air Force Exchange System (AAFES), the Marine Corps Exchange System (MCX) and the Coast Guard Exchange System (CGX). These can be per cent and cents-off in-store coupons, coupons pre sented in a coupon book, or printed from Facebook. All coupon terms and conditions apply. The NEX also accepts a man ufacturers coupon and NEX coupon, or coupon from another Military Exchange Service, on the same item. The combination of the two coupons cannot exceed the price of the product; money is not returned to a customer on the redemption of coupon(s) which exceeds the price of the prod uct. Only overseas NEXs accept expired coupons for up to six months past its expiration date. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) oversees 100 Navy Exchange (NEX) facilities and nearly 300 stores worldwide, 40 Navy Lodges, Ships Stores, the Uniform Program Management Office, the Navy Clothing Textile and Research Facility and the Telecommunications Program Office. NEXCOMs parent com mand is the Naval Supply Systems Command. NEXCOMs mission is to provide authorized cus tomers quality goods and services at a savings and to support quality of life prorams for active duty military, retirees, reserv ists and their families. NEXs and Navy Lodges operate primarily as a non-appropriated fund (NAF) business instru mentality. NEX reve nues generated are used to support Navy Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs. In FY11, $2.7 billion in sales were generated with $42.8 million in dividends pro vided to Navy MWR pro grams. Select NEXs to Sell Navy Marine Corps Relief Society Benefit Sales TixFrom NEXCOMBeginning in March, customers at select NEXs will be able to show their support for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) by pur chasing a $5 benefit sale ticket. The benefit sales ticket will entitle customers to specific percent-off dis counts for a one-time pur chase on either April 22 or 23, 2013. The $5 dona tion will be passed onto NMCRS on behalf of cus tomers. The benefit sales tick et entitles customers to tiered discounts depend ing on the type of mer chandise with some exclusions. Merchandise store wide is 10 percent off, but excludes merchandise previously purchased, existing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alcohol ic beverages, electron ics, cameras, comput ers, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DVDs, CDs and conces sion departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic. The discount also can not be applied to e-com merce, all gift cards and prepaid cards, Autoport services and the Exchange Catalog. The benefit sales tick et also offers 10 percent off the entire stock of fine jewelry, excluding Rolex watches, Omega watches, Maui Divers and Pandora jewelry. With the benefit ticket, customers will receive 20 percent off the entire stock of regular priced apparel, shoes, watches and sunglasses. Already reduced furniture with prices ending in .94, .96 or .97 will be 30 percent off. The maximum discount for any item is $250. NEXs participating in this event include NEX Mayport, Jacksonville, Fla., and NEX Kings Bay, Ga. This promotion has proven to be very popular with customers over the past several years. Last year, custom ers donated a total of $291,593 to NMCRS. Navy MWR also benefits through increased profits generated through this promotion. Students Encouraged To Submit Earth Day PosterFrom the city of JacksoonvilleJacksonville students are encour aged to tap their creativity for the Environmental Protection Boards (EPB) 2013 Earth Day Poster Contest. The competition is open to all students from kindergarten through 12th grade. Entries received from kindergarten through second grade must be class projects. All other entries may be indi vidual or group entries. This years contest theme which must appear somewhere on the post er is Shades of Green. The posters should show how even one persons actions can make a positive impact on the local environment. Awards are sponsored by CSX Transportation, and all entries will receive a certificate of participation. Photos of the winning posters will be displayed on the EPB website. First, second and third place winners will be awarded in each category below: er enhanced) The first place award is $150, the sec ond place award is $100 and the third place award is $50. Posters between 30 x 36 inches and 16 x 16 inches may be submitted until 5 p.m. on April 1 to the Environmental Protection Board, 214 North Hogan Street, Fifth Floor, Jacksonville, Florida 32202. The EPB is partnering with the Jacksonville Public Libraries for this contest. Entries may be dropped off in the Childrens Section of each of the libraries listed below until Friday, March 29. 303 N. Laura St. 32202 13295 Beach Blvd. 32246 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd. 32256 6887 103rd St. 32210 1755 Edgewood Ave. W 32208 1826 Dunn Ave. 32218 For more information on the poster contest, contact James Richardson by phone at (904) 255-7213 or email at jrichard@coj.net. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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COMPASS: A Course For Navy Life Upcoming Course For Navy Spouses COMPASS is a 12-hour Team mentoring program developed by spouses for spouses. Come make new friends as you learn about the Navy lifestyle and gain knowledge and skills to successfully meet the challenges ahead. COMPASS is FREE and open to ALL Navy spous es! For more information and to register for the upcoming February session, please visit: http:// www.gocompass.org/ jacksonville.html 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Eric Clapton Ticket Drawing-Enter To Win The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is doing a ticket draw ing for three free pairs of tickets to the Eric Clapton concert on Tuesday, March 26, at the Veterans Memorial Arena but you cant win if you dont enter. The drawing is limited to active duty only with one entry per dual service family. To enter, please send your first and last name, email address, command, and contact number to drawing@ usojax.com. The deadline to enter is Friday, March 15. Disney On Ice TicketsThis Week The Mayport and NAS USO centers is sell ing lower level tickets to the Friday, April 5 per formance of Disney on Ice. Lower level Tickets are $10 each and are cash only. Tickets are open to Active/Retired/ Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Share a great evening with your fam ily. Call the Mayport USO (246-3481) or the NAS USO (778-2821) to reserve your tickets. Sorry, no refunds/exchanges on tickets purchased for the Thursday night perfor mance. Calling All Veterans And Military FamiliesJTA Survey JTA needs your help to complete a Veterans and Military Families Transportation Options survey in connection with a grant for regional transportation assistance. If you havent already, please complete the sur vey at: http://bit.ly/one call-oneclick. The survey deadline is Feb. 28. USO Annual Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on March 22 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Lots of fun, prizes on course and refreshments and food after completion of play. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. We are lim ited to 30 foursomes. 2013 Honda ClassicFree Admission See Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy face off at the 2013 Honda Classic for free. All active duty, reserve, and retirees, as well as dependents receive complimentary admission. You must pre register at https://bird iesforthebrave.sheerid. com/hondaclassic/ to print your voucher for free entry. Also, enjoy compli mentary food and drinks at the Birdies for the Brave Outpost sponsored by Wells Fargo and Sikorsky. THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS Military Discount A hit in NYC and Chicago, the magnifi cent theatrical adap tation of C. S. Lewis THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS comes to Jacksonville for two per formances only March 9. THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS is a provoca tive look at spiritual warfare from a demons point of view. www. ScrewtapeOnStage.com For $10 off tickets, pur chase at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Box Office or visit Ticketmaster.com and use promo code USO10 Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Employment Program The Military Spouse Business Alliance pre sented by Capital One is bringing you a one-ofa-kind Hiring Fair and Career Forum on Feb. 21 for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves and retired veteran popula tion. Veterans, Active Duty Military, and Members of Guard and Reserve Components are also welcome. All are encouraged to attend. See attached flyer for more information. For regis tration questions, please contact us at hiringourhe roes@uschamber.com or call 202-5807. Relay For Life-NS Mayport Join Relay For Life and NS Mayport in fighting cancer. NS Mayport will host its first Relay For Life on April 13-14 with the opening ceremo ny beginning at noon. The theme this year is Seek and Destroy. This event is open to family, friends, coworkers, and those wishing to join the fight against cancer. For more information, visit www.relayforlife.org/ MayportFL. The Players Military Job Fair-May 5 In partnership with Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition, The Players will welcome active duty, reservists, retired military, veterans, and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass on Sunday, May 5 to participate in its second annual job fair. Information on local educational institutions with veterans programs, career counseling, and resume writing assistance will also be provided. The job fair at The Players will take place in The Turn hospitality venue. Companies interested in participating may contact Bill Hickley at bill.hick ley@incepture.com Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available. For more information, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS New Benches For Mayport USO-Photo by Paige GnannKalani Patao, 9, joins other members of her Girl Scout Troop 1335 in painting new benches donated to the Mayport USO by the Junior Girl Scouts. The wood was purchased with funds they had saved more than three months and assembled by Chief Hull Technician Charles Johnson of SERMC, father of Arielle Johnson, who is in the troop. The benches will get lots of use at the USO with all the Special events, No Dough Dinners and Ceremonies that are held for the Military Personnel. The service project helps the girls work towards their Bronze Award in Girl Scouts. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 9

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 & 1587 and the Galley to get the lat est news on your Liberty program. March 2: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 7:30 a.m. Cost $15 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation). March 4: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 6: College Workshop. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Lounge. Representatives from FSCJ will be here to show you how to get started on your education. Free refreshments. Sign Up For Spring Break Camp At YACFrom MWRSpring is in the air here at Mayport and, for the children of Mayport that means just one thing: Spring Break Camp from March 25-29 at the Mayport Youth Activities Center. During this great camp, kids ages 6-12 can get out and about with great activities, games, trips and more. Campers are fed breakfast, lunch and snacks every day. Registration opens March 4 until full. Parents can register their child Monday-Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Youth Center. Parents of children in the Before and After School Program may register from 6-8 a.m. Payment is due at the time of registration or by March 15 if attending the Before and After School Program. Fees are based on total household income and fee scale. For more information, please call (904) 270-5680. March 1: Freedom FridayArcade Night and Movie. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 15: Freedom FridayRock Your Shamrock. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Wear your green and dance with DJ Derek! Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Employment Orientation. 4-5 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 270-5680 March 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is high ly recommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by April 30, 2013. 2705680 On The MessdeckFocsle Lounges Spring SpecialsSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8Bogeys SpecialsThursday, Feb. 28 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a side, $ 6.95 California Club Wrap with Turkey, Ham, Bacon, Avocado with Lettuce and Tomato with a side, $7.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $10.95 Soup: Clam Chowder Friday, March 1 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a side, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich with a side, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, March 2 Western Burger: Our Signature Burger Topped with Bacon, Cheddar Cheese and Onion Rings with a Side, $7.95 Bbq Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Soup: Chicken and Dumpling Tuesday, March 3 Chicken Fried Steak with Whipped Potatoes, Vegetable and Roll, $8.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Chicken Caesar Tortellini, $7.95 Soup: Chili Wednesday, March 4 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, Garden Rice, Broccoli and Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $ 7.95 Soup: Chicken and Dumpling Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive align ment). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of sur prises and an additional $5 off for all active duty military (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge March 8: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 March 15: Luck O the Irish St. Patricks Day Weekend Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Every Sunday: NASCAR at Castaways: Sprint Cup Series. Watch every race on our Hi-Def TVs! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimentary Park-toPark pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID to activate ticket at front gate. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 2705145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orlando From your local ITT office and upgrade for free to a Length of Stay Pass (unlimited vis its within a 14-day con secutive window). FL residents can buy a one day admission ticket at their local ITT office and get the rest of the year for free (formerly called a splash pass)! Unlimited visits good until Dec. 31, 2013. Proof of residency must be shown if neces sary. 270-5145 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for priz es. 270-5377 March 20: Command Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Open to all military and civil ian employees assigned to commands at NS Mayport is a Fr ee Bowling Party (up to 120 people) + 100 Instant Party Bowling Coupons (over $2500 value). Teams will play 3 games of bowling : 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize! Captains Cup Points awarded. Cost is $75 per team. 270-5377. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 6: Cobra Demo Day. 11 a.m.3 p.m. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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MWR Sports/Fitness -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane stands with Becky Callender and Cmdr. Andy Hunt, the winners of MWRs first Mayport Sandbox Smackdown held behind Surfside Fitness Center on Feb. 15. Thirteen participants competed for top male and female in events such as Olympic Lifts, Gymnastics, Sprints and Plyometrics.MWR HITs It In SandboxSoftball In Full SwingMWR Sports CoordinatorNaval Station Mayports ball fields lit up with the opening of the 2013 Mens Softball Captains Cup season starting with HSM40 Airwolves taking on Air Operations Air Ops in a six-inning battle on Feb. 19. Airwolves opened with three runs holding Air Ops scoreless in the first inning. They picked up seven runs in the second allowing Air Ops to score only one run. Airwolves scored two runs in the third inning allowing Air ops only one run. Airwolves con tinued their streak by picking up six more runs in the fourth holding Air Ops scoreless mak ing the score 18-2. In the fifth inning Airwolves scored an additional two runs, as Air Ops started to fight back with a ninerun inning. In the final inning, Airwolves scored three more runs holding Air Ops to only one run and finishing the game with a final score of 23 12 Airwolves. The game of their double header Air Ops took on USS Taylor The Taylor. This game was a five-inning battle. The Taylor pulled out to an early lead scoring seven runs in the first three innings holding Air Ops to one run in the first three innings. The Taylor added to their score with three more runs in the fourth inning. Air Ops sticks got hot as they attempted to comeback scoring 12 runs in the fourth inning taking the lead 13-10. The Taylor battled back scoring 13 runs in the fifth and final inning, holding Air Ops to one run making the final score 24-14 The Taylor. At the same time The Taylor and Air Ops were playing, Harbor Operations Saltwater Cowboys were playing against the Airwolves. Airwolves started off by scoring a run in the first inning, but going scoreless in the next two innings. Saltwater Cowboys started the first three innings score less. In the fourth inning both teams managed to each score one run. Saltwater Cowboys out scored the Airwolves in the fifth inning, three runs to two runs, tying the game at four all. Saltwater Cowboys scored six more runs in the sixth inning. Saltwater Cowboys held the Airwolves scoreless in the final two innings, starting off their season with a 10-4 victory. The final game of the night was the Saltwater Cowboys against The Taylor. This was a tight battle game, going into extra innings for a winner. The Taylor took the lead in the first inning by outscoring Saltwater Cowboys six runs to five. Saltwater Cowboys tied up the game outscoring The Taylor in the sec ond inning by scoring 4 to 3. The Taylor scored another run in the third inning, but went score less in the fourth and fifth innings. Saltwater Cowboys went scoreless in the third and fourth inning, pulling their sticks together to score three runs in the fifth inning, giving the Saltwater Cowboys the lead 12-10. The Taylor reclaimed the lead by scoring five runs in the sixth inning, and Saltwater Cowboys only scoring two runs. Saltwater Cowboys tied up the game at 16 in the seventh inning. Both teams went scoreless in the Eighth inning. Saltwater Cowboys gave up one run in the ninth to allow The Taylor to pick up the lead. The Taylors defense went back to work and held Saltwater Cowboys scoreless in the bottom of the ninth to take home the win with a final score of 17-16. Captains Cup Softball is still open to teams. For more information on how you can get your team involved in the league contact Rita @ 904-2705451. March 9: Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. All-military teams $40, military/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. March 12: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. -Photo courtesy of MWRTeens participated in a donut relay at the Mayport Teen Center Lock in on Saturday, Feb. 16. There were games, challenges, snacks, a bonfire and more for all to enjoy throughout the night and into the early morning. Donut Relays At Lock In THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 11

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Life At Sea With Robert G. Bradley -Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Gas Turbine Mechanical Fireman Huffine checks out a sample of JP-5 while Gas Turbine Electrical 1st Class Kim reports down to the Central Control Station that the fuel sample is clear and bright during an underway replenishment onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). Photo by CTTSA Robert RoutonInformation Technician 3rd Class Corey Wisdom stands watch as a Master Helmsman in Aft Steering during Sea and Anchor onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). -Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Aerographers Mate 1st Class Corey Kelley and Aerographers Mate 3rd Class Nicolas Matta take weather measurements and observe the cloud formations to aid with flight operations on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). -Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Sailors on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) take on supplies at a CONREP station during an underway replenishment. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Navy Housing Offers Rental PartnershipsFrom Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsMoving is costly, and for service members, the cost of moving to a new duty station every few years can really add up. Navy Housings Rental Partnership Program, better known as the RPP, helps service members and their fami lies save money on their moving costs associated with renting a home. The RPP provides ser vice members with an affordable alternative for off-base housing and defrays some of the costs incurred as a result of their relocation. Benefits include reduced rents, reduced or no security deposits, and reduced or no application or admin istrative fees. Greater than 75 per cent of our service mem bers live in the commu nity, and we are commit ted to providing them with services that meet their needs and help them save money, said Corky Vazquez, Navy Housing Program director. Local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC) staffs seek out desir able neighborhoods and homes and negotiate with landlords to enroll them in the RPP. Our Navy HSC staffs are knowledgeable of the community surround ing their bases. They are uniquely able to create and foster relationships with local landlords and property owners through the RPP, said Mike Bowlin, Navy Housing Services Program. Service members that take advantage of the RPP have confidence that the property has Navy Housings seal of approv al. In addition to meeting landlord requirements, every property must pass a safety inspection by the Navy HSC before being accepted into the RPP. All full-time active duty service members, mar ried or single, eligible to receive Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH), are eligible to participate in the RPP. Service mem bers cannot be rejected because of a poor credit history or score. The ser vice members BAH is used to match the service member to appropriate RPP properties; no addi tional income is needed to qualify. The RPP is operated at many Navy bases world wide. Service members are invited to contact their local Navy HSC to learn about availability of the RPP at their duty station by visiting Navy Housings website at: www.cnic. navy.mil/Housing. For more information about the RPP, visit www.cnic. navy.mil/RPP.BBC Scholarship For Residents Applications DueBy Balfour Beatty CommunitiesRecognizing the importance of education and its continu ing rising costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholar ships for the 2013-2014 aca demic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. We encourage our fam ily housing residents with high school and undergrad uate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation, its a diffi cult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exception al submissions. The applica tion details and requirements can be found at www.bbcom munitiesfoundation.org. The application deadline is April 15, 2013. Balfour Beatty Communities, responsible for the privatized family hous ing at Naval Station Mayport, formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization com mitted to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to commu nity leadership through edu cational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality living environment that supports the diverse interests and needs of our military families. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. Looking Down Range -Photo by MC2 A.J. JonesChief Warrant Officer Avery Dunn looks through a range finder aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security coopera tion efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 13

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USS Klakring Sailors Give Back To JaxUSS Klakring PAOSailors from USS Klakring (FFG-42), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, vol unteered their time to serve the community by participat ing in a community relations project throughout February. Seventeen of Klakrings Sailors sre volunteering at a Habitat for Humanity build site in St. Augustine, Fla. They partici pated at four worksites, working side by side with several civilian volunteers. Additionally, several Sailors helped paint one site, while Klakrings Boatswains Mate 1st Class Angel Delgado added final dcor touches by hanging curtains. For many of the Sailors, including Sonar Technician Surface 3rd Class Grigorie Draghici, this was their first COMREL with USS Klakring. COMRELs are our way to give back to a community that continues to support us and offer us a home, said Chief Damage Controlman Chase Hampton responded. We are excited to be able to contribute to the Jacksonville areas con tinued prosperity through this project. USS Klakring is currently in her final months of ser vice, making preparations for decommissioning on March 22. She will continue to participate with the Habitat for Humanity project throughout her decom missioning period.SPS Building Skills, Structures In Belize Southern Partnership Station public affairsNavy Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 (CBMU) Seabees and the Riverine Squadron 2, Det. 2 (RIVRON 2) arrived here to set up for the start of Southern Partnership Station 2013 on Feb. 19. This was the first stop in a multi-country deploy ment in the U.S. Navys 4th Fleet area of responsibility. Both units will stay remain in Belize and work hand-in-hand with their Belize Defense Force counterparts for nearly three weeks to build part nership and interoper ability. Seabees will work to build a multi-purpose open bay structure, known as a seahut, and provide the materials for up to two additional buildings. We are here not only to build a seahut with the Belizean Defense Force, but also pass on our knowledge so they can accurately and efficiently build more in the future, said Builder 2nd Class Nathaniel Devincentis, CBMU 202. RIVRON 2 will share their expertise with the Belizean Defense Force and help them improve their skills in areas such as interdiction and inserts and extracts of security teams on the water. Our end goal is to give the Belizean Defense Force what they need to succeed. If they learn it and implement it, then its a good day for us, said Chief Boatswain Mate Jason Hatfield, RIVRON 2. The two units have sep arate missions but share a common purpose; to maintain a strong rela tionship with the Belizean Defense Force and share ideas, experience and technology. -Photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley HyattSailors stack bottled water in Belize. Troops from various branches of the U.S. military are deployed to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibility to conduct Southern Partnership Station 2013.New Medal Retains Place In Order Of PrecedenceAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe new Distinguished Warfare Medal will retain its place in the order of prece dence among military decora tions, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Feb. 19. Much of the public discus sion of the new medal has cen tered on its precedence. It ranks below the Distinguished Flying Cross and above the Bronze Star. We are not diminishing at all the importance of the Bronze Star -that remains an impor tant award for our combat troops and will remain so, Little said in a meeting with reporters. Senior civilian and mili tary leaders decided on where to place the new medal in the order of precedence, he added. We expect this award to be granted pretty rarely, and that factored in to the decision [on its precedence], he said. Juliet Beyler, the Defense Departments acting director of officer and enlisted personnel management, said in an inter view after the announcement of the new medal that technologi cal developments on the battle field have changed the way ser vice members fight. The services all came for ward and said there are peo ple ... who are doing incredible things, and we wanted the ability to recognize them for those things, she said. Service members do not have to be physically present on the battlefield to contribute to suc cess in combat. Unmanned aerial vehicle pilots and cyber specialists can be thousands of miles away from combat and make contri butions to victory. To be eligible to receive the award, a service member has to have direct, hands-on employ ment, such as an unmanned aerial vehicle operator drop ping a bomb or a cyber special ist detecting and fending off a computer network attack. Combatant commanders must certify the impacts of the action before the award is for warded to the service secretary for approval. The secretaries may not del egate that authority. Officials stressed that the medal is meant to recognize actions with direct effects on combat. Other awards are available to recognize service over a length of time, officials added, noting that the Distinguished Warfare Medal is not an end-of-tour award. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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First Littoral Combat Ship To Deploy In MarchDefense Media Activity NavyDuring a media avail ability Feb. 21, Navy offi cials announced the lit toral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is on track to begin its first deployment March 1. This milestone was announced by the LCS Council, a group established by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert Aug. 22, to oversee continued fleet testing and the intro duction of the LCS. Addressing challenges identified by these stud ies, on the timeline we require, necessitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive the action across acquisition, requirements and fleet enterprises of the Navy, said Greenert. The output of the coun cil is intended to assist in maximizing the expan sive potential capabilities of LCS and its associated mission packages in glob al fleet operations for the joint warfighter. I am confident we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This council will continue to unify our efforts to implement operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful fleet integration. LCS ships are designed to employ mission pack ages that address capa bility gaps in the areas of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine war fare. Due to its modular design, each LCS ship can be reconfigured to per form one of those three distinct missions in a short period of time. Freedoms deploy ment will demonstrate her operational capa bilities, and allow the LCS Council to evaluate crew rotation and main tenance plans. The ship will operate forward from Singapore and spend eight months in theater conducting maritime security operations, par ticipate in international exhibitions and exercises to highlight U.S. strategic intent in the region, and reassure U.S. partners through bilateral and multilateral interoperability. -Photo by MC1 James R. EvansThe littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is underway conducting sea trials off the coast of Southern California. Freedom, the lead ship of the Freedom variant of LCS, is expected to deploy to Southeast Asia this spring. Association of Naval Services Officers Convention Cancelled Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe President of the Association of Naval Services Officers announced the cancella tion of their convention Feb. 14. NAVADMIN 029/13 announces the offi cial cancellation of the ANSO Convention which was scheduled to take place from May 6-10 in Arlington, Va. In light of the recent correspondence concerning our very drastic fund ing shortfall in our opera tions and maintenance account for the Navy, and the direction we all need to take to minimize, if not eliminate, our spending in non-mission essential areas, I have canceled this years face-to-face ANSO Symposium, said retired Rear Adm. William Rodriguez, president of ANSO. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert issued his latest guidance Jan. 25 on yearlong continuing resolution and sequestra tion. In his message, all temporary travel, duties and professional train ing not deemed mis sion essential, to include attendance at conference, will be curtailed. Based on the chal lenges of facing the continuing resolution and potential impact of sequestration, the chief of Naval Operations has given us all clear direc tion, said Cmdr. Angela Katson, Director of the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The Navy greatly appreciates the mission and value that all the sea service affin ity groups provide, and we appreciate the critical support ANSO has pro vided to our officers and Sailors since their incep tion. In light of Greenerts Jan. 25 message, ANSO announced its decision Jan. 30 to cancel the 2013 in-person convention. ANSO is currently explor ing alternatives to the 2013 convention, includ ing a possible webinar symposium. Our ANSO board of directors and I are explor ing ways to continue our symposium in a virtual way, in lieu of having a face-to-face symposium this year, said Rodriguez. Our focus for our 2013 virtual symposium, similar to our 2012 sym posium, will maintain our course of continuing to grow our current sea service hispanics to be tomorrows sea service leaders, even during these challenging fiscal times. ANSO is continuing planning for a 2014 con vention to be held in Washington, D.C. 75-Day Leave Carry Over Policy ExtendedNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe 2010 law that allowed Sailors to carry over up to 75 days of leave has been extended to 2015, per NAVADMIN 026/13. The 2013 National Defense Authorization Act passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama in January, extended the expiration of the 75-day leave carry-over policy from Sept. 30, 2013 to Sept. 30, 2015. Afterward, leave carry over will be reset to 60 days and any leave balance in excess of 60 days will be lost. Special Leave Accrual for service members assigned to hostile fire or imminent danger areas, certain deployable ships, mobile units, or other duty remains unchanged and Sailors should review MILPERSMAN 1050-070 for more informa tion. Further extensions of the 75-day leave carryover policy are not expected beyond 2015 and therefore, Sailors are encouraged to work with their chain of command to manage excess amounts of leave. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 15

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Medical/Dental No-Shows Affect Patient AccessNaval Hospital Jacksonville Associate Director of Medical Services Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay) takes pride in the time and care provided to its patients. And while some appointment cancellations are inevitable, when a patient doesnt show up, it prevents another patient with an urgent need from being seen at that time. Last year in one clinic alone (pedi atrics), eight percent of appointments were lost due to patient no-shows. Thats nearly seven appointments a day (1,519 total)at a cost of $107 each ($162,533 total)that couldnt be used by other patients. NH Jacksonville wants to partner with its patients to reverse this trend. In the private sector, some health pro viders charge a no-show fee for cancel lations made less than 24 hours before handsome go as far as charging a fee for each 15 minutes a patient is late. While military treatment facilities dont function that way, its important that patients understand the impact of noshows on others. To cancel or reschedule, please call Central Appointments at (800) 5294677 (or the clinic directly) well in advance hours in advance is recom mendedso the time slot can be used by another patient who needs care. The care team and all of its patients appreci ate it. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles prior ity since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax, like at www.face book/NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www. youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for email updates at nhjaxcon nect@med.navy.mil. -Photo by Jacob Sippel Michelle Harris, Naval Hospital Jacksonville medical support assistant, hands Electricians Mate 2nd Class Hermiedave Asistio a check-in sheet before his appointment at family medicine Jan. 31. HEALTHBEATTeaching Children To Love Their TeethTRICARE Management ActivityShow children how to love their teeth this month and all year long. During National Childrens Dental Month, parents can teach their children healthy oral care tips and schedule annual check-ups with their fam ily dentist. Forming healthy oral care habits during childhood is important. said Lt. Col. Kathleen Gates, acting TRICARE Dental Branch Chief. Beginning a healthy routine as a child encourages healthy behavior into adulthood. Eligible TRICARE ben eficiaries not on active duty have two options for dental care coverage, the TRICARE Dental Program or the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program. Both dental programs cover dependent children for routine dental care such as annual exams, cleanings and x-rays, as well as dental emergen cies and orthodontics. Costs and coverage details vary according to program and enrollment status, and the type of care received. Interested active duty family mem bers, National Guard and Reserve members and their families can get more information or enroll at www.tricare.mil/ dental. Brushing and floss ing daily are important tools to prevent cavities and gum disease caused by food debris and drink residue left in the mouth. Bacteria in the mouth use these to form plaque that can damage teeth and gums and cause cavities. To remove plaque and maintain healthy teeth, the American Dental Association recommends children brush at least twice a day. Brushing in the morn ing after waking up and again before going to bed should be a regular part of every childs daily routine. Teaching children healthy oral care habits is not just important for healthy smiles, but for their overall health in the future. The good oral care habits children form while they are young can help keep them healthy as adults. For more information or to enroll in a TRICARE dental program go to www.tricare.mil/dental. *Active duty service members are not eligible for either dental program and must coordinate their dental care through their dental treatment facility. Did You Know?When George Washington became the first president of the United States in 1789, he had only one tooth left in his mouth. George Washingtons false teeth were not made of wood. He had dentures made from a combination of human teeth, animal teeth, and ivory. 1. Your mouth produces two to four pints of saliva, or spit, in a day. 2 That is about enough to fill an empty gallonsized milk carton in two days. Teeth are like fingerprintseveryone has dif ferent dental patterns, even identical twins. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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NH Jacksonville Welcomes New OmbudsmanNaval Hospital Jacksonville Pub lic Affairs AssistantOakleaf Club of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville mem ber Molly Croft has been appointed, by NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, as command ombudsman. Since being introduced into the Navy in 1970, the Ombudsman Program has ensured that issues and concerns of Navy families are addressed. It is a command operat ed program intended to improve communication between the command and a sailors family mem bers. The position is con sidered an official Navy volunteer, which means that it must be filled by someone with a desire to serve others. They also need to be very structured as they are required to disseminate information throughout the chain of command. They provide important information to help families obtain valu able resources during their loved ones careers. Ombudsmen are consid ered the go to people for guidance. NH Jacksonvilles com manding officer trusts Croft will do a great job linking together com mand families and com mand leadership. The Navy ombudsman plays a critical role supporting our Navy familiessome thing especially impor tant for our families with deployed spouses, says Shaffer. I have utter con fidence Ms. Croft will do an outstanding job guiding our families in the right direction through various challenges they may face time-to-time, serving as their advocate and helping them navi gate available resources. Oakleaf Club of Naval Hospital Jacksonville President Nichol Lee con curs with Shaffer. Lee says Croft brings to the posi tion a great amount of experience and enthusi asm. We are very excit ed to have Ms. Croft on board as the command ombudsman, says Lee. We look forward to col laborating with her on future endeavors to ben efit the families of our amazing Naval Hospital Jacksonville heroes. Croft found her calling to serve as an ombuds man while her husband, Lt. Cmdr. Coby Croft, was stationed at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Rota, Spain. In 2004, her husband was deployed after a tsunami occurred in Indonesia. This left Croft, a mother of three, with many appre hensions and questions about who she could turn to without her spouse being there to help. That feeling of helplessness and anxiety inspired her to aid others by becoming the command ombuds man until their reloca tion to NH Jacksonville in 2012. My husband has deployed four times, and my children have been various ages and stages during each deployment, recalls Croft. The levels of support that we need ed changed from one to another. Croft enjoys helping families on a personal level. And she feels NH Jacksonville is unique ly positioned with its high level of Individual Augmentee (IA) deploy ments, with up to eight percent of its active duty staff deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disas ter care. It can be very lonely and isolating with individual deployments, says Croft. Helping a family find resources and providing them with the support they need is very satisfying because Ive been that spouse, and Ive walked in those shoes. Along with empow ering family members with resources they need to help themselves, the ombudsman is also available to help resolve conflicts that may arise between the command and family members from a confidential, nonbiased viewpoint. The ombuds man helps develop fair solutions to complex and difficult problems. When Croft became an ombuds man, she took an oath to uphold strict confidentiality. I take very seriously the confidence given to me by the families who contact me, assures Croft. Ive been trained through the Fleet and Family Support Center and con tinue monthly trainings, maintaining updated resources to best serve the families of the command. Contact the command ombudsman at nhjaxom budsman@gmail.com or call (904) 508-7610. Mrs. Davis, NBHC Mayports ombudsman can be con tacted at nbhcombuds man@gmail.com or (904) 303-5596. Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population,000 active and retired sailors, sol diers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their fam iliesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a prima ry care manager at one of its facilities. Molly Croft NH Jax OmbudsmanMoving? Add Medical Records To Packing ListTRICARE Management ActivityThere are often loose ends to tie up before mov ing. This can be espe cially true when a fam ily is moving from one TRICARE region to another or transferring over seas. One thing families need to add to the pack ing list are copies of medi cal records for everyone who is moving. Up-to-date medical records are important tools for health care pro viders to deliver continu ity of care, and they are especially useful when patients switch providers. Medical records help pro viders understand their patients medical history for diagnosing condi tions, prescribing treat ments and avoid potential hazards like allergies or harmful drug interactions. One tool available to TRICARE beneficiaries is TRICARE Online (TOL). TOL lets eligible TRICARE beneficiaries access per sonal health data cap tured during treatment at military hospitals and clinics via the Blue Button. Available Blue Button personal health data includes lab results, notes from doctors vis its (known as encounter notes), problem lists, and medication and allergy data documented in military and Veterans Affairs electronic health records. Individuals can find out what TOL offers them by creating an account at www.tricareonline.com. Need help to register or use TOL? TRICARE TV has a video tuto rial to help beneficia ries navigate TOL and manage their personal health data. The tutorial can be viewed online at www.youtube.com/tri carehealth, look for the Manage Your Personal Health Record title. Beneficiaries should request copies of their complete medical records from their primary care manager (PCM) before moving or switching doc tors. Some civilian PCMs charge a fee for providing copies. TRICARE covers the cost of those fees for active duty service mem bers only. All other beneficiaries are responsible for paying the fee and will not be reimbursed. Once a beneficiary has selected a PCM in their new location, they can request that their medical records be sent directly by mail. Sending medical records by mail could mean a delay in receiving them, and beneficiaries may still have to pay an administrative fee. Not all PCMs will send medical records by mail, so ben eficiaries should plan to transport copies of their own records and keep them secure. Beneficiaries should talk with their PCM about transporting their medical records well in advance of a move. For more infor mation or to register in TOL, go to www.tricare online.com. For infor mation about personal medical records go to www.tricare.mil and click on Medical Records and Privacy under the Medical tab from the home page. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 17

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USS Hu City Completes First 2013 Deployment Replenishment At Sea USS Hu City Public AffairsSailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) completed their first replenishment at sea (RAS) of the ships 2013 deployment with Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo ship USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) on Feb. 23. During the RAS, Medgar Evers used the time to practice load ing and off loading pallets to Hu City in order to hone its skills, which is essential to both ships missions. Conducting a successful RAS evolution allows the ship to remain at sea for extended peri ods of time without hav ing to pull into port to refuel or take on cargo. This was the first of many replenishments we will conduct with Medgar Evers, so this just builds our working relationship, said Ensign Corey Schulz, Hu Citys 1st Lieutenant. I was really impressed with everyone today, this being the second half of our deployment and everyone able to jump right back in the saddle and accomplish our mis sion. Hu City success fully received more than 152,000 gallons of fuel for the ship and embarked helicopters. The evolution highlighted the crews proficiency as well as Hu Citys ability to work alongside other ships. A RAS is an all-hands evolution and every Sailor plays an impor tant role. During the evolution, Sailors form a qualified bridge watch team, including a master helmsman responsible for maneuvering the ship at a close but safe distance from the replenishment ship. Other required duties include safety observers, rig captains, riggers, signalmen and phone talkers. Every department on the ship provides person nel to act as line handlers. Engineering person nel test samples of the oncoming fuel and advise the ship when to secure pumping. Gunners mates are on station to fire shot lines between the ships. Supply personnel move and secure oncoming supplies within the ship. It is an exercise that truly requires the crew to come together and work as one. The reason it was a successful evolution was because everyone was safe and on their toes making it nice and quick, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Daven Arce. The most important aspect to any evolution is everyone stays motivated to look out for each other and work together as a team, and we have a good team here. Hu City is on deploy ment to support maritime security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeAbove, Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) secure the anchor for sea during sea and anchor detail. Right, Seaman Recruit Anna Colins, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), speaks to the pilothouse during sea and anchor detail as the ship begins its deployment. 18 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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-Photo courtesy of F&ESNS Mayport Fire Inspector Moises Colon stands with MWR Youth Counselor Brandy Wainwright and members of the Youth Activities Center 4-H who collected teddy bears for the base fire department during a teddy bear drive. First Coast Navy Fire & Emer gency ServicesMembers of the teen center, with the help of youth counselor Brandy Wainwright, participated in a 4-H teddy bear drive at Naval Station Mayport last week. Their goal was to collect teddy bears for the local base fire department. The toys collected will be given to children dur ing emergency calls with the hopes of providing comfort during traumatic experiences. The teens are members of the 4-H club, which is the nations largest youth develop ment organization. In addition to the teddy bear drive, the teens recently collaborated with fire inspectors at Naval Station Mayport to create and star in a fire preven tion skit. The original skit was performed during Fire Prevention Week with the intention of educat ing Mayports youth on fire safety. The skit was digitally recorded and is currently being used for training by the fire pre vention office. NS Mayport Gets Cuddly For A Cause Working In Confined Spaces-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of Naval Station Mayports Fire & Emergency Services team race to set up a tripod as part of a confined space exercise held Feb. 9 at Mayports new swim ming pool. The pool is part of the new addition to the Mayport gym construction currently underway. The rescue team set up a dummy and practiced rescue drills during a real-time scenario at the pool.Dispose of Household Hazardous Waste ProperlyFrom Mayport EnvironmentalHalf empty cans of paint, an aerosol can without a spray tip, unwanted insecticides, and old containers of transmission fluid chemicals that you will probably never use again but dont know what to do with these are all examples of what is com monly termed Household Hazardous Waste (HHW). Because they are so commonplace within the community, the cumu lative effect of HHW, if not properly discarded, can pollute the environ ment and pose a threat to human health. To properly dispose of household hazardous wastesthroughout the year, you may bring mate rials to the Household Hazardous Waste Facility, 2675 Commonwealth Ave. The HHW Facility is openTuesday through Saturday, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. In addition, the City provides HHW mobile collection events at vari ous locations throughout Jacksonville. They will be heldfrom 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the following loca tions: March 16, 2013 Blue Cypress Park:4012 University Blvd. N. Naval Station Mayport departments and other Navy organizations must arrange for dis posal of hazardous waste through the Public Works Department Hazardous Waste Facility (Bldg. 1986) call 270-6468. To report improper dump ing of household hazard ous waste on the Station, please call 270-6781 or 270-6070. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 19

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Retiree NewsExplaining Arrears Of PayFrom the Retired Activities OfficeWhen a retiree dies, his or hers retired pay ceases upon notification to DFAS. This can be done with a phone call to DFAS (800-321-1080). It should be done as soon as pos sible in order to prevent any over payment of retired pay that could cause future monetary problems with DFAS. However, the beneficiary (nor mally the spouse) is entitled to the pro-rated amount of his or her military members final months retired pay. This is called the arrears of pay (AOP). When DFAS is noti fied of the service members death, they will reclaim the final months retired pay and conduct an audit of his or hers account to compute the amount of the AOP. To receive this final payment, a DD Form-1174, Claim for Unpaid Compensation must be filled out and filed with DFAS with a copy of the long form death certificate. This can be done either by submitting the form via mail or online at the DFAS web site (http://www.dfas. mil/retiredmilitary.html). A blank DD-1174 form is nor mally sent to the beneficiary by the DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity sec tion. It can also be obtained at the NAS Jax Retired Activities Office at the Fleet and Family Support Center. However the form is submitted, a copy of the long form death cer tificate has to accompany the 1174 or faxed separately to DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity Section (800-4696559). If the 1174 and death certificate are faxed to DFAS, ensure there is adequate reference to the service member (full name, address, Social Security Number or service num ber, phone number and name for point of contact on both pieces of documentation). For planning purposes, it can take upwards of four to eight weeks for processing and payment sent to your financial institution. For more information, call 5425790. Saturday, March 2 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is kicking off Garden Month 2013 with a Free Community Day and Plant Sale start ing at 9 a.m. The Cummer is dedicating the entire month of March to the historic gardens. Garden Month 2013 kicks off with a Free Community Day featuring live music, art-making activities, a plant sale, The St. Johns Riverkeeper Rain Barrel Sale and artist demonstra tions in the gardens. Plant Sale vendors include Anitas Garden Shop, Flying Dragon Citrus Nursery, Native Gardens Nursery, Philips Garden Store, Rockaway Garden Center and Trads Garden Center. Community Day coincides with the launch of Weaver Free First Saturdays at The Cummer, which opens the Museum to the public for free the first Saturday of every month. Artist Demonstrations in the Gardens: Noon to 3 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 899-6038 or visit www.cummer. org. For more informa tion about the Plant Sale, please call The Cummer Store at (904) 899-6035. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Garrison event on Saturday, March 2 and Sunday, March 3 at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Avenue, Fernandina Beach. This program will allow visi tors to interact with liv ing historians to experi ence life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing demon strations, marching drills, cooking and daily activi ties. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. North Atlantic right whales visit Northeast Florida waters to give birth to calves December through March. Join a ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about one of the worlds most endangered large mammals. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, March 3 Fort Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Road will begin a new church ser vice at 1:10 p.m. The service, entitled Life Redeemed 1:10 features current praise music and is targeted for collegegoing youth. Join us! For more information, call 744-1311. Monday, March 4 A Canning Workshop Freezing Products come learn to freeze products in jars and plastic con tainers, at Duval County Canning Center, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., at 1 p.m. Cost is $20 with limited space; with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby at255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. A Canning Workshop Splenda Product Pomogranate Jelly come learn to make and take home some of the prod uct made at Duval County Canning Center, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., at 9 a.m. Cost is $20 with limited space; with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Tuesday, March 5 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be a presentation by Olis Garber on Bird and Landscape Photography. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Saturday, March 9 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Duval County Staff are offering an irrigation class on water saving tech niques, tuning up your irrigation system and low volume irrigation for gar dens from 9 a.m.-noon at Duval County Extension, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. We are offering a free water savings kit to the first 50 registrants. Call Becky at 255-7450 to pre-register or email her at beckyd@ coj.net with your name and phone number. Cost is $5. You can pay at the door. Orlando HarleyDavidson will host a pair of events benefiting Operation Giveback www. operation-giveback.org to honor the heroic sacrifice of Americas veterans and their families. Starting at 11:45 a.m., a large motor cycle convoy will travel on surface roads from the Orlando Harley-Davidson South Dealership on 192 in Kissimmee to the Orlando HarleyDavidson Historic Factory Dealership. Starting at 1 p.m., hundreds of riders and members of the pub lic will be treated to enter tainment and food. A $10 donation (cash or check) per rider and a $5 dona tion per passenger will be required. All proceeds will benefit wounded war riors, their families and the children of our fallen heroes. For more informa tion, visit www.orlando harley.com The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park is partnering with the Friends of Fort Clinch, Inc., Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission and Fish Florida to conduct a Kids Fishing Clinic from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, to teach lessons on knot tying, fishing ethics, tack le, habitat, casting and more. The clinic is open to children ages four to 16 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. The first 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. Bring your family to enjoy a fun day of saltwater fishing. For additional information, please contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks. org. Tuesday, March 12 The Duval County Extension Office along with Standard Feed & Seed, Dinsmore Feed & Supply and Purina Animal Nutrition is offer ing a Small Scale Poultry Production Workshop from 6-8:30 p.m. This free workshop will cover breed selection, nutrition and feeding, basic manage ment of recycling chicken litter, current regulations and petition update, gen eral tips and an Q & A panel. Everyone in atten dance will receive a cou pon for two free chicks. Light refreshments will be served. To pre-register call Becky at 904-255-7450 or go to http://raising poultry2013.eventbrite. com. This workshop will be located at the Duval County Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Friday, March 15 Duval County Extension is offering a Make and Take Rain Barrel Workshop on from 10 a.m.-noon. The cost is $45. Pre-registration with payment is due by Monday, March 11. Please make check for $45 payable to DCOHAC and mail to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N McDuff Ave. The class is limited in size. Please bring a vehicle big enough to get the 55-gallon plastic drum home. Sorry, no deliver ies. For questions, please call Becky at 904-2557450. Saturday, March 23 Why are we fascinated with monsters and the mysterious? Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a discussion on the differ ent types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. The program is free. Saturday, March 30 Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m. through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 18th Annual St Johns Celebration Cleanup From Mayport Environ mentalVolunteers are needed to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport for the 18th Annual St. Johns River Celebration Cleanup on March 16. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on March 16 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 11 a.m. volun teers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. Community Service hours may be earned from partici pation in this event. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net (key words: St Johns River Celebration) or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. Preregistration is not required. 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Mayport Goes To War Taking A Look Back At NS Mayports HistoryFormer Station LibrarianEditors Note: The fol lowing is a reprint of an article first published on June 1, 1990. It is the first in a series that follows the history of Naval Station Mayport from its begin nings to present day. In April 1939, the Navy department implemented plans for the establish ment and construction of an aircraft carrier base on the East Coast of the United States. One of sev eral locations considered was a site near Mayport at the mouth of the St. Johns River. In December 1939, Ribault Bay was selected. On Oct. 27, 1940, a relatively obscure naval Reserve officer was called to active duty to establish and assume command of the new U.S. Naval Frontier Section Base at Mayport. Two months later, Lt. Cmdr. Maynard R. Sanders, a 27-year vet eran of the Naval Reserve, assumed his duties dur ing the commissioning ceremonies held at the old U.S. Naval Reserve Armory in the southside of Jacksonville. Sanders served as the section base commanding officer until he was reassigned to the position of district per sonnel officer, with the rank of commander, at the Sixth Naval District in Charleston, S.C. The land surrounding the bay was purchased in 1941, and construction of barracks, mess hall, dis pensary and administra tion facilities and dredg ing of the bay was started immediately. But in May of that year, Congess shelved the plans for the carrier facility, opting instead for a crash boat and patrol boat training facility. In December of 1940, the dark clouds of war were gathering just beyond the horizons of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and they were aimed at America. One year late, the whirlwinds of German and Japanese aggression swept those clouds toward the United States with all the fury of a hurricane. Two events were the catalysts that plunged America into a second world war in the relatively short period of 23 years. On Oct. 31, 1941, a German submarine, U-552, torpedoed and sank the American destroyer USS Reuben James in the North Atlantic. Of the entire crew of about 160, only 45 were rescued. On Dec. 7. Japan unleashed the might of its naval, sea and air forces against an unsuspect ing military and civil ian population at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On Dec. 11, Germany and Italy declared war against the United States. At the time of the attack on our fleet at Pearl Harbor, the Atlantic Fleet consisted of four old bat tleships, New York Texas, Arkansas and Wyoming; four heavy cruisers, San Francisco, Tuscaloosa, Quincy and Vincennes; Destroyer Squadron 10; and two aircraft carriers, Ranger and Wasp. During the criti cal months of 1942 and early 1943, the Atlantic Fleet had been dis persed either to the North Atlantic for convoy duty or to North Africa and the Mediterranean. Shipping along the East Coast of the United States was most vulnerable to attack by German submarines. With the dispersal of the Atlantic fleet, the ship ping lanes along the East coast from Halifax to the Panama Canal were left unprotected. Grand Adm. Karl Doenitz, commander in chief of Hitlers subma rine service, unleashed his U-boats and aimed them toward the United States on Jan. 13, 1942. Operation Drumbeat, Doenitzs code name for the operation, became a reality. America was soon to find its Atlantic Coast beaches covered with fuel oil and the bodies of dead seamen, and its offshore waters the graveyard of sunken ships. In this, the first of sev eral articles detailing the history of the naval sta tion, I briefly touched on the activities involving the creation of the station. Future articles will cover the period from 1939 to 1946, when the station was deactivated. The his tory will be composed of data collected from pho tographs taken of the station between 1939 and 1945, interviews with surviving veterans of the Mayport Naval Reserve veterans who served here during the war years, and from documents donat ed to the librarys collec tion by various patrons, including Helen Sanders and Ida Crozier, the wife and daughter of the late Capt. Maynard R. Sanders. -Official U.S. Navy PhotoSailors work at the U.S. Naval Reserve Armory located in the southside of Jacksonville. Sailors stationed at the Armory would later man a newly-created U.S. Naval Frontier Section Base at Mayport. Initiative Reduces Disability Claims VA Processing TimeFrom a Department of Veterans Affairs News ReleaseThe Veterans Affairs Department has launched a new initiative that could eliminate the requirement for an in-person medi cal examination for some veterans and shorten the time it takes to process disability compensation claims. Officials said the initia tive called Acceptable Clinical Evidence, or ACE was developed jointly by the Veterans Health Administration and the Veterans Benefits Administration to pro vide a veteran-centric approach for disability examinations. Use of the ACE process opens the possibility of doing assessments with out an in-person exami nation when there is suf ficient information in the record, officials said. Under ACE practices, a VA medical provider com pletes a disability benefits questionnaire by review ing existing medical evi dence. This evidence can be supplemented with information obtained during a telephone inter view with the veteran, officials explained, allevi ating the need for some veterans to report for an in-person examination. ACE is a process improvement that will help us meet our goal to eliminate the claims backlog and provide more timely benefits to our vet erans, their families and survivors, said Allison A. Hickey, VAs undersec retary for benefits. The initiative also saves vet erans the inconvenience and costs associated with attending a medical examination. When a VA medical provider determines VA records already contain sufficient medical infor mation to provide the needed documentation for disability rating pur poses, the requirement for veterans to travel to a medical facility for an examination may be elim inated. If VA can complete a disability benefits ques tionnaire by reviewing medical records already on file, it will use the ACE process. This would then expedite the determina tion of disability ratings, officials said, in turn eliminating the wait time to schedule and conduct an exam from the claims process. During a 15-month pilot test at one VA regional claims process ing office, officials noted, 38 percent of claims sub mitted were eligible for ACE. The ACE initiative is a part of a five-year effort by the Veterans Benefits Administration designed to improve claims pro cessing, officials said. The goal of the transforma tion plan is to eliminate the claims backlog and process all claims within 125 days with 98 percent accuracy in 2015. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 21

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com SERMC Reaches ExcellenceCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center Public AffairsCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) Rear Adm. David Gale select ed Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) as the 2012 Regional Maintenance Center Excellence Award winner Feb. 13 in Norfolk. SERMC is located on Naval Station Mayport and provides surface ship maintenance and repair support to U.S. Navy ships in the southeast region of the United States, ships visiting the region, and to those in need of emergent repair support as directed by CNRMC. SERMCs performance exceeded expectations and milestones through out 2012, said Gale. The command provided southeast region ships and visiting ships with outstanding maintenance availabilities, fleet techni cal assistance and emer gent repairs. An availability is a scheduled event during which a ship undergoes repairs, maintenance and/or modernization. Throughout 2012, SERMC completed seven Chief of Naval Operation (CNO) avail abilities, 34 surface ship Continuous Maintenance Availabilities (CMAVs) and two decommission ing availabilities. In August 2012, after USS Porter (DDG 78) collided with a large Japaneseowned merchant vessel near the Strait of Hormuz, SERMCs Commanding Officer, Capt. Ron Cook and his Chief Engineer Phil Schmid quickly responded to support Gale, who led damage assessments and initial repairs. The repair team arrived in Dubai on Aug. 15, which gave them vir tually no advance notifi cation to prepare for this effort. Despite the inher ent challenges, their abil ity to arrive and immedi ately help assess damage and support repair rec ommendations was com mendable, said Gale. Last July, SERMCs Engineering and Production shops teamed with ships force on the USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) to perform a Total Ship Readiness Assessment (TSRA) in preparation for the ships Inspection and Survey (INSURV). During the assess ment, SERMC identified and assisted ships force in working nearly 900 jobs. Typically, these jobs would be given to the crew to write ship main tenance forms known as 2-Kilo reports, which they would then use to plan, document and perform the work themselves. Rather than handing over the immense number of jobs identified dur ing the TSRA for ships force to work, SERMC partnered with them and provided the sup port of their Engineering and Production (Code 200/900) shops. INSURVs are extreme ly challenging for ships force, and can be equally demanding for the RMC. Im very proud of the way SERMC and the leader ship and crew of USS Robert G. Bradley part nered in the weeks lead ing up to their INSURV to prepare for a successful inspection, said Gale. USS Hu City Deploys With IKE CSG The Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKECSG), with nearly 4,500 Sailors, deployed from Naval Station Norfolk and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Feb. 21, to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleets. The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), commanded by Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock, along with German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220), commanded by Commander Ralf Kuchler, departed from Naval Station Norfolk, and the guided mis sile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), commanded by Capt. Dan Uhls, from Naval Station Mayport. Eisenhower and Hu City returned three months earli er than previously scheduled in order to resurface its flight deck prior to a planned rede ployment. The IKECSG is redeploying to support carrier strike group presence requirements in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet area of operations. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, the IKECSG Sailors will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This strike group is test ed and always ready for the next mission, said Rear Adm. Michael C. Manazir, CSG 8 commander. Im proud of the versatility and flexibil ity of every Sailor in this strike group. They have proven that we can meet all tasks set out for us by our fleet command ers. I look forward to once again playing a part in ensur ing the security of interna tional waterways and build ing partnerships around the world, Manazin added. For this deployment, IKECSG is comprised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN69), embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220) and USS Hu City (CG 66). Aircraft squadrons of CVW-7 include strike fighter squad rons VFA-143 Pukin Dogs, VFA-131 Wildcats, VFA-83 Rampagers and VFA-103 Jolly Rogers, tactical elec tronics warfare squadron VAQ-140 Patriots, carrier airborne early warning squad ron VAW-121 Bluetails, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Rawhides and heli copter anti-submarine squad ron HS-5 Nightdippers. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenMeagan Usry waves goodbye as the Ticonderoga Class guided-missle cruiser USS Hu City (CG-66) departs Naval Station Mayport Feb. 21. Usry's husband Sonar Technician Surface Seaman Keith Ursy serves on board Hu City. Hu City joins the USS Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group on a six-month deployment. Read more on USS Hu City, Page 18. New Skipper For HSL-48From HSL-48Cmdr. T. T. Bart Simpson was relieved by Cmdr. Eric J. Bower on Feb. 22 as commanding officer of HSL48 (Vipers) during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Station Mayport. Simpson reported to the Vipers in July 2010 and upon taking command, he sent an unprecedented seven helicopters detachments to sea during CY 2012, totaling more than 7,000 flight hours during his tenure. Simpson will report to the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower to assume duties as the Navigation officer. Bower assumed the duties as commanding officer after serving as executive officer since November 2011. -Photo by Lt. Justin CooperCmdr. Tyrone Simpson, outgoing commanding officer of HSL-48, speaks at the change of command ceremony before handing over command to Cmdr. Eric Bower. Are You Saving?From American Forces Press ServiceDefense Department officials have designated this week as Military Saves Week to highlight the need for military families to reduce debt and save for the future, a key to force readiness. The event is part of the yearlong Military Saves campaign, an opportunity for leaders to stress the importance of good financial habits to all members of the force and their families to encour age saving, reducing debt and building wealth, officials said. Visit http://www.militarysaves.org for more information about Military Saves or call FFSC at 270-6600 for classes.

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Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror To everyday civilians, the pursuit of happi ness typically involves career, home, love, and family. Its no different for military families, with one important exception: ORDERS. Unlike their civilian counterparts, active duty servicepersons must pursue their happiness within the strict confines of written military orders, which are lengthy docu ments that appear to be written in alien code. Military orders seem riddled with gibberish, and might be easily rep licated as follows: Sit on a computer keyboard for about ten minutes, peri odically shifting posi tions. Once enough XXXXXXXXs and UUUUUUs have been typed, print out about 15 pages; staple. Trust me, even the most seasoned soldier or Sailor wouldnt immediately notice the difference. However, buried amongst the seem ingly nonsensical ver biage are key phrases such as Report no later than August 2013 and Newport, Rhode Island, which, although embed ded in gobbledygook, are important mandatory instructions regarding the next couple of years in a servicepersons life. We are a Navy family whos seen our share of military orders. Our most recent writ ten orders arrived a month ago. Besides RTTUZYUW and UUUU--RHMCSUU my husbands orders indi cate that this summer, he must report to a new job at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. Our last orders instructed my husband to report to Naval Station Mayport, Florida in March 2011, and before that to Africa Command, Stuttgart, Germany in July 2008. Before that Djibouti, East Africa. Before that Norfolk, Virginia. Before that Molesworth, England. Before that, Monterey California. And so on, and so on. I cant prove it with out the assistance of an experienced cryptogra pher, but I think that our orders might also contain mandates such as /// GET OVER IT/// or /// NO WHINING--YOURE IN THE MILITARY///. We must follow mili tary orders regardless of inconvenience or hard ship, like moving your son before his senior year, or leaving the church that you like so much, or separating your youngest after she finally made a new best friend. None of that matters. We are at the mercy of the U.S. Navy. Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesFor the past several weeks I have written arti cles about students with special needs, students struggling academically, and students who need financial aid. This week the focus is on academi cally advanced elemen tary and middle school students. Whether your child has been identified as gifted or not, Duke Universitys TIP Program may be just the ticket you need to help you better under stand, motivate, enrich, and academically chal lenge your child. The Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) identifies gifted students and pro vides resources to nur ture the development of these exceptionally bright youngsters. Because giftedness is greatly misunderstood, students with advanced intellectual and academ ic abilities confuse and challenge educators and, especially, their parents. Duke TIP is committed to serving this unique group of students by providing services and programs beyond what is offered in the classroom. Through Duke TIP a whole range of activities and programs are accessible to parents and teachers to meet the individual needs of gifted children. For a variety of reasons, many gifted children simply do not reach their full potential. Exceptionally bright students often go unrecognized because they hide their talents, underachieve, or exhibit behavioral problems. In addition, a dispropor tionately large number of minority group students, youngsters from fami lies where English is not the primary spoken lan guage in the home and children from less afflu ent families are at risk for not being identified as gifted. Beginning at criti cal points in education, Duke TIP gives students a chance to learn more about their abilities. Qualifying fourth and fifth grade students may participate in Duke TIPs 4th/5th Grade Talent Search (formerly MAP) program and may take advantage of its option al above-level testing. Through Duke TIPs 7th Grade Talent Search pro gram, which focuses on the identification, rec ognition, and support of high-ability students, qualifying seventh grade students take college entrance exams alongside high school students. A large number of 7th grade Talent Search participants outscore many high school students. To learn more about this very special program, check with your school counselor or go to www. tip.duke.edu/7benefits. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingSpecial Program Planned For Academically Advanced Elementary, Middle School StudentsWe all have wounds sometimes, whether they are emotional, physical, or spiritual. Some may be small and relatively easy to get over. But other wounds can be big, seri ous, and deep. These wounds may hurt for days, weeks, months, or even years. Wounds like this can become a part of us and impact our life. So what should we do when we are hurt by others? Should we try to get even? Should we forgive? We learn from Scripture to not condemn and we will not be condemned, and to forgive and we will be forgiven (Luke 6:37). If we insist on getting even and seek revenge, I wonder if that is like saying that we can handle this bet ter than God. Scripture also teaches us that God will do the judging, that God will take care of it (Romans 12:19). The question is do we trust that God will ultimately take care of everything? Are any of us perfect? No. That means that all of us at times have wound ed someone and been wounded by someone. So there are times when we all need to forgive and be forgiven. So what is forgiveness? It is important to understand what forgiveness is and what it is not. Forgiving does not always mean forget ting. Forgiveness does not mean that there are no consequences. Its not the same as pretend ing that unacceptable behavior is acceptable. If we forgive someone, it doesnt mean that we no longer feel pain or that we are finished griev ing. Forgiveness does not always immediately lead to trust and recon ciliation. So, what does it mean to forgive some one? Forgiveness is like a cancelled debt. It means giving up the perceived right to get even, giving up the attitude that you owe me. Of course, this is all easier said than done. For minor mistakes and offenses, we might be able to forgive quick ly. We can try to accept others imperfections and remember our own flaws. But for more major offenses and betrayals, we might need to go slowly and get help and sup port from others to work towards forgiving some one. We can remind ourselves that the relation ship with our loved one or friend is more important than the offense. We can also remember the times we have needed forgive ness and seek to develop compassion for the other person. We should take the time we need, patiently work through any painful feelings, and then strive to forgive and move forward. Forgiveness is really more about the one for giving than the one being forgiven. There are many benefits to forgiving oth ers. Forgiveness over comes bitterness and helps us move beyond pain. Forgiveness can increase our capacity for love and make reconcili ation possible. When we forgive someone and set them free, its like were really setting ourselves free. There has been a great deal of research about forgiveness, not only from a spiritual perspective but also in the context of counseling and educa tion. Research has shown that forgiveness inter ventions in counseling are successful in treating many problems, includ ing substance abuse and addiction, anger and depression, and relation ship problems. Research indicates that some of the benefits of forgive ness are: 1) happier mar riages and families, 2) better emotional and physical health, 3) lower levels of anger and hos tility, and 4) reduction in stress responses and other behaviors related to cardiovascular disease. Forgiving leads to personal growth and progression in many ways. Forgiveness takes cour age and strength. When we forgive, we try to see things from the others perspective and to devel op increased empathy and understanding. Also, even though forgiving is not the same as forgetting, we try to stop dwelling on the past. Although we may still remember that we were wronged, we no longer hold it against the other person. We choose to let it go. Forgiveness is a liberating gift we can give to the other person and to ourselves. Is there someone in your life you need to forgive? My hope and prayer is that each of us Chap Luke Wilson Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSForgiveness Is A Very Powerful ThingSo why do we con tinue to let ourselves get ordered around? In todays unstable economic climate, one might think that mere job secu rity is what motivates military families to keep following orders, and with all the news of fiscal cliffs and sequestration there is some truth to this. However, regardless of job security, a deep attachment to a military culture develops. With each successive move, military families not only become more resilient, but also cultivate a strong identity and pride in their unique lifestyle. Believe it or not, we become so accustomed to being ordered to go somewhere new, we often look for ward to it after being in one place for a couple of years. I must admit, Ive wondered if our affection for military life might be a twinge of Stockholm syndrome. Or maybe its rooted in fear of whats on the outside, like longterm prisoners who are afraid to be released. Or maybe its a compulsion, like Pacinos Michael Corleone in Godfather III (Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!) Truly, I know our affin ity for this lifestyle is rooted in honor, duty, courage, loyalty, patrio tism and sacrifice for others. These concepts have become muddled in todays society, so we feel fortunate to raise our kids in a military environment where those virtues are emphasized. We live and work with other military families who have a common understanding of good and evil, right and wrong. We dont need a permanent hometown its the similar sense of values and camaraderie with fellow military fami lies that make us feel at home. No doubt about it: nonmilitary families are fortunate to put down roots in one place where they can make close friendships and foster stable school, family and commu nity ties. They might not understand how a family like mine could be happy about moving to Rhode Island after less than two years in Florida. But we are happy about our ninth move in 20 years, because its part and parcel of our military lifestyle. To quote a com mon saying which adorns many a Sailors front door, Home is where the Navy sends us. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comSee Chapel, Page 3 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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can remember when we have needed forgiveness from God and others, that we can forgive as we have been forgiven, that we can give to others what has been given to us, and that we can set someone free and in the process set ourselves free too.From Page 2Chapel Importance Of Civilians To Navy MissionFrom CNO Jonathan GreenertShipmates, I am re-purposing a memo I signed [Feb. 20] about the Importance of Civilians to ourNavy Mission that is being released to all our Navy Civilians: Navy Civilians are essential to what we do as a Navy. You repair and maintain our ships, aircraft and combat sys tems; plan and manage our budgets; and design and engineer our future force. Your efforts remain absolutely essential to our ability to be ready to fight and win today while preparing for tomorrows challenges. Today, 186,000 Navy Civilians serve in every state and 20 countries overseas. I have seen firsthand your dedication, pride and unwavering commitment and I appreciate your steadfastness through this challenging time. As we prepare for potential budget short falls, I remain focused on supporting our Sailors, Civilians and their Families and funding our most important mis sions. Today the Defense Department notified Congress that it plans to furlough Civilian person nel if sequestration goes into effect. If sequestra tion begins March 1, fur loughs would begin in late April. Information on the furlough process and your rights and benefits is at: http://www.navy.mil/ docs/CivilianFurloughsIn foImpacts_19FEB13.ppt I will do everything possible to keep you informed and direct you to resources available to you and your families. The Navy will remain on the front line of our nations efforts in war and in peace. Navy Civilians will continue to play a critical role in those efforts, even in the face of budget uncertainty and fiscal challenges. Thank you for the incredible work you do each and every day, and for car rying forward our more than two-century tradi tion of warfighting excel lence and resilience.DOD Preparing For Civilian FurloughsAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has notified Congress that the Defense Department is prepared to implement furloughs for civilian personnel in response to the threat of sequestration. In a memo to all employees, Panetta vowed to continue work ing with Congress to avoid sequestration, which would add $470 billion to the $487 billion in defense spending cuts the department already is making over the next 10 years. If Congress cannot agree on an alternative deficit reduction plan, the cuts go into effect March 1. Panetta and every other defense leader have called the cuts dangerous. They would come on top of cuts imposed by operat ing under a continuing resolution. For fiscal year 2013, the effect will be further magnified, because the cuts must be done in the final six months of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. In the event of sequestration, we will do every thing we can to be able to continue to perform our core mission of provid ing for the security of the United States, Panetta wrote in the memo, but there is no mistaking that the rigid nature of the cuts forced upon this depart ment, and their scale, will result in a serious erosion of readiness across the force. Panetta and DOD lead ers long have expressed deep concern about the direct impact sequestra tion will have on mili tary personnel, civilian employees and families. Flexibility in sequestra tion is limited, the sec retary said in his memo, noting that while military personnel are exempt from direct impact, ser vices on bases will dete riorate, and families may feel the pinch in other ways. Civilian employees will be furloughed if seques tration is triggered. Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter said last week that civilian employees could lose 20 percent of their normal income through September. I can assure you that, if we have to implement furloughs, all affected employees will be pro vided at least 30 days notice prior to executing a furlough, and your benefits will be protected to the maximum extent possible, Panetta wrote. DOD will work to ensure furloughs are executed in a consistent and appropriate manner, the secretary said, and Pentagon officials also will continue work with employee unions. Our most important asset at the department is our world-class person nel, Panetta wrote. You are fighting every day to keep our country strong and secure, and rest assured that the leaders of this department will con tinue to fight with you and for you.Lunch Time Class With ERAUFrom ERAUEmbry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) will be organizing a series of Lunch Time classes if a minimum of students show inter est. The requirements to launch this project is a minimum of seven stu dents. All classes offered will be business core related and could be used in any general education core. We will like to begin these classes in the spring term on May 31 in Building 1553 (FRC) near the base helicopter squadrons. Classes will run from Monday to Thursday from 11 a.m.-noon in the training room. There are some general requirements that need to be completed if you are not currently enrolled in ERAU. Please contact us if you have any questions or need more information at 904-249-6700/may port@erau.edu Bring in a new student referral and you could be eligible for a textbook reimburse ment of up to $50. Go to http://worldwide.erau. edu/admissions/finance/ scholarships/index.html for current scholarships available. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 3

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Navy Updates Hazing Reporting PoliciesFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy initiated new measures to track and prevent cases of hazing, as announced in Naval Administrative message 137/13, released Feb. 20. Hazing occurs when a service member causes another to be exposed to cruel, abusive, humiliat ing, oppressive, demean ing, or harmful activities. Hazing can be physical, verbal, or psychological in nature. This behavior is contrary to the Navys core values of honor, courage, and commit ment, as expressed by Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of Naval Personnel. Hazing has no place within the Navys culture of dignity and respect for every Sailor, said Van Buskirk. It diminishes our Sailors trust in their Shipmates, their unit and our organization, it affects readiness, and it will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and deckplate leader to both reject and report hazing. The NAVADMIN estab lishes the Navy Office of Hazing Prevention (OPNAV N137) as the lead entity for hazing policy and tracking sub stantiated cases. Within each command, hazing is tracked by assigned command managed equal opportunity (CMEO) program managers, equal opportunity advi sors, and equal opportu nity program managers, who will then work with commanding officers to ensure timely reporting of incidents. Reporting proce dures are outlined in the NAVADMIN. The Navy Office of Hazing Prevention is working to expand the Military Equal Opportunity Network (MEONet) database to include tracking information on hazing incidents. MEONet is a standalone online web-based pro gram that standardizes, tracks and reports administrative actions associ ated with the primary duties of EO advisors and CMEO program manag ers. Tracking substantiated hazing events is vital to determining the extent to which these events are occurring and the nature of such events, as well as analyzing trends. Incidents of haz ing will be reported by the Navy Office of Hazing Prevention to the Chief of Naval Personnel quar terly. The full Department of Navy policy on hazing can be found in SECNAVINST 1610.2A. For more news from the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit http:// www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/ diversity. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity KnowingMonitor Sailors To Be Interred At ArlingtonNavy Office of InformationSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced that remains recovered from the USS Monitor will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery. A ceremony will be held March 8 to honor the two unknown Sailors. The specific date of the inter ment was chosen to honor Monitors role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington, said Mabus. Its important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the sig nificant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course for our modern Navy. The Brooklyn-built Monitor, the nations first ironclad warship, made nautical history after being designed and assembled in 118 days. Commissioned Feb. 25, 1862, the Monitor fought in the first battle between two ironclads when it engaged CSS Virginia in the Battle of Hampton Roads March 9, 1862. The battle marked the first time iron-armored ships clashed in naval warfare and signaled the end of the era of wooden ships. Though the Monitors confrontation with the Virginia ended in a draw, the Monitor prevented the Virginia from gaining control of Hampton Roads and thus preserved the Federal blockade of the Norfolk-area. Months later, 16 Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 in a storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C. Her wreck was discovered in 1974 was designated the nations first national marine sanctuary, man aged by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Starting in 1998, the Navy, NOAA and the Mariners Museum in Newport News, Va., began working together to recover artifacts from Monitor. During the summer of 2002, while attempting to recover the ships 150-ton gun turret, Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. The remains were transported to Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) in Hawaii for possible iden tification. JPAC, with the assis tance of the Navy Casualty Office and NOAA, con ducted a comprehen sive effort to identify the remains of the unknown Sailors, to include timedemanding and detailed genealogical research. Given the age of the remains, efforts to iden tify them were unsuc cessful. However, JPAC was able to narrow down possible descendents of the unknown Sailors to 30 family members from 10 different families. The decision to lay these heroes to rest in Arlington, honors not only these two men but all those who died the night Monitor sank and reminds us, that the sac rifices made a hundred and fifty years ago, will never be forgotten by this nation, said David Alberg, Superintendent of NOAAs Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. -Photo by MC2 Gina K. MorrissetteThe facial reconstruction of two Sailors whose remains were discovered inside the gun turret of the USS Monitor after it was raised from the ocean floor in 2002 are revealed during a ceremony sponsored by the U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation. The ceremony is part of the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads on March 8 and 9, 1862, when Monitor and CSS Merrimac fought in the first ironclad battle in naval history. Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras, N.C. later that year. While much has been learned about the physical characteristics of the two Sailors, their identities remain a mystery. 4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Ensure Your Awards Are In Your RecordNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsChanges to how the Navy processes awards makes it easier for Sailors to confirm their personal decorations and medals are reflected in their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), officials said Jan. 29. NAVADMIN 016/13 out lines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reflected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service (NDAWS) and their OMPF. All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. In the past, award cita tions or certificates received directly from the member for the OMPF were not accepted, since they were required to be mailed from the command authorized to enter the award into NDAWS, said Jim Giger, head of Records Management Policy Branch (PERS-313), Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Sailors will now be able to send in copies of their own award citations or certificates for their OMPF if the award is accurately reflected in NDAWS. Before a Sailor requests a missing award citation or cer tificate be added to their OMPF, they should verify the award is recorded in NDAWS by visiting the U.S. Navy Awards website at https://awards.navy.mil and launching the Personal Awards Query. If a Sailors award is record ed in NDAWS, but missing in their OMPF, they should mail a legible, clean copy of the signed award citation, or cer tificate in the case of Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals, with the service members full social security number printed in the upper right hand corner, to PERS-313 at: Navy Personnel Command PERS-313 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN 38055-3130 According to Giger, if a Sailors award is not reflected in the NDAWS database, the citation will not be accepted by NPC for entry into the ser vice members OMPF. To resolve this conflict, a Sailor must contact their commands NDAWS coordinator, since only NDAWS coordinators can enter approved awards into the NDAWS database. The NDAWS coordinator will need an original copy of the award citation/certificate and, if available, a copy of the orders from the service or joint approval authorities. Once and award is entered and reflected in the database, the NDAWS coordinator will then submit the award citation or certificate to NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. Awarding authorities must submit a completed OPNAV Form 1650/3 and award cita tions or certificates to their NDAWS coordinator for entry into NDAWS. A list of NDAWS coordinators is available on the U.S. Navy Awards website. It is important that only authorized personal awards are reflected in both NDAWS and in a service members OMPF, said Giger. And ensuring only those award citations or certificates that are accurately reflecting in NDAWS are included in the OMPF will increase the integrity of both NDAWS and the OMPF. Per NAVADMIN 016/13, Sailors submitting a selec tion board package with an award citation or certificate not already in their OMPF, but recorded in NDAWS, will auto matically have the award added to their OMPF. Those Sailors can expect to see the award citation added to their OMPF four to six weeks after the selection board has adjourned, said Giger. Sailors can access their OMPF anytime online for the most upto-date service record informa tion by visiting BUPERS Online (BOL) at https://www.bol.navy. mil. For more information, read NAVADMIN 016/13, visit the NDAWS Web Page on the NPC website at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/ recordsmanagement/pages/ awddecormedal.aspx or call the NPC Customer Service Center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC or 1-866827-5672. For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/npc/. Taking Road Less Travelled -Photo by MCC Sam ShaversSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus observes training at Naval Special Warfare Center Detachment Kodiak. Additionally, Mabus officiated a promotion and awards ceremony and held all-hands call in which he thanked the Sailors for their service and sacrifice and discussed issues currently affecting the fleet including operational and personnel issues and the potential impacts of sequestration and the Continuing Resolution on the Navy. All Hands Magazine ReLaunched OnlineDefense Media Activity NavyThe Navy relaunched its flagship magazine, All Hands Magazine, for Sailors and their families as an online publication at www.ah.mil. The new online version will feature stories, photos and videos about topics that are relevant to Sailors and their families. The magazine will highlight Navy culture and heri tage, and it will aim to be an informative and entertaining resource Sailors and their families can use to make decisions regarding their Navy careers. All Hands Magazine is a Web publication for Sailors by Sailors, said Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Navy chief of information. For almost 90 years, the print version of All Hands Magazine greeted Sailors everywhere. It started as a typewritten news bulle tin, but over its lifespan it grew in style and stature. The Navy stopped print ing a physical monthly version of the magazine in Dec. 2011. My intent is to bring that same sense of pur pose and tradition for ward with this online magazine, said Kirby. The first issue will fea ture stories about how sequestration and the continuing resolution will affect the Navy if they occur; recruit divi sion commander duty; changes to the Navys enlisted detailing process and more. Additionally, the website will allow readers to comment and share content across various popular social media channels. According to its mission statement, the goal of All Hands Magazine is to include articles, information, imagery and videos that are relevant to Sailors and their families. It will explore issues that are of concern to Sailors and provide information that Sailors and their families can use to make deci sions regarding their Navy careers. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 5

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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 NS Mayport Puts Its Shield UpFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport joined naval bases throughout the Continental U.S. in con ducting the annual an annual Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism (FP/ AT) exercise Citadel Shield (CS) 2013 February 19-23. The annual exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security forces to respond to threats to installations and units. The CS 2013 exercise tested different areas of the Navys anti-terrorism program and naval secu rity force personnels ability to respond to realworld threats. Thursday and Friday, the Security teams responded to real world scenarios including a IED hidden in a truck and a hostage situation in the old Bank of America building near the Mayport Gym. Security coordinated efforts with Mayports Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6, as well as Mayport Fire & Emergency Services, NCIS, FBI and The Salvation Army. As with every exercise, its great to get all the first responders together and practice in an integrated and controlled environ ment, said Naval Station Mayport Security Officer, CWO4 Chuck Mogle. We had the good fortune of going outside the instal lation and working with the FBI. This will help us if there ever was an unfortunate real-life event. Although we were constrained this year with limited funding, we were still able to maximize our training efforts and gain a lot of lessoned learned from the scenarios we enacted, Mogle added. -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at-Arms 2nd Class Shawn Shirley, and Master-at-Arms Seaman Robert Marshall hold down bad guy Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Nicholas Converso after MA2 Bohannon and his military working dog Milko apprehend the suspect during Citadel Shield 2013. -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Security team observes as Officer Michael Cokus inspects a vehicle with suspect Converso during a simulated IED scenario as part of the Citadel Shield exercise. Master-at-Arms Seaman Genesis Garibay works with military working dog Axel to locate explosives during a Citadel Shield training exercise Thursday. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergFBI Agents participate in an active shooter drill during Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. Citadel Shield is an annual Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism exercise conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. -Photo by Paige GnannA Citadel Shield participant unloads his weapon into a clearing barrel during one of the scenarios as Chief Gunners Mate Heather Scott checks the process.-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Security participates in an active duty shooter drill as the observance teams watch their manuevers during the Citadel Shield exercsie.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 7 -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at-Arms 1st Class Jos Pacheco and Officer Kathleen Duncan stake out the old Bank of America building after a hostage situation is reported during the Citadel Shield exercise held last week at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at-Arms 2nd Class Christopher Hernandez has his gear checked by a safety observer during Citadel Shield exercise on Friday. The Salvation Army also participated in the event to train their crew on disaster situations. -Photo by Paige GnannExplosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Zach Phillips sends out a robot to check for potential explosives during one of the anti-terrorist/force protection exercises conducted during Citadel Shield 2013 at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by MC3 Damian BergMaster-at-Arms 3rd Class Robert Blanton and his mili tary working dog Rudy participate in an active shooter drill for Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSailors from Naval Station Mayport participate in an active shooter drill for Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergAn FBI Agent briefs Sailors from Naval Station Mayport on the status of the event during an active shooter drill for exercise Citadel Shield 2013. Citadel Shield is an annual Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism exercise conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States.

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NEX Accepts Manufacturers CouponsFrom NEXCOMCustomers know they can save money every day by shopping their NEX. In addition to the average 21 percent savings and no sales tax, customers can also save money by using manufacturers cents off coupons on their NEX purchases. Redeeming coupons provides our custom ers another way to save money when shopping at their NEX, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Senior Vice President Store Operations. Coupons are a great way to save even more when shopping for the necessities your fam ily needs. In fiscal year 2012, NEXs accepted nearly 1.6 million manufactur ers coupons that gener ated just over $2 million in additional savings to customers. NEXs accept current valid manufacturers coupons for the item featured on the coupon, subject to its terms and conditions. This includes on-line Internet coupons, except for those coupons offering free products, coupons for Proctor & Gamble (P&G) products or those deter mined to be fraudulent. The NEX does not dou ble or triple the face value of a manufacturers coupon. The NEX accepts scratch-off, percent and cents-off cou pons from the Army Air Force Exchange System (AAFES), the Marine Corps Exchange System (MCX) and the Coast Guard Exchange System (CGX). These can be per cent and cents-off in-store coupons, coupons pre sented in a coupon book, or printed from Facebook. All coupon terms and conditions apply. The NEX also accepts a man ufacturers coupon and NEX coupon, or coupon from another Military Exchange Service, on the same item. The combination of the two coupons cannot exceed the price of the product; money is not returned to a customer on the redemption of coupon(s) which exceeds the price of the prod uct. Only overseas NEXs accept expired coupons for up to six months past its expiration date. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) oversees 100 Navy Exchange (NEX) facilities and nearly 300 stores worldwide, 40 Navy Lodges, Ships Stores, the Uniform Program Management Office, the Navy Clothing Textile and Research Facility and the Telecommunications Program Office. NEXCOMs parent com mand is the Naval Supply Systems Command. NEXCOMs mission is to provide authorized cus tomers quality goods and services at a savings and to support quality of life prorams for active duty military, retirees, reserv ists and their families. NEXs and Navy Lodges operate primarily as a non-appropriated fund (NAF) business instru mentality. NEX reve nues generated are used to support Navy Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs. In FY11, $2.7 billion in sales were generated with $42.8 million in dividends pro vided to Navy MWR pro grams. Select NEXs to Sell Navy Marine Corps Relief Society Benefit Sales TixFrom NEXCOMBeginning in March, customers at select NEXs will be able to show their support for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) by pur chasing a $5 benefit sale ticket. The benefit sales ticket will entitle customers to specific percent-off dis counts for a one-time purchase on either April 22 or 23, 2013. The $5 dona tion will be passed onto NMCRS on behalf of cus tomers. The benefit sales tick et entitles customers to tiered discounts depend ing on the type of mer chandise with some exclusions. Merchandise store wide is 10 percent off, but excludes merchandise previously purchased, existing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alcohol ic beverages, electron ics, cameras, comput ers, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DVDs, CDs and conces sion departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic. The discount also can not be applied to e-com merce, all gift cards and prepaid cards, Autoport services and the Exchange Catalog. The benefit sales tick et also offers 10 percent off the entire stock of fine jewelry, excluding Rolex watches, Omega watches, Maui Divers and Pandora jewelry. With the benefit ticket, customers will receive 20 percent off the entire stock of regular priced apparel, shoes, watches and sunglasses. Already reduced furniture with prices ending in .94, .96 or .97 will be 30 percent off. The maximum discount for any item is $250. NEXs participating in this event include NEX Mayport, Jacksonville, Fla., and NEX Kings Bay, Ga. This promotion has proven to be very popular with customers over the past several years. Last year, custom ers donated a total of $291,593 to NMCRS. Navy MWR also benefits through increased profits generated through this promotion. Students Encouraged To Submit Earth Day PosterFrom the city of JacksoonvilleJacksonville students are encour aged to tap their creativity for the Environmental Protection Boards (EPB) 2013 Earth Day Poster Contest. The competition is open to all students from kindergarten through 12th grade. Entries received from kindergarten through second grade must be class projects. All other entries may be individual or group entries. This years contest theme which must appear somewhere on the post er is Shades of Green. The posters should show how even one persons actions can make a positive impact on the local environment. Awards are sponsored by CSX Transportation, and all entries will receive a certificate of participation. Photos of the winning posters will be displayed on the EPB website. First, second and third place winners will be awarded in each category below: er enhanced) The first place award is $150, the second place award is $100 and the third place award is $50. Posters between 30 x 36 inches and 16 x 16 inches may be submitted until 5 p.m. on April 1 to the Environmental Protection Board, 214 North Hogan Street, Fifth Floor, Jacksonville, Florida 32202. The EPB is partnering with the Jacksonville Public Libraries for this contest. Entries may be dropped off in the Childrens Section of each of the libraries listed below until Friday, March 29. 303 N. Laura St. 32202 13295 Beach Blvd. 32246 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd. 32256 6887 103rd St. 32210 1755 Edgewood Ave. W 32208 1826 Dunn Ave. 32218 For more information on the poster contest, contact James Richardson by phone at (904) 255-7213 or email at jrichard@coj.net. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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COMPASS: A Course For Navy Life Upcoming Course For Navy Spouses COMPASS is a 12-hour Team mentoring program developed by spouses for spouses. Come make new friends as you learn about the Navy lifestyle and gain knowledge and skills to successfully meet the challenges ahead. COMPASS is FREE and open to ALL Navy spous es! For more information and to register for the upcoming February session, please visit: http:// www.gocompass.org/ jacksonville.html 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Eric Clapton Ticket Drawing-Enter To Win The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is doing a ticket draw ing for three free pairs of tickets to the Eric Clapton concert on Tuesday, March 26, at the Veterans Memorial Arena but you cant win if you dont enter. The drawing is limited to active duty only with one entry per dual service family. To enter, please send your first and last name, email address, command, and contact number to drawing@ usojax.com. The deadline to enter is Friday, March 15. Disney On Ice TicketsThis Week The Mayport and NAS USO centers is sell ing lower level tickets to the Friday, April 5 per formance of Disney on Ice. Lower level Tickets are $10 each and are cash only. Tickets are open to Active/Retired/ Reservists/ National Guard/ and Veterans (with ID). Share a great evening with your fam ily. Call the Mayport USO (246-3481) or the NAS USO (778-2821) to reserve your tickets. Sorry, no refunds/exchanges on tickets purchased for the Thursday night perfor mance. Calling All Veterans And Military FamiliesJTA Survey JTA needs your help to complete a Veterans and Military Families Transportation Options survey in connection with a grant for regional transportation assistance. If you havent already, please complete the sur vey at: http://bit.ly/one call-oneclick. The survey deadline is Feb. 28. USO Annual Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on March 22 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Lots of fun, prizes on course and refreshments and food after completion of play. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. We are limited to 30 foursomes. 2013 Honda ClassicFree Admission See Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy face off at the 2013 Honda Classic for free. All active duty, reserve, and retirees, as well as dependents receive complimentary admission. You must preregister at https://bird iesforthebrave.sheerid. com/hondaclassic/ to print your voucher for free entry. Also, enjoy complimentary food and drinks at the Birdies for the Brave Outpost sponsored by Wells Fargo and Sikorsky. THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS Military Discount A hit in NYC and Chicago, the magnifi cent theatrical adap tation of C. S. Lewis THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS comes to Jacksonville for two per formances only March 9. THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS is a provoca tive look at spiritual warfare from a demons point of view. www. ScrewtapeOnStage.com For $10 off tickets, pur chase at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Box Office or visit Ticketmaster.com and use promo code USO10 Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Employment Program The Military Spouse Business Alliance pre sented by Capital One is bringing you a one-ofa-kind Hiring Fair and Career Forum on Feb. 21 for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves and retired veteran popula tion. Veterans, Active Duty Military, and Members of Guard and Reserve Components are also welcome. All are encouraged to attend. See attached flyer for more information. For regis tration questions, please contact us at hiringourheroes@uschamber.com or call 202-5807. Relay For Life-NS Mayport Join Relay For Life and NS Mayport in fighting cancer. NS Mayport will host its first Relay For Life on April 13-14 with the opening ceremo ny beginning at noon. The theme this year is Seek and Destroy. This event is open to family, friends, coworkers, and those wishing to join the fight against cancer. For more information, visit www.relayforlife.org/ MayportFL. The Players Military Job Fair-May 5 In partnership with Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition, The Players will welcome active duty, reservists, retired military, veterans, and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass on Sunday, May 5 to participate in its second annual job fair. Information on local educational institutions with veterans programs, career counseling, and resume writing assistance will also be provided. The job fair at The Players will take place in The Turn hospitality venue. Companies interested in participating may contact Bill Hickley at bill.hick ley@incepture.com Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more information, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available. For more information, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS New Benches For Mayport USO-Photo by Paige GnannKalani Patao, 9, joins other members of her Girl Scout Troop 1335 in painting new benches donated to the Mayport USO by the Junior Girl Scouts. The wood was purchased with funds they had saved more than three months and assembled by Chief Hull Technician Charles Johnson of SERMC, father of Arielle Johnson, who is in the troop. The benches will get lots of use at the USO with all the Special events, No Dough Dinners and Ceremonies that are held for the Military Personnel. The service project helps the girls work towards their Bronze Award in Girl Scouts. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 9

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 & 1587 and the Galley to get the lat est news on your Liberty program. March 2: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 7:30 a.m. Cost $15 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation). March 4: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 6: College Workshop. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Lounge. Representatives from FSCJ will be here to show you how to get started on your education. Free refreshments. Sign Up For Spring Break Camp At YACFrom MWRSpring is in the air here at Mayport and, for the children of Mayport that means just one thing: Spring Break Camp from March 25-29 at the Mayport Youth Activities Center. During this great camp, kids ages 6-12 can get out and about with great activities, games, trips and more. Campers are fed breakfast, lunch and snacks every day. Registration opens March 4 until full. Parents can register their child Monday-Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Youth Center. Parents of children in the Before and After School Program may register from 6-8 a.m. Payment is due at the time of registration or by March 15 if attending the Before and After School Program. Fees are based on total household income and fee scale. For more information, please call (904) 270-5680. March 1: Freedom FridayArcade Night and Movie. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 15: Freedom FridayRock Your Shamrock. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Wear your green and dance with DJ Derek! Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Employment Orientation. 4-5 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 270-5680 March 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is high ly recommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by April 30, 2013. 2705680 On The MessdeckFocsle Lounges Spring SpecialsSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8Bogeys SpecialsThursday, Feb. 28 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a side, $ 6.95 California Club Wrap with Turkey, Ham, Bacon, Avocado with Lettuce and Tomato with a side, $7.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $10.95 Soup: Clam Chowder Friday, March 1 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with a side, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with a side, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich with a side, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, March 2 Western Burger: Our Signature Burger Topped with Bacon, Cheddar Cheese and Onion Rings with a Side, $7.95 Bbq Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Soup: Chicken and Dumpling Tuesday, March 3 Chicken Fried Steak with Whipped Potatoes, Vegetable and Roll, $8.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Chicken Caesar Tortellini, $7.95 Soup: Chili Wednesday, March 4 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, Garden Rice, Broccoli and Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $ 7.95 Soup: Chicken and Dumpling Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive align ment). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty military (must show valid ID). 270-7204 Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge March 8: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 March 15: Luck O the Irish St. Patricks Day Weekend Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Every Sunday: NASCAR at Castaways: Sprint Cup Series. Watch every race on our Hi-Def TVs! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retirees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimentary Park-toPark pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid military ID to activate ticket at front gate. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 2705145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orlando From your local ITT office and upgrade for free to a Length of Stay Pass (unlimited visits within a 14-day con secutive window). FL residents can buy a one day admission ticket at their local ITT office and get the rest of the year for free (formerly called a splash pass)! Unlimited visits good until Dec. 31, 2013. Proof of residency must be shown if neces sary. 270-5145 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 20: Command Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Open to all military and civil ian employees assigned to commands at NS Mayport is a Fr ee Bowling Party (up to 120 people) + 100 Instant Party Bowling Coupons (over $2500 value). Teams will play 3 games of bowling : 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize! Captains Cup Points awarded. Cost is $75 per team. 270-5377. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 6: Cobra Demo Day. 11 a.m.3 p.m. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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MWR Sports/Fitness -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane stands with Becky Callender and Cmdr. Andy Hunt, the winners of MWRs first Mayport Sandbox Smackdown held behind Surfside Fitness Center on Feb. 15. Thirteen participants competed for top male and female in events such as Olympic Lifts, Gymnastics, Sprints and Plyometrics.MWR HITs It In SandboxSoftball In Full SwingMWR Sports CoordinatorNaval Station Mayports ball fields lit up with the opening of the 2013 Mens Softball Captains Cup season starting with HSM40 Airwolves taking on Air Operations Air Ops in a six-inning battle on Feb. 19. Airwolves opened with three runs holding Air Ops scoreless in the first inning. They picked up seven runs in the second allowing Air Ops to score only one run. Airwolves scored two runs in the third inning allowing Air ops only one run. Airwolves con tinued their streak by picking up six more runs in the fourth holding Air Ops scoreless mak ing the score 18-2. In the fifth inning Airwolves scored an additional two runs, as Air Ops started to fight back with a ninerun inning. In the final inning, Airwolves scored three more runs holding Air Ops to only one run and finishing the game with a final score of 23 12 Airwolves. The game of their double header Air Ops took on USS Taylor The Taylor. This game was a five-inning battle. The Taylor pulled out to an early lead scoring seven runs in the first three innings holding Air Ops to one run in the first three innings. The Taylor added to their score with three more runs in the fourth inning. Air Ops sticks got hot as they attempted to comeback scoring 12 runs in the fourth inning taking the lead 13-10. The Taylor battled back scoring 13 runs in the fifth and final inning, holding Air Ops to one run making the final score 24-14 The Taylor. At the same time The Taylor and Air Ops were playing, Harbor Operations Saltwater Cowboys were playing against the Airwolves. Airwolves started off by scoring a run in the first inning, but going scoreless in the next two innings. Saltwater Cowboys started the first three innings score less. In the fourth inning both teams managed to each score one run. Saltwater Cowboys out scored the Airwolves in the fifth inning, three runs to two runs, tying the game at four all. Saltwater Cowboys scored six more runs in the sixth inning. Saltwater Cowboys held the Airwolves scoreless in the final two innings, starting off their season with a 10-4 victory. The final game of the night was the Saltwater Cowboys against The Taylor. This was a tight battle game, going into extra innings for a winner. The Taylor took the lead in the first inning by outscoring Saltwater Cowboys six runs to five. Saltwater Cowboys tied up the game outscoring The Taylor in the sec ond inning by scoring 4 to 3. The Taylor scored another run in the third inning, but went score less in the fourth and fifth innings. Saltwater Cowboys went scoreless in the third and fourth inning, pulling their sticks together to score three runs in the fifth inning, giving the Saltwater Cowboys the lead 12-10. The Taylor reclaimed the lead by scoring five runs in the sixth inning, and Saltwater Cowboys only scoring two runs. Saltwater Cowboys tied up the game at 16 in the seventh inning. Both teams went scoreless in the Eighth inning. Saltwater Cowboys gave up one run in the ninth to allow The Taylor to pick up the lead. The Taylors defense went back to work and held Saltwater Cowboys scoreless in the bottom of the ninth to take home the win with a final score of 17-16. Captains Cup Softball is still open to teams. For more information on how you can get your team involved in the league contact Rita @ 904-2705451. March 9: Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. All-military teams $40, military/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. March 12: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. -Photo courtesy of MWRTeens participated in a donut relay at the Mayport Teen Center Lock in on Saturday, Feb. 16. There were games, challenges, snacks, a bonfire and more for all to enjoy throughout the night and into the early morning. Donut Relays At Lock In THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 11

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Life At Sea With Robert G. Bradley -Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Gas Turbine Mechanical Fireman Huffine checks out a sample of JP-5 while Gas Turbine Electrical 1st Class Kim reports down to the Central Control Station that the fuel sample is clear and bright during an underway replenishment onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). Photo by CTTSA Robert RoutonInformation Technician 3rd Class Corey Wisdom stands watch as a Master Helmsman in Aft Steering during Sea and Anchor onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). -Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Aerographers Mate 1st Class Corey Kelley and Aerographers Mate 3rd Class Nicolas Matta take weather measurements and observe the cloud formations to aid with flight operations on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). -Photo by Ensign Matthew Roberts Sailors on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) take on supplies at a CONREP station during an underway replenishment. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Navy Housing Offers Rental PartnershipsFrom Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsMoving is costly, and for service members, the cost of moving to a new duty station every few years can really add up. Navy Housings Rental Partnership Program, better known as the RPP, helps service members and their fami lies save money on their moving costs associated with renting a home. The RPP provides ser vice members with an affordable alternative for off-base housing and defrays some of the costs incurred as a result of their relocation. Benefits include reduced rents, reduced or no security deposits, and reduced or no application or admin istrative fees. Greater than 75 per cent of our service mem bers live in the commu nity, and we are commit ted to providing them with services that meet their needs and help them save money, said Corky Vazquez, Navy Housing Program director. Local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC) staffs seek out desir able neighborhoods and homes and negotiate with landlords to enroll them in the RPP. Our Navy HSC staffs are knowledgeable of the community surround ing their bases. They are uniquely able to create and foster relationships with local landlords and property owners through the RPP, said Mike Bowlin, Navy Housing Services Program. Service members that take advantage of the RPP have confidence that the property has Navy Housings seal of approv al. In addition to meeting landlord requirements, every property must pass a safety inspection by the Navy HSC before being accepted into the RPP. All full-time active duty service members, mar ried or single, eligible to receive Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH), are eligible to participate in the RPP. Service mem bers cannot be rejected because of a poor credit history or score. The ser vice members BAH is used to match the service member to appropriate RPP properties; no addi tional income is needed to qualify. The RPP is operated at many Navy bases world wide. Service members are invited to contact their local Navy HSC to learn about availability of the RPP at their duty station by visiting Navy Housings website at: www.cnic. navy.mil/Housing. For more information about the RPP, visit www.cnic. navy.mil/RPP.BBC Scholarship For Residents Applications DueBy Balfour Beatty CommunitiesRecognizing the importance of education and its continu ing rising costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholar ships for the 2013-2014 aca demic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. We encourage our fam ily housing residents with high school and undergrad uate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation, its a diffi cult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exception al submissions. The applica tion details and requirements can be found at www.bbcom munitiesfoundation.org. The application deadline is April 15, 2013. Balfour Beatty Communities, responsible for the privatized family hous ing at Naval Station Mayport, formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization com mitted to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to commu nity leadership through edu cational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality living environment that supports the diverse interests and needs of our military families. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. Looking Down Range -Photo by MC2 A.J. JonesChief Warrant Officer Avery Dunn looks through a range finder aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 13

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USS Klakring Sailors Give Back To JaxUSS Klakring PAOSailors from USS Klakring (FFG-42), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, vol unteered their time to serve the community by participat ing in a community relations project throughout February. Seventeen of Klakrings Sailors sre volunteering at a Habitat for Humanity build site in St. Augustine, Fla. They partici pated at four worksites, working side by side with several civilian volunteers. Additionally, several Sailors helped paint one site, while Klakrings Boatswains Mate 1st Class Angel Delgado added final dcor touches by hanging curtains. For many of the Sailors, including Sonar Technician Surface 3rd Class Grigorie Draghici, this was their first COMREL with USS Klakring. COMRELs are our way to give back to a community that continues to support us and offer us a home, said Chief Damage Controlman Chase Hampton responded. We are excited to be able to contribute to the Jacksonville areas con tinued prosperity through this project. USS Klakring is currently in her final months of ser vice, making preparations for decommissioning on March 22. She will continue to participate with the Habitat for Humanity project throughout her decom missioning period.SPS Building Skills, Structures In Belize Southern Partnership Station public affairsNavy Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 (CBMU) Seabees and the Riverine Squadron 2, Det. 2 (RIVRON 2) arrived here to set up for the start of Southern Partnership Station 2013 on Feb. 19. This was the first stop in a multi-country deploy ment in the U.S. Navys 4th Fleet area of responsibility. Both units will stay remain in Belize and work hand-in-hand with their Belize Defense Force counterparts for nearly three weeks to build partnership and interoper ability. Seabees will work to build a multi-purpose open bay structure, known as a seahut, and provide the materials for up to two additional buildings. We are here not only to build a seahut with the Belizean Defense Force, but also pass on our knowledge so they can accurately and efficiently build more in the future, said Builder 2nd Class Nathaniel Devincentis, CBMU 202. RIVRON 2 will share their expertise with the Belizean Defense Force and help them improve their skills in areas such as interdiction and inserts and extracts of security teams on the water. Our end goal is to give the Belizean Defense Force what they need to succeed. If they learn it and implement it, then its a good day for us, said Chief Boatswain Mate Jason Hatfield, RIVRON 2. The two units have separate missions but share a common purpose; to maintain a strong rela tionship with the Belizean Defense Force and share ideas, experience and technology. -Photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley HyattSailors stack bottled water in Belize. Troops from various branches of the U.S. military are deployed to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibility to conduct Southern Partnership Station 2013.New Medal Retains Place In Order Of PrecedenceAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe new Distinguished Warfare Medal will retain its place in the order of prece dence among military decora tions, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Feb. 19. Much of the public discus sion of the new medal has centered on its precedence. It ranks below the Distinguished Flying Cross and above the Bronze Star. We are not diminishing at all the importance of the Bronze Star -that remains an impor tant award for our combat troops and will remain so, Little said in a meeting with reporters. Senior civilian and mili tary leaders decided on where to place the new medal in the order of precedence, he added. We expect this award to be granted pretty rarely, and that factored in to the decision [on its precedence], he said. Juliet Beyler, the Defense Departments acting director of officer and enlisted personnel management, said in an inter view after the announcement of the new medal that technological developments on the battlefield have changed the way service members fight. The services all came for ward and said there are peo ple ... who are doing incredible things, and we wanted the ability to recognize them for those things, she said. Service members do not have to be physically present on the battlefield to contribute to suc cess in combat. Unmanned aerial vehicle pilots and cyber specialists can be thousands of miles away from combat and make contri butions to victory. To be eligible to receive the award, a service member has to have direct, hands-on employ ment, such as an unmanned aerial vehicle operator drop ping a bomb or a cyber specialist detecting and fending off a computer network attack. Combatant commanders must certify the impacts of the action before the award is for warded to the service secretary for approval. The secretaries may not del egate that authority. Officials stressed that the medal is meant to recognize actions with direct effects on combat. Other awards are available to recognize service over a length of time, officials added, noting that the Distinguished Warfare Medal is not an end-of-tour award. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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First Littoral Combat Ship To Deploy In MarchDefense Media Activity NavyDuring a media avail ability Feb. 21, Navy offi cials announced the lit toral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is on track to begin its first deployment March 1. This milestone was announced by the LCS Council, a group established by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert Aug. 22, to oversee continued fleet testing and the introduction of the LCS. Addressing challenges identified by these stud ies, on the timeline we require, necessitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive the action across acquisition, requirements and fleet enterprises of the Navy, said Greenert. The output of the council is intended to assist in maximizing the expan sive potential capabilities of LCS and its associated mission packages in global fleet operations for the joint warfighter. I am confident we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This council will continue to unify our efforts to implement operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful fleet integration. LCS ships are designed to employ mission pack ages that address capa bility gaps in the areas of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine war fare. Due to its modular design, each LCS ship can be reconfigured to per form one of those three distinct missions in a short period of time. Freedoms deploy ment will demonstrate her operational capa bilities, and allow the LCS Council to evaluate crew rotation and main tenance plans. The ship will operate forward from Singapore and spend eight months in theater conducting maritime security operations, par ticipate in international exhibitions and exercises to highlight U.S. strategic intent in the region, and reassure U.S. partners through bilateral and multilateral interoperability. -Photo by MC1 James R. EvansThe littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is underway conducting sea trials off the coast of Southern California. Freedom, the lead ship of the Freedom variant of LCS, is expected to deploy to Southeast Asia this spring. Association of Naval Services Officers Convention Cancelled Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe President of the Association of Naval Services Officers announced the cancella tion of their convention Feb. 14. NAVADMIN 029/13 announces the offi cial cancellation of the ANSO Convention which was scheduled to take place from May 6-10 in Arlington, Va. In light of the recent correspondence concerning our very drastic funding shortfall in our operations and maintenance account for the Navy, and the direction we all need to take to minimize, if not eliminate, our spending in non-mission essential areas, I have canceled this years face-to-face ANSO Symposium, said retired Rear Adm. William Rodriguez, president of ANSO. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert issued his latest guidance Jan. 25 on yearlong continuing resolution and sequestra tion. In his message, all temporary travel, duties and professional train ing not deemed mis sion essential, to include attendance at conference, will be curtailed. Based on the chal lenges of facing the continuing resolution and potential impact of sequestration, the chief of Naval Operations has given us all clear direc tion, said Cmdr. Angela Katson, Director of the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The Navy greatly appreciates the mission and value that all the sea service affin ity groups provide, and we appreciate the critical support ANSO has pro vided to our officers and Sailors since their incep tion. In light of Greenerts Jan. 25 message, ANSO announced its decision Jan. 30 to cancel the 2013 in-person convention. ANSO is currently explor ing alternatives to the 2013 convention, includ ing a possible webinar symposium. Our ANSO board of directors and I are exploring ways to continue our symposium in a virtual way, in lieu of having a face-to-face symposium this year, said Rodriguez. Our focus for our 2013 virtual symposium, similar to our 2012 sym posium, will maintain our course of continuing to grow our current sea service hispanics to be tomorrows sea service leaders, even during these challenging fiscal times. ANSO is continuing planning for a 2014 con vention to be held in Washington, D.C. 75-Day Leave Carry Over Policy ExtendedNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe 2010 law that allowed Sailors to carry over up to 75 days of leave has been extended to 2015, per NAVADMIN 026/13. The 2013 National Defense Authorization Act passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama in January, extended the expiration of the 75-day leave carry-over policy from Sept. 30, 2013 to Sept. 30, 2015. Afterward, leave carryover will be reset to 60 days and any leave balance in excess of 60 days will be lost. Special Leave Accrual for service members assigned to hostile fire or imminent danger areas, certain deployable ships, mobile units, or other duty remains unchanged and Sailors should review MILPERSMAN 1050-070 for more information. Further extensions of the 75-day leave carryover policy are not expected beyond 2015 and therefore, Sailors are encouraged to work with their chain of command to manage excess amounts of leave. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 15

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Medical/Dental No-Shows Affect Patient AccessNaval Hospital Jacksonville Associate Director of Medical Services Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay) takes pride in the time and care provided to its patients. And while some appointment cancellations are inevitable, when a patient doesnt show up, it prevents another patient with an urgent need from being seen at that time. Last year in one clinic alone (pedi atrics), eight percent of appointments were lost due to patient no-shows. Thats nearly seven appointments a day (1,519 total)at a cost of $107 each ($162,533 total)that couldnt be used by other patients. NH Jacksonville wants to partner with its patients to reverse this trend. In the private sector, some health providers charge a no-show fee for cancellations made less than 24 hours beforehandsome go as far as charging a fee for each 15 minutes a patient is late. While military treatment facilities dont function that way, its important that patients understand the impact of noshows on others. To cancel or reschedule, please call Central Appointments at (800) 5294677 (or the clinic directly) well in advance hours in advance is recommendedso the time slot can be used by another patient who needs care. The care team and all of its patients appreciate it. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles prior ity since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax, like at www.face book/NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www. youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for email updates at nhjaxcon nect@med.navy.mil. -Photo by Jacob Sippel Michelle Harris, Naval Hospital Jacksonville medical support assistant, hands Electricians Mate 2nd Class Hermiedave Asistio a check-in sheet before his appointment at family medicine Jan. 31. HEALTHBEATTeaching Children To Love Their TeethTRICARE Management ActivityShow children how to love their teeth this month and all year long. During National Childrens Dental Month, parents can teach their children healthy oral care tips and schedule annual check-ups with their family dentist. Forming healthy oral care habits during childhood is important. said Lt. Col. Kathleen Gates, acting TRICARE Dental Branch Chief. Beginning a healthy routine as a child encourages healthy behavior into adulthood. Eligible TRICARE ben eficiaries not on active duty have two options for dental care coverage, the TRICARE Dental Program or the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program. Both dental programs cover dependent children for routine dental care such as annual exams, cleanings and x-rays, as well as dental emergen cies and orthodontics. Costs and coverage details vary according to program and enrollment status, and the type of care received. Interested active duty family mem bers, National Guard and Reserve members and their families can get more information or enroll at www.tricare.mil/ dental. Brushing and floss ing daily are important tools to prevent cavities and gum disease caused by food debris and drink residue left in the mouth. Bacteria in the mouth use these to form plaque that can damage teeth and gums and cause cavities. To remove plaque and maintain healthy teeth, the American Dental Association recommends children brush at least twice a day. Brushing in the morn ing after waking up and again before going to bed should be a regular part of every childs daily routine. Teaching children healthy oral care habits is not just important for healthy smiles, but for their overall health in the future. The good oral care habits children form while they are young can help keep them healthy as adults. For more information or to enroll in a TRICARE dental program go to www.tricare.mil/dental. *Active duty service members are not eligible for either dental program and must coordinate their dental care through their dental treatment facility. Did You Know?When George Washington became the first president of the United States in 1789, he had only one tooth left in his mouth. George Washingtons false teeth were not made of wood. He had dentures made from a combination of human teeth, animal teeth, and ivory. 1. Your mouth produces two to four pints of saliva, or spit, in a day. 2 That is about enough to fill an empty gallonsized milk carton in two days. Teeth are like fingerprintseveryone has dif ferent dental patterns, even identical twins. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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NH Jacksonville Welcomes New OmbudsmanNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs AssistantOakleaf Club of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville mem ber Molly Croft has been appointed, by NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, as command ombudsman. Since being introduced into the Navy in 1970, the Ombudsman Program has ensured that issues and concerns of Navy families are addressed. It is a command operat ed program intended to improve communication between the command and a sailors family members. The position is con sidered an official Navy volunteer, which means that it must be filled by someone with a desire to serve others. They also need to be very structured as they are required to disseminate information throughout the chain of command. They provide important information to help families obtain valu able resources during their loved ones careers. Ombudsmen are consid ered the go to people for guidance. NH Jacksonvilles com manding officer trusts Croft will do a great job linking together com mand families and com mand leadership. The Navy ombudsman plays a critical role supporting our Navy familiessomething especially impor tant for our families with deployed spouses, says Shaffer. I have utter con fidence Ms. Croft will do an outstanding job guiding our families in the right direction through various challenges they may face time-to-time, serving as their advocate and helping them navi gate available resources. Oakleaf Club of Naval Hospital Jacksonville President Nichol Lee concurs with Shaffer. Lee says Croft brings to the posi tion a great amount of experience and enthusi asm. We are very excit ed to have Ms. Croft on board as the command ombudsman, says Lee. We look forward to col laborating with her on future endeavors to ben efit the families of our amazing Naval Hospital Jacksonville heroes. Croft found her calling to serve as an ombuds man while her husband, Lt. Cmdr. Coby Croft, was stationed at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Rota, Spain. In 2004, her husband was deployed after a tsunami occurred in Indonesia. This left Croft, a mother of three, with many appre hensions and questions about who she could turn to without her spouse being there to help. That feeling of helplessness and anxiety inspired her to aid others by becoming the command ombuds man until their reloca tion to NH Jacksonville in 2012. My husband has deployed four times, and my children have been various ages and stages during each deployment, recalls Croft. The levels of support that we need ed changed from one to another. Croft enjoys helping families on a personal level. And she feels NH Jacksonville is unique ly positioned with its high level of Individual Augmentee (IA) deploy ments, with up to eight percent of its active duty staff deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disas ter care. It can be very lonely and isolating with individual deployments, says Croft. Helping a family find resources and providing them with the support they need is very satisfying because Ive been that spouse, and Ive walked in those shoes. Along with empow ering family members with resources they need to help themselves, the ombudsman is also available to help resolve conflicts that may arise between the command and family members from a confidential, nonbiased viewpoint. The ombuds man helps develop fair solutions to complex and difficult problems. When Croft became an ombudsman, she took an oath to uphold strict confidentiality. I take very seriously the confidence given to me by the families who contact me, assures Croft. Ive been trained through the Fleet and Family Support Center and con tinue monthly trainings, maintaining updated resources to best serve the families of the command. Contact the command ombudsman at nhjaxom budsman@gmail.com or call (904) 508-7610. Mrs. Davis, NBHC Mayports ombudsman can be con tacted at nbhcombuds man@gmail.com or (904) 303-5596. Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population,000 active and retired sailors, sol diers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. Molly Croft NH Jax OmbudsmanMoving? Add Medical Records To Packing ListTRICARE Management ActivityThere are often loose ends to tie up before moving. This can be espe cially true when a fam ily is moving from one TRICARE region to another or transferring over seas. One thing families need to add to the pack ing list are copies of medical records for everyone who is moving. Up-to-date medical records are important tools for health care pro viders to deliver continu ity of care, and they are especially useful when patients switch providers. Medical records help providers understand their patients medical history for diagnosing condi tions, prescribing treat ments and avoid potential hazards like allergies or harmful drug interactions. One tool available to TRICARE beneficiaries is TRICARE Online (TOL). TOL lets eligible TRICARE beneficiaries access per sonal health data cap tured during treatment at military hospitals and clinics via the Blue Button. Available Blue Button personal health data includes lab results, notes from doctors vis its (known as encounter notes), problem lists, and medication and allergy data documented in military and Veterans Affairs electronic health records. Individuals can find out what TOL offers them by creating an account at www.tricareonline.com. Need help to register or use TOL? TRICARE TV has a video tuto rial to help beneficia ries navigate TOL and manage their personal health data. The tutorial can be viewed online at www.youtube.com/tri carehealth, look for the Manage Your Personal Health Record title. Beneficiaries should request copies of their complete medical records from their primary care manager (PCM) before moving or switching doctors. Some civilian PCMs charge a fee for providing copies. TRICARE covers the cost of those fees for active duty service mem bers only. All other beneficiaries are responsible for paying the fee and will not be reimbursed. Once a beneficiary has selected a PCM in their new location, they can request that their medical records be sent directly by mail. Sending medical records by mail could mean a delay in receiving them, and beneficiaries may still have to pay an administrative fee. Not all PCMs will send medical records by mail, so ben eficiaries should plan to transport copies of their own records and keep them secure. Beneficiaries should talk with their PCM about transporting their medical records well in advance of a move. For more infor mation or to register in TOL, go to www.tricare online.com. For infor mation about personal medical records go to www.tricare.mil and click on Medical Records and Privacy under the Medical tab from the home page. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 17

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USS Hu City Completes First 2013 Deployment Replenishment At Sea USS Hu City Public AffairsSailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) completed their first replenishment at sea (RAS) of the ships 2013 deployment with Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo ship USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) on Feb. 23. During the RAS, Medgar Evers used the time to practice load ing and off loading pallets to Hu City in order to hone its skills, which is essential to both ships missions. Conducting a successful RAS evolution allows the ship to remain at sea for extended peri ods of time without hav ing to pull into port to refuel or take on cargo. This was the first of many replenishments we will conduct with Medgar Evers, so this just builds our working relationship, said Ensign Corey Schulz, Hu Citys 1st Lieutenant. I was really impressed with everyone today, this being the second half of our deployment and everyone able to jump right back in the saddle and accomplish our mis sion. Hu City success fully received more than 152,000 gallons of fuel for the ship and embarked helicopters. The evolution highlighted the crews proficiency as well as Hu Citys ability to work alongside other ships. A RAS is an all-hands evolution and every Sailor plays an impor tant role. During the evolution, Sailors form a qualified bridge watch team, including a master helmsman responsible for maneuvering the ship at a close but safe distance from the replenishment ship. Other required duties include safety observers, rig captains, riggers, signalmen and phone talkers. Every department on the ship provides person nel to act as line handlers. Engineering person nel test samples of the oncoming fuel and advise the ship when to secure pumping. Gunners mates are on station to fire shot lines between the ships. Supply personnel move and secure oncoming supplies within the ship. It is an exercise that truly requires the crew to come together and work as one. The reason it was a successful evolution was because everyone was safe and on their toes making it nice and quick, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Daven Arce. The most important aspect to any evolution is everyone stays motivated to look out for each other and work together as a team, and we have a good team here. Hu City is on deploy ment to support maritime security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Matthew R. ColeAbove, Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) secure the anchor for sea during sea and anchor detail. Right, Seaman Recruit Anna Colins, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), speaks to the pilothouse during sea and anchor detail as the ship begins its deployment. 18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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-Photo courtesy of F&ESNS Mayport Fire Inspector Moises Colon stands with MWR Youth Counselor Brandy Wainwright and members of the Youth Activities Center 4-H who collected teddy bears for the base fire department during a teddy bear drive. First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency ServicesMembers of the teen center, with the help of youth counselor Brandy Wainwright, participated in a 4-H teddy bear drive at Naval Station Mayport last week. Their goal was to collect teddy bears for the local base fire department. The toys collected will be given to children dur ing emergency calls with the hopes of providing comfort during traumatic experiences. The teens are members of the 4-H club, which is the nations largest youth develop ment organization. In addition to the teddy bear drive, the teens recently collaborated with fire inspectors at Naval Station Mayport to create and star in a fire preven tion skit. The original skit was performed during Fire Prevention Week with the intention of educat ing Mayports youth on fire safety. The skit was digitally recorded and is currently being used for training by the fire pre vention office. NS Mayport Gets Cuddly For A Cause Working In Confined Spaces-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of Naval Station Mayports Fire & Emergency Services team race to set up a tripod as part of a confined space exercise held Feb. 9 at Mayports new swimming pool. The pool is part of the new addition to the Mayport gym construction currently underway. The rescue team set up a dummy and practiced rescue drills during a real-time scenario at the pool.Dispose of Household Hazardous Waste ProperlyFrom Mayport EnvironmentalHalf empty cans of paint, an aerosol can without a spray tip, unwanted insecticides, and old containers of transmission fluid chemicals that you will probably never use again but dont know what to do with these are all examples of what is com monly termed Household Hazardous Waste (HHW). Because they are so commonplace within the community, the cumu lative effect of HHW, if not properly discarded, can pollute the environ ment and pose a threat to human health. To properly dispose of household hazardous wastesthroughout the year, you may bring materials to the Household Hazardous Waste Facility, 2675 Commonwealth Ave. The HHW Facility is openTuesday through Saturday, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. In addition, the City provides HHW mobile collection events at vari ous locations throughout Jacksonville. They will be heldfrom 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the following locations: March 16, 2013 Blue Cypress Park:4012 University Blvd. N. Naval Station Mayport departments and other Navy organizations must arrange for dis posal of hazardous waste through the Public Works Department Hazardous Waste Facility (Bldg. 1986) call 270-6468. To report improper dump ing of household hazard ous waste on the Station, please call 270-6781 or 270-6070. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 19

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Retiree NewsExplaining Arrears Of PayFrom the Retired Activities OfficeWhen a retiree dies, his or hers retired pay ceases upon notification to DFAS. This can be done with a phone call to DFAS (800-321-1080). It should be done as soon as possible in order to prevent any over payment of retired pay that could cause future monetary problems with DFAS. However, the beneficiary (nor mally the spouse) is entitled to the pro-rated amount of his or her military members final months retired pay. This is called the arrears of pay (AOP). When DFAS is notified of the service members death, they will reclaim the final months retired pay and conduct an audit of his or hers account to compute the amount of the AOP. To receive this final payment, a DD Form-1174, Claim for Unpaid Compensation must be filled out and filed with DFAS with a copy of the long form death certificate. This can be done either by submitting the form via mail or online at the DFAS web site (http://www.dfas. mil/retiredmilitary.html). A blank DD-1174 form is nor mally sent to the beneficiary by the DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity section. It can also be obtained at the NAS Jax Retired Activities Office at the Fleet and Family Support Center. However the form is submitted, a copy of the long form death cer tificate has to accompany the 1174 or faxed separately to DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity Section (800-4696559). If the 1174 and death certificate are faxed to DFAS, ensure there is adequate reference to the service member (full name, address, Social Security Number or service num ber, phone number and name for point of contact on both pieces of documentation). For planning purposes, it can take upwards of four to eight weeks for processing and payment sent to your financial institution. For more information, call 5425790. Saturday, March 2 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., is kicking off Garden Month 2013 with a Free Community Day and Plant Sale start ing at 9 a.m. The Cummer is dedicating the entire month of March to the historic gardens. Garden Month 2013 kicks off with a Free Community Day featuring live music, art-making activities, a plant sale, The St. Johns Riverkeeper Rain Barrel Sale and artist demonstrations in the gardens. Plant Sale vendors include Anitas Garden Shop, Flying Dragon Citrus Nursery, Native Gardens Nursery, Philips Garden Store, Rockaway Garden Center and Trads Garden Center. Community Day coincides with the launch of Weaver Free First Saturdays at The Cummer, which opens the Museum to the public for free the first Saturday of every month. Artist Demonstrations in the Gardens: Noon to 3 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 899-6038 or visit www.cummer. org. For more information about the Plant Sale, please call The Cummer Store at (904) 899-6035. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Garrison event on Saturday, March 2 and Sunday, March 3 at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Avenue, Fernandina Beach. This program will allow visi tors to interact with liv ing historians to experi ence life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costumes involved in firing demon strations, marching drills, cooking and daily activi ties. Come join in this unique, family friendly event. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. North Atlantic right whales visit Northeast Florida waters to give birth to calves December through March. Join a ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about one of the worlds most endangered large mammals. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, March 3 Fort Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Road will begin a new church ser vice at 1:10 p.m. The service, entitled Life Redeemed 1:10 features current praise music and is targeted for collegegoing youth. Join us! For more information, call 744-1311. Monday, March 4 A Canning Workshop Freezing Products come learn to freeze products in jars and plastic con tainers, at Duval County Canning Center, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., at 1 p.m. Cost is $20 with limited space; with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby at255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. A Canning Workshop Splenda Product Pomogranate Jelly come learn to make and take home some of the prod uct made at Duval County Canning Center, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., at 9 a.m. Cost is $20 with limited space; with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Tuesday, March 5 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be a presentation by Olis Garber on Bird and Landscape Photography. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Saturday, March 9 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Duval County Staff are offering an irrigation class on water saving tech niques, tuning up your irrigation system and low volume irrigation for gar dens from 9 a.m.-noon at Duval County Extension, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. We are offering a free water savings kit to the first 50 registrants. Call Becky at 255-7450 to pre-register or email her at beckyd@ coj.net with your name and phone number. Cost is $5. You can pay at the door. Orlando HarleyDavidson will host a pair of events benefiting Operation Giveback www. operation-giveback.org to honor the heroic sacrifice of Americas veterans and their families. Starting at 11:45 a.m., a large motor cycle convoy will travel on surface roads from the Orlando Harley-Davidson South Dealership on 192 in Kissimmee to the Orlando HarleyDavidson Historic Factory Dealership. Starting at 1 p.m., hundreds of riders and members of the public will be treated to entertainment and food. A $10 donation (cash or check) per rider and a $5 dona tion per passenger will be required. All proceeds will benefit wounded warriors, their families and the children of our fallen heroes. For more information, visit www.orlando harley.com The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park is partnering with the Friends of Fort Clinch, Inc., Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission and Fish Florida to conduct a Kids Fishing Clinic from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, to teach lessons on knot tying, fishing ethics, tack le, habitat, casting and more. The clinic is open to children ages four to 16 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. The first 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. Bring your family to enjoy a fun day of saltwater fishing. For additional information, please contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.floridastateparks. org. Tuesday, March 12 The Duval County Extension Office along with Standard Feed & Seed, Dinsmore Feed & Supply and Purina Animal Nutrition is offer ing a Small Scale Poultry Production Workshop from 6-8:30 p.m. This free workshop will cover breed selection, nutrition and feeding, basic manage ment of recycling chicken litter, current regulations and petition update, gen eral tips and an Q & A panel. Everyone in atten dance will receive a cou pon for two free chicks. Light refreshments will be served. To pre-register call Becky at 904-255-7450 or go to http://raising poultry2013.eventbrite. com. This workshop will be located at the Duval County Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Friday, March 15 Duval County Extension is offering a Make and Take Rain Barrel Workshop on from 10 a.m.-noon. The cost is $45. Pre-registration with payment is due by Monday, March 11. Please make check for $45 payable to DCOHAC and mail to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N McDuff Ave. The class is limited in size. Please bring a vehicle big enough to get the 55-gallon plastic drum home. Sorry, no deliver ies. For questions, please call Becky at 904-2557450. Sat urday, March 23 Why are we fascinated with monsters and the mysterious? Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a discussion on the differ ent types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. The program is free. Saturday, March 30 Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m. through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 18th Annual St Johns Celebration Cleanup From Mayport EnvironmentalVolunteers are needed to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport for the 18th Annual St. Johns River Celebration Cleanup on March 16. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on March 16 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 11 a.m. volun teers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net (key words: St Johns River Celebration) or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. Preregistration is not required. 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Mayport Goes To War Taking A Look Back At NS Mayports HistoryFormer Station LibrarianEditors Note: The fol lowing is a reprint of an article first published on June 1, 1990. It is the first in a series that follows the history of Naval Station Mayport from its begin nings to present day. In April 1939, the Navy department implemented plans for the establish ment and construction of an aircraft carrier base on the East Coast of the United States. One of several locations considered was a site near Mayport at the mouth of the St. Johns River. In December 1939, Ribault Bay was selected. On Oct. 27, 1940, a relatively obscure naval Reserve officer was called to active duty to establish and assume command of the new U.S. Naval Frontier Section Base at Mayport. Two months later, Lt. Cmdr. Maynard R. Sanders, a 27-year vet eran of the Naval Reserve, assumed his duties dur ing the commissioning ceremonies held at the old U.S. Naval Reserve Armory in the southside of Jacksonville. Sanders served as the section base commanding officer until he was reassigned to the position of district per sonnel officer, with the rank of commander, at the Sixth Naval District in Charleston, S.C. The land surrounding the bay was purchased in 1941, and construction of barracks, mess hall, dis pensary and administra tion facilities and dredg ing of the bay was started immediately. But in May of that year, Congess shelved the plans for the carrier facility, opting instead for a crash boat and patrol boat training facility. In December of 1940, the dark clouds of war were gathering just beyond the horizons of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and they were aimed at America. One year late, the whirlwinds of German and Japanese aggression swept those clouds toward the United States with all the fury of a hurricane. Two events were the catalysts that plunged America into a second world war in the relatively short period of 23 years. On Oct. 31, 1941, a German submarine, U-552, torpedoed and sank the American destroyer USS Reuben James in the North Atlantic. Of the entire crew of about 160, only 45 were rescued. On Dec. 7. Japan unleashed the might of its naval, sea and air forces against an unsuspect ing military and civil ian population at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On Dec. 11, Germany and Italy declared war against the United States. At the time of the attack on our fleet at Pearl Harbor, the Atlantic Fleet consisted of four old bat tleships, New York Texas, Arkansas and Wyoming; four heavy cruisers, San Francisco, Tuscaloosa, Quincy and Vincennes; Destroyer Squadron 10; and two aircraft carriers, Ranger and Wasp. During the criti cal months of 1942 and early 1943, the Atlantic Fleet had been dis persed either to the North Atlantic for convoy duty or to North Africa and the Mediterranean. Shipping along the East Coast of the United States was most vulnerable to attack by German submarines. With the dispersal of the Atlantic fleet, the ship ping lanes along the East coast from Halifax to the Panama Canal were left unprotected. Grand Adm. Karl Doenitz, commander in chief of Hitlers submarine service, unleashed his U-boats and aimed them toward the United States on Jan. 13, 1942. Operation Drumbeat, Doenitzs code name for the operation, became a reality. America was soon to find its Atlantic Coast beaches covered with fuel oil and the bodies of dead seamen, and its offshore waters the graveyard of sunken ships. In this, the first of sev eral articles detailing the history of the naval sta tion, I briefly touched on the activities involving the creation of the station. Future articles will cover the period from 1939 to 1946, when the station was deactivated. The his tory will be composed of data collected from pho tographs taken of the station between 1939 and 1945, interviews with surviving veterans of the Mayport Naval Reserve veterans who served here during the war years, and from documents donat ed to the librarys collec tion by various patrons, including Helen Sanders and Ida Crozier, the wife and daughter of the late Capt. Maynard R. Sanders. -Official U.S. Navy PhotoSailors work at the U.S. Naval Reserve Armory located in the southside of Jacksonville. Sailors stationed at the Armory would later man a newly-created U.S. Naval Frontier Section Base at Mayport. Initiative Reduces Disability Claims VA Processing TimeFrom a Department of Veterans Affairs News ReleaseThe Veterans Affairs Department has launched a new initiative that could eliminate the requirement for an in-person medi cal examination for some veterans and shorten the time it takes to process disability compensation claims. Officials said the initia tive called Acceptable Clinical Evidence, or ACE was developed jointly by the Veterans Health Administration and the Veterans Benefits Administration to pro vide a veteran-centric approach for disability examinations. Use of the ACE process opens the possibility of doing assessments with out an in-person exami nation when there is suf ficient information in the record, officials said. Under ACE practices, a VA medical provider completes a disability benefits questionnaire by review ing existing medical evi dence. This evidence can be supplemented with information obtained during a telephone inter view with the veteran, officials explained, allevi ating the need for some veterans to report for an in-person examination. ACE is a process improvement that will help us meet our goal to eliminate the claims backlog and provide more timely benefits to our veterans, their families and survivors, said Allison A. Hickey, VAs undersec retary for benefits. The initiative also saves vet erans the inconvenience and costs associated with attending a medical examination. When a VA medical provider determines VA records already contain sufficient medical infor mation to provide the needed documentation for disability rating pur poses, the requirement for veterans to travel to a medical facility for an examination may be eliminated. If VA can complete a disability benefits ques tionnaire by reviewing medical records already on file, it will use the ACE process. This would then expedite the determina tion of disability ratings, officials said, in turn eliminating the wait time to schedule and conduct an exam from the claims process. During a 15-month pilot test at one VA regional claims process ing office, officials noted, 38 percent of claims submitted were eligible for ACE. The ACE initiative is a part of a five-year effort by the Veterans Benefits Administration designed to improve claims pro cessing, officials said. The goal of the transforma tion plan is to eliminate the claims backlog and process all claims within 125 days with 98 percent accuracy in 2015. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 28, 2013 21

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