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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00286


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com SCPOA Shines Up Memorial-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of Naval Station Mayports Second Class Petty Officers Association (SCPOA) salute during morning colors in the newly refurbished Mayport Memorial Garden. The SCPOA spent a Saturday cleaning, remulch ing, pressure washing and weeding the area and has committed to perform the upkeep every month.Mayport, Jax Continue Environmental Partnership With State and Local AgenciesContributorRepresentatives from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Navy Region Southeast, Naval Station Mayport and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast joined local and state officials in signing the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter Feb. 12 at Jacksonville City Hall. The Navy is a part of the Jacksonville commu nity and the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team is a prime example of our ongoing coop eration on items of mutual interest, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. We continue to main tain a proactive partner ship with environmental regulatory agencies to identify and implement innovative solutions with the goals of enhancing environmental compli ance, promoting natural resources management and protecting public health, Scorby added. The Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team shows that we are stronger when we work together on behalf of our waterways, our land, the air we breathe and the future of our city, said Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Im proud to carry on this tradition of partnership for our city and I thank the Navy, Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) and all the stakeholders for their continued support. The team was estab lished in 2002 to ensure Navy and regulatory agen cies achieve environmen tal compliance by identi fying and implementing innovative solutions to promote natural resourc es management and pro tect public health. According to NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland, who briefed the team before the charter signing, the partnership has exceed ed all expectations to provide more efficient and effective protection of Jacksonvilles air and water resources. Gartland shared some of the major accomplish ments of the partnership including: hoto by Kaylee LaRocqueNS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Cochrane signs the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter during a charter signing ceremo ny at Jacksonville City Hall Feb. 12.See Environment, Page 12CO Talks BudgetTeam Mayport, I think its time to communicate some information about the potential budget impacts we may face as our nation struggles with the continuing resolution (CR) and the sequestration impacts. Thankfully, the automatic spending cuts required by sequestration in January were delayed to March to allow Congress time to work a deficit reduction plan. While this renewed effort to find a healthy way forward is encouraging, we need to address a different, but more immediate, fiscal potentiality the absence of an FY-13 appropriations bill which may force us to operate under a year-long CR. The CR is a challenge because we have to operate under FY12 funding levels which is less than planned for FY13. Additionally, there has been unplanned/ abnormally high expenses as a result of increased naval ops in the Middle East, increased fuel costs, and unex pected critical repairs to a number of submarines and ships. Lastly, under the CR, there is limited flexibility to transfer funds between accounts to cover the main shortfall in Operations and Maintenance (O&M). As a whole, the Navy projects a shortfall of $4.6 billion in O&M accounts. All of this has required some dras tic measures to ensure we can function throughout the year should the CR continue. This problem is not unique to DoN, since all of the services are facing cuts to their operating accounts, albeit at different rates and in different areas. In order to slow the O&M burn-rate, Navy leader ship is implementing actions such as the following: Limiting or cancelling ship and aircraft mainte nance Limiting or cancelling deployments Implement reduced travel and a civilian hiring freeze Deferring facility restoration and modernization programs (Projects under the FY13 CNIC special project pro gram are deferred.) Cutting facilities sustainment (minimal funding for only necessary maintenance and emergency repairs) Reduce spending on base operating support (examining reduced standards of service) I know that many of you are already experiencing impacts of these decisions, especially with respect to travel and hiring, and we will do our best to keep you up-to-date on policy and requirements as we push through these challenges. At this point, each of these steps are designed to be reversible, at least to some extent, should Congress pass an FY-13 budget. As a last resort, civilian furlough are being contem plated within DOD and Navy leadership. There have been no decisions on this and much will depend on how effective budget cuts in other areas can be imple -See Budget, Page 5

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, I want to invite Naval Station Mayport Sailors and tenant commands to commemorate African American Heritage Month on Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. at the Base Chapel. Guest speaker for this years ceremony will by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, USNAVSO/4thFLT, followed by a special lunch menu prepared by Oasis Galley staff at Beachside Community Center. The theme of this years event is At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington Both of these course-changing events are at milestone years the Emancipation Proclamation happened 150 years ago, the March on Washington is 50 years old. It is a great time to reflect on how diversity and free dom have made our country and our military great. It also gives us the oppor tunity to recognize the many AfricanAmerican who have contributed to the nations defense. I hope to see you all there. I want to send out a Bravo Zulu to the Mayport Second Class Petty Officer Association for taking on the responsi bility of upkeep at Mayports Memorial Park that includes the USS Stark Memorial. The SCPOA mulched, weed ed, and shined up the big bell and has committed to keeping the area looking its best. The Memorial Park is there to honor those Sailors who gave the ulti mate price for our freedoms. It is only fitting that todays Sailors are honoring those fallen shipmates and carrying on the tradition of never forgetting their sacrifice. Welcome back to the crew of USS Halyburton. The ship returned to Naval Station Mayport last Saturday after a six-month deployment to the COMFIFTHFLT and COMSIXTHFLT areas of responsibility with focused operations off the Horn of Africa. Halyburton conducted counter pira cy operations in support of Operation Ocean Shield off the coast of Africa and the Somali Basin. Assigned to Standing NATO Maritime Group One, Halyburtons primary mission was to deter piracy and provide maritime security. Job well done Halyburton! Have you cracked your books yets? Petty officer exams are only a month away so if you havent already started studying, you better get at it. Make sure while youre exercising your mind, that you are exercising your body. The PFA is right around the corner as well. Last Tuesday, the three area base com manding officers joined Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby and Jacksonville Mayort Alvin Brown in signing the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter. The charter basically means that the Navy and Jacksonville will partner to look towards applying innovative solutions for natural resource management while limiting their envi ronmental impact. I am proud to say that Naval Station Mayport has been forward thinking in this endeavor. Our Environmental team, led by Cheryl Mitchell, works diligently to promote good environmental stewardship. The team has received numerous military, state and city awards including the CNO Environmental Award and participated in multiple public outreach opportuni ties. We take our environment very seri ously. It was great to, once again, show that commitment through this partner ship. We will have another opportunity to show our stewardship with the annual St. Johns River Celebration Clean Up on March 16. Put the date on your calendar and commit to coming out to pick up the debris that tarnishes our great waterway. Continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSHas your senior made his final decision about what he will be doing next year after he graduates from high school? Has he at least come to the real ization that he will need some type of postsecond ary training? With todays economy, it is almost impossible to support oneself with just a high school diploma. Further education means more money! And it is not just seniors who need to investigate postsecondary train ing! This process starts in elementary school. So dont think your child has to be in high school before you start research ing this information. The search can never begin too early; it can only begin too late in terms of finding the perfect life after high school. Right here in Jacksonville we have several postsecondary institutions which could meet his training require ments. The University of North Florida, Jacksonville University, Edward Waters College, and Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) all offer bachelor degrees. In addition to offering bachelor degrees, FSCJ has maintained its histor ic mission of a commu nity college by maintaining open admission for associate degrees, remediation, response to com munity needs, outreach to underserved populations, and statewide articulation agreements. It continues to offer certificate and degree programs which range from auto mechan ics to nursing to associate in arts degree. This asso ciates degree guarantees transfer to a Florida state university. So right in our back yard, your child can get the training he needs to be successful in the world of work. So the next ques tion to ask is, How does my child decide which program best fits his career goals? You can log in with your child to FLVC.org (Florida Virtual Campus which is the new name for FACTS. org.). At FLVC.org the student can ests, abilities, and pref erences to help choose a career and appropriate courses for that career, career goal can be achieved at a university, community college, tech nical school, or through the military either mili tary service or a military academy, ing which one of those choices will help him to achieve his career goal, and which leads to postsec ondary training success. For a hands-on inves tigation, attend FSCJs College Open House on February 21st from 5:30 7:30 pm at their Downtown Campus Advanced Technology Center (ATC). This build ing is at the corner of State and Pearl Streets. The event is free and parking is free. Representatives from a wide variety of their pro grams will answer your questions about length of program, costs, and job availability in the North Florida area. Various workshops will also be offered on Scholarships & Enrollment Services, Leadership, and Services for Students with Disabilities. While all of these will be specific to FSCJ, the infor mation will closely match that at other Florida state institutions of higher learning. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Ready For Life After High School?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowing Director, Naval History and Heritage CommandIt is a curious fact of history that of the first 35 commanders in chief, 23 served in either the Army or in a state mili tia. Of those men, 12 achieved the title gen eral ranging from General of the Armies George Washington to Brevet Brigadier General of Volunteers Benjamin Harrison. What is even more interesting is that over the span of those first 35 presidents, not one naval officer was elected to the nations highest office. However, begin ning with our nations 36th president, John F. Kennedy, there began a line of six Sailors in the White House that ran from Kennedy to George H.W. Bush, broken only by Army Capt. Ronald Reagan. Each of these presi dential Navy officers had served with honorably and some with high dis tinction in a naval officers uniform. Lt.j.g. Kennedy had appeared on the national stage earning the Navy and Marine Corps Medal as a dashing hero, saving the lives of his crew following the sink ing of the PT-109.Lyndon Johnson had taken a leave of absence from the House of Representatives to serve in the South Pacific, earning a contro versial Silver Star while flying as an observer on a B-26 bombing mis sion.Richard Nixon headed up a series of Navy cargo handling units around the Pacific during World War II, achieving the rank of commander in the Naval Reserve. Lt. Cmdr. Gerald Ford served onboard the light aircraft carrier Monterey, sur viving Typhoon Cobra and earning 10 battle stars. Jimmy Carter is the only president to gradu ate from the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. He went on to be selected for service in nuclear sub marines by the legend ary Admiral Hyman G. Rickover.George H.W. Bush was one of the youngest pilots ever to earn his aviation designa tion in the Navy, receiv ing his wings of gold at age 19. Bush flew torpedo bombers from the deck of the USS San Jacinto, earn ing a Distinguished Flying Cross and numerous Air Medals before being shot down by anti-aircraft fire. Each of these men was indelibly marked by their experiences, perhaps more than they, or we, have previously under stood. Service in the U.S. Army creates a land-cen tered outlook, which was important to the develop ing nation during the 18th and 19th centuries. From its founding till the early 1890s, the United States was intent on conquering its portion of the North American continent, and as such its foreign rela tions and military strat egy were focused on questions rooted in com petition for land. In this environment, an Army Six Sailors, Their Legacies In The White Housebackground had a natural political advantage; the nation needed this partic ular expertise. However, with the closing of the American frontier and the gradual shift in strategic focus to overseas resourc es as well as foreign mar kets for U.S. manufac tured goods, knowledge of seapower and oce anic commerce began to come to the forefront. It was into this environment that the maritime-mind ed Roosevelts, Theodore and his distant cousin Franklin, paved the way towards the United States emerging as a global power. However, it was the six Sailors who occupied the White House between 1961 and 1993 who for ever altered the balance of American foreign pol icy from a continental to globally focused effort. Each, unconsciously or consciously, drew upon their experiences in the Navy to view the world not from the confines of land and artificial bor ders, but rather from the expansive, globalized per spective that can only be derived from the vantage point of a ship at sea. Their values, as evidenced in by their adher ence to such norms as free trade and free navi gation on the high seas, are maritime values. At the dawn of the 20th cen tury, naval theorist Alfred T. Mahan defined the sea lanes of communication as a vast interlocking web of alliances. Where there is a chokepoint or a heavily trav eled commercial sea lane, there lay American national interests, and, probably, a partnership or alliance. When the Soviet Union fell in 1989 and a new paradigm emerged with the United States sit ting atop a new interna tional system, it was a sys tem defined by the seas that connect the planet rather than oceans that divide continents. Three presidents have come and two have gone since the last Sailor sat in the White House.The Resolute desk crafted from the timbers of the HMS Resolute remains in the oval room in the West Wing, but the feel ings it evoked when PT boat skippers and Avenger pilots sat behind it have begun to fade. However, the lessons they learned when they were young about the impor tance of the oceans still echoes. As another great power emerges and plots its course upon the worlds blue waters, the commander in chief of the United States armed services will not be able to escape the knowledge that the oceans have long ceased to be a defensive barrier and that only by remaining strong at sea will the nation remain secure. This is the instinc tive knowledge of the six Sailor presidents, and their enduring legacy.

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From StaffIn honor of AfricanAmerican/Black History Month, Oasis Galley is featuring a special menu for Feb. 26 from 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. to be served at Beachside Community Center. All hands are invited to attend. Price is $4.60 for meal. On the menu is Cinnamon Scented Lentil & Vegetable Soup Tanzanian Fish Curry Fried Chicken Pork Chops with Spicy Peanut Sauce Macaroni & Cheese Joloff Rice Steamed Rice Baked Sweet Potatoes Boiled Beets Collard Greens Black-eyed Peas $ Carrots Cape of Good Hope Cabbage Peach Cobbler Banana Pudding Pineapple Upside Down CakeOasis Serves Up Special MealAegis BMD System Intercepts TargetAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Missile Defense Agency and sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie conducted a success ful flight test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense system Feb. 13, resulting in the intercept of a medium-range ballistic mis sile target over the Pacific Ocean by a Standard Missile-3 Block IA guided missile. At 4:10 a.m. EST, a uni tary medium-range bal listic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The target flew northwest toward a broad area of the Pacific Ocean. The in-orbit Space Tracking and Surveillance System-Demonstrators, or STSS-D, detected and tracked the target, and forwarded track data to the USS Lake Erie. The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense weapon system, used Launch on Remote doc trine to engage the target. The ship developed a fire control solution from the STSS-D track and launched the SM-3 Block IA guided missile about five minutes after target launch. The SM-3 maneuvered to a point in space and released its kinetic warhead. The war head acquired the target re-entry vehicle, diverted into its path, and, using only the force of a direct impact, engaged and destroyed the target. Initial indications are that all components per formed as designed, offi cials said. Program offi cials will assess and eval uate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained dur ing the test, they added. Todays event, desig nated Flight Test Standard Missile-20, or FTM-20, was a demonstration of the ability of spacebased assets to provide mid-course fire control quality data to an Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense ship, extending the battle space, providing the abil ity for longer-range inter cepts and defense of larger areas, officials said. FTM-20 is the 24th suc cessful intercept in 30 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight testing began in 2002. Across all Ballistic Missile Defense System programs, this is the 58th successful hit-to-kill inter cept in 73 flight tests since 2001. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense is the sea-based component of the Missile Defense Agencys Ballistic Missile Defense System. The Aegis BMD engage ment capability defeats shortto intermediaterange, unitary and sepa rating, midcourse-phase ballistic missile threats with the SM-3, as well as short-range ballistic mis siles in the terminal phase with the SM-2 Block IV missile. The MDA and the Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program. Dear Kate,I really hate CFLs. These light bulbs just look ugly and their light is harsh. Yet, everyone says they save energy. Do they really work? What else can I do? Signed, Burnt-Out Dear Burnt, You are not the first to complain about CFL light bulbs. But their energy savings make it worth a sec ond look. New CFLs look better and last longer. Other ways to save on lighting are to take out extra bulbs is every single one needed?? Lighting is a big energy use in the home, so these changes are very illuminating. Get it?KateAsk Kate THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 Roosevelt, Vicksburg Complete COMPTUEX Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment, NorfolkSailors from the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and Marines from assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) completed Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Feb. 17. COMPTUEX is designed to prepare and assess the ships in the ARG individually and as a unit prior to deployment. The Kearsarge ARG is comprised of the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), the amphibious trans port dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17), the amphibious dock land ing ship USS Carter Hall (LSD 50), Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4 and the 26th MEU, embarked with the ARG. This COMPTUEX has been very successful, said Capt. Brad Skillman, commodore of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4. Everyone in the ARG pulled together and worked hard to make sure that we met all of our goals for the exercise. This shows that we are ready to deploy and will be able to readily handle any chal lenges that may arise. Each ship ran through a series of drills that test ed the ARGs ability to respond to different sce narios such as general quarters, non-combatant evacuation operations, and visit, board, search and seizure operations. COMPTUEX validated our ability to carry out any mission, said Capt. Rick Nielsen, command ing officer of Kearsarge. It helped us ensure our readiness before we deploy this spring and it also tested our train ing and responsiveness. The scenarios pushed our crew to the limit and proved that the extensive training was superior to any training received through the exercise peri od and well worth the time and effort. The three-week exercise also helped to develop cooperation between the different units involved by allowing them to prac tice responding together to various plausible sce narios. The scenarios mirror real-world circumstanc es that we are possibly going to face in some of the areas in which we are going to be operating, said Cmdr. Greg Blyden, commanding officer of Carter Hall. The brisk pace of operations helped prepare the crew for what could be expected of the ARG and how rapidly a situation could escalate. Key components of COMPTUEX are com munication and coopera tion not only between the ships but also between the Sailors and Marines aboard. COMPTUEX prepares the ships for deploy ment in a safe environ ment with subject mat ter experts and mentors available to answer ques tions, said Cmdr. Neil A. Koprowski, commanding officer of San Antonio. It is also important to gar ner the blue/green rela tionships to ensure seamless transitions. There are missions that are inher ently Navy, but there are many more that are inher ently Marine. You have to find the balance and COMPTUEX allows the ships, the staffs and the MEU that opportunity. During COMPTUEX the three ships and the 26th MEU showed that they are ready to deploy and to respond to any number of missions. They performed magnificently, and I am honored to stand beside them, said Col. Matthew G. St. Clair, commanding officer of the 26th MEU. I am confident this team is ready for the challenges of the dynamic and uncer tain operational environ ment we will encounter during our deployment. -Photo by MCSN Hunter S. HarwellSailors in a rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) approach the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) during a simulated straits transit with the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG). Kearsarge ARG is participating in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the East Coast of the U.S. in preparation for an deployment this spring. -Photo by MC1 Abraham EssenmacherThe amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17), the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) sail in formation during a simulated strait transit. San Antonio and Kearsarge are participating in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the East Coast of the U.S. in preparation for a deployment this spring. Navy/GSA Streamline Heavy Equipment RentalNAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs OfficerNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Base Support Vehicles and Equipment (BSVE) Product Line declared success Feb. 5 working with General Services Administration (GSA) in a joint venture to streamline the short term rental pro cess for Navy heavy equipment in the Southeast. Public Works Departments, along with other government agencies, now has access to various types of heavy duty Civil Engineering Support Equipment (CESE) on a short term basis (up to 365 days) through the GSA Heavy Equipment Short Term Rental (STR) Program. Types of equipment in the program include, but are not lim ited to bulldozers, back-hoes, genera tors, loaders, and man-lifts. This new tool will definitely help the Navy and will lead to significant cost reductions in operations by allowing us to reduce our pool of equipment, said Jeff Killian, NAVFAC Southeast Public Works Business Line Coordinator. Emergencies come up in our business and this will provide a means to quick ly resolve equipment needs. This acquisition strategy is now available by the implementation of a GSA negotiated, multi-vendor/multi region product delivery contract. Historically we have on occasion rented heavy equipment, but the process and pay ment was somewhat difficult to enable full time usage, said Ryan Costa, NAVFAC Southeast transportation specialist. With this program the process is web based and we make payment through our already established GSA billing cycle. In 2010, the BSVE team reached out to GSA to collaborate a new initiative to reduce underutilized equipment. The team was aware of the already resounding success of the GSA STR program for light duty vehicles and wanted to look at what could be done for the CESE program. The new contract provides a means for competitive and low cost equip ment rentals from multiple vendors, said Costa. Utilizing this program will provide multiple cost saving benefits to the Navy and other agencies throughout the Government. With more equipment available on an interim basis through this pro gram, the Navy can look at reducing the inventory of heavy equipment that it owns. Reductions of agency owned assets will dramatically reduce own ership and operational costs such as maintenance, labor and procurement cost, said Costa. The GSA Heavy Equipment STR program will help us meet our strategic goal of reducing our direct and indirect costs. The savings will be realized through not having to procure equipment and also bear the cost of maintenance. As the various sites throughout the south east start utilizing the new program, they will review existing equipment inventories to determine at what point in time the inventory can be purged based on the new rental data. We need to continue to think out side the box and manufacture business strategies like this to mitigate costs always being mindful of the taxpayers dollars. The new program allows flexibility during contingency events by lessening the need for contingency contracting and enabling access to available equip ment on a National scale. NAVFAC Southeast was the exclusive Government agency during the pro grams Pilot inception period during the middle of fiscal year 2012 (FY 12) and had realization of programmatic success shortly after. The accessibility of this program is currently available at all stateside locations within theNavys Southeast region, said Costa. BSVE continues to partner with GSA during this evolution and looks for ward to the success of the program as GSA plans to phase the programs availability to all Government Agencies this year.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 5 Vicksburg: Wiffle While You Work! USS Vicksburg Public Affairs The crack of a wiffle ball bat echoed in the helicop ter hangar during the first annual wiffle ball tour nament on board guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). It was the closest we could get to baseball while underway, and its sure to be a great time, said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW) Steven Pietrusza. The wiffle ball tourna ment was sponsored by the Vicksburg chapter of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) and featured a five-day tour nament, playoffs, and a championship game with 20 teams competing for bragging rights and a plaque. I think its awesome to raise morale onboard the ship, and having fun with your shipmates is a great way to do it! I really think our team will come out as the champions! said Chief Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Robert C. Laird Jr., a member of the team dubbed The Khaki Response Team. The event kicked off the morning of Feb. 8 with an opening ceremony including the National Anthem. Capt. Logan Jones was present to throw out the first pitch and give the order to play ball! After the first game I could see the morale and spirits of the crew increase, even the ones who were just spectators. We have teams of vari ous ranks and ages and I see the unit cohesion in each team. This tour nament is giving Sailors the opportunity to do something that relieves stress and just have some fun throughout the underway routine said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Clayton Duke, USS Vicksburg CSADD President. Engineman 2nd Class (SW) Welsey Dollarballard of The Bench Warmers explains, in a truly competitive spirit, what it means to be a real wiffle ball player. Wiffle ball is my life, without it I have nothing! Our team has the wisdom of the old, and power of the young. Its going to be a one sided match. Heads up, the Bench Warmers are off the bench! Without an embarked helicopter detachment, the hangar and flight deck are available for many activities like this tour nament, a recent steel beach picnic for Super Bowl XLVII, and group workouts. Approximately 50 Vicksburg Sailors independently partici pate daily Insanity work out sessions in order to help them prepare for the upcoming Physical Fitness Assesment in May. The Vicksburg CSADD chapter formed in 2012 in order to help positively influence Sailor behavior through resources and tools that promote good decision making. It exists to enable lead ership development of junior Sailors, create an atmosphere of good order and discipline, and rein force the culture of ship mates helping shipmates. USS Vicksburg is underway as a part of the opposition force in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) for the Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group. COMPTUEX is designed to bring every part of a strike group together to work effective ly and efficiently as one cohesive unit, ensuring overall readiness prior to a regular deployment. Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Jacob Bryant pitches for his team The Master Batters, as Yeoman Seaman James McKinney and Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Tywone James guard the outfield during the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). -Photos courtesy of USS VicksburgSenior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW) Steven Pietrusza, Captain Logan Jones, and Command Master Chief Robert Bostic christen the wiffle ball field with Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Clayton Duke, CSADD President. The Pasadena Thunderweasels and the Khaki Response Team played the first match during the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). USS Vicksburg is underway as a part of the opposition force in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) for the Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group. Personnel Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Demetreous Hill of Beast Mode stands at bat during the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Lt.j.g. Michael Wilkinson and Senior Chief Gas Turbine Technician (SW) Jamie Johnson provide play-by-play announcing throughout the first annual wiffle ball tour nament onboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). mented. Let me be very clear on this point. The Navy leadership has been very focused on cutting hard in all areas so that furloughs can possibly be avoided. We have also been careful to ensure that the CNIC funding we rely on to pay for our valued Government Service and contract employees are categorized as must-fund. The Navy is committed to protecting its work force as our nation works through these challenging fiscal times. While I believe NAVSTA Mayport is well poised to weather funding shortfalls from a civilian personnel perspec tive as a result of workforce shaping actions we took a year ago, additional budget reductions will still make this challenging for us. I want you to know that as before, we are committed to taking every measure available to pro tect our workforce. We are receiving guidance almost on a daily basis, so please be prepared for changes as they arrive. A web site on the employee portal (Sequestration/ Continuing Resolution Information Page) highlighting CR updates is post ed and will be updated as information comes in. If you have a question that cannot be answered from the website, please contact your supervisor or our PAO, MCC William Townsend, 2705226 ext. 1014, so we can get you a factual answer. I want to thank everyone for your service to our nation, and please know that your concerns are my concerns. You play a critical role in support ing our mission and I cant thank you enough for that continued support. As I have said many times before, Its easy to lead when things are going well. Lets all take a deep breath, count to about a Three Mississippi and real ize we will come through this chal lenge, stronger and better prepared for the future than ever before! V/r Skipper CochraneFrom Page 1Budget

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Underwood Helps Finegan DREAMUSS Underwood PAOSailors from USS Underwood (FFG 36) spent time talking to local elementary school stu dents about the impor tance of education, nutri tion, and fitness as part of Communities in Schools new DREAM Project ini tiative, a program focus ing on involving active duty military and veter ans as volunteer men tors and tutors for mili tary dependent students. Communities In Schools of Jacksonville is a lead ing dropout prevention organization helping kids successfully learn, stay in school and prepare for life. UNDERWOOD sailors were able to support them in their mission to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life. As part of the DREAM program, Underwood participated in a 3-day partnership with Finegan Elementary School where they were able to have group discussions with third through fifth grade students. The first day focused on nutrition and diet and was led by Culinary Specialist First Class Tarrell Brown. He covered the importance of eating healthy, exam ples of both healthy and unhealthy foods and the benefits of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Petty Officer Brown shared what he was doing to improve his health and the students volunteered what they do to eat healthy. The second day focused on physical fitness and education. Electricians Mate First Class Samuel Clay and Electronics Technician Second Class James Blocker both dis cussed fitness with the students. As USS Underwoods Command Fitness Leader, Petty Officer Clay explained to the students what physi cal fitness means and the benefits of staying fit. He stressed that each student can find activi ties that interest them and help them maintain an active life style. Petty Officer Blocker discussed the importance of set ting goals. He shared his personal goal of run ning a marathon and the hard work he put in to achieve that goal. Petty Officer Clay and Blocker were accompanied by Operation Specialist First Class Leron Parrish and Boatswainsmate First Class Dimitry Spiridinov. Both sailors discussed their careers in the navy and how fitness and edu cation have played a role in their success. USS Underwoods visit to Finegan Elementary School culminated the final day with Gas Turbine Systems TechnicianElectrical First Class Christopher Farrow, Lieutenant Dustin Schultz, and Executive Officer, Commander Michael Brasseur, discussing education and leadership. Lieutenant Schultz, Underwoods Navigator talked about his upcoming gradu ate school opportuni ty. He advised the stu dents to work hard now so that they will have more opportunities in the future. Commander Brasseur shared with the students his secrets of being a leader. His 3 mes sages to the students were to have a strong mind and body, be honest and paint an inspirational vision of the future for your people. The Underwood Sailors enjoyed their time with the Finegan Elementary School students and hope they were able to learn from their life lessons on education and a healthy lifestyle. The DREAM program is headed by Adam Bagby, an Army veteran himself. He explained that the DREAM program has two purposes: to improve the lives of our military youth by providing assistance in literacy and mentor ing and to connect the military community with opportunities to improve the city of Jacksonville and surrounding areas through service. If you are interested in more information con cerning the DREAM proj ect or Communities in School, please visit their website at http://www. cisjax.org. -Photos courtesy of USS UnderwoodCulinary Specialist 1st class Tarrell Brown talks to students about the importance of eat ing healthy during Communities in Schools new DREAM Project initiative, a program focusing on involving active duty military and veterans as volunteer mentors and tutors for military dependent students. Learn How To Be A Millionaire With FFSCFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 21, 11 a.m.-noon, Savings and Investment Class Building 1 Room 104 Feb. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Class Building 1 Room 104 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Feb. 25-March 1, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Feb. 26-27, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Million Dollar Sailor Workshop Building 1 Room 104 Feb. 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Feb. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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Congratulations To EOQ 4th Quarter Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, presents Capt. Allan Schlegel of Security with a Letter of Appreciation after he is announced Naval Station Civilian Employee of the Quarter Fourth Quarter 2012 during a luncheon held Feb. 5 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Other nominees for EOQ include David Lam, Fire/Emergency Services; Cheryl Washington, Housing; Mary Henry, MWR; Leslie Allen, PWD; Luis Soto, Security; Tegwen McNeal, Air Ops.BBC Wants Your LocksFrom BBCBalfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport is host ing its second annual Locks of Love event on Feb. 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. During last years event, Balfour Beatty collected more than 75 ponytails. which contributed to constructing almost eight hairpieces for underprivi leged children suffer ing from permanent hair loss. It typically takes 8-10 ponytails to make one prosthetic hairpiece. Locks of Love is a pub lic, non-profit organiza tion whose mission is to return a sense of self, confidence and normal cy to children suffering from hair loss by utilizing donated ponytails to pro vide the highest quality hair prosthetics to finan cially disadvantaged chil dren. The children receive hair prostheses free of charge or on a sliding scale, based on financial need. Hair donations must be at least 10 inches long and cannot have been bleached (highlighted). Hair that has been col ored or permed can be used and dreadlocks, extensions, synthetic hair or wigs cannot be used. Those who donate will receive a trim and style from master stylists Renee Pendlay and Kristin Greco of Victorias Hair and Nails, a gift bag for par ticipation and be entered to win a gift basket filled with gift cards, health and beauty products and other surprises. The event will be held at the Ribault Bay Community Center locat ed at 1201 Assisi Lane, Atlantic Beach, Fla. 32233. For more information about the event, please call Jessica at 904-3724702.BBC Foundation Seeks Military Housing Applicants For ScholarshipBy Balfour Beatty CommunitiesRecognizing the importance of education and its continuing ris ing costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholarships for the 20132014 academic year to high school and under graduate students of mili tary members residing in family housing. We encourage our family housing residents with high school and undergraduate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation, its a difficult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the pos sibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. The application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommu nitiesfoundation.org. The application deadline is April 15, 2013. Balfour Beatty Communities, respon sible for the priva tized family hous ing at Naval Station Mayport, formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to honoring military per sonnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a com mitment to community leadership through edu cational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is com mitted to providing a quality living environ ment that supports the diverse interests and needs of our military families. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that mili tary members do and the sacrifices their families make. NAVADMIN 016/13 outlines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reflected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service (NDAWS) and their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF). All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. For more information read NAVADMIN 016/13 at www.npc.navy.mil.Verify Personal Awards THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 7

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Let The Good Times Run -Photos by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Master Chief Bob White starts off runners and walkers during the MWR Mardi Gras 3K Walk/5K Run held on Feb. 12 in front of the MWR Gym. John Aimone with MWR mans the sign up booth at the MWR Mardi Gras 3K Walk/5K Run. MWR sponsors walk/runs each second Tuesday of the month at 8:10 a.m. in front of the MWR Gym. For more information about the runs or sports pro gram, call MWR Sports at 270-5452. Mardi Gras Fun-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of HSL-60 Chief Petty Officers Mess stand with musical duo, Two Eyed Jakes during Mardi Gras Night at the Focsle Lounge. The Mess sponsored a crawfish boil with red beans and rice in honor of the Louisiana festival. There will be an All-Hands Seafood Boil on Feb. 27 at 4-7 p.m. The event is sponsored by COMDESRON 14. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the CDS-14. For tickets, contact ITCS Phil Smith (904) 270-5801 ext. 143. New Tuesday Night Bingo ProgramFrom MWRThere are big changes happening for Beachside Bingo! Beginning Feb. 26, the Tuesday night program is getting a complete make over. This new program is focused on the bud get-minded player with 3-pack paper pack start ing at just $18. Six-pack paper packs will be avail able for $20 and computer 3-6 packs are available for just $50. Active duty military also receive a special bonus discount: an additional $5 off when they show their ID. Tuesday nights will also feature eight nightly door prizes, King and Queen spin the wheel, surprises and more! Drop into Beachside Bingo today or call for more information at (904) 270-7204. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 9

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive alignment). Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and com puters are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty military Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume con tests, cupcakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game. March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge Feb. 22: Chocolate Fest 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Second Tyme Around. Come dress to impress and enjoy all the choco late you can eat. 270-7205 Feb. 23: UFC 157Rousey vs. Carmouche 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 March 8: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 Beginning March 19: March Madness. Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Every Sunday: NASCAR at Castaways: Sprint Cup Series. Watch every race on Hi-Def TVs! Focsle Lounge CPO Club Feb. 27: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the CDS-14. For tickets, contact ITCS Phil Smith (904) 270-5801 x143. Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retir ees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimentary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day win dow. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid mili tary ID to activate ticket at front gate. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 270-5145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orland. 270-5145 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and light show. Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburg er or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 20: Command Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Open to all military and civil ian employees assigned to commands at NS Mayport is a Fr ee Bowling Party (up to 120 peo ple) + 100 Instant Party Bowling Coupons (over $2500 value). Teams will play 3 games of bowling: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize! Captains Cup Points awarded. Cost is $75 per team. 270-5377. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 6: Cobra Demo Day. 11 a.m.3 p.m.YAC Drama Club Performs Charlie BrownKid ZoneFeb. 23: Teen Bowling Trip. Depart Teen Center at 7 p.m.; return 10 p.m. Permission slip required. 246-0347 March 1: Freedom FridayArcade Night and Movie. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 15: Freedom FridayRock Your Shamrock. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Wear your green and dance with DJ Derek! Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Employment Orientation. 4-5 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 270-5680 March 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is high ly recommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by April 30, 2013. 2705680 Liberty CallThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more informa tion, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 22: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Sign up deadline Feb. 20 Feb. 23: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $15; Sign up deadline Feb. 20 Feb. 22: Chocolate Fest 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Second Tyme Around. Come dress to impress and enjoy all the chocolate you can eat. 270-7205 Feb. 23: UFC 157Rousey vs. Carmouche 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Feb. 24: Jacksonville Giants vs. Fayetteville Flight. Van departs 5:30 p.m. FREE. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Feb. 21 Feb. 27: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the CDS14. For tickets, contact ITCS Phil Smith (904) 270-5801 x143. Feb. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. On The MessdeckFocsle Lounges Spring SpecialsSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8Bogeys SpecialsThursday, Feb. 21 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 Spinach Turkey Avocado Wrap, $7.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $10.95 Soup: Cream of Broccoli Friday, Feb. 22 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, Feb. 25 Florida Burger: Our Signature Burger Topped with Swiss Cheese, Grilled Onions, Mushrooms and Sour Cream, $7.95 Bbq Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Tuesday, Feb. 26 Shrimp Po Boy with Remoulade Sauce, $8.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Chicken Salad, $7.95 Wednesday, Feb. 27 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, Scalloped Potatoes and Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $ 7.95 Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 -Photos courtesy of MWRSnoopy (Sakura Waseline, age 8) shows Charlie Brown (Akire Rogers, age 11) his latest musings on Valentines Day Members of the Youth Center Drama Clubs production of Charlie Browns Valentine perform a song and dance to Im in Shape. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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MWR Sports/FitnessIntramural Sports March 9: Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. All-military teams $40, military/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. March 12: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 16: Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by March 8. 270-5451 March 23: Womens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. Allmilitary teams $40, mili tary/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Tuesday 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Wednesday 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp HIT At the Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7:30 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT Saturday 9:30 a.m., HIT 10:30 a.m. Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor This incentive program develops muscu lar strength and power needed to attain the Steel Anchor Award. Structured and progres sive training targets muscles to increase your bench press, squat, and dead-lift. Participants will utilize multiple pieces of free weight, selectorized and plate loaded strength equipment in the gym. Workouts will be tracked to provide motivation, guidance and award determination. 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT A 6part prerequisite training program which will prepare Mayports personnel for safe and effective incorporation into Mayports HIT pro gram. Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 11

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million wastewater reuse expansion to eliminate all wastewater discharge to the St. Johns River and reduce groundwater withdrawal by the Navy, City of Jacksonville, FDEP and SJRWMD by 2014; reuse of Jacksonville Electric Authoritys treat ed wastewater to mitigate low flow conditions at the stations wastewater plant and increase reuse irrigation on the base golf course; ardous waste, solid waste, storage tanks, or storm water violations at NAS Jacksonville or NS Mayport in past three years; and civilians participated in numerous city-wide cleanup events and com munity improvement ini tiatives; chromate primer on P-3 and trainer aircraft to reduce material use and personnel exposure to hexavalent chrome; ment and cleanup of beach debris by City of Jacksonville, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, NS Mayport and Army Corps of Engineers at Huguenot Park. It has been an honor to be part of this dedi cated team of environ mental professionals for the past 11 years. The team remains focused on ways to continually improve the environ mental quality of life on and off the naval installations in Jacksonville, said Gartland. We will significant ly reduce wastewater discharge from NAS Jacksonville to the St. Johns River this year and totally eliminate dis charge to the river next year. We will eliminate groundwater withdrawal to irrigate our golf course this year and continue to identify ways to reduce groundwater withdrawal next year, he added. And, we will continue to reach out to our com munity with innovative solutions that protect our environment as an inte gral part of performing our organizational mis sions.From Page 1EnvironmentWaterjets Could Propel LCS To Greater SpeedsBy Office of Naval Research The Navys fifth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), Milwaukee, will be the first to benefit from new high-power density waterjets aimed at staving off rudder and propeller damage experienced on high-speed ships. The product of an Office of Naval Research (ONR) Future Naval Capabilities (FNC) pro gram, the waterjets arrived last month at the Marinette Marine ship yard in Wisconsin, where Milwaukee (LCS 5) is under construction. We believe these waterjets are the future, said Dr. Ki-Han Kim, program manager in ONRs Ship Systems and Engineering Research Division. Anything that we can do to keep ships ready to go will ultimately benefit our warfighters. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenerts 20132017 Navigation Plan calls for fielding improved ships to support coun terterrorism and irregu lar warfare missions at sea and ashore. The LCS will play a big role in the Navys plan as a modular, adaptable vessel for use against diesel subma rines, littoral mines and attacks by small surface craft. Developed by RollsRoyce Naval Marine in Walpole, Mass., in col laboration with ONR and Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, the new AxialFlow Waterjet Mk-1 can move nearly half a mil lion gallons of seawa ter per minute, provid ing more thrust per unit than current commercial waterjets. Four of the new waterjets will propel the LCS to speeds greater than 40 knots. Researchers believe the smaller, more effi cient waterjets will help the LCS avoid excessive maintenance costs asso ciated with cavitation a phenomenon that occurs when changes in pressure create air bubbles on rotating machinery, such as marine propellers. Repeated occurrences can cause whole chunks of metal to wear away, lead ing to frequent repairs and replacements. The waterjets new design could increase their lifespan between repairs. The FNC program that oversaw development of this technology proved to be as adaptable as LCS. The waterjets origi nally were slated to ben efit another ship program that was discontinued. Instead of cancelling the waterjets program, offi cials regrouped and shift ed their focus to design ing a product that would improve the performance of LCS. ONRs FNC program saves taxpayer money by streamlining processes to deliver cutting-edge products within five years. The waterjets project began in 2007, and the delivery last month to the ship yard marked its successful completion. Next up for the water jets will be full-scale sea trials on Milwaukee (LCS 5), expected to occur in the next 24 months. Eventually, the water jets could end up on 10 LCS under contract to be built by Lockheed Martin.New Distinguished Warfare Medal AvailableFrom DoDThe Department of Defense announced the creation of the Distinguished Warfare Medal to recognize a service members extraordinary achievements directly impacting combat operations. Modern technology enables service members with special training and capabilities to more directly and precisely impact military operations at times far from the battlefield. The Distinguished Warfare Medal will be awarded in the name of the secretary of defense to service members whose extraordinary achieve ments, regardless of their dis tance to the traditional combat theater, deserve distinct depart ment-wide recognition. I have seen first-hand how modern tools like remotely piloted platforms and cyber systems have changed the way wars can be fought, said Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta. We should also have the ability to honor extraordi nary actions that make a true difference in combat opera tions, even if those actions are physically removed from the fight. Based on the order of pre cedence, the Distinguished Warfare Medal will sit directly below the Distinguished Flying Cross. It may be awarded for actions in any domain but not involving acts of valor. This new medal recog nizes the changing charac ter of warfare and those who make extraordinary contribu tions to it, said Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin E. Dempsey. The criteria for this award will be highly selective and reflect high standards. The medal, designed by The Institute of Heraldry, will be available in the coming months. The signed memo, cri teria for the medal, along with the design, can be seen here: http://www.defense.gov/news/ DistinguishedWarfareMedalMe mo.pdf 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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4th Fleet Says Joint HSV Is Perfect MatchFrom U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe Navys first joint high-speed vessel, USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1), made a brief stop at Naval Station Mayport Feb. 14 to introduce the ship to Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet on its way to its new homeport in Little Creek, Va. The port call is an opportunity for senior officials and military personnel from U.S. 4th Fleet to visit the ship and receive capability brief ings for future operation al planning. Spearhead is scheduled to deploy to the 4th Fleet area of oper ations to support upcom ing Southern Partnership Station deployments. The joint high-speed vessel Spearhead is a per fect match for 4th Fleet and we plan to use it across all of our lines of operations; security cooperation activities, mari time security operations and contingency opera tions, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. U.S. 4th Fleets area of operations includes the maritime domains in South and Central America as well as the Caribbean Sea. Spearhead is criti cally important to Fourth Fleets area of operations because of her shallow draft and ability to work in more austere ports that traditional warships might not be able to. We see the high speed ves sels as even more capable in terms of reaching out to our partner nations, Harris said. Spearhead is the first of 10 planned joint high speed vessels under con tract to be built. The next ship, USNS Choctaw County (JHSV-2), is scheduled to be operational later this year. Built in Mobile, Ala., by Austal U.S.A., USNS Spearhead is designed for rapid, intra-theater transport of troops and military equipment. The U.S. Navys Military Sealift Command (MSC) owns and operates Spearhead, along with the nine other JHSVs that are cur rently under contract. Spearhead is a 338-foot long aluminum catama ran designed for speed, flexibility and maneuver ability. The reconfigurable 20,000-square-foot mis sion bay area can be quickly adapted to sup port a number of differ ent missions anything from carrying container ized portable hospitals to support disaster relief to transporting tanks and troops. Spearheads crew of 22 civil service mariners works for MSC, which operates, navigates and maintains the ship. JHSVs are capable of transporting approxi mately 600 tons of mili tary troops, vehicles, supplies and equipment 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots, and are designed to oper ate in austere ports and waterways, providing added flexibility to U.S. warfighters worldwide. U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photos by MC3 Damian BergSailors stationed at Naval Station Mayport pull in the mooring lines of the Military Sealift Command USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) as it pulls into Naval Station Mayport to be inspected by the US Commander of Fourth Fleet, Rear. Adm. Sinclair M. Harris. Spearhead is the first of of nine Navy joint high-speed vessels and is designed for rapid intra-theater transport of troops and military equipment. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerJoint High Speed Vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) moored at Naval Station Mayport Feb 14 for a brief port visit on the way to its new home port of Little Creek, Va. The ship stopped here to be inspected by Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet as it is planned to support future Southern Partnership Station missions in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerJoint High Speed Vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1)and Cruiser USS Gettysburg (CC64) moored at Naval Station Mayport Feb 14. 4th Fleet Sailors Visit Jax University NROTC -Photo by MC1 Sean Allen Senior Chief Information Systems Technician Shannen Kippers of Command U.S. Naval forces Southern Command/Command U.S. 4th Fleet speaks to Reserve Officer Training Cadets (ROTC) at Jacksonville University Feb. 14. Kippers and other members of 4th Fleet were invited to speak to the group of future Naval Officers on various subjects the Cadets would encounter at their first command.4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors from U.S. 4th Fleet spent the morn ing with more than 50 Navy midshipmen from Jacksonville University Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) Feb. 14. The group from 4th Fleet comprised of sev eral Chief Petty Officers, including Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (SW/EXW/FMF) David Tellez, and 4th Fleet Sailor of the Year, Fire Controlman (SW) 1st Class Harry Hall. Tellez spoke to the group about the impor tance of junior officers and chief petty officers working together. It is essential for offi cers and chiefs to work together, said Tellez. Young sailors look at leadership for guidance, so it is important for junior officers and chiefs to be on the same page. Tellez also talked about the importance of officers being aware of what is going on in their Sailors lives. The Sailors you lead will have many things going on in their lives, personal issues at home, and work issues such as Preform to Serve, said Tellez. It is important that you are aware of these issues and be able to guide these Sailors. Hall shared some of his experiences as a young enlisted sailor and the impact officers have on the Sailors they lead. Division officers can have a large influence on a Sailors career and if they decide to stay in the Navy or not, said Hall. Knowing that can help you as you prepare to begin your Naval career. Lt. Andrew Broyles, senior class advisor for Jacksonville University ROTC was grateful for the group coming to speak to the midshipmen. It is important for the midshipmen to hear first hand the importance of the relationship between junior officers and chief petty officers, said Broyles. This is a great opportunity for them to listen and be able to ask questions to fleet Sailors. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com SCPOA Shines Up Memorial-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of Naval Station Mayports Second Class Petty Officers Association (SCPOA) salute during morning colors in the newly refurbished Mayport Memorial Garden. The SCPOA spent a Saturday cleaning, remulching, pressure washing and weeding the area and has committed to perform the upkeep every month.Mayport, Jax Continue Environmental Partnership With State and Local AgenciesContributorRepresentatives from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Navy Region Southeast, Naval Station Mayport and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast joined local and state officials in signing the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter Feb. 12 at Jacksonville City Hall. The Navy is a part of the Jacksonville commu nity and the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team is a prime example of our ongoing coop eration on items of mutual interest, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. We continue to main tain a proactive partner ship with environmental regulatory agencies to identify and implement innovative solutions with the goals of enhancing environmental compli ance, promoting natural resources management and protecting public health, Scorby added. The Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team shows that we are stronger when we work together on behalf of our waterways, our land, the air we breathe and the future of our city, said Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Im proud to carry on this tradition of partnership for our city and I thank the Navy, Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) and all the stakeholders for their continued support. The team was estab lished in 2002 to ensure Navy and regulatory agencies achieve environmental compliance by identi fying and implementing innovative solutions to promote natural resourc es management and pro tect public health. According to NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland, who briefed the team before the charter signing, the partnership has exceed ed all expectations to provide more efficient and effective protection of Jacksonvilles air and water resources. Gartland shared some of the major accomplish ments of the partnership including: hoto by Kaylee LaRocqueNS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Cochrane signs the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter during a charter signing ceremony at Jacksonville City Hall Feb. 12.See Environment, Page 12CO Talks BudgetTeam Mayport, I think its time to communicate some information about the potential budget impacts we may face as our nation struggles with the continuing resolution (CR) and the sequestration impacts. Thankfully, the automatic spending cuts required by sequestration in January were delayed to March to allow Congress time to work a deficit reduction plan. While this renewed effort to find a healthy way forward is encouraging, we need to address a different, but more immediate, fiscal potentiality the absence of an FY-13 appropriations bill which may force us to operate under a year-long CR. The CR is a challenge because we have to operate under FY12 funding levels which is less than planned for FY13. Additionally, there has been unplanned/ abnormally high expenses as a result of increased naval ops in the Middle East, increased fuel costs, and unexpected critical repairs to a number of submarines and ships. Lastly, under the CR, there is limited flexibility to transfer funds between accounts to cover the main shortfall in Operations and Maintenance (O&M). As a whole, the Navy projects a shortfall of $4.6 billion in O&M accounts. All of this has required some drastic measures to ensure we can function throughout the year should the CR continue. This problem is not unique to DoN, since all of the services are facing cuts to their operating accounts, albeit at different rates and in different areas. In order to slow the O&M burn-rate, Navy leadership is implementing actions such as the following: Limiting or cancelling ship and aircraft mainte nance Limiting or cancelling deployments Implement reduced travel and a civilian hiring freeze Deferring facility restoration and modernization programs (Projects under the FY13 CNIC special project pro gram are deferred.) Cutting facilities sustainment (minimal funding for only necessary maintenance and emergency repairs) Reduce spending on base operating support (examining reduced standards of service) I know that many of you are already experiencing impacts of these decisions, especially with respect to travel and hiring, and we will do our best to keep you up-to-date on policy and requirements as we push through these challenges. At this point, each of these steps are designed to be reversible, at least to some extent, should Congress pass an FY-13 budget. As a last resort, civilian furlough are being contem plated within DOD and Navy leadership. There have been no decisions on this and much will depend on how effective budget cuts in other areas can be imple-See Budget, Page 5

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Shipmates, I want to invite Naval Station Mayport Sailors and tenant commands to commemorate African American Heritage Month on Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. at the Base Chapel. Guest speaker for this years ceremony will by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, USNAVSO/4thFLT, followed by a special lunch menu prepared by Oasis Galley staff at Beachside Community Center. The theme of this years event is At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington Both of these course-changing events are at milestone years the Emancipation Proclamation happened 150 years ago, the March on Washington is 50 years old. It is a great time to reflect on how diversity and freedom have made our country and our military great. It also gives us the opportunity to recognize the many AfricanAmerican who have contributed to the nations defense. I hope to see you all there. I want to send out a Bravo Zulu to the Mayport Second Class Petty Officer Association for taking on the responsi bility of upkeep at Mayports Memorial Park that includes the USS Stark Memorial. The SCPOA mulched, weed ed, and shined up the big bell and has committed to keeping the area looking its best. The Memorial Park is there to honor those Sailors who gave the ulti mate price for our freedoms. It is only fitting that todays Sailors are honoring those fallen shipmates and carrying on the tradition of never forgetting their sacrifice. Welcome back to the crew of USS Halyburton. The ship returned to Naval Station Mayport last Saturday after a six-month deployment to the COMFIFTHFLT and COMSIXTHFLT areas of responsibility with focused operations off the Horn of Africa. Halyburton conducted counter pira cy operations in support of Operation Ocean Shield off the coast of Africa and the Somali Basin. Assigned to Standing NATO Maritime Group One, Halyburtons primary mission was to deter piracy and provide maritime security. Job well done Halyburton! Have you cracked your books yets? Petty officer exams are only a month away so if you havent already started studying, you better get at it. Make sure while youre exercising your mind, that you are exercising your body. The PFA is right around the corner as well. Last Tuesday, the three area base commanding officers joined Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby and Jacksonville Mayort Alvin Brown in signing the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter. The charter basically means that the Navy and Jacksonville will partner to look towards applying innovative solutions for natural resource management while limiting their envi ronmental impact. I am proud to say that Naval Station Mayport has been forward thinking in this endeavor. Our Environmental team, led by Cheryl Mitchell, works diligently to promote good environmental stewardship. The team has received numerous military, state and city awards including the CNO Environmental Award and participated in multiple public outreach opportuni ties. We take our environment very seriously. It was great to, once again, show that commitment through this partner ship. We will have another opportunity to show our stewardship with the annual St. Johns River Celebration Clean Up on March 16. Put the date on your calendar and commit to coming out to pick up the debris that tarnishes our great waterway. Continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSHas your senior made his final decision about what he will be doing next year after he graduates from high school? Has he at least come to the real ization that he will need some type of postsecondary training? With todays economy, it is almost impossible to support oneself with just a high school diploma. Further education means more money! And it is not just seniors who need to investigate postsecondary train ing! This process starts in elementary school. So dont think your child has to be in high school before you start researching this information. The search can never begin too early; it can only begin too late in terms of finding the perfect life after high school. Right here in Jacksonville we have several postsecondary institutions which could meet his training requirements. The University of North Florida, Jacksonville University, Edward Waters College, and Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) all offer bachelor degrees. In addition to offering bachelor degrees, FSCJ has maintained its historic mission of a commu nity college by maintaining open admission for associate degrees, remediation, response to community needs, outreach to underserved populations, and statewide articulation agreements. It continues to offer certificate and degree programs which range from auto mechan ics to nursing to associate in arts degree. This associates degree guarantees transfer to a Florida state university. So right in our back yard, your child can get the training he needs to be successful in the world of work. So the next question to ask is, How does my child decide which program best fits his career goals? You can log in with your child to FLVC.org (Florida Virtual Campus which is the new name for FACTS. org.). At FLVC.org the student can ests, abilities, and pref erences to help choose a career and appropriate courses for that career, career goal can be achieved at a university, community college, tech nical school, or through the military either mili tary service or a military academy, ing which one of those choices will help him to achieve his career goal, and which leads to postsec ondary training success. For a hands-on inves tigation, attend FSCJs College Open House on February 21st from 5:30 7:30 pm at their Downtown Campus Advanced Technology Center (ATC). This building is at the corner of State and Pearl Streets. The event is free and parking is free. Representatives from a wide variety of their pro grams will answer your questions about length of program, costs, and job availability in the North Florida area. Various workshops will also be offered on Scholarships & Enrollment Services, Leadership, and Services for Students with Disabilities. While all of these will be specific to FSCJ, the information will closely match that at other Florida state institutions of higher learning. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Ready For Life After High School?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowing Director, Naval History and Heritage CommandIt is a curious fact of history that of the first 35 commanders in chief, 23 served in either the Army or in a state mili tia. Of those men, 12 achieved the title gen eral ranging from General of the Armies George Washington to Brevet Brigadier General of Volunteers Benjamin Harrison. What is even more interesting is that over the span of those first 35 presidents, not one naval officer was elected to the nations highest office. However, begin ning with our nations 36th president, John F. Kennedy, there began a line of six Sailors in the White House that ran from Kennedy to George H.W. Bush, broken only by Army Capt. Ronald Reagan. Each of these presi dential Navy officers had served with honorably and some with high dis tinction in a naval officers uniform. Lt.j.g. Kennedy had appeared on the national stage earning the Navy and Marine Corps Medal as a dashing hero, saving the lives of his crew following the sink ing of the PT-109.Lyndon Johnson had taken a leave of absence from the House of Representatives to serve in the South Pacific, earning a contro versial Silver Star while flying as an observer on a B-26 bombing mis sion.Richard Nixon headed up a series of Navy cargo handling units around the Pacific during World War II, achieving the rank of commander in the Naval Reserve. Lt. Cmdr. Gerald Ford served onboard the light aircraft carrier Monterey, sur viving Typhoon Cobra and earning 10 battle stars. Jimmy Carter is the only president to gradu ate from the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. He went on to be selected for service in nuclear sub marines by the legend ary Admiral Hyman G. Rickover.George H.W. Bush was one of the youngest pilots ever to earn his aviation designation in the Navy, receiv ing his wings of gold at age 19. Bush flew torpedo bombers from the deck of the USS San Jacinto, earning a Distinguished Flying Cross and numerous Air Medals before being shot down by anti-aircraft fire. Each of these men was indelibly marked by their experiences, perhaps more than they, or we, have previously under stood. Service in the U.S. Army creates a land-cen tered outlook, which was important to the developing nation during the 18th and 19th centuries. From its founding till the early 1890s, the United States was intent on conquering its portion of the North American continent, and as such its foreign rela tions and military strat egy were focused on questions rooted in com petition for land. In this environment, an Army Six Sailors, Their Legacies In The White Housebackground had a natural political advantage; the nation needed this particular expertise. However, with the closing of the American frontier and the gradual shift in strategic focus to overseas resources as well as foreign markets for U.S. manufac tured goods, knowledge of seapower and oce anic commerce began to come to the forefront. It was into this environment that the maritime-mind ed Roosevelts, Theodore and his distant cousin Franklin, paved the way towards the United States emerging as a global power. However, it was the six Sailors who occupied the White House between 1961 and 1993 who for ever altered the balance of American foreign pol icy from a continental to globally focused effort. Each, unconsciously or consciously, drew upon their experiences in the Navy to view the world not from the confines of land and artificial bor ders, but rather from the expansive, globalized perspective that can only be derived from the vantage point of a ship at sea. Their values, as evidenced in by their adher ence to such norms as free trade and free navi gation on the high seas, are maritime values. At the dawn of the 20th century, naval theorist Alfred T. Mahan defined the sea lanes of communication as a vast interlocking web of alliances. Where there is a chokepoint or a heavily trav eled commercial sea lane, there lay American national interests, and, probably, a partnership or alliance. When the Soviet Union fell in 1989 and a new paradigm emerged with the United States sitting atop a new interna tional system, it was a system defined by the seas that connect the planet rather than oceans that divide continents. Three presidents have come and two have gone since the last Sailor sat in the White House.The Resolute desk crafted from the timbers of the HMS Resolute remains in the oval room in the West Wing, but the feel ings it evoked when PT boat skippers and Avenger pilots sat behind it have begun to fade. However, the lessons they learned when they were young about the impor tance of the oceans still echoes. As another great power emerges and plots its course upon the worlds blue waters, the commander in chief of the United States armed services will not be able to escape the knowledge that the oceans have long ceased to be a defensive barrier and that only by remaining strong at sea will the nation remain secure. This is the instinctive knowledge of the six Sailor presidents, and their enduring legacy.

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From StaffIn honor of AfricanAmerican/Black History Month, Oasis Galley is featuring a special menu for Feb. 26 from 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. to be served at Beachside Community Center. All hands are invited to attend. Price is $4.60 for meal. On the menu is Cinnamon Scented Lentil & Vegetable Soup Tanzanian Fish Curry Fried Chicken Pork Chops with Spicy Peanut Sauce Macaroni & Cheese Joloff Rice Steamed Rice Baked Sweet Potatoes Boiled Beets Collard Greens Black-eyed Peas $ Carrots Cape of Good Hope Cabbage Peach Cobbler Banana Pudding Pineapple Upside Down CakeOasis Serves Up Special MealAegis BMD System Intercepts TargetAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Missile Defense Agency and sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie conducted a success ful flight test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense system Feb. 13, resulting in the intercept of a medium-range ballistic mis sile target over the Pacific Ocean by a Standard Missile-3 Block IA guided missile. At 4:10 a.m. EST, a uni tary medium-range bal listic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The target flew northwest toward a broad area of the Pacific Ocean. The in-orbit Space Tracking and Surveillance System-Demonstrators, or STSS-D, detected and tracked the target, and forwarded track data to the USS Lake Erie. The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense weapon system, used Launch on Remote doctrine to engage the target. The ship developed a fire control solution from the STSS-D track and launched the SM-3 Block IA guided missile about five minutes after target launch. The SM-3 maneuvered to a point in space and released its kinetic warhead. The warhead acquired the target re-entry vehicle, diverted into its path, and, using only the force of a direct impact, engaged and destroyed the target. Initial indications are that all components per formed as designed, offi cials said. Program offi cials will assess and evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained dur ing the test, they added. Todays event, desig nated Flight Test Standard Missile-20, or FTM-20, was a demonstration of the ability of spacebased assets to provide mid-course fire control quality data to an Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense ship, extending the battle space, providing the abil ity for longer-range inter cepts and defense of larger areas, officials said. FTM-20 is the 24th successful intercept in 30 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight testing began in 2002. Across all Ballistic Missile Defense System programs, this is the 58th successful hit-to-kill intercept in 73 flight tests since 2001. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense is the sea-based component of the Missile Defense Agencys Ballistic Missile Defense System. The Aegis BMD engage ment capability defeats shortto intermediaterange, unitary and sepa rating, midcourse-phase ballistic missile threats with the SM-3, as well as short-range ballistic mis siles in the terminal phase with the SM-2 Block IV missile. The MDA and the Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program. Dear Kate,I really hate CFLs. These light bulbs just look ugly and their light is harsh. Yet, everyone says they save energy. Do they really work? What else can I do? Signed, Burnt-Out Dear Burnt, You are not the first to complain about CFL light bulbs. But their energy savings make it worth a sec ond look. New CFLs look better and last longer. Other ways to save on lighting are to take out extra bulbs is every single one needed?? Lighting is a big energy use in the home, so these changes are very illuminating. Get it?KateAsk Kate THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 Roosevelt, Vicksburg Complete COMPTUEX Navy Public Affairs Support Element, NorfolkSailors from the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and Marines from assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) completed Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Feb. 17. COMPTUEX is designed to prepare and assess the ships in the ARG individually and as a unit prior to deployment. The Kearsarge ARG is comprised of the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), the amphibious trans port dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17), the amphibious dock land ing ship USS Carter Hall (LSD 50), Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4 and the 26th MEU, embarked with the ARG. This COMPTUEX has been very successful, said Capt. Brad Skillman, commodore of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4. Everyone in the ARG pulled together and worked hard to make sure that we met all of our goals for the exercise. This shows that we are ready to deploy and will be able to readily handle any chal lenges that may arise. Each ship ran through a series of drills that test ed the ARGs ability to respond to different sce narios such as general quarters, non-combatant evacuation operations, and visit, board, search and seizure operations. COMPTUEX validated our ability to carry out any mission, said Capt. Rick Nielsen, command ing officer of Kearsarge. It helped us ensure our readiness before we deploy this spring and it also tested our train ing and responsiveness. The scenarios pushed our crew to the limit and proved that the extensive training was superior to any training received through the exercise period and well worth the time and effort. The three-week exercise also helped to develop cooperation between the different units involved by allowing them to practice responding together to various plausible sce narios. The scenarios mirror real-world circumstanc es that we are possibly going to face in some of the areas in which we are going to be operating, said Cmdr. Greg Blyden, commanding officer of Carter Hall. The brisk pace of operations helped prepare the crew for what could be expected of the ARG and how rapidly a situation could escalate. Key components of COMPTUEX are com munication and coopera tion not only between the ships but also between the Sailors and Marines aboard. COMPTUEX prepares the ships for deploy ment in a safe environ ment with subject mat ter experts and mentors available to answer ques tions, said Cmdr. Neil A. Koprowski, commanding officer of San Antonio. It is also important to gar ner the blue/green rela tionships to ensure seamless transitions. There are missions that are inher ently Navy, but there are many more that are inherently Marine. You have to find the balance and COMPTUEX allows the ships, the staffs and the MEU that opportunity. During COMPTUEX the three ships and the 26th MEU showed that they are ready to deploy and to respond to any number of missions. They performed magnificently, and I am honored to stand beside them, said Col. Matthew G. St. Clair, commanding officer of the 26th MEU. I am confident this team is ready for the challenges of the dynamic and uncer tain operational environ ment we will encounter during our deployment. -Photo by MCSN Hunter S. HarwellSailors in a rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) approach the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) during a simulated straits transit with the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG). Kearsarge ARG is participating in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the East Coast of the U.S. in preparation for an deployment this spring. -Photo by MC1 Abraham EssenmacherThe amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17), the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) sail in formation during a simulated strait transit. San Antonio and Kearsarge are participating in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the East Coast of the U.S. in preparation for a deployment this spring. Navy/GSA Streamline Heavy Equipment RentalNAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs OfficerNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Base Support Vehicles and Equipment (BSVE) Product Line declared success Feb. 5 working with General Services Administration (GSA) in a joint venture to streamline the short term rental process for Navy heavy equipment in the Southeast. Public Works Departments, along with other government agencies, now has access to various types of heavy duty Civil Engineering Support Equipment (CESE) on a short term basis (up to 365 days) through the GSA Heavy Equipment Short Term Rental (STR) Program. Types of equipment in the program include, but are not lim ited to bulldozers, back-hoes, genera tors, loaders, and man-lifts. This new tool will definitely help the Navy and will lead to significant cost reductions in operations by allowing us to reduce our pool of equipment, said Jeff Killian, NAVFAC Southeast Public Works Business Line Coordinator. Emergencies come up in our business and this will provide a means to quickly resolve equipment needs. This acquisition strategy is now available by the implementation of a GSA negotiated, multi-vendor/multi region product delivery contract. Historically we have on occasion rented heavy equipment, but the process and payment was somewhat difficult to enable full time usage, said Ryan Costa, NAVFAC Southeast transportation specialist. With this program the process is web based and we make payment through our already established GSA billing cycle. In 2010, the BSVE team reached out to GSA to collaborate a new initiative to reduce underutilized equipment. The team was aware of the already resounding success of the GSA STR program for light duty vehicles and wanted to look at what could be done for the CESE program. The new contract provides a means for competitive and low cost equip ment rentals from multiple vendors, said Costa. Utilizing this program will provide multiple cost saving benefits to the Navy and other agencies throughout the Government. With more equipment available on an interim basis through this pro gram, the Navy can look at reducing the inventory of heavy equipment that it owns. Reductions of agency owned assets will dramatically reduce own ership and operational costs such as maintenance, labor and procurement cost, said Costa. The GSA Heavy Equipment STR program will help us meet our strategic goal of reducing our direct and indirect costs. The savings will be realized through not having to procure equipment and also bear the cost of maintenance. As the various sites throughout the southeast start utilizing the new program, they will review existing equipment inventories to determine at what point in time the inventory can be purged based on the new rental data. We need to continue to think out side the box and manufacture business strategies like this to mitigate costs always being mindful of the taxpayers dollars. The new program allows flexibility during contingency events by lessening the need for contingency contracting and enabling access to available equipment on a National scale. NAVFAC Southeast was the exclusive Government agency during the pro grams Pilot inception period during the middle of fiscal year 2012 (FY 12) and had realization of programmatic success shortly after. The accessibility of this program is currently available at all stateside locations within theNavys Southeast region, said Costa. BSVE continues to partner with GSA during this evolution and looks for ward to the success of the program as GSA plans to phase the programs availability to all Government Agencies this year.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 5 Vicksburg: Wiffle While You Work! USS Vicksburg Public Affairs The crack of a wiffle ball bat echoed in the helicopter hangar during the first annual wiffle ball tour nament on board guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). It was the closest we could get to baseball while underway, and its sure to be a great time, said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW) Steven Pietrusza. The wiffle ball tourna ment was sponsored by the Vicksburg chapter of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) and featured a five-day tour nament, playoffs, and a championship game with 20 teams competing for bragging rights and a plaque. I think its awesome to raise morale onboard the ship, and having fun with your shipmates is a great way to do it! I really think our team will come out as the champions! said Chief Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Robert C. Laird Jr., a member of the team dubbed The Khaki Response Team. The event kicked off the morning of Feb. 8 with an opening ceremony including the National Anthem. Capt. Logan Jones was present to throw out the first pitch and give the order to play ball! After the first game I could see the morale and spirits of the crew increase, even the ones who were just spectators. We have teams of vari ous ranks and ages and I see the unit cohesion in each team. This tour nament is giving Sailors the opportunity to do something that relieves stress and just have some fun throughout the underway routine said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Clayton Duke, USS Vicksburg CSADD President. Engineman 2nd Class (SW) Welsey Dollarballard of The Bench Warmers explains, in a truly competitive spirit, what it means to be a real wiffle ball player. Wiffle ball is my life, without it I have nothing! Our team has the wisdom of the old, and power of the young. Its going to be a one sided match. Heads up, the Bench Warmers are off the bench! Without an embarked helicopter detachment, the hangar and flight deck are available for many activities like this tour nament, a recent steel beach picnic for Super Bowl XLVII, and group workouts. Approximately 50 Vicksburg Sailors independently partici pate daily Insanity work out sessions in order to help them prepare for the upcoming Physical Fitness Assesment in May. The Vicksburg CSADD chapter formed in 2012 in order to help positively influence Sailor behavior through resources and tools that promote good decision making. It exists to enable lead ership development of junior Sailors, create an atmosphere of good order and discipline, and rein force the culture of shipmates helping shipmates. USS Vicksburg is underway as a part of the opposition force in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) for the Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group. COMPTUEX is designed to bring every part of a strike group together to work effectively and efficiently as one cohesive unit, ensuring overall readiness prior to a regular deployment. Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Jacob Bryant pitches for his team The Master Batters, as Yeoman Seaman James McKinney and Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Tywone James guard the outfield during the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). -Photos courtesy of USS VicksburgSenior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW) Steven Pietrusza, Captain Logan Jones, and Command Master Chief Robert Bostic christen the wiffle ball field with Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Clayton Duke, CSADD President. The Pasadena Thunderweasels and the Khaki Response Team played the first match during the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). USS Vicksburg is underway as a part of the opposition force in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) for the Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group. Personnel Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Demetreous Hill of Beast Mode stands at bat during the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Lt.j.g. Michael Wilkinson and Senior Chief Gas Turbine Technician (SW) Jamie Johnson provide play-by-play announcing throughout the first annual wiffle ball tournament onboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). mented. Let me be very clear on this point. The Navy leadership has been very focused on cutting hard in all areas so that furloughs can possibly be avoided. We have also been careful to ensure that the CNIC funding we rely on to pay for our valued Government Service and contract employees are categorized as must-fund. The Navy is committed to protecting its work force as our nation works through these challenging fiscal times. While I believe NAVSTA Mayport is well poised to weather funding shortfalls from a civilian personnel perspec tive as a result of workforce shaping actions we took a year ago, additional budget reductions will still make this challenging for us. I want you to know that as before, we are committed to taking every measure available to protect our workforce. We are receiving guidance almost on a daily basis, so please be prepared for changes as they arrive. A web site on the employee portal (Sequestration/ Continuing Resolution Information Page) highlighting CR updates is posted and will be updated as information comes in. If you have a question that cannot be answered from the website, please contact your supervisor or our PAO, MCC William Townsend, 2705226 ext. 1014, so we can get you a factual answer. I want to thank everyone for your service to our nation, and please know that your concerns are my concerns. You play a critical role in support ing our mission and I cant thank you enough for that continued support. As I have said many times before, Its easy to lead when things are going well. Lets all take a deep breath, count to about a Three Mississippi and real ize we will come through this chal lenge, stronger and better prepared for the future than ever before! V/r Skipper CochraneFrom Page 1Budget

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Underwood Helps Finegan DREAMUSS Underwood PAOSailors from USS Underwood (FFG 36) spent time talking to local elementary school stu dents about the impor tance of education, nutri tion, and fitness as part of Communities in Schools new DREAM Project ini tiative, a program focus ing on involving active duty military and veter ans as volunteer men tors and tutors for mili tary dependent students. Communities In Schools of Jacksonville is a lead ing dropout prevention organization helping kids successfully learn, stay in school and prepare for life. UNDERWOOD sailors were able to support them in their mission to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life. As part of the DREAM program, Underwood participated in a 3-day partnership with Finegan Elementary School where they were able to have group discussions with third through fifth grade students. The first day focused on nutrition and diet and was led by Culinary Specialist First Class Tarrell Brown. He covered the importance of eating healthy, exam ples of both healthy and unhealthy foods and the benefits of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Petty Officer Brown shared what he was doing to improve his health and the students volunteered what they do to eat healthy. The second day focused on physical fitness and education. Electricians Mate First Class Samuel Clay and Electronics Technician Second Class James Blocker both dis cussed fitness with the students. As USS Underwoods Command Fitness Leader, Petty Officer Clay explained to the students what physi cal fitness means and the benefits of staying fit. He stressed that each student can find activi ties that interest them and help them maintain an active life style. Petty Officer Blocker discussed the importance of set ting goals. He shared his personal goal of run ning a marathon and the hard work he put in to achieve that goal. Petty Officer Clay and Blocker were accompanied by Operation Specialist First Class Leron Parrish and Boatswainsmate First Class Dimitry Spiridinov. Both sailors discussed their careers in the navy and how fitness and edu cation have played a role in their success. USS Underwoods visit to Finegan Elementary School culminated the final day with Gas Turbine Systems TechnicianElectrical First Class Christopher Farrow, Lieutenant Dustin Schultz, and Executive Officer, Commander Michael Brasseur, discussing education and leadership. Lieutenant Schultz, Underwoods Navigator talked about his upcoming gradu ate school opportuni ty. He advised the stu dents to work hard now so that they will have more opportunities in the future. Commander Brasseur shared with the students his secrets of being a leader. His 3 messages to the students were to have a strong mind and body, be honest and paint an inspirational vision of the future for your people. The Underwood Sailors enjoyed their time with the Finegan Elementary School students and hope they were able to learn from their life lessons on education and a healthy lifestyle. The DREAM program is headed by Adam Bagby, an Army veteran himself. He explained that the DREAM program has two purposes: to improve the lives of our military youth by providing assistance in literacy and mentor ing and to connect the military community with opportunities to improve the city of Jacksonville and surrounding areas through service. If you are interested in more information con cerning the DREAM proj ect or Communities in School, please visit their website at http://www. cisjax.org. -Photos courtesy of USS UnderwoodCulinary Specialist 1st class Tarrell Brown talks to students about the importance of eating healthy during Communities in Schools new DREAM Project initiative, a program focusing on involving active duty military and veterans as volunteer mentors and tutors for military dependent students. Learn How To Be A Millionaire With FFSCFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 21, 11 a.m.-noon, Savings and Investment Class Building 1 Room 104 Feb. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Class Building 1 Room 104 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Feb. 25-March 1, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Feb. 26-27, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Million Dollar Sailor Workshop Building 1 Room 104 Feb. 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Class FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Feb. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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Congratulations To EOQ 4th Quarter Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, presents Capt. Allan Schlegel of Security with a Letter of Appreciation after he is announced Naval Station Civilian Employee of the Quarter Fourth Quarter 2012 during a luncheon held Feb. 5 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Other nominees for EOQ include David Lam, Fire/Emergency Services; Cheryl Washington, Housing; Mary Henry, MWR; Leslie Allen, PWD; Luis Soto, Security; Tegwen McNeal, Air Ops.BBC Wants Your LocksFrom BBCBalfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport is host ing its second annual Locks of Love event on Feb. 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. During last years event, Balfour Beatty collected more than 75 ponytails. which contributed to constructing almost eight hairpieces for underprivi leged children suffer ing from permanent hair loss. It typically takes 8-10 ponytails to make one prosthetic hairpiece. Locks of Love is a pub lic, non-profit organiza tion whose mission is to return a sense of self, confidence and normal cy to children suffering from hair loss by utilizing donated ponytails to pro vide the highest quality hair prosthetics to finan cially disadvantaged chil dren. The children receive hair prostheses free of charge or on a sliding scale, based on financial need. Hair donations must be at least 10 inches long and cannot have been bleached (highlighted). Hair that has been col ored or permed can be used and dreadlocks, extensions, synthetic hair or wigs cannot be used. Those who donate will receive a trim and style from master stylists Renee Pendlay and Kristin Greco of Victorias Hair and Nails, a gift bag for par ticipation and be entered to win a gift basket filled with gift cards, health and beauty products and other surprises. The event will be held at the Ribault Bay Community Center locat ed at 1201 Assisi Lane, Atlantic Beach, Fla. 32233. For more information about the event, please call Jessica at 904-3724702.BBC Foundation Seeks Military Housing Applicants For ScholarshipBy Balfour Beatty CommunitiesRecognizing the importance of education and its continuing ris ing costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholarships for the 20132014 academic year to high school and under graduate students of military members residing in family housing. We encourage our family housing residents with high school and undergraduate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation, its a difficult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. The application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org. The application deadline is April 15, 2013. Balfour Beatty Communities, respon sible for the priva tized family hous ing at Naval Station Mayport, formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to honoring military per sonnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a com mitment to community leadership through edu cational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is com mitted to providing a quality living environ ment that supports the diverse interests and needs of our military families. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. NAVADMIN 016/13 outlines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reflected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service (NDAWS) and their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF). All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. For more information read NAVADMIN 016/13 at www.npc.navy.mil.Verify Personal Awards THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 7

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Let The Good Times Run -Photos by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Master Chief Bob White starts off runners and walkers during the MWR Mardi Gras 3K Walk/5K Run held on Feb. 12 in front of the MWR Gym. John Aimone with MWR mans the sign up booth at the MWR Mardi Gras 3K Walk/5K Run. MWR sponsors walk/runs each second Tuesday of the month at 8:10 a.m. in front of the MWR Gym. For more information about the runs or sports program, call MWR Sports at 270-5452. Mardi Gras Fun-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of HSL-60 Chief Petty Officers Mess stand with musical duo, Two Eyed Jakes during Mardi Gras Night at the Focsle Lounge. The Mess sponsored a crawfish boil with red beans and rice in honor of the Louisiana festival. There will be an All-Hands Seafood Boil on Feb. 27 at 4-7 p.m. The event is sponsored by COMDESRON 14. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the CDS-14. For tickets, contact ITCS Phil Smith (904) 270-5801 ext. 143. New Tuesday Night Bingo ProgramFrom MWRThere are big changes happening for Beachside Bingo! Beginning Feb. 26, the Tuesday night program is getting a complete makeover. This new program is focused on the bud get-minded player with 3-pack paper pack start ing at just $18. Six-pack paper packs will be avail able for $20 and computer 3-6 packs are available for just $50. Active duty military also receive a special bonus discount: an additional $5 off when they show their ID. Tuesday nights will also feature eight nightly door prizes, King and Queen spin the wheel, surprises and more! Drop into Beachside Bingo today or call for more information at (904) 270-7204. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 9

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance, pay for 3, get the fourth one free and 4-wheel brake job $150 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free alignment on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive alignment). Beachside Bingo Tuesdays: Special Pricing! Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $18 for a 3 pack, $20 for a 6 pack, and computers are just $50 for a 3-6 pack. Plus door prizes nightly, lots of surprises and an additional $5 off for all active duty military Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cupcakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game. March 31: Beachside Bingo will be closed for Easter Sunday Castaways Lounge Feb. 22: Chocolate Fest 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Second Tyme Around. Come dress to impress and enjoy all the chocolate you can eat. 270-7205 Feb. 23: UFC 157Rousey vs. Carmouche 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 March 8: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 270-7205 Beginning March 19: March Madness. Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Every Sunday: NASCAR at Castaways: Sprint Cup Series. Watch every race on Hi-Def TVs! Focsle Lounge CPO Club Feb. 27: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the CDS-14. For tickets, contact ITCS Phil Smith (904) 270-5801 x143. Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Discover Disney Florida Resident Special: 3-Day Discovery Disney pass starts at $117. Tickets valid through June 17, 2013. Blackout dates apply. 270-5145 Universal Military Salute: All active duty military, retir ees, reserves or national guard can receive one complimentary Park-to-Park pass for Universal Studios Orlando or Islands of Adventure (while supplies lasts). All three days must be used within a 14 consecutive day window. Tickets valid through June 30, 2013. Must have valid mili tary ID to activate ticket at front gate. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Studios: Active duty, retirees, reservists and children only pay $29 per ticket; Regular tickets $44 per person. 270-5145 St. Augustine Trolley Tours: Adult tickets buy one, get one free. 270-5145 Wet n Wild Special: Purchase any one-day ticket to Wet n Wild Orland. 270-5145 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and light show. Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburg er or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 20: Command Bowling Challenge. 4 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Open to all military and civil ian employees assigned to commands at NS Mayport is a Fr ee Bowling Party (up to 120 peo ple) + 100 Instant Party Bowling Coupons (over $2500 value). Teams will play 3 games of bowling: 8 Pin No Tap, 9 Pin No Tap and Conventional Scoring. Total pins knocked down wins the Grand Prize! Captains Cup Points awarded. Cost is $75 per team. 270-5377. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 6: Cobra Demo Day. 11 a.m.3 p.m.YAC Drama Club Performs Charlie BrownKid ZoneFeb. 23: Teen Bowling Trip. Depart Teen Center at 7 p.m.; return 10 p.m. Permission slip required. 246-0347 March 1: Freedom FridayArcade Night and Movie. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 15: Freedom FridayRock Your Shamrock. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Wear your green and dance with DJ Derek! Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Employment Orientation. 4-5 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2013. 270-5680 March 26-27: Teen Career Launch. 9 am3:30 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is high ly recommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by April 30, 2013. 2705680 Liberty CallThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more informa tion, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 22: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Sign up deadline Feb. 20 Feb. 23: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $15; Sign up deadline Feb. 20 Feb. 22: Chocolate Fest 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Second Tyme Around. Come dress to impress and enjoy all the chocolate you can eat. 270-7205 Feb. 23: UFC 157Rousey vs. Carmouche 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Feb. 24: Jacksonville Giants vs. Fayetteville Flight. Van departs 5:30 p.m. FREE. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Feb. 21 Feb. 27: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the CDS14. For tickets, contact ITCS Phil Smith (904) 270-5801 x143. Feb. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. On The MessdeckFocsle Lounges Spring SpecialsSmashed Sandwich, $8 Chicken Breast & Spinach Panini, $8 Strawberry Chicken Salad, $7.50 Big Chief Grilled Cheese Sandwich, $7 Shrimp & Bacon Pita, $8.50 Every Wednesday: Fried Chicken Buffet, $8Bogeys SpecialsThursday, Feb. 21 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $ 6.95 Spinach Turkey Avocado Wrap, $7.95 Steak Caesar Salad, $10.95 Soup: Cream of Broccoli Friday, Feb. 22 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Pot Roast with Potatoes, Vegetable and a Roll, $7.95 Egg Salad Sandwich, $4.25 Soup: Crab Bisque Monday, Feb. 25 Florida Burger: Our Signature Burger Topped with Swiss Cheese, Grilled Onions, Mushrooms and Sour Cream, $7.95 Bbq Pulled Pork Sandwich, $6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich, $6.95 Greek Chicken Salad, $7.95 Tuesday, Feb. 26 Shrimp Po Boy with Remoulade Sauce, $8.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Chicken Salad, $7.95 Wednesday, Feb. 27 8 Oz NY Strip Steak, Scalloped Potatoes and Roll, $10.95 BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.50 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Fries, Chips Or Slaw, $ 6.95 Chicken Cobb Salad, $ 7.95 Mayport Bowling CenterThursday Cheeseburger with fries and 20 oz soda, $6 Friday 2 chili dogs, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $5 2-pieces fish, fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Fish sandwich (2 pieces), fries, and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Monday Chicken patty sandwich with, fries and 20 oz. soda, $6.25 Tuesday BBQ beef sandwich, fries and 20 oz. soda, $5 Wednesday Hamburger with jalapenos, grilled onions, fries and 20 oz soda, $5.75 -Photos courtesy of MWRSnoopy (Sakura Waseline, age 8) shows Charlie Brown (Akire Rogers, age 11) his latest musings on Valentines Day Members of the Youth Center Drama Clubs production of Charlie Browns Valentine perform a song and dance to Im in Shape. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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MWR Sports/FitnessIntramural Sports March 9: Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. All-military teams $40, military/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. March 12: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 16: Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by March 8. 270-5451 March 23: Womens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Volleyball Courts behind Beachside Community Center. Allmilitary teams $40, mili tary/civilian teams $45, all-civilian teams $50. Register by March 1. Check in 8:30 a.m.; games start at 9 a.m. 270-5451. Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Tuesday 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Wednesday 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp HIT At the Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7:30 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT Saturday 9:30 a.m., HIT 10:30 a.m. Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor This incentive program develops muscu lar strength and power needed to attain the Steel Anchor Award. Structured and progres sive training targets muscles to increase your bench press, squat, and dead-lift. Participants will utilize multiple pieces of free weight, selectorized and plate loaded strength equipment in the gym. Workouts will be tracked to provide motivation, guidance and award determination. 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT A 6part prerequisite training program which will prepare Mayports personnel for safe and effective incorporation into Mayports HIT pro gram. Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 11

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million wastewater reuse expansion to eliminate all wastewater discharge to the St. Johns River and reduce groundwater withdrawal by the Navy, City of Jacksonville, FDEP and SJRWMD by 2014; reuse of Jacksonville Electric Authoritys treated wastewater to mitigate low flow conditions at the stations wastewater plant and increase reuse irrigation on the base golf course; ardous waste, solid waste, storage tanks, or storm water violations at NAS Jacksonville or NS Mayport in past three years; and civilians participated in numerous city-wide cleanup events and com munity improvement ini tiatives; chromate primer on P-3 and trainer aircraft to reduce material use and personnel exposure to hexavalent chrome; ment and cleanup of beach debris by City of Jacksonville, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, NS Mayport and Army Corps of Engineers at Huguenot Park. It has been an honor to be part of this dedi cated team of environ mental professionals for the past 11 years. The team remains focused on ways to continually improve the environ mental quality of life on and off the naval installations in Jacksonville, said Gartland. We will significant ly reduce wastewater discharge from NAS Jacksonville to the St. Johns River this year and totally eliminate dis charge to the river next year. We will eliminate groundwater withdrawal to irrigate our golf course this year and continue to identify ways to reduce groundwater withdrawal next year, he added. And, we will continue to reach out to our com munity with innovative solutions that protect our environment as an inte gral part of performing our organizational mis sions.From Page 1EnvironmentWaterjets Could Propel LCS To Greater SpeedsBy Office of Naval Research The Navys fifth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), Milwaukee, will be the first to benefit from new high-power density waterjets aimed at staving off rudder and propeller damage experienced on high-speed ships. The product of an Office of Naval Research (ONR) Future Naval Capabilities (FNC) pro gram, the waterjets arrived last month at the Marinette Marine ship yard in Wisconsin, where Milwaukee (LCS 5) is under construction. We believe these waterjets are the future, said Dr. Ki-Han Kim, program manager in ONRs Ship Systems and Engineering Research Division. Anything that we can do to keep ships ready to go will ultimately benefit our warfighters. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenerts 20132017 Navigation Plan calls for fielding improved ships to support coun terterrorism and irregu lar warfare missions at sea and ashore. The LCS will play a big role in the Navys plan as a modular, adaptable vessel for use against diesel subma rines, littoral mines and attacks by small surface craft. Developed by RollsRoyce Naval Marine in Walpole, Mass., in col laboration with ONR and Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, the new AxialFlow Waterjet Mk-1 can move nearly half a mil lion gallons of seawa ter per minute, provid ing more thrust per unit than current commercial waterjets. Four of the new waterjets will propel the LCS to speeds greater than 40 knots. Researchers believe the smaller, more effi cient waterjets will help the LCS avoid excessive maintenance costs asso ciated with cavitation a phenomenon that occurs when changes in pressure create air bubbles on rotating machinery, such as marine propellers. Repeated occurrences can cause whole chunks of metal to wear away, leading to frequent repairs and replacements. The waterjets new design could increase their lifespan between repairs. The FNC program that oversaw development of this technology proved to be as adaptable as LCS. The waterjets origi nally were slated to ben efit another ship program that was discontinued. Instead of cancelling the waterjets program, offi cials regrouped and shift ed their focus to design ing a product that would improve the performance of LCS. ONRs FNC program saves taxpayer money by streamlining processes to deliver cutting-edge products within five years. The waterjets project began in 2007, and the delivery last month to the ship yard marked its successful completion. Next up for the water jets will be full-scale sea trials on Milwaukee (LCS 5), expected to occur in the next 24 months. Eventually, the water jets could end up on 10 LCS under contract to be built by Lockheed Martin.New Distinguished Warfare Medal AvailableFrom DoDThe Department of Defense announced the creation of the Distinguished Warfare Medal to recognize a service members extraordinary achievements directly impacting combat operations. Modern technology enables service members with special training and capabilities to more directly and precisely impact military operations at times far from the battlefield. The Distinguished Warfare Medal will be awarded in the name of the secretary of defense to service members whose extraordinary achieve ments, regardless of their dis tance to the traditional combat theater, deserve distinct department-wide recognition. I have seen first-hand how modern tools like remotely piloted platforms and cyber systems have changed the way wars can be fought, said Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta. We should also have the ability to honor extraordi nary actions that make a true difference in combat opera tions, even if those actions are physically removed from the fight. Based on the order of pre cedence, the Distinguished Warfare Medal will sit directly below the Distinguished Flying Cross. It may be awarded for actions in any domain but not involving acts of valor. This new medal recog nizes the changing charac ter of warfare and those who make extraordinary contribu tions to it, said Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin E. Dempsey. The criteria for this award will be highly selective and reflect high standards. The medal, designed by The Institute of Heraldry, will be available in the coming months. The signed memo, criteria for the medal, along with the design, can be seen here: http://www.defense.gov/news/ DistinguishedWarfareMedalMe mo.pdf 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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4th Fleet Says Joint HSV Is Perfect MatchFrom U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe Navys first joint high-speed vessel, USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1), made a brief stop at Naval Station Mayport Feb. 14 to introduce the ship to Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet on its way to its new homeport in Little Creek, Va. The port call is an opportunity for senior officials and military personnel from U.S. 4th Fleet to visit the ship and receive capability brief ings for future operation al planning. Spearhead is scheduled to deploy to the 4th Fleet area of operations to support upcoming Southern Partnership Station deployments. The joint high-speed vessel Spearhead is a perfect match for 4th Fleet and we plan to use it across all of our lines of operations; security cooperation activities, mari time security operations and contingency opera tions, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. U.S. 4th Fleets area of operations includes the maritime domains in South and Central America as well as the Caribbean Sea. Spearhead is criti cally important to Fourth Fleets area of operations because of her shallow draft and ability to work in more austere ports that traditional warships might not be able to. We see the high speed ves sels as even more capable in terms of reaching out to our partner nations, Harris said. Spearhead is the first of 10 planned joint high speed vessels under con tract to be built. The next ship, USNS Choctaw County (JHSV-2), is scheduled to be operational later this year. Built in Mobile, Ala., by Austal U.S.A., USNS Spearhead is designed for rapid, intra-theater transport of troops and military equipment. The U.S. Navys Military Sealift Command (MSC) owns and operates Spearhead, along with the nine other JHSVs that are cur rently under contract. Spearhead is a 338-foot long aluminum catama ran designed for speed, flexibility and maneuver ability. The reconfigurable 20,000-square-foot mis sion bay area can be quickly adapted to sup port a number of differ ent missions anything from carrying container ized portable hospitals to support disaster relief to transporting tanks and troops. Spearheads crew of 22 civil service mariners works for MSC, which operates, navigates and maintains the ship. JHSVs are capable of transporting approxi mately 600 tons of mili tary troops, vehicles, supplies and equipment 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots, and are designed to operate in austere ports and waterways, providing added flexibility to U.S. warfighters worldwide. U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photos by MC3 Damian BergSailors stationed at Naval Station Mayport pull in the mooring lines of the Military Sealift Command USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) as it pulls into Naval Station Mayport to be inspected by the US Commander of Fourth Fleet, Rear. Adm. Sinclair M. Harris. Spearhead is the first of of nine Navy joint high-speed vessels and is designed for rapid intra-theater transport of troops and military equipment. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerJoint High Speed Vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) moored at Naval Station Mayport Feb 14 for a brief port visit on the way to its new home port of Little Creek, Va. The ship stopped here to be inspected by Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet as it is planned to support future Southern Partnership Station missions in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerJoint High Speed Vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1)and Cruiser USS Gettysburg (CC64) moored at Naval Station Mayport Feb 14. 4th Fleet Sailors Visit Jax University NROTC -Photo by MC1 Sean Allen Senior Chief Information Systems Technician Shannen Kippers of Command U.S. Naval forces Southern Command/Command U.S. 4th Fleet speaks to Reserve Officer Training Cadets (ROTC) at Jacksonville University Feb. 14. Kippers and other members of 4th Fleet were invited to speak to the group of future Naval Officers on various subjects the Cadets would encounter at their first command.4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors from U.S. 4th Fleet spent the morn ing with more than 50 Navy midshipmen from Jacksonville University Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) Feb. 14. The group from 4th Fleet comprised of sev eral Chief Petty Officers, including Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (SW/EXW/FMF) David Tellez, and 4th Fleet Sailor of the Year, Fire Controlman (SW) 1st Class Harry Hall. Tellez spoke to the group about the impor tance of junior officers and chief petty officers working together. It is essential for offi cers and chiefs to work together, said Tellez. Young sailors look at leadership for guidance, so it is important for junior officers and chiefs to be on the same page. Tellez also talked about the importance of officers being aware of what is going on in their Sailors lives. The Sailors you lead will have many things going on in their lives, personal issues at home, and work issues such as Preform to Serve, said Tellez. It is important that you are aware of these issues and be able to guide these Sailors. Hall shared some of his experiences as a young enlisted sailor and the impact officers have on the Sailors they lead. Division officers can have a large influence on a Sailors career and if they decide to stay in the Navy or not, said Hall. Knowing that can help you as you prepare to begin your Naval career. Lt. Andrew Broyles, senior class advisor for Jacksonville University ROTC was grateful for the group coming to speak to the midshipmen. It is important for the midshipmen to hear firsthand the importance of the relationship between junior officers and chief petty officers, said Broyles. This is a great opportunity for them to listen and be able to ask questions to fleet Sailors. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 21, 2013 13

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