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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com DoD Plans For Budget UncertaintiesAmerican Forces Press ServiceDeputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter has released a memo directing the services and defense agencies to begin plan ning for possible upcoming bud get challenges. The memo allows defense com ponents to freeze civilian hiring, terminate temporary hires and reduce base operating funds. It also allows components to cur tail travel, training and confer ences and to curtail administrative expenses. The memo dated Jan. 10 points to the threat of seques tration and the continued use of a continuing resolution as a way to fund the department. Sequestration was to have become effective Jan. 2, but Congress delayed its activation until March 1 to give lawmakers more time to come up with an alternative. It would impose major across-theboard spending cuts. Since Congress did not approve an appropriations act for fiscal 2013, the Defense Department has been operating under a continu ing resolution and will continue to do so at least through March 27. Because most operating funding was planned to increase from fis cal 2012 to fiscal 2013, but instead is being held at fiscal 2012 levels under the continuing resolution, funds will run short at current rates of expenditure if the continu ing resolution continues through the end of the fiscal year in its current form, Carter wrote in the memo. Given this budgetary uncertainty, the department must take steps now, the deputy secretary said. I therefore authorize all Defense components to begin implementing measures that will help mitigate execution risks, the memo reads. For now, and to the extent possible, any actions taken must be reversible at a later date in the event that Congress acts to remove the risks. ... The actions should be structured to minimize harmful effects on our people and on operations and unit readiness. The memo allows components to review contracts and studies for possible cost savings, to can cel thirdand fourth-quarter ship maintenance, and to examine ground and aviation depot-level maintenance. This last must be finished by Feb. 15. -Photo by Paige GnannUSS Roosevelt outgoing Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Robert Thompson, left, is joined by COMDESRON 14, Capt. Paul Flood, and Chaplain Edsil Logan, in applauding for Cmdr. Frankie Clark as he becomes the ships new commanding officer during a change of command cer emony on Jan. 11.NS Mayport Begins New Road Improvement NPASENaval Station Mayport (NAVSTA Mayport) held a groundbreaking ceremo ny Jan. 09 to commence its base-wide expansion project. The project includes improvements on several avenues on base in order to improve base capacity as well as the safety of the specific intersections. Not only are these improvements going to provide safer vehicu lar and pedestrian traf fic, but it also shows the Navys commitment to Mayport remain ing a vital Navy hub well into the future, said NAVSTA Mayports Pubilc Affairs Officer, Chief Mass Communication Specialist William H. Townsend. The current two-lane roads and four-way stop intersections are being transformed into boule vard-style roadways with two-lanes in each direc tion that are then going to be divided by a raised median. This project that were working on here with the Navy is our single most important project in the Department of Defense arena, stated Pond & Company Architect Michael Panczykowski. This is a major roadway improvement on a signifi cant corridor on NAVSTA Mayport. Its an honor to work alongside the United States Navy. The Navy has big plans for the future of Naval Station Mayport. The base is strategically locat ed and plays a major role in the Navys sea power capabilities. The Department of Defense and the Department of the Navy are voting with their checkbook. What theyre voting on is the strate gic importance and the vital nature of NAVSTA Mayport, said Capt. Douglas Cochrane, NS Mayport command ing officer. This is the only military road proj ect that is taking place in the Navy right now. By 2020 youre going to see nearly Twenty Thousand people on this installation as well as over 20 war ships and a tremendously bright future for NAVSTA Mayport. Since its commissioning in December 1942, Mayport has grown to become the third largest naval surface fleet con centration area in the United States. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergFrom left, Andrew Culpepper, the quality control manager of TMG Services, Michael Panczykowskim, Senior vice president of Pond Architects engineers planners, Capt. Doug Cochrane, commanding officer of Naval Station Mayport and Cmdr. Miguel Deguez, public works officer Naval Station Mayport break ground for the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement Projects The 2 phase $6.7 million project to improve capacities and safety on Naval Station Mayport is scheduled for completion in February 2014. USS Halyburton Holds Change Of Command USS Halyburton Public AffairsDuring a Change of Command Ceremony on board Halyburton, Cmdr. David E. Fowler relieved Cmdr. Bertram C. Hodge as the commanding officer of guided missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Hodge took command in August 2011, meeting the ship on her way home from deployment. He was imme diately tasked with leading the ship through a mainte nance period with follow on sea trials and an intense train ing cycle, which prepared Halyburton for another NATO Counter-Piracy deployment in support of Operation Ocean Shield. Hodge will report to guided missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) to become her Commanding Officer. Fowler assumes the duty as commanding officer after his most recent tour ashore serving as a staff officer at the Allied Maritime Component Command in Naples, Italy. New CO For RooseveltUSS Roosevelt PAOCmdr. Robert S. Thompson was relieved by Cmdr. Frankie J. Clark on Jan. 11 as commanding officer of USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) during a pierside ceremony at Naval Station Mayport Thompson reported to Roosevelt as executive officer in October 2010 and oversaw the highly successful visit by the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) as well as deployment certification exercises with the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group. Thompson assumed command of Roosevelt on July 1, 2011, while deployed in the AFRICOM Area of Responsibility. Upon taking com mand, the class of 1993 Naval Academy graduate led Roosevelt through the remainder of her indepen dent deployment providing Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance sup port with the embarked Scan Eagle Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. The ship was com mended by Commander, Sixth Fleet As well as the Commanding General of the Joint Special Operations Command for their superb performance, which resulted in Roosevelt and her crew being awarded the Global War on Terror Service and Expeditionary Medal. Roosevelt was also a Battle E award recipient for DESRON 14 during 2011. Following Roosevelts return to Mayport, she subsequent --Photo courtesy of USS HalyburtonCmdr. David Fowler is piped aboard during USS Halyburtons change of command ceremony where he relieved Cmdr. Bertram Hodge as command ing officer.See Roosevelt, Page 8 See Budget, Page 6 NS Mayport will hold its quarterly blood drive on Jan. 29 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1, Room 104.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.CNO Releases 2013 Message To Fleet Chief of Naval Operations Public AffairsChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert released his New Year video message to the fleet in his blog Jan. 11. In the video blog mes sage Greenert highlighted the importance of safety, wellness and trust among shipmates. While most are focused on losing weight, Greenert stressed a larger goal of overall wellness. I want you to be fit mentally and physically... take care of yourself, said Greenert. We need you more than you know; you are the key to our suc cess. Greenert went on to say that more than any other service; the Navy is dependent upon trust. We go to sea; it is inherently dangerous out there, he said. If youre alone in the water, even tually youll die. You need to depend on someone else, whether youre flying over the water, youre sail ing on the water or youre submerged. Greenert stated that trust ties in with taking care of one another. He encouraged all personnel to have the moral courage to step up and intervene if they see a shipmate struggling. I tell you shipmates, again and again; when weve talked to people who have considered taking their lives, you know what made the dif ference? said Greenert. Someone cared enough about that Sailor to get them the help they need ed. Greenert also covered the budget concerns which he said Sailors would be hearing a lot about in the weeks to come. He clearly stated in the video that no mat ter what happens with the budget, pay and benefits for active duty military will not be affected. He also said that taking care of families and maintain ing fleet and family ser vices is a priority. Greenert told Sailors to stay focused on the mis sion and not the budget discussion in Washington. He said that leadership will have to take hard look at non-critical operations and that he would keep the fleet informed on any potential changes. Worry about warf ighting first, worry about operating forward, and worry about being ready, Greenert said. You leave the rest to us. CNO Greenerts video message can be viewed in its entirety on his blog: http://cno.navylive. dodlive.mil/2013/01/10/ kicking-off-2013/ If you are the parent of a high school senior, you are probably wonder ing what you need to do to apply for financial aid for your child. To qualify for any type of federal aid, you and your child will need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). And completion of the FAFSA is now a requirement for Bright Futures eligibility. You need to begin gath ering the information you will need to complete your taxes in order to complete the FAFSA. You may be wondering what is the rush since you dont even have your W-2 yet? What you may not know is that many schools award aid on a first-come, firstserved basis. Therefore, the student may not be eligible for state aid in Florida if the FAFSA isnt submitted until April. Many state aid dead lines are early in the cal endar year (calendar year 2013 for the 2013-14 award year). While stu dents are responsible for filling out the FAFSA, parents must also pro vide financial informa tion if the student is their dependent. The form requires the previous years tax return and other tax information for the student and parents. On the other hand, the online Florida Financial Aid Application, required for state aid including Bright Futures, is a selfreported document. The student can use his tran script from June 2012 to complete the application. All information will be verified when the district uploads his first semes ter grades and courses in January of 2013. To get help with the ins and outs of completing the FAFSA and the Florida Financial Aid Application, plan to attend the NS Mayports Parent Program on Financial Aid. This program is scheduled for Jan. 24 from 68 p.m. It will be held at the USO, 2560 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, FL 32233. You DO NOT have to register for this FREE event. Clarence Richardson, a retired US Navy Lt. Commander and enrollment specialist for FSCJ, is the area expert on all aspects of financial aid. He will explain the pro cess for completing the FAFSA and answer any questions. Lynn Brannon, Military OneSource consultant, will present the military side of financial aid, and I will provide additional information on the Florida Financial Aid Application This special program on financial aid is offered for military par ents and students as part of Duval County Public Schools Financial Aid Nights. If you are unable to attend the presentation on Jan. 24, you can attend any of DCPS Regional Financial Aid Nights. This schedule is included. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Need Financial Aid for College? Hoping For A Bright Futures Scholarship?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowing I love snowy white win ters, but ever since the Navy moved us to Florida, the only flakes we see are floating in milk-filled cereal bowls. So, I sit on my sunny screened porch in January, surrounded by green grass, ocean breez es, and palm trees, and I dream of snow. I know, I know, thats nuts. Crazy. Certifiable. But I cant help it. Something was imprint ed in my psyche many years ago, something that makes me associate winter with snow, and snow with pleasure. As a child growing up in Pennsylvania, my heart filled with anticipation at the first snow. To us, snow, especially in copi ous amounts, meant FUN. Snowballs, sled riding, hot chocolate, and one of the most joyous occa sions in a childs life SNOWDAYS. I can recall falling off my flying red plastic sled in a puff of white on the hill behind our house, and laying a minute or two, to make sure I was still in one piece and to listen to the silence how the snow absorbs noise and brings a soft quiet ness to the air. Packed and padded in protective lay ers, I felt swaddled like a baby, watching my breath ascend over me into the air. It was pure joy. Ironically, a serious sledding accident in the winter of 1977 only strengthened my positive association with snow. I was in the fifth grade, and it was the last night of our winter break from school, and also my fathers poker night. While the men played cards in our basement rec room, my brother and I listened to radio reports of a blizzard, and hoped for school closures. Fueled by bravado (and a few beers), my father and his buddies decided it would be a good idea to take our 12-man wooden toboggan out for a run down the hill behind our house. My brother and I couldnt believe our luck, and eagerly followed. With my legs criss crossed under the tobog gans wooden curl, I sat in the front, four men and my brother behind me. Visibility was nil due Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&Potatoesto the blizzard and dark night, but there was a wide path between the houses for our ride. With the weight of the men, we took off like a bullet, and I pulled the ties of my parka hood tight to keep the snow from hitting my face. About halfway down the hill WHAM! The rest came in flashes: my fathers friend looking down wearing one of my hats, someone saying I think its broken, rid ing in the back of a truck, being carried on the toboggan into the hospi tal, three layers of pants being cut off, wanting my mom and dad. I had broken my femur. Apparently, our tobog gan had drifted off course, running into a white flag pole in our neighbors yard. I spent the next two and a half months in a hospital bed, with a weight hanging off the end of my foot. To add insult to injury, during my lengthy hospi tal stay, the historic 1977 blizzard blew into town. Schools were cancelled for over two weeks, and I was stuck in a hospital bed watching Don Ho and eating Jell-O. One might think that the experience would have caused me to asso ciate snow with pain; however, the pain of my broken leg paled in com parison to the envy I had for my peers who spent two glorious weeks out of school, sucking on icicles, throwing snowballs, and drinking hot chocolate. So now, like Pavlovs dog, when winter rolls around, I begin to drool. Sometimes the Navy sends us somewhere that fulfills my nostalgic long ings, like our last tour in snowy Stuttgart, Germany. I must admit, there was a downside. Bundled up like the Michelin Man, I See Life, Page 3

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would trudge four flights down our military stair well housing to our mini van, hazy with salt residue and laden with blackened hunks of snow behind each wheel. Despite spraying de-icing com pound into the locks, the doors would often be fro zen solid, requiring me to climb in from the trunk. But now, even with the memories of crusted, frozen, gritty car doors still freshly juxtaposed against this balmy pastel Florida winter, I cant help but long for snow. Big fluffy, white hunks drop ping from tree branches. Delicate crystalline flakes drifting slowly from the sky. Cold to the touch. Warm to my heart. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2LifeNavy Remembers Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsAs announced by NAVADMIN 001/13, the Navy will join the nation in observing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 21. Navy commands are encouraged to reflect on the recurring theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day Off! and increase their knowledge and awareness of Dr. Kings contributions to American history and civil rights by participat ing in military and com munity events. Dr. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism during the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. Following in the foot steps of his father, King entered the Christian ministry in February 1948 at the age of 19. He was ordained at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and in 1954, upon com pletion of graduate stud ies at Boston University, he accepted a call to serve at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. While ministering there, King became an instrumental leader in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, made famous by the arrest of Rosa Parks. The boycott lasted over a year and led to the 1956 District Court ruling that racial segregation on buses was unconstitutional. Over the course of his lifetime, King was arrested 30 sep arate times for his par ticipation in civil rights activities. Although King spent the majority of his life preaching on the issues of social justice, empow erment, love and peace, which won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, his attention and efforts also included fighting eco nomic injustice. On April 4, 1968, King journeyed to Memphis, Tenn., to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions. While standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, King was shot and ultimately died. In honor of Kings unfinished efforts, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. The first obser vance was held Jan. 15, 1986, the anniversary of Kings birthday. In 1992, President George H.W. Bush proclaimed the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday would be observed every year on the third Monday of January. On Aug. 23, 1994 Congress passed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday and Service Act, designating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday as a day of nation al volunteer service. All commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowl edge and awareness of Kings contributions to American history and civil rights through participa tion in military and com munity events and volunteerism within their com munities and worldwide. More information on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, including a search engine to find volunteer opportunities near you can be found online at http://www. mlkday.gov/about/ser veonkingday.php. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity Mayport Holds MLK Observance Jan. 18Naval Station Mayport will commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day with an observance on Jan. 18 at 10 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. The Oasis Galley staff will prepare a special meal to immediately follow. The cost of the meal is $4.60 per person.Live In PPV Housing?Make Informed Pet ChoicesFrom StaffWith Valentines Day quickly approaching,you might think a new puppy would make a great gift for your sweetheart. Before you go out and get the new addition, Naval Station Mayport on and off-base housing residents are remind ed that Balfour Beatty Communities does have a pet clause for its residents. According to the BBC pet addendum, Akita, American Bull Dog, Chow, Doberman, Pit Bull and Rotweiller breeds are not permitted and neither are exotic pets, such as snakes and lizards. Only two pets per house are allowoed. Fish tanks and bird cases count as one pet. No more than one first tank is permitted in Housing and no more than two bird cages. All pets must be kept current with vaccinations, testing and treatment and must be approved by management. The privilege of keeping a pet in Housing may be revoked and/or a Letter of Caution issued if the pet is determined to be a nuisance. A nuisance is defined as any action of a pet that endangers life or health, gives offense to the senses, violates laws of decency, or obstructs reasonable or comfort able use of property. For example, an animal may be deemed a nuisance if it: edly barks in such a man ner or to such an extent that it disturbs others persons engaging in exer cise or physical activity of a home not occupied by its owner leash law THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 New Workouts Onboard RGB USS Robert G. Bradley Public Affairs OfficerOnboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Sailors are trying to be fit with a new type of workout. Two times a day a famil iar grunting and groan ing can be heard from the focsle or the flight deck where Sailors struggle through the daily RGB Workouts. Everyday the workout is different with sweat and suffering being the only constant. The RGB Workout program was started as an idea by Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class (SW) Tyson Schmidt to provide equipment for the crew to use for exercise with the limited space available onboard. Each workout we beat ourselves up physically, but we have fun doing it, said Schmidt. Schmidt raised $2,200 prior to deployment by selling raffle tickets to the crew in order to purchase kettlebells, slam balls and other workout equip ment. After the deploy ment a drawing will be held to give the workout equipment back to the crew. Initially, Robert G. Bradley was supposed to go on an African Partnership Station mis sion and this required Bradley to give up its cur rent exercise equipment to provide room for stores and other mission essen tial gear. Bradley now has a new mission instead of APS and supports Sixth Fleet Operations in the Mediterranean, however the new workout equip ment is used Monday through Saturday or as operational schedule allows. This new workout pro gram even goes beyond using the equipment. Sailors participating in the RGB Workout are weighed and measured each month using Personal Profile Sheets to continu ously monitor their gains and losses. The goal of the RGB Workout is for each participant to see constant improvement over the duration of the deployment. The workouts focus on high intensity and max repetitions with the length being anywhere from 25-45 minutes. I really like the inten sity of the workouts, but we always seem to do my least favorite exer cise, burpees, says Lt.j.g. Daniel J. Pokewaldt, a constant participant in the daily workouts. The workouts are unique and different each time so as not to follow a pattern and they often separate the Sailors into teams to promote competition and teamwork. Competition is also pro vided often at the end of each workout with a short challenge that usually involves a single exercise and going for maximum repetitions or time. This Christmas Eve a special workout was held that was based on the 12 days of Christmas. Each day was an exercise and the workout followed the format of the well known song with each exercise being repeated multiple times. Additionally, each month a RGB Fitness challenge is held to deter mine whose team of three is the toughest on the ship. The winner of the months challenge gets bragging rights and a right to take their pic ture with the RGB Fitness Challenge Trophy. USS Robert G. Bradley is an Oliver Hazard Perry Class Frigate homeported out of Mayport, Florida, and is currently on a deployment in support of Sixth Fleet operations in the Mediterranean Sea. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Sailors onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) posing after completing the 12 days of Christmas workout. Photo by Ensign Matthew P. Roberts Right, Lt.j.g. Cameron Leseane and Ensign Patrick Staub cheer on Lt.j.g. Jack McGee onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) during the RGB group workouts. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Sailors on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) hold a squat during the RGB group workouts. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Lt.j.g. Pokelwaldt swinging a kettlebell over his head during the RGB Workouts.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 5 C6F Visits USS Robert G. Bradley SailorsFrom Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. 6th Fleet visited Sailors aboard guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Jan. 5. During the visit, Vice Adm. Frank C. Pandolfe toured the ship, held an all-hands call on the ships forecastle, met with the ships senior leader ship, and recognized sev eral Sailors accomplish ments in an awards cer emony. The admirals visit today reiterates the importance of the mission and how important their time away from home is to our national interests, said Cmdr. Peter Ehlers, Robert G. Bradleys com manding officer. Pandolfe thanked the Sailors for their contri butions and spoke about the importance of their deployment. This is a great ship with a proud legacy and youre adding to it today by operating in this the ater, said Pandolfe. Thank you so much for what youre doing. Your mission is very impor tant. Members of the crew felt honored that the fleet commander took time to visit. I felt like it was a good visit, said Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Dana Plummer. Its reassur ing that he would take the time out of his busy schedule to come and see us and talk to us about the great job were doing. It felt really good to know were out here making a difference. During the all-hands call, Pandolfe also pre sented nine Sailors with awards. It was a big honor. Ive never even heard of somebody thats been pinned by the admiral, said Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Marlon Narvaez, who received his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification during the ceremony. Its something Ill remember even after I get out of the Navy. Robert G. Bradley, homeported in Mayport, Fla., is currently deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Vice Adm. Pandolfe pins on Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Marlon J. Narvaezs ESWS pin onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49).-Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Boatswain Mate 1st Class Bonin pipes during Vice Admiral Pandolfe arrival onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49).RGB Helps Out San Vincenzo Abbey USS Robert G. Bradley Public Affairs OfficerSeveral USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Sailors participated in a com munity relations project at the San Vincenzo al Volturno Abbey during a quality of life port visit in Naples, Italy on Jan 3-4. The abbey was founded in 703 A.D. outside of Naples. The Sailors performed yard work to clear weeds and brush around olive trees in order to prepare the abbeys olive grove for the next harvest and after wards toured the ancient abbey. The main focus of our team was to help with yard work, said RGBs Community Relations Program Coordinator, Chaplain (Lt.) Stephan Cloer, who stressed that the abbey was short in staffing for the amount of area they had to take care of. This is only the begin ning of a seven-month deployment, and it is the start of RGBs commit ment to community rela tions in foreign ports. The Sailors who volunteered were happy to have this opportunity to help out. One might think Sailors on a liberty port in Italy would be ready for rest and relaxation and would rather see the historical sites in Rome, Naples, and Pompeii. Not so for these 16 community ser vice volunteers from USS Robert G. Bradley. The Sailors kept ask ing if they could do more, Cloer said. Everyone had a great time and we were happy to carry on the great relationship the Navy has with the abbey. This was not the first time the abbey has been visited by Sailors and the Navy has had a long history helping out the nuns at San Vincenzo al Volturno. The abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno is a historical monument, tourist attraction and symbol of Italys longstanding spiritual tradi tions. The site is a major interest for archaeologists, and is becoming recog nized as one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the century. Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Gregory Glover, one of RGBs vol unteers, said the project was fun and worthwhile. It was great to be able to help them out and it was also a cultural expe rience for us, he said. They showed us around the abbey and it was interesting to see a part of ancient Italy. Glover said that RGBs help was appreciated, and that the nuns at the abbey were left with a positive impression of RGB Sailors and the US Navy. There was only one nun there and she was very grateful for our help, Glover said, Together, with our greater numbers, we were able to accom plish more. USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate, is homeported out of Mayport, Fla., and is on a scheduled deployment to the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility in the Mediterranean Sea.-Photo by Lt. Stephen Cloer Sailors from USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) being shown around during a tour of the Abbey of San Vincenzo al Volturno. -Photo by Lt. Stephen Cloer Ensign Matthew L. McCain cutting away brush at the Abbey of San Vincenzo al Volturno. -Photo by Lt. Stephen Cloer Sailors from USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) clear brush at the Abbey of San Vincenzo al Volturno.

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It also calls on all research and devel opment and production and contract modifications that obligate more than $500 million to be cleared with the undersecretary of defense for acquisi tion, technology and logistics before being awarded. For science and technology accounts, the components must provide the undersecretary and the assistant sec retary of defense for research and engi neering with an assessment of the bud getary impacts that the budgetary uncer tainty will cause to research priorities.From Page 1BudgetCPPD Releases 2013 Naval Leader Planning Guide and Weekly PlannerCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsThe Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) has released the 2013 edition of the Naval Leader Planning Guide (NLPG) and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner (NLWP), CPPD leadership said Jan. 3. Both versions of the planner were avail able online Dec. 13, and commands can down load the PDF version free-of-charge from Navy Knowledge Online. Users can also down load a file that can be imported into Microsoft Outlook that will popu late personal calendars with the dates found in the product. Commands are authorized to use the downloaded source files to arrange for printing at local facilities to satisfy unit-level requests for the resource. We did a hard scrub of this years the Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner to ensure we had the best possible product, said Capt. John Newcomer, CPPDs com manding officer. We see delivering this product as part of our commit ment to provide the fleet with the tools to lead with courage, respect and trust and mentor future leaders to do the same. The Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Weekly Planner are full of information to help leaders do just that. The NLPG brings together a large amount of information in a compact, portable for mat. This years edition includes a 15-month cal endar (January 2013 to March 2014), a complete list of CPPD courses and services, contact informa tion for all CPPD learning sites and Navy College Offices around the world, the Principles of Naval Leadership, and Navy and Marine Corps Selection Board and Fitness Report/ Evaluation schedules. It also includes a directory of community manag ers and technical advi sors at Navy Personnel Command. The weekly version of this product contains a 13-month calendar, but all other sections con tained in it are the same resources as the monthly guide, including the per sonal and professional development sections and the career management points of contact. The 2013 product includes the latest Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Professional Reading Program list, which was announced in October of 2012 in conjunction with the Navys birth day. The Marine Corps Professional Reading Program list was also updated for 2013. We strive to provide the most up-to-date infor mation possible to ensure the fleet has the informa tion needed to meet mis sion, said Newcomer. Of course theres always an opportunity to improve, and we greatly value feedback from everyone on the Navy and Marine Corps team on how we can make it even better please send us your suggestions. To download the 2013 NLPG, log on to www. nko.navy.mil and select the Leadership tab. The guide can be downloaded as either a PDF file for printing or as an Excel file, which can be imported into Microsoft Outlook. CPPD is responsible for providing a wide range of personal and profession al development courses and materials, including General Military Training, Navy instructor training, alcohol and drug aware ness program training, suicide and sexual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and person al responsibility classes. CPPDs required leader ship training is delivered multiple times throughout a Sailors career via com mand-delivered enlisted leadership training mate rial and officer leadership courses in a schoolhouse setting. CPPD also administers the Navys volun tary education program, which provides Sailors with the opportunity to earn college degrees. CPPD additionally man ages the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program, which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprentice ship certifications. For more informa tion about the Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD), visit https://www.netc. navy.mil/centers/cppd NavyNew Navy Apprenticeship Trade AvailableCenter for Security Forces Public AffairsThe Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced Jan. 13 that the fourth installment to its list of apprenticeship trades is now available to Sailors for open enroll ment. The new Armory Technician Apprenticeship Trade is available to Sailors, E-4 and above, who serve in a broad range of ratings such as Gunners Mate, Master-At-Arms, Special Warfare Operator, and more. This is an apprentice level trade appli cable to personnel who store, inventory, issue, receive and maintain records on assigned arms, ammunition and explo sives, said Jose Bautista, Master-At-Arms (MA) programs manager at (CENSECFOR). Sailors can enroll in this new Department of Labor (DoL) approved appren ticeship trade by vis iting United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP) online and select the Enroll/ Reinstate link to begin. Bautista went on to point out that this is probably the only appren ticeship trade that cov ers multiple ratings and provides sailors with improved skills and com petencies. Sailors desiring to enroll must have com pleted the Security Force Weapons Personal Qualifications 301, 305, 308, 322, and 323. A Sailor must also pos sess NEC [Naval Enlisted Classification Code] 0812, 0814, 9525, or 9536, said Bautista. Sailors who successful ly complete the required 2000 hours of document ed experience will earn the distinction of being an Armory Technician. The level of experience covers six select skill areas such as maintenance, inven tory control, security, and safety just to name a few. USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeymanlevel certificates of com pletion for members of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. During their apprenticeship, ser vice members document their military duties while working in their rating or military occupational specialty. Bautista also allud ed to the next wave of apprenticeship trades to be released as being the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship and the Military Working Dog (MWD) Apprenticeship. The package for the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship is cur rently pending DOL approval with an antici pated release sometime this spring or summer. The CIA (Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship) is designed for MA person nel having the military police investigator NEC 2002, as well as appro priate personnel in the USMC and USCG, said Bautista. The MWD apprenticeship is current ly in development stages and its anticipated release date is yet to be deter mined. Apprenticeship fore runners to the new Armory Technician Apprenticeship have been highly successful since their debut. For example, the Security Specialist and the Police Officer I (Government Service) apprenticeships have had up to 1,600 active enroll ments. Earning the DOL cer tificate costs the service member nothing and does not normally require working additional offduty hours. USMAP has provided sea-service military members with journeyman level cer tifications for more than 35 years and reached a record 50,000 current active USMAP partici pants last year. These nationally rec ognized certifications give Sailors the opportunity to perform duties and gain experience they might not otherwise have an oppor tunity to achieve, said Bautista. The Center for Security Forces provides special ized training to more than 28 thousand students each year and has 14 training locations. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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New Tool Helps Families Plan DeploymentsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department has launched a new resource to help troops and their families plan for the before, during and after of deploying. Barbara Thompson, direc tor of DODs office for fam ily policy, explained Plan My Deployment during an interview with the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service. This is a new, interactive, online tool that supports service members and their families as they prepare for the different stages of deployment, she said. The new resource guides users through the ins and outs of deployment, Thompson said: from power of attorney and legal assistance consider ations to financial and emotion al issues. Other tips and tools address education and training benefits, she added. We modeled this after the very, very popular Plan My Move, which helps with [per manent change of station] moves, she said. Its the same kind of approach: we look at providing the tools and infor mation, and you tailor it to your individual familys needs. Plan My Deployment saves the users information, she said, so people can exit from the site and return at their convenience, picking up where they left off. Though other deployment planning guides and resources already exist, Thompson said, DOD leaders wanted to offer family readiness assistance to the entire active duty, National Guard and Reserve force and their families. While the pace of deployment across the services has dropped since U.S. forces left Iraq and will continue to decline as the combat mission in Afghanistan draws to an end, Thompson said, service members always will face the possibility of deploying for duty. Lets face it: military mem bers deploy all the time. ... Weve learned a lot of lessons during this long-term conflict, and we want to make sure that our service members and their families are prepared for whats in the future, she said. Plan My Deployment is available at DODs Military OneSource website, which also offers a range of other services for military families, she said. Thompson pointed out the site is outside the gates in the public domain, so it is available to extended family members who dont have access to mili tary facilities.Uniform Working Groups Established In FleetFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public AffairsCommander, U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) and Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CPF) distributed a message to commanders and commanding officers Jan. 11 that announces the agendas of two uni form working groups. The working groups are reviewing the requirements and flame resistant qualities of fleet organi zational clothing and subsequently the suit ability of working uni forms worn at sea. They were formed following a recent impromptu test by the Navy clothing tex tile research facility that showed the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I is not flame resistant and will burn when subjected to flame. USFF Commander Adm. Bill Gortney said the working group that will review all organizational clothing worn by Sailors on ships, submarines, and in expeditionary units is designed to inform the second working group, which will ultimately determine the require ments for at-sea work ing uniforms. The Navy removed the require ment for all hands to wear flame resistant uniforms at sea in 1996. The organizational clothing working group has been tasked with providing fact-based information and deter mining whether to limit flame resistant organiza tional clothing to Sailors who work in engineering departments, flight decks, and other high risk areas; or to expand fire resistant organizational clothing to all Sailors afloat, said Gortney. Those findings are necessary before any recommendations can be made about at-sea work ing uniforms. The primary consid eration for both working groups is Sailor safety, and the results will provide the answers needed to maintain operation al readiness and safety requirements. We intend to use these working groups to inform a deliberative review pro cess. We will determine the level of protection our Sailors need, given the missions and tasks we expect them to exe cute in their respective work environments, said Gortney. Both working groups will be comprised of members of the USFF and CPF staffs along with members of the Naval Safety Center, systems commands, and various operational commands. While the groups are not working on a specific timeline, Gortney said he hopes to have the organi zational working groups findings in a matter of weeks. The Navy currently requires Sailors who stand watch in engine room or machinery spaces to wear fire retar dant coveralls, with the sleeves rolled down, and when theyre performing maintenance in machin ery spaces where steam is circulating in the pip ing systems or fuel fired machinery is in opera tion. Individual Navy type commanders also provide organizational clothing, with added protection, to Sailors working on the flight deck or as part of damage control teams.New Requirements For Overseas Bases MailNavy Public Affairs Support Element-East Detachment EuropeThe United States Postal Service (USPS) recently sent out a man date that all letter mail being shipped to overseas military installations be addressed with a ninedigit zip code, starting January 2013. The policy change came with an upgrade to USPSs mail sorting system and the opening of an addi tional centralized gateway for receiving and shipping all government mail. The USPS is asking anyone sending letters to service members at overseas bases to label them with a nine-digit zip code, said Chief Logistic Specialist (SW) Jimmy Jimenez, leading chief petty officer of the Naval Support Activity (NSA) Naples Capodichino post office. This change accompanied the opening of a centralized gateway at OHare to take some of the stress off of John F. Kennedy International Airport, which used to be the sole routing hub for government mail. The new mail sorting system will enable mail to be delivered and sort ed quicker by giving the sorting machines another way to divide up the mail. The new address format will include the box num ber as a four-digit num ber at the end of the zip code. For example: John Smith PSC 999 Box 82 FPO AE 09622-0082 The new system will make it so that everything is already sorted when it gets here, said Jimenez. This means we dont have to spend hours sort ing baskets full of mail, and we can put it directly into the boxes. For more information, visit the USPS website at https://www.usps.com/ ship/apo-fpo-guidelines. htm. For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Det. Europe, visit www. navy.mil/local/npaseeu rope THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 7

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ly completed a success ful SRA, Basic Phase, and Training Phase, and participated in Fleet Week New York City in May 2012 and Mobile, Alabamas Bayfest in October 2012. His next duty assign ment will be an internship at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency followed by attendance at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, a college of the National Defense University. Clark will assume com mand of the guided mis sile destroyer after serving as her executive officer for the past 18 months. Prior to this tour, he served as the Flag Aide to Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa and Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples. He is a native of Pembroke, Georgia and graduated from Morris Brown College in 1995. Clark began his naval career serving aboard USS Kearsarge (LSD 3) as Electrical, Main Propulsion, and Deck Division Officer. He subsequently served on USS Hayler (DD 997) as Navigation/ Administration Officer; as Engineer Officer on board USS Ross (DDG 71); and as Material Officer for Commander, Destroyer Squadron 28 in Norfolk, Virginia. His shore tours include Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, where he earned a Masters Degree in Systems Management under the Joint C4I Curriculum, and the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies.From Page 1RooseveltNavy Implements Changes To INSURVFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public AffairsThe president of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) rolled out major changes to the frequency and grading method of the INSURV program effective Jan. 1. Rear Adm. Robert Wray, INSURV president, said changes to the frequen cy of the inspections and the grading system were implemented to improve the readiness of Navy ships and crews and to provide Navy and con gressional leaders with an accurate reflection of that readiness. Under the old program, INSURV teams conducted exhaustive inspections and surveys of ships every five years and reported their material readiness to Congress. Now ships will be inspected about every 30 months. The Navy is always working to improve how we assess our ships. Over time, we came to the con clusion that ships arent being looked at often enough to give leadership the readiness informa tion we want, and to give ships crews the practice they need to get through the inspections on their own, said Wray. Hence the move to double the frequency of inspections. Under the new inspec tion timeline, INSURV inspectors will conduct a traditional Material Inspection during a units Fleet Response Plan (FRP) cycle. In the alter nating cycle, a similar inspection will be con ducted by the units type commander with INSURV support. The other notable change comes to the overall grading system. Previously, the program utilized a grading status of Satisfactory, Degraded or Unsatisfactory, which oversimplified inspection results with a coarse oneword descriptor attempt ing to describe a ship with nearly 200 sub-systems. The new system will use a more quantifiable INSURV Figure of Merit, which is a weighted aver age of 30 scores used to provide a final grade and report on the overall read iness of a ship. In the past, Sailors could spend up to two years preparing their ship for an INSURV inspec tion. Come as you are is one of the goals of the revised process. It means that rather than exhaus tively preparing for an INSURV, ships will pre pare for deployment, and the INSURV process will measure their material condition as a part of that process. Changes to the scope, breadth and rigor of the INSURV process have already been fully imple mented. Wray said Navy leadership felt the grad ing system and the fiveyear time span between inspections under the old system were not effective ly meeting Navy material readiness objectives. The major change for the average Sailor will be two-fold, Wray said. First, each ship, prior to each deployment, will have a full-blown mate rial inspection in which the ship will be expected to get underway, do full power, anchor, shoot guns, operate com bat systems, etc., for a team of external inspec tors. Second, ships will be expected to do this on their own, without months of external prepa ration and assistance. While twice as many inspections may sound like a bad thing, Wray stressed that the new process will benefit the Sailors who have to pre pare the ship for INSURV. We want the predeployment material inspection to be a nor mal part of doing busi ness, like the Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), something ships know how to do on their own, he said. In a larger sense, we want to create a culture of mate rial readiness in which ships and their crews are always thinking about being ready for INSURV. The concept is to create a culture for material readi ness, in which any ship, at any time in the appropri ate part of the FRP, could successfully shoot their guns, do full-power runs, anchor, and demonstrate her combat systems. Wray said the goal of these changes is very sim ple. In a perfect world, every ship will complete a rigorous material inspec tion prior to every deploy ment, conducted either by INSURV or by their TYCOM, using INSURV methods. Ships crews will be able to prepare for, and successfully complete, the inspection on their own. Navy leadership will also get true, accurate, unvar nished readiness information upon which to make resourcing decisions. INSURVs primary pur pose is to fulfill Title 10 responsibilities to exam ine the material readiness of U.S. Navy vessels and report the findings to the secretary of the Navy. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Navy Launches New POD AnnouncementsFrom Defense Media Activity NavyNavy leaders launched Navy Plan of the Day announcements, a new resource on the Navys webpage, www.navy.mil. The initiative is intend ed to get current, relevant information to deckplate Sailors so they can be pro active in managing their careers. We have to keep find ing new and better ways to make sure our people are fully aware of Navy policies and programs that affect their careers and families. This initia tive launches a new page on Navy.mil called Navy Plan of the Day (POD) announcements, dedi cated to giving Executive Officers good material to choose from when put ting together their POD, said Rear Adm. John Kirby, Navy Chief of Information. The POD announce ments page is divided into three sections. The first includes specific POD notes on issues that are of fleet-wide interest. The second is a list of upcom ing dates and deadlines from the Navy Leader Planning Guide. The final section is devoted to This Date in Navy History. Coordinators will update the online ver sion as they receive input. In addition to maintain ing the Web page, people can sign up for a weekly e-mail that includes POD information for the coming week at www.govdelivery.com. This will make the information available for Sailors at sea who may have difficulty accessing the internet. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Heaving The Line On USS Farragut Fire Controlman 3rd Class Vincent Schaefer puts a round turn on a bitt aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) as the ship moors. Farragut is deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photos by MC2 A.J. JonesBoatswains Mate 3rd Class Ernest Obengmanu, left, and Seaman Daniel Desir connect a replenishment fixture aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Walter S. Diehl (T-AO 193). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 9

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Happy Birthday 29th USS Halyburton USS Halyburton Public AffairsUSS Halyburtons (FFG 40) crew members celebrate the 29th birthday of the ships commissioning. USS Halyburtons keel was laid on Sept. 26, 1980 and launched on Oct. 13, 1981. Halyburton was named after Pharmacist Mate 2nd Class William D. Halyburton. William Halyburton was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism, while serving with the 5th Marines, dur ing the Battle of Okinawa. On May 10, 1945, Halyburton served with a Marine rifle company against the Japanese in Okinawa when they suf fered numerous casualties after advancing into battle. Exposed to enemy fire, he rushed to aid a fallen Marine the fur thest away. Shielding the man with his own body while administering aid, Halyburton was mortally wounded. On Jan. 7, 1984, the Navy honored Pharmacist Mate 2nd Class William D. Halyburton by naming guided missile frigate 40 after him. A number of other mili tary structures have been named for him, including the Halyburton Quarters in Charleston, South Carolina; a road at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland; and a bar racks at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida. In memory of Halyburtons commis sioning, Halyburton Commanding Officer, Cmdr. David E. Fowler, and the Command Senior Chief, Lee C. Friedlander served cake and ice cream to the Halyburton Sailors. USS Halyburton is scheduled for decom missioning after her 30th anniversary in 2014. Halyburton is currently deployed, working in support of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in counter piracy operations for Operation Ocean Shield in the 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. Above, during USS Halyburtons 29th birthday celebration on board the ship, Commanding Officer, Cmdr. David E. Fowler, serves birthday cake to the crew. Halyburton was named after Pharmacist Mate 2nd Class William D. Halyburton who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during World War II. Right, Command Senior Chief Lee C. Friedlander, serves ice cream to the crew. Halyburton is currently deployed, working in support of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in counter piracy operations for Operation Ocean Shield in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photos by OS3(SW) Quintrel R. Brown 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Halyburton Clean Up In Seychelles USS Halyburton Public Affairs Sailors from USS Halyburton (FFG 40) took time to volunteer at Foyer De Nazareth Boys Orphanage in Anse Etoile during a recent port visit to Victoria, Seychelles. Ten Sailors participated in the community relations project (COMREL), clear ing away underbrush from the orphanage entrance, servicing lawn equipment, and pulling weeds. After the work was finished some of the orphans scaled the palm trees and threw down coco nuts for the Sailors to enjoy. The volunteers were joined by the Consulate Representative, Mrs. Marie-Anette Ernesta, and her family. The nuns who oversee the orphanage prepared a local bread-fruit for all to enjoy. As the Sailors enjoyed the snack, Mrs. Ernesta shared a local saying- Once you have eaten the bread-fruit, you will come back to Seychelles again. The Sailors concluded the COMREL by distribut ing school supplies, fris bees, items donated by the NFLs Green Bay Packers and Carolina Panthers; baseballs, t-shirts, and key chains from the Charlotte Knights, and soccer balls to the 14 orphan boys, ranging from ages 4 to 16, living there. COMRELs are some thing that I love doing. It makes me realize that love and peace can prevail, said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Emmanuel Appiahkupi. If we teach children how to honor natures gifts, the joy and beauty of the outdoors will be here forever. Chaplain Tom Bingol, Halyburtons COMREL organizer, shared that the orphanage projects provide Halyburton Sailors with an excellent opportunity to help those in need and expand their worldviews. Even with a major holiday, busy in-port schedule, and some severe weather courtesy of a pass ing tropical cyclone, Team Haly-B comes through when there is a chance to lend a helping hand. Special thanks to Halyburtons chapter of CSADD, and Ms. Gail Self of Concord, North Carolina, who coordinated with the Packers, Panthers, and Knights and provided soccer balls for the event. USS Halyburton is deployed off of the coast of Africa in support of Operation Ocean Shield. Photos by MC2 Jamar Perry Above left, Halyburton volunteers help pull weeds and plant flowers outside of the Foyer De Nazareth Boys Orphanage in Victoria, Seychelles. Bottom left, Boatwains Mate 3rd Class Frank Charles (Left) and Lt. Tom (CHAPS) Bingol (Center) help pull weeds to help beautify the orphanage. Above, all of the volunteers from Halyburton with the boys from the orphanage and the nuns and volunteers who run the orphanage. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 11

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Thursday, Jan. 17 North Jacksonville Baptist Church, located at 8531 North Main St., will host the exciting Jubilee Tour, featuring talented Christian recording art ists, The Booth Brothers, Greater Vision and Legacy Five. The Jublee con cert will begin at 7 p.m. Reserve tickets online at www.imcconcerts.com by phone at 1-800-9659324 or in person at the North Jacksonville Baptist Church in Jacksonville. Friday, Jan. 18 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association #290 will hold a Mexican dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Rd. Donations are $8. The dinner is open to the public. Take out orders are welcome. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, Jan. 19 North Atlantic right whales visit Northeast Florida waters to give birth to calves December through March. Join a ranger to learn about one of the worlds most endangered large mam mals. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens will hold its annual CSX Train Days promotion on Jan. 19-20. For these two days the Zoo will only charge $1 per person for train rides, sponsored by CSX Corporation. CSX employees will act as honorary train conduc tors for part of the twoday period. For more information on the Zoo, log on to www.jackson villezoo.org. Tuesday, Jan. 22 The Jacksonville Public Library and The Artist Series proudly present the 11th Annual Family Night on Broadway, dur ing opening night of Mary Poppins during preshow at 6:30 p.m. and inter mission. Family-friendly activities will include a Mary Poppins sing-along, face painting, color ing tables, arts and crafts, green screen photos, and an origami kite station inspired by the song Lets Go Fly a Kite. Guests can sign up for library cards and check out books at the show. All Family Night activities are free with paid admission tick ets. Discounted Family Night tickets are available through The Artist Series. Buy one adult ticket and get a childs ticket free with the passcode: CHILD when you order online at www.artistseriesjax.org. For more information call (904) 442-BWAY (2929). Restrictions apply. Saturday, Jan. 26 Join a Park Ranger at 1 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural com munities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park and is part of the Timucuan Adventure Day event. No reservations are necessary and the program is free.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR FRGs USS Taylor private party on Jan. 18 from 6-8 p.m. USS Hue City Family Readiness Group on Jan. 22 from 7-8 p.m. USS Halyburton Family Readiness Group on Jan. 25 from 6-8:30 p.m. No Dough Dinner There will be a No Dough Dinner on Jan. 28 from 5-7 p.m. featuring chicken and broccoli cas serole. Sponsored by Atria Humana Challenge Weekend Join the World Golf Hall of Fame in honor ing Bob Hope Jan. 17-20. The World Golf Hall of Fame is celebrating the Humana Challenge, for merly the Bob Hope Classic. Guests can enjoy the Halls Bob Hope: Shanks for the Memory exhibit while watching the tournament in the Bob Hope Theater. Visitors can also participate in a spe cial Bob Hope scavenger hunt in the museum for a chance to win a Humana Challenge Prize pack (no purchase necessary to enter). Active and retired military receive free admission to Museum, and St. Johns County resi dents will receive 30 per cent off admission. Free JaxCERT Emergency Preparedness Course The American Legion Auxiliary-Post 316 in Atlantic Beach will be offering a FREE emergency preparedness course for anyone interested. The program is free and open to the public. Classes began on Wednesday, Jan. 16 and meet weekly from 6:30-9 p.m. Free JaxCERT Emergency Preparedness Course The American Legion Auxiliary-Post 316 in Atlantic Beach will be offering a FREE emergency preparedness course for anyone interested. The program is free and open to the public. Classes began on Wednesday, Jan. 16 and meet weekly from 6:30-9 p.m. Military Wives Vendor Show Come out and sup port your local military spouse businesses at the Mayport USO on Feb. 3 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and get a head start on your Valentines Day shopping. This event is free and open to the public. MLS Soccer Match Coming To Jacksonville On Feb. 15, 2013, the Philadelphia Union will face another MLS team, to be announced in the near future, at Everbank Field starting at 7:30 p.m. Use the link and password listed below and $2 for every ticket will be donat ed back to your local Jacksonville USO office. Come out and support this great event and our local Military Men and Women. There will also be a FREE youth clinic at 5:30 p.m before the game. PASSWORD USOJAX www.ticketmaster.com/ event/2200498AA0DC 6031?did=uso COMPASS: A Course For Navy Life Upcoming Course For Navy Spouses COMPASS is a 12-hour Team mentoring program developed by spouses for spouses. Come make new friends as you learn about the Navy lifestyle and gain knowledge and skills to successfully meet the challenges ahead. COMPASS is FREE and open to ALL Navy spous es! For more information and to register for the upcoming February session, please visit: http:// www.gocompass.org/ jacksonville.html 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. 2nd Annual Jax Area USO Chili Cook Off Do you think you make the best chili around? Would you like a chance to prove it? The 2nd annual Jax Area USO Chili Cook off will be held February 23rd from 12:00-5:00pm at the Fleet Reserve on Collins Road. For more information and registration, visit www. jaxusochilicookoff.com. Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submission of a current military iden tification card and proof of Florida residency. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. NEWS 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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NS Mayport FFSC Sets Workshop, Class ScheduleFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Jan. 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Jan. 19, 11:30-until, IA Childrens Circus Outing Veterans Memorial Arena Jan. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 23, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying, FFSC Room 702 Jan. 23, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course, FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 24, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training FFSC Room 1124 Jan. 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 28, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Jan. 29, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Jan. 29, 1-3 p.m., What About The Kids FFSC Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an addi tional motivator for end ing the violence and seek ing intervention. Jan. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 31, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend.Financial ManagementFinancial management is a key quality of life issue that affects every Sailor, family member and the command. Sailors experiencing financial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their command financial specialist to devel op a budget, explore options for military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other strategies. Visit www.MilitarySaves.org to learn more.NEX Online Offers Flat Rate ShippingFrom NEXCOMThe NEX online store, www.myNavy Exchange.com, now offers flat rate shipping on all merchandise. NEX customers can shop confidently knowing what to expect when it is time to check out, said Tess Paquette, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Chief Merchandising Officer. By having flat rate ship ping on all orders, cus tomers can calculate the total cost of their order before they check out. Customers will pay $5.95 for standard deliv ery (7 10 business days); $12.95 for priority delivery (3-5 business days); and $17.95 for express delivery (1-3 business days). Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 13

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Jan. 18: Karaoke Night. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Belt it out at karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FLC JAX. For tickets, con tact (904) 270-7178. Jan. 24: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Jan. 29: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 19. 270-5451 Feb. 1: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Feb. 1: Sugar & Spice Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Aftershock. Free food, beverage specials, giveaways and more. 2707205 Feb. 2: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 2: UFC 156Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Feb. 3: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 3: Superbowl XLVII at Castaways Lounge. Pre-game at 5:30 p.m. Kick off at 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. Free t-shirts for the first 100 attendees through the door. 2707205 Feb. 5: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Feb. 6: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Feb. 6: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Feb. 6: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 6: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Feb. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 11-13: Pre-Season Softball Tournament Sign up by Feb. 4. Feb. 12: Mardi Gras 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 12: Mardi Gras Party 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring DJ entertain ment. Free food, Mardi Gras trivia, prizes Feb. 13: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the SERMC. For tickets, con tact (904) 270-5431. Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Special. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. There will be double payouts on all warm-ups, $150 payouts on all hard cards, free desserts and dauber, plus, when you bring your significant other, they will receive a free paper pack. 270-7204 Feb. 18: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 MWRJan. 18: Freedom FridayNight at the Drive-In. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 25: Teen Trip: Als Pizza and Beaches Area. Depart Teen Center at 6 p.m.; return 10 p.m. Please bring money for dinner; Permission slip required. 246-0347 Feb. 1: Teen Base Round Up. 7 p.m. at the Teen Center. Follow up the Base Round up with soda and sliders at the Teen Center. Permission slip required. 246-0347 Feb. 2: Freedom FridayFootball Fanatics. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 3: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb 14: Youth Drama Club Presents Charlie Browns Valentine. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680 Feb. 15: Freedom FridayCupid Shuffle. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 16: Teen Lock In 7 p.m.7 a.m. at the Teen Center. Enjoy a bonfire, smores, hot dogs, games, ice cream break fast and more. Permission slip required; cost is $15 advanced sign-up and $20 day of, space permitting. 246-0347 Feb. 23: Teen Bowling Trip. Depart Teen Center at 7 p.m.; return 10 p.m. Permission slip required. KID 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Jan. 18: Karaoke Night 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Belt it out at karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Jan. 20: Disc Golf. Van departs 11 a.m. FREE; equipment provided. Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 23: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FLC JAX. For tickets, con tact (904) 270-7178. Jan. 24: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Jan. 26: Hoggetowne Medieval Faire. Van departs 9 a.m. Cost $7. Jan. 27: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE; Transportation only Jan. 29: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 19. 270-5451 Jan. 30: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 31: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 1: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Feb. 1: Sugar & Spice Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Aftershock. Free food, beverage specials, giveaways and more. 2707205 Feb. 2: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 2: UFC 156Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Feb. 3: Superbowl XLVII at Castaways Lounge. Pre-game at 5:30 p.m. Kick off at 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. Free t-shirts for the first 100 attendees through the door. 2707205 Feb. 4: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 & 1587 and get the latest news on your Liberty program. Feb. 5: WWE Smackdown. Van departs 5 p.m. FREE. Must be in uniform. Feb. 6: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Feb. 6: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 6: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Feb. 6: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 7: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. Feb. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 LIBERTY Thursday, Jan 24 7:30 pm at Castaways Lounge LOUNGECASTAWAYS G2 A1 M3 E1 N1 I1 G2 H2 T1 More info? (904) 270-7205www.facebook.com/castawaysloungemayport Food! Fun! Prizes!Enjoy a night of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more! THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 15

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Experts Weigh-In On Staying, Getting FitFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsGetting fit rates high among resolutions peo ple make at the start of the New Year, and Navys Physical Readiness Program has resources and information to help Sailors and families achieve their fitness goals, officials said Jan. 8. Whether you exer cise and want to increase your current level of fit ness or you are looking to start a routine to attain a healthy level of fitness we can help, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Focusing on the wellness of Sailors and their fami lies by providing the skills and tools for fitness and nutrition is one of our pri mary objectives. While it is common for Sailors to skip or reduce workouts over the holi days according to Moore, Sailors should be able to resume their normal fit ness routine if little time elapsed between work outs over the holidays. Most commands wrap up their fall physical fit ness assessments before Thanksgiving and there are gatherings and shop ping that may eat into fit ness time over the holi days, so it is natural for people to exercise less, said Moore. Missing four to five days of exercise over the holidays should have little impact on fit ness routines. Sailors who missed more than six days between workouts may experience some muscle soreness when resuming their routine. For those who havent worked out since the last semiannual physi cal readiness test Moore recommends starting off slowly and building up slowly. Start with a shorter duration for cardio-respiratory exercise and less weight for strength train ing. Build up from there, said Moore. Sailors can start with 20 minutes of some sort of exercise two or three days per week, slowly increasing time by five minutes per week until they reach their desired level of activity. If you have truly been inactive and want to start a routine, then you should consult your physician before performing exer cise, he added. Once you establish fit ness routine Moore rec ommends making it part of a weekly schedule. Consistency is the key, he said, adding that whether serving on shore duty, on board ship or submarine, or in the dirt and sand, the Navy pro vides its Sailors resources and equipment to remain fit to fight. Navy guidance recom mends Sailors complete at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week and perform strength-training exer cises at least twice a week to work all major muscle groups. Examples of moderateintensity cardio-respi ratory activities include brisk walking (3 mph or faster), bicycling (slower than 10 mph) and water aerobics. High-intensity activities include jogging or running, lap swim ming, jumping rope and circuit training. Strength training includes push ups, lifting weights, and working with resistance bands. Including two ses sions per week of 8-10 exercises that work all the different parts of the body (legs, hips, back, chest, abs, shoulders and arms) repeated for 10-12 reps each can improve fitness, decrease muscle loss and help maintain a healthy weight. The Navy Physical Readiness Program website at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/support/physical/ Pages/default2.aspx has links to sample warmups and workouts users may choose. One sam ple workout specifically addresses techniques to improve performance on the Navys physical readi ness test. Sailors and families will also find links to nutrition information that when followed compliment a good fitness routine. No matter what your fitness goals are, good nutrition can help improve your exercise performance, decrease your recovery time from strenuous exercise, pre vent injuries due to fatigue, and provide the fuel required during times of high-intensity train ing and weight control, said Lt. Cmdr Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Physical Readiness Program. The site also contains a Navy registered dieti tian locator so Sailors and family members may meet face-to-face with an expert and learn more about incorporating proper nutrition to maximize the benefits of their fit ness routine. Whether it is maintaining or seeking to attain a healthy level of fitness the Navy provides Sailors and family mem bers the tools to reach their goals, according to Moore. Get ShipShape With Health PromoFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Jan. 22 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty per sonnel, adult dependents, and retir ees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calo ries, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more infor mation, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-270-5251 ext. 16. Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Want to see more mus cles in the mirror? Perfect your form and technique in a resistance training class designed to maxi mize muscle strength. This full body strength training class will chal lenge every major mus cle group and includes core training specifically designed to build and strengthen the muscles of the abdomen and back. Get ready to get ripped! 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Reap the benefits of flexibility training in this 30-minute class designed for increasing range of movement of limbs and improving circulation. Stretching assists with relaxation, flexibility, strength and injury pre vention. Class includes active and passive stretch es as well as myofascial release. Learn proper stretching techniques for every muscle in the body and tissue management techniques that can be used after every workout to aide in recovery. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Tuesday 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Wednesday 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp HIT At the Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7:30 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT Saturday 9:30 a.m., HIT 10:30 a.m. Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor This incentive program develops muscu lar strength and power needed to attain the Steel Anchor Award. Structured and progres sive training targets muscles to increase your bench press, squat, and dead-lift. Participants will utilize multiple piec es of free weight, selec torized and plate loaded strength equipment in the gym. Steel Anchor award includes a shirt and plaque recognition. 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning This 45-minute indoor cycling class will enhance your speed and strength and burn mega calories without compromising joint health. Good for all fitness levels. Meets at the back of the temp Gym weightroom. Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com DoD Plans For Budget UncertaintiesAmerican Forces Press ServiceDeputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter has released a memo directing the services and defense agencies to begin plan ning for possible upcoming bud get challenges. The memo allows defense components to freeze civilian hiring, terminate temporary hires and reduce base operating funds. It also allows components to cur tail travel, training and confer ences and to curtail administrative expenses. The memo dated Jan. 10 points to the threat of seques tration and the continued use of a continuing resolution as a way to fund the department. Sequestration was to have become effective Jan. 2, but Congress delayed its activation until March 1 to give lawmakers more time to come up with an alternative. It would impose major across-theboard spending cuts. Since Congress did not approve an appropriations act for fiscal 2013, the Defense Department has been operating under a continu ing resolution and will continue to do so at least through March 27. Because most operating funding was planned to increase from fis cal 2012 to fiscal 2013, but instead is being held at fiscal 2012 levels under the continuing resolution, funds will run short at current rates of expenditure if the continuing resolution continues through the end of the fiscal year in its current form, Carter wrote in the memo. Given this budgetary uncertainty, the department must take steps now, the deputy secretary said. I therefore authorize all Defense components to begin implementing measures that will help mitigate execution risks, the memo reads. For now, and to the extent possible, any actions taken must be reversible at a later date in the event that Congress acts to remove the risks. ... The actions should be structured to minimize harmful effects on our people and on operations and unit readiness. The memo allows components to review contracts and studies for possible cost savings, to can cel thirdand fourth-quarter ship maintenance, and to examine ground and aviation depot-level maintenance. This last must be finished by Feb. 15. -Photo by Paige GnannUSS Roosevelt outgoing Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Robert Thompson, left, is joined by COMDESRON 14, Capt. Paul Flood, and Chaplain Edsil Logan, in applauding for Cmdr. Frankie Clark as he becomes the ships new commanding officer during a change of command ceremony on Jan. 11.NS Mayport Begins New Road Improvement NPASENaval Station Mayport (NAVSTA Mayport) held a groundbreaking ceremo ny Jan. 09 to commence its base-wide expansion project. The project includes improvements on several avenues on base in order to improve base capacity as well as the safety of the specific intersections. Not only are these improvements going to provide safer vehicu lar and pedestrian traf fic, but it also shows the Navys commitment to Mayport remain ing a vital Navy hub well into the future, said NAVSTA Mayports Pubilc Affairs Officer, Chief Mass Communication Specialist William H. Townsend. The current two-lane roads and four-way stop intersections are being transformed into boule vard-style roadways with two-lanes in each direc tion that are then going to be divided by a raised median. This project that were working on here with the Navy is our single most important project in the Department of Defense arena, stated Pond & Company Architect Michael Panczykowski. This is a major roadway improvement on a significant corridor on NAVSTA Mayport. Its an honor to work alongside the United States Navy. The Navy has big plans for the future of Naval Station Mayport. The base is strategically locat ed and plays a major role in the Navys sea power capabilities. The Department of Defense and the Department of the Navy are voting with their checkbook. What theyre voting on is the strate gic importance and the vital nature of NAVSTA Mayport, said Capt. Douglas Cochrane, NS Mayport command ing officer. This is the only military road proj ect that is taking place in the Navy right now. By 2020 youre going to see nearly Twenty Thousand people on this installation as well as over 20 war ships and a tremendously bright future for NAVSTA Mayport. Since its commissioning in December 1942, Mayport has grown to become the third largest naval surface fleet con centration area in the United States. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergFrom left, Andrew Culpepper, the quality control manager of TMG Services, Michael Panczykowskim, Senior vice president of Pond Architects engineers planners, Capt. Doug Cochrane, commanding officer of Naval Station Mayport and Cmdr. Miguel Deguez, public works officer Naval Station Mayport break ground for the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement Projects The 2 phase $6.7 million project to improve capacities and safety on Naval Station Mayport is scheduled for completion in February 2014. USS Halyburton Holds Change Of Command USS Halyburton Public AffairsDuring a Change of Command Ceremony on board Halyburton, Cmdr. David E. Fowler relieved Cmdr. Bertram C. Hodge as the commanding officer of guided missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Hodge took command in August 2011, meeting the ship on her way home from deployment. He was imme diately tasked with leading the ship through a mainte nance period with follow on sea trials and an intense training cycle, which prepared Halyburton for another NATO Counter-Piracy deployment in support of Operation Ocean Shield. Hodge will report to guided missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) to become her Commanding Officer. Fowler assumes the duty as commanding officer after his most recent tour ashore serving as a staff officer at the Allied Maritime Component Command in Naples, Italy. New CO For RooseveltUSS Roosevelt PAOCmdr. Robert S. Thompson was relieved by Cmdr. Frankie J. Clark on Jan. 11 as commanding officer of USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) during a pierside ceremony at Naval Station Mayport Thompson reported to Roosevelt as executive officer in October 2010 and oversaw the highly successful visit by the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) as well as deployment certification exercises with the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group. Thompson assumed command of Roosevelt on July 1, 2011, while deployed in the AFRICOM Area of Responsibility. Upon taking com mand, the class of 1993 Naval Academy graduate led Roosevelt through the remainder of her indepen dent deployment providing Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance sup port with the embarked Scan Eagle Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. The ship was com mended by Commander, Sixth Fleet As well as the Commanding General of the Joint Special Operations Command for their superb performance, which resulted in Roosevelt and her crew being awarded the Global War on Terror Service and Expeditionary Medal. Roosevelt was also a Battle E award recipient for DESRON 14 during 2011. Following Roosevelts return to Mayport, she subsequent--Photo courtesy of USS HalyburtonCmdr. David Fowler is piped aboard during USS Halyburtons change of command ceremony where he relieved Cmdr. Bertram Hodge as commanding officer.See Roosevelt, Page 8 See Budget, Page 6 NS Mayport will hold its quarterly blood drive on Jan. 29 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1, Room 104.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.CNO Releases 2013 Message To Fleet Chief of Naval Operations Public AffairsChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert released his New Year video message to the fleet in his blog Jan. 11. In the video blog mes sage Greenert highlighted the importance of safety, wellness and trust among shipmates. While most are focused on losing weight, Greenert stressed a larger goal of overall wellness. I want you to be fit mentally and physically... take care of yourself, said Greenert. We need you more than you know; you are the key to our suc cess. Greenert went on to say that more than any other service; the Navy is dependent upon trust. We go to sea; it is inherently dangerous out there, he said. If youre alone in the water, even tually youll die. You need to depend on someone else, whether youre flying over the water, youre sailing on the water or youre submerged. Greenert stated that trust ties in with taking care of one another. He encouraged all personnel to have the moral courage to step up and intervene if they see a shipmate struggling. I tell you shipmates, again and again; when weve talked to people who have considered taking their lives, you know what made the dif ference? said Greenert. Someone cared enough about that Sailor to get them the help they need ed. Greenert also covered the budget concerns which he said Sailors would be hearing a lot about in the weeks to come. He clearly stated in the video that no mat ter what happens with the budget, pay and benefits for active duty military will not be affected. He also said that taking care of families and maintain ing fleet and family ser vices is a priority. Greenert told Sailors to stay focused on the mis sion and not the budget discussion in Washington. He said that leadership will have to take hard look at non-critical operations and that he would keep the fleet informed on any potential changes. Worry about warf ighting first, worry about operating forward, and worry about being ready, Greenert said. You leave the rest to us. CNO Greenerts video message can be viewed in its entirety on his blog: http://cno.navylive. dodlive.mil/2013/01/10/ kicking-off-2013/ If you are the parent of a high school senior, you are probably wonder ing what you need to do to apply for financial aid for your child. To qualify for any type of federal aid, you and your child will need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). And completion of the FAFSA is now a requirement for Bright Futures eligibility. You need to begin gathering the information you will need to complete your taxes in order to complete the FAFSA. You may be wondering what is the rush since you dont even have your W-2 yet? What you may not know is that many schools award aid on a first-come, firstserved basis. Therefore, the student may not be eligible for state aid in Florida if the FAFSA isnt submitted until April. Many state aid dead lines are early in the cal endar year (calendar year 2013 for the 2013-14 award year). While stu dents are responsible for filling out the FAFSA, parents must also pro vide financial informa tion if the student is their dependent. The form requires the previous years tax return and other tax information for the student and parents. On the other hand, the online Florida Financial Aid Application, required for state aid including Bright Futures, is a selfreported document. The student can use his tran script from June 2012 to complete the application. All information will be verified when the district uploads his first semes ter grades and courses in January of 2013. To get help with the ins and outs of completing the FAFSA and the Florida Financial Aid Application, plan to attend the NS Mayports Parent Program on Financial Aid. This program is scheduled for Jan. 24 from 68 p.m. It will be held at the USO, 2560 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, FL 32233. You DO NOT have to register for this FREE event. Clarence Richardson, a retired US Navy Lt. Commander and enrollment specialist for FSCJ, is the area expert on all aspects of financial aid. He will explain the pro cess for completing the FAFSA and answer any questions. Lynn Brannon, Military OneSource consultant, will present the military side of financial aid, and I will provide additional information on the Florida Financial Aid Application This special program on financial aid is offered for military parents and students as part of Duval County Public Schools Financial Aid Nights. If you are unable to attend the presentation on Jan. 24, you can attend any of DCPS Regional Financial Aid Nights. This schedule is included. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Need Financial Aid for College? Hoping For A Bright Futures Scholarship?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowing I love snowy white winters, but ever since the Navy moved us to Florida, the only flakes we see are floating in milk-filled cereal bowls. So, I sit on my sunny screened porch in January, surrounded by green grass, ocean breez es, and palm trees, and I dream of snow. I know, I know, thats nuts. Crazy. Certifiable. But I cant help it. Something was imprint ed in my psyche many years ago, something that makes me associate winter with snow, and snow with pleasure. As a child growing up in Pennsylvania, my heart filled with anticipation at the first snow. To us, snow, especially in copi ous amounts, meant FUN. Snowballs, sled riding, hot chocolate, and one of the most joyous occa sions in a childs life SNOWDAYS. I can recall falling off my flying red plastic sled in a puff of white on the hill behind our house, and laying a minute or two, to make sure I was still in one piece and to listen to the silence how the snow absorbs noise and brings a soft quiet ness to the air. Packed and padded in protective lay ers, I felt swaddled like a baby, watching my breath ascend over me into the air. It was pure joy. Ironically, a serious sledding accident in the winter of 1977 only strengthened my positive association with snow. I was in the fifth grade, and it was the last night of our winter break from school, and also my fathers poker night. While the men played cards in our basement rec room, my brother and I listened to radio reports of a blizzard, and hoped for school closures. Fueled by bravado (and a few beers), my father and his buddies decided it would be a good idea to take our 12-man wooden toboggan out for a run down the hill behind our house. My brother and I couldnt believe our luck, and eagerly followed. With my legs criss crossed under the tobog gans wooden curl, I sat in the front, four men and my brother behind me. Visibility was nil due Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&Potatoesto the blizzard and dark night, but there was a wide path between the houses for our ride. With the weight of the men, we took off like a bullet, and I pulled the ties of my parka hood tight to keep the snow from hitting my face. About halfway down the hill WHAM! The rest came in flashes: my fathers friend looking down wearing one of my hats, someone saying I think its broken, rid ing in the back of a truck, being carried on the toboggan into the hospi tal, three layers of pants being cut off, wanting my mom and dad. I had broken my femur. Apparently, our tobog gan had drifted off course, running into a white flag pole in our neighbors yard. I spent the next two and a half months in a hospital bed, with a weight hanging off the end of my foot. To add insult to injury, during my lengthy hospi tal stay, the historic 1977 blizzard blew into town. Schools were cancelled for over two weeks, and I was stuck in a hospital bed watching Don Ho and eating Jell-O. One might think that the experience would have caused me to asso ciate snow with pain; however, the pain of my broken leg paled in com parison to the envy I had for my peers who spent two glorious weeks out of school, sucking on icicles, throwing snowballs, and drinking hot chocolate. So now, like Pavlovs dog, when winter rolls around, I begin to drool. Sometimes the Navy sends us somewhere that fulfills my nostalgic long ings, like our last tour in snowy Stuttgart, Germany. I must admit, there was a downside. Bundled up like the Michelin Man, I See Life, Page 3

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would trudge four flights down our military stair well housing to our mini van, hazy with salt residue and laden with blackened hunks of snow behind each wheel. Despite spraying de-icing com pound into the locks, the doors would often be fro zen solid, requiring me to climb in from the trunk. But now, even with the memories of crusted, frozen, gritty car doors still freshly juxtaposed against this balmy pastel Florida winter, I cant help but long for snow. Big fluffy, white hunks drop ping from tree branches. Delicate crystalline flakes drifting slowly from the sky. Cold to the touch. Warm to my heart. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2LifeNavy Remembers Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsAs announced by NAVADMIN 001/13, the Navy will join the nation in observing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 21. Navy commands are encouraged to reflect on the recurring theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day Off! and increase their knowledge and awareness of Dr. Kings contributions to American history and civil rights by participat ing in military and com munity events. Dr. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism during the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. Following in the foot steps of his father, King entered the Christian ministry in February 1948 at the age of 19. He was ordained at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and in 1954, upon com pletion of graduate stud ies at Boston University, he accepted a call to serve at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. While ministering there, King became an instrumental leader in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, made famous by the arrest of Rosa Parks. The boycott lasted over a year and led to the 1956 District Court ruling that racial segregation on buses was unconstitutional. Over the course of his lifetime, King was arrested 30 separate times for his par ticipation in civil rights activities. Although King spent the majority of his life preaching on the issues of social justice, empow erment, love and peace, which won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, his attention and efforts also included fighting eco nomic injustice. On April 4, 1968, King journeyed to Memphis, Tenn., to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions. While standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, King was shot and ultimately died. In honor of Kings unfinished efforts, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. The first obser vance was held Jan. 15, 1986, the anniversary of Kings birthday. In 1992, President George H.W. Bush proclaimed the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday would be observed every year on the third Monday of January. On Aug. 23, 1994 Congress passed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday and Service Act, designating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday as a day of national volunteer service. All commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowl edge and awareness of Kings contributions to American history and civil rights through participa tion in military and com munity events and volunteerism within their communities and worldwide. More information on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, including a search engine to find volunteer opportunities near you can be found online at http://www. mlkday.gov/about/ser veonkingday.php. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity Mayport Holds MLK Observance Jan. 18Naval Station Mayport will commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day with an observance on Jan. 18 at 10 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. The Oasis Galley staff will prepare a special meal to immediately follow. The cost of the meal is $4.60 per person.Live In PPV Housing?Make Informed Pet ChoicesFrom StaffWith Valentines Day quickly approaching,you might think a new puppy would make a great gift for your sweetheart. Before you go out and get the new addition, Naval Station Mayport on and off-base housing residents are remind ed that Balfour Beatty Communities does have a pet clause for its residents. According to the BBC pet addendum, Akita, American Bull Dog, Chow, Doberman, Pit Bull and Rotweiller breeds are not permitted and neither are exotic pets, such as snakes and lizards. Only two pets per house are allowoed. Fish tanks and bird cases count as one pet. No more than one first tank is permitted in Housing and no more than two bird cages. All pets must be kept current with vaccinations, testing and treatment and must be approved by management. The privilege of keeping a pet in Housing may be revoked and/or a Letter of Caution issued if the pet is determined to be a nuisance. A nuisance is defined as any action of a pet that endangers life or health, gives offense to the senses, violates laws of decency, or obstructs reasonable or comfort able use of property. For example, an animal may be deemed a nuisance if it: edly barks in such a manner or to such an extent that it disturbs others persons engaging in exer cise or physical activity of a home not occupied by its owner leash law THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 New Workouts Onboard RGB USS Robert G. Bradley Public Affairs OfficerOnboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Sailors are trying to be fit with a new type of workout. Two times a day a famil iar grunting and groan ing can be heard from the focsle or the flight deck where Sailors struggle through the daily RGB Workouts. Everyday the workout is different with sweat and suffering being the only constant. The RGB Workout program was started as an idea by Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class (SW) Tyson Schmidt to provide equipment for the crew to use for exercise with the limited space available onboard. Each workout we beat ourselves up physically, but we have fun doing it, said Schmidt. Schmidt raised $2,200 prior to deployment by selling raffle tickets to the crew in order to purchase kettlebells, slam balls and other workout equip ment. After the deploy ment a drawing will be held to give the workout equipment back to the crew. Initially, Robert G. Bradley was supposed to go on an African Partnership Station mis sion and this required Bradley to give up its current exercise equipment to provide room for stores and other mission essen tial gear. Bradley now has a new mission instead of APS and supports Sixth Fleet Operations in the Mediterranean, however the new workout equip ment is used Monday through Saturday or as operational schedule allows. This new workout pro gram even goes beyond using the equipment. Sailors participating in the RGB Workout are weighed and measured each month using Personal Profile Sheets to continuously monitor their gains and losses. The goal of the RGB Workout is for each participant to see constant improvement over the duration of the deployment. The workouts focus on high intensity and max repetitions with the length being anywhere from 25-45 minutes. I really like the inten sity of the workouts, but we always seem to do my least favorite exer cise, burpees, says Lt.j.g. Daniel J. Pokewaldt, a constant participant in the daily workouts. The workouts are unique and different each time so as not to follow a pattern and they often separate the Sailors into teams to promote competition and teamwork. Competition is also pro vided often at the end of each workout with a short challenge that usually involves a single exercise and going for maximum repetitions or time. This Christmas Eve a special workout was held that was based on the 12 days of Christmas. Each day was an exercise and the workout followed the format of the well known song with each exercise being repeated multiple times. Additionally, each month a RGB Fitness challenge is held to determine whose team of three is the toughest on the ship. The winner of the months challenge gets bragging rights and a right to take their pic ture with the RGB Fitness Challenge Trophy. USS Robert G. Bradley is an Oliver Hazard Perry Class Frigate homeported out of Mayport, Florida, and is currently on a deployment in support of Sixth Fleet operations in the Mediterranean Sea. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Sailors onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) posing after completing the 12 days of Christmas workout. Photo by Ensign Matthew P. Roberts Right, Lt.j.g. Cameron Leseane and Ensign Patrick Staub cheer on Lt.j.g. Jack McGee onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) during the RGB group workouts. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Sailors on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) hold a squat during the RGB group workouts. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Lt.j.g. Pokelwaldt swinging a kettlebell over his head during the RGB Workouts.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 5 C6F Visits USS Robert G. Bradley SailorsFrom Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. 6th Fleet visited Sailors aboard guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Jan. 5. During the visit, Vice Adm. Frank C. Pandolfe toured the ship, held an all-hands call on the ships forecastle, met with the ships senior leader ship, and recognized sev eral Sailors accomplish ments in an awards cer emony. The admirals visit today reiterates the importance of the mission and how important their time away from home is to our national interests, said Cmdr. Peter Ehlers, Robert G. Bradleys com manding officer. Pandolfe thanked the Sailors for their contri butions and spoke about the importance of their deployment. This is a great ship with a proud legacy and youre adding to it today by operating in this the ater, said Pandolfe. Thank you so much for what youre doing. Your mission is very impor tant. Members of the crew felt honored that the fleet commander took time to visit. I felt like it was a good visit, said Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Dana Plummer. Its reassur ing that he would take the time out of his busy schedule to come and see us and talk to us about the great job were doing. It felt really good to know were out here making a difference. During the all-hands call, Pandolfe also pre sented nine Sailors with awards. It was a big honor. Ive never even heard of somebody thats been pinned by the admiral, said Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Marlon Narvaez, who received his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification during the ceremony. Its something Ill remember even after I get out of the Navy. Robert G. Bradley, homeported in Mayport, Fla., is currently deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Vice Adm. Pandolfe pins on Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Marlon J. Narvaezs ESWS pin onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49).-Photo by ET1(SW) Daniel Raley Boatswain Mate 1st Class Bonin pipes during Vice Admiral Pandolfe arrival onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49).RGB Helps Out San Vincenzo Abbey USS Robert G. Bradley Public Affairs OfficerSeveral USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Sailors participated in a com munity relations project at the San Vincenzo al Volturno Abbey during a quality of life port visit in Naples, Italy on Jan 3-4. The abbey was founded in 703 A.D. outside of Naples. The Sailors performed yard work to clear weeds and brush around olive trees in order to prepare the abbeys olive grove for the next harvest and afterwards toured the ancient abbey. The main focus of our team was to help with yard work, said RGBs Community Relations Program Coordinator, Chaplain (Lt.) Stephan Cloer, who stressed that the abbey was short in staffing for the amount of area they had to take care of. This is only the begin ning of a seven-month deployment, and it is the start of RGBs commit ment to community rela tions in foreign ports. The Sailors who volunteered were happy to have this opportunity to help out. One might think Sailors on a liberty port in Italy would be ready for rest and relaxation and would rather see the historical sites in Rome, Naples, and Pompeii. Not so for these 16 community ser vice volunteers from USS Robert G. Bradley. The Sailors kept ask ing if they could do more, Cloer said. Everyone had a great time and we were happy to carry on the great relationship the Navy has with the abbey. This was not the first time the abbey has been visited by Sailors and the Navy has had a long history helping out the nuns at San Vincenzo al Volturno. The abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno is a historical monument, tourist attraction and symbol of Italys longstanding spiritual tradi tions. The site is a major interest for archaeologists, and is becoming recog nized as one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the century. Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Gregory Glover, one of RGBs vol unteers, said the project was fun and worthwhile. It was great to be able to help them out and it was also a cultural expe rience for us, he said. They showed us around the abbey and it was interesting to see a part of ancient Italy. Glover said that RGBs help was appreciated, and that the nuns at the abbey were left with a positive impression of RGB Sailors and the US Navy. There was only one nun there and she was very grateful for our help, Glover said, Together, with our greater numbers, we were able to accom plish more. USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate, is homeported out of Mayport, Fla., and is on a scheduled deployment to the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility in the Mediterranean Sea.-Photo by Lt. Stephen Cloer Sailors from USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) being shown around during a tour of the Abbey of San Vincenzo al Volturno. -Photo by Lt. Stephen Cloer Ensign Matthew L. McCain cutting away brush at the Abbey of San Vincenzo al Volturno. -Photo by Lt. Stephen Cloer Sailors from USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) clear brush at the Abbey of San Vincenzo al Volturno.

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It also calls on all research and development and production and contract modifications that obligate more than $500 million to be cleared with the undersecretary of defense for acquisi tion, technology and logistics before being awarded. For science and technology accounts, the components must provide the undersecretary and the assistant sec retary of defense for research and engi neering with an assessment of the budgetary impacts that the budgetary uncertainty will cause to research priorities.From Page 1BudgetCPPD Releases 2013 Naval Leader Planning Guide and Weekly PlannerCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsThe Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) has released the 2013 edition of the Naval Leader Planning Guide (NLPG) and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner (NLWP), CPPD leadership said Jan. 3. Both versions of the planner were avail able online Dec. 13, and commands can down load the PDF version free-of-charge from Navy Knowledge Online. Users can also down load a file that can be imported into Microsoft Outlook that will popu late personal calendars with the dates found in the product. Commands are authorized to use the downloaded source files to arrange for printing at local facilities to satisfy unit-level requests for the resource. We did a hard scrub of this years the Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner to ensure we had the best possible product, said Capt. John Newcomer, CPPDs com manding officer. We see delivering this product as part of our commit ment to provide the fleet with the tools to lead with courage, respect and trust and mentor future leaders to do the same. The Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Weekly Planner are full of information to help leaders do just that. The NLPG brings together a large amount of information in a compact, portable for mat. This years edition includes a 15-month cal endar (January 2013 to March 2014), a complete list of CPPD courses and services, contact information for all CPPD learning sites and Navy College Offices around the world, the Principles of Naval Leadership, and Navy and Marine Corps Selection Board and Fitness Report/ Evaluation schedules. It also includes a directory of community manag ers and technical advi sors at Navy Personnel Command. The weekly version of this product contains a 13-month calendar, but all other sections con tained in it are the same resources as the monthly guide, including the per sonal and professional development sections and the career management points of contact. The 2013 product includes the latest Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Professional Reading Program list, which was announced in October of 2012 in conjunction with the Navys birthday. The Marine Corps Professional Reading Program list was also updated for 2013. We strive to provide the most up-to-date information possible to ensure the fleet has the informa tion needed to meet mis sion, said Newcomer. Of course theres always an opportunity to improve, and we greatly value feedback from everyone on the Navy and Marine Corps team on how we can make it even better please send us your suggestions. To download the 2013 NLPG, log on to www. nko.navy.mil and select the Leadership tab. The guide can be downloaded as either a PDF file for printing or as an Excel file, which can be imported into Microsoft Outlook. CPPD is responsible for providing a wide range of personal and profession al development courses and materials, including General Military Training, Navy instructor training, alcohol and drug aware ness program training, suicide and sexual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPDs required leadership training is delivered multiple times throughout a Sailors career via com mand-delivered enlisted leadership training mate rial and officer leadership courses in a schoolhouse setting. CPPD also administers the Navys volun tary education program, which provides Sailors with the opportunity to earn college degrees. CPPD additionally man ages the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program, which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprentice ship certifications. For more informa tion about the Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD), visit https://www.netc. navy.mil/centers/cppd NavyNew Navy Apprenticeship Trade AvailableCenter for Security Forces Public AffairsThe Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced Jan. 13 that the fourth installment to its list of apprenticeship trades is now available to Sailors for open enroll ment. The new Armory Technician Apprenticeship Trade is available to Sailors, E-4 and above, who serve in a broad range of ratings such as Gunners Mate, Master-At-Arms, Special Warfare Operator, and more. This is an apprentice level trade appli cable to personnel who store, inventory, issue, receive and maintain records on assigned arms, ammunition and explo sives, said Jose Bautista, Master-At-Arms (MA) programs manager at (CENSECFOR). Sailors can enroll in this new Department of Labor (DoL) approved appren ticeship trade by vis iting United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP) online and select the Enroll/ Reinstate link to begin. Bautista went on to point out that this is probably the only appren ticeship trade that cov ers multiple ratings and provides sailors with improved skills and com petencies. Sailors desiring to enroll must have com pleted the Security Force Weapons Personal Qualifications 301, 305, 308, 322, and 323. A Sailor must also pos sess NEC [Naval Enlisted Classification Code] 0812, 0814, 9525, or 9536, said Bautista. Sailors who successful ly complete the required 2000 hours of document ed experience will earn the distinction of being an Armory Technician. The level of experience covers six select skill areas such as maintenance, inven tory control, security, and safety just to name a few. USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeymanlevel certificates of com pletion for members of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. During their apprenticeship, ser vice members document their military duties while working in their rating or military occupational specialty. Bautista also allud ed to the next wave of apprenticeship trades to be released as being the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship and the Military Working Dog (MWD) Apprenticeship. The package for the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship is cur rently pending DOL approval with an antici pated release sometime this spring or summer. The CIA (Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship) is designed for MA person nel having the military police investigator NEC 2002, as well as appro priate personnel in the USMC and USCG, said Bautista. The MWD apprenticeship is currently in development stages and its anticipated release date is yet to be deter mined. Apprenticeship fore runners to the new Armory Technician Apprenticeship have been highly successful since their debut. For example, the Security Specialist and the Police Officer I (Government Service) apprenticeships have had up to 1,600 active enroll ments. Earning the DOL cer tificate costs the service member nothing and does not normally require working additional offduty hours. USMAP has provided sea-service military members with journeyman level cer tifications for more than 35 years and reached a record 50,000 current active USMAP partici pants last year. These nationally rec ognized certifications give Sailors the opportunity to perform duties and gain experience they might not otherwise have an oppor tunity to achieve, said Bautista. The Center for Security Forces provides special ized training to more than 28 thousand students each year and has 14 training locations. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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New Tool Helps Families Plan DeploymentsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department has launched a new resource to help troops and their families plan for the before, during and after of deploying. Barbara Thompson, direc tor of DODs office for fam ily policy, explained Plan My Deployment during an interview with the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service. This is a new, interactive, online tool that supports service members and their families as they prepare for the different stages of deployment, she said. The new resource guides users through the ins and outs of deployment, Thompson said: from power of attorney and legal assistance consider ations to financial and emotional issues. Other tips and tools address education and training benefits, she added. We modeled this after the very, very popular Plan My Move, which helps with [per manent change of station] moves, she said. Its the same kind of approach: we look at providing the tools and infor mation, and you tailor it to your individual familys needs. Plan My Deployment saves the users information, she said, so people can exit from the site and return at their convenience, picking up where they left off. Though other deployment planning guides and resources already exist, Thompson said, DOD leaders wanted to offer family readiness assistance to the entire active duty, National Guard and Reserve force and their families. While the pace of deployment across the services has dropped since U.S. forces left Iraq and will continue to decline as the combat mission in Afghanistan draws to an end, Thompson said, service members always will face the possibility of deploying for duty. Lets face it: military mem bers deploy all the time. ... Weve learned a lot of lessons during this long-term conflict, and we want to make sure that our service members and their families are prepared for whats in the future, she said. Plan My Deployment is available at DODs Military OneSource website, which also offers a range of other services for military families, she said. Thompson pointed out the site is outside the gates in the public domain, so it is available to extended family members who dont have access to mili tary facilities.Uniform Working Groups Established In FleetFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public AffairsCommander, U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) and Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CPF) distributed a message to commanders and commanding officers Jan. 11 that announces the agendas of two uni form working groups. The working groups are reviewing the requirements and flame resistant qualities of fleet organi zational clothing and subsequently the suit ability of working uni forms worn at sea. They were formed following a recent impromptu test by the Navy clothing tex tile research facility that showed the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I is not flame resistant and will burn when subjected to flame. USFF Commander Adm. Bill Gortney said the working group that will review all organizational clothing worn by Sailors on ships, submarines, and in expeditionary units is designed to inform the second working group, which will ultimately determine the require ments for at-sea work ing uniforms. The Navy removed the require ment for all hands to wear flame resistant uniforms at sea in 1996. The organizational clothing working group has been tasked with providing fact-based information and deter mining whether to limit flame resistant organiza tional clothing to Sailors who work in engineering departments, flight decks, and other high risk areas; or to expand fire resistant organizational clothing to all Sailors afloat, said Gortney. Those findings are necessary before any recommendations can be made about at-sea work ing uniforms. The primary consid eration for both working groups is Sailor safety, and the results will provide the answers needed to maintain operation al readiness and safety requirements. We intend to use these working groups to inform a deliberative review process. We will determine the level of protection our Sailors need, given the missions and tasks we expect them to exe cute in their respective work environments, said Gortney. Both working groups will be comprised of members of the USFF and CPF staffs along with members of the Naval Safety Center, systems commands, and various operational commands. While the groups are not working on a specific timeline, Gortney said he hopes to have the organizational working groups findings in a matter of weeks. The Navy currently requires Sailors who stand watch in engine room or machinery spaces to wear fire retar dant coveralls, with the sleeves rolled down, and when theyre performing maintenance in machin ery spaces where steam is circulating in the pip ing systems or fuel fired machinery is in opera tion. Individual Navy type commanders also provide organizational clothing, with added protection, to Sailors working on the flight deck or as part of damage control teams.New Requirements For Overseas Bases MailNavy Public Affairs Support Element-East Detachment EuropeThe United States Postal Service (USPS) recently sent out a man date that all letter mail being shipped to overseas military installations be addressed with a ninedigit zip code, starting January 2013. The policy change came with an upgrade to USPSs mail sorting system and the opening of an addi tional centralized gateway for receiving and shipping all government mail. The USPS is asking anyone sending letters to service members at overseas bases to label them with a nine-digit zip code, said Chief Logistic Specialist (SW) Jimmy Jimenez, leading chief petty officer of the Naval Support Activity (NSA) Naples Capodichino post office. This change accompanied the opening of a centralized gateway at OHare to take some of the stress off of John F. Kennedy International Airport, which used to be the sole routing hub for government mail. The new mail sorting system will enable mail to be delivered and sort ed quicker by giving the sorting machines another way to divide up the mail. The new address format will include the box number as a four-digit num ber at the end of the zip code. For example: John Smith PSC 999 Box 82 FPO AE 09622-0082 The new system will make it so that everything is already sorted when it gets here, said Jimenez. This means we dont have to spend hours sorting baskets full of mail, and we can put it directly into the boxes. For more information, visit the USPS website at https://www.usps.com/ ship/apo-fpo-guidelines. htm. For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Det. Europe, visit www. navy.mil/local/npaseeu rope THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 7

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ly completed a success ful SRA, Basic Phase, and Training Phase, and participated in Fleet Week New York City in May 2012 and Mobile, Alabamas Bayfest in October 2012. His next duty assign ment will be an internship at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency followed by attendance at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, a college of the National Defense University. Clark will assume command of the guided mis sile destroyer after serving as her executive officer for the past 18 months. Prior to this tour, he served as the Flag Aide to Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa and Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples. He is a native of Pembroke, Georgia and graduated from Morris Brown College in 1995. Clark began his naval career serving aboard USS Kearsarge (LSD 3) as Electrical, Main Propulsion, and Deck Division Officer. He subsequently served on USS Hayler (DD 997) as Navigation/ Administration Officer; as Engineer Officer on board USS Ross (DDG 71); and as Material Officer for Commander, Destroyer Squadron 28 in Norfolk, Virginia. His shore tours include Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, where he earned a Masters Degree in Systems Management under the Joint C4I Curriculum, and the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies.From Page 1RooseveltNavy Implements Changes To INSURVFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public AffairsThe president of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) rolled out major changes to the frequency and grading method of the INSURV program effective Jan. 1. Rear Adm. Robert Wray, INSURV president, said changes to the frequen cy of the inspections and the grading system were implemented to improve the readiness of Navy ships and crews and to provide Navy and con gressional leaders with an accurate reflection of that readiness. Under the old program, INSURV teams conducted exhaustive inspections and surveys of ships every five years and reported their material readiness to Congress. Now ships will be inspected about every 30 months. The Navy is always working to improve how we assess our ships. Over time, we came to the conclusion that ships arent being looked at often enough to give leadership the readiness informa tion we want, and to give ships crews the practice they need to get through the inspections on their own, said Wray. Hence the move to double the frequency of inspections. Under the new inspec tion timeline, INSURV inspectors will conduct a traditional Material Inspection during a units Fleet Response Plan (FRP) cycle. In the alter nating cycle, a similar inspection will be con ducted by the units type commander with INSURV support. The other notable change comes to the overall grading system. Previously, the program utilized a grading status of Satisfactory, Degraded or Unsatisfactory, which oversimplified inspection results with a coarse oneword descriptor attempt ing to describe a ship with nearly 200 sub-systems. The new system will use a more quantifiable INSURV Figure of Merit, which is a weighted aver age of 30 scores used to provide a final grade and report on the overall readiness of a ship. In the past, Sailors could spend up to two years preparing their ship for an INSURV inspec tion. Come as you are is one of the goals of the revised process. It means that rather than exhaus tively preparing for an INSURV, ships will pre pare for deployment, and the INSURV process will measure their material condition as a part of that process. Changes to the scope, breadth and rigor of the INSURV process have already been fully imple mented. Wray said Navy leadership felt the grad ing system and the fiveyear time span between inspections under the old system were not effectively meeting Navy material readiness objectives. The major change for the average Sailor will be two-fold, Wray said. First, each ship, prior to each deployment, will have a full-blown mate rial inspection in which the ship will be expected to get underway, do full power, anchor, shoot guns, operate com bat systems, etc., for a team of external inspec tors. Second, ships will be expected to do this on their own, without months of external preparation and assistance. While twice as many inspections may sound like a bad thing, Wray stressed that the new process will benefit the Sailors who have to pre pare the ship for INSURV. We want the predeployment material inspection to be a nor mal part of doing busi ness, like the Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), something ships know how to do on their own, he said. In a larger sense, we want to create a culture of mate rial readiness in which ships and their crews are always thinking about being ready for INSURV. The concept is to create a culture for material readiness, in which any ship, at any time in the appropri ate part of the FRP, could successfully shoot their guns, do full-power runs, anchor, and demonstrate her combat systems. Wray said the goal of these changes is very simple. In a perfect world, every ship will complete a rigorous material inspec tion prior to every deployment, conducted either by INSURV or by their TYCOM, using INSURV methods. Ships crews will be able to prepare for, and successfully complete, the inspection on their own. Navy leadership will also get true, accurate, unvar nished readiness information upon which to make resourcing decisions. INSURVs primary pur pose is to fulfill Title 10 responsibilities to exam ine the material readiness of U.S. Navy vessels and report the findings to the secretary of the Navy. 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Navy Launches New POD AnnouncementsFrom Defense Media Activity NavyNavy leaders launched Navy Plan of the Day announcements, a new resource on the Navys webpage, www.navy.mil. The initiative is intend ed to get current, relevant information to deckplate Sailors so they can be proactive in managing their careers. We have to keep find ing new and better ways to make sure our people are fully aware of Navy policies and programs that affect their careers and families. This initia tive launches a new page on Navy.mil called Navy Plan of the Day (POD) announcements, dedi cated to giving Executive Officers good material to choose from when put ting together their POD, said Rear Adm. John Kirby, Navy Chief of Information. The POD announce ments page is divided into three sections. The first includes specific POD notes on issues that are of fleet-wide interest. The second is a list of upcoming dates and deadlines from the Navy Leader Planning Guide. The final section is devoted to This Date in Navy History. Coordinators will update the online ver sion as they receive input. In addition to maintain ing the Web page, people can sign up for a weekly e-mail that includes POD information for the coming week at www.govdelivery.com. This will make the information available for Sailors at sea who may have difficulty accessing the internet. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Heaving The Line On USS Farragut Fire Controlman 3rd Class Vincent Schaefer puts a round turn on a bitt aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) as the ship moors. Farragut is deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photos by MC2 A.J. JonesBoatswains Mate 3rd Class Ernest Obengmanu, left, and Seaman Daniel Desir connect a replenishment fixture aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Walter S. Diehl (T-AO 193). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 9

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Happy Birthday 29th USS Halyburton USS Halyburton Public AffairsUSS Halyburtons (FFG 40) crew members celebrate the 29th birthday of the ships commissioning. USS Halyburtons keel was laid on Sept. 26, 1980 and launched on Oct. 13, 1981. Halyburton was named after Pharmacist Mate 2nd Class William D. Halyburton. William Halyburton was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism, while serving with the 5th Marines, dur ing the Battle of Okinawa. On May 10, 1945, Halyburton served with a Marine rifle company against the Japanese in Okinawa when they suf fered numerous casualties after advancing into battle. Exposed to enemy fire, he rushed to aid a fallen Marine the fur thest away. Shielding the man with his own body while administering aid, Halyburton was mortally wounded. On Jan. 7, 1984, the Navy honored Pharmacist Mate 2nd Class William D. Halyburton by naming guided missile frigate 40 after him. A number of other military structures have been named for him, including the Halyburton Quarters in Charleston, South Carolina; a road at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland; and a bar racks at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida. In memory of Halyburtons commis sioning, Halyburton Commanding Officer, Cmdr. David E. Fowler, and the Command Senior Chief, Lee C. Friedlander served cake and ice cream to the Halyburton Sailors. USS Halyburton is scheduled for decom missioning after her 30th anniversary in 2014. Halyburton is currently deployed, working in support of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in counter piracy operations for Operation Ocean Shield in the 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. Above, during USS Halyburtons 29th birthday celebration on board the ship, Commanding Officer, Cmdr. David E. Fowler, serves birthday cake to the crew. Halyburton was named after Pharmacist Mate 2nd Class William D. Halyburton who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during World War II. Right, Command Senior Chief Lee C. Friedlander, serves ice cream to the crew. Halyburton is currently deployed, working in support of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in counter piracy operations for Operation Ocean Shield in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photos by OS3(SW) Quintrel R. Brown 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Halyburton Clean Up In Seychelles USS Halyburton Public Affairs Sailors from USS Halyburton (FFG 40) took time to volunteer at Foyer De Nazareth Boys Orphanage in Anse Etoile during a recent port visit to Victoria, Seychelles. Ten Sailors participated in the community relations project (COMREL), clear ing away underbrush from the orphanage entrance, servicing lawn equipment, and pulling weeds. After the work was finished some of the orphans scaled the palm trees and threw down coco nuts for the Sailors to enjoy. The volunteers were joined by the Consulate Representative, Mrs. Marie-Anette Ernesta, and her family. The nuns who oversee the orphanage prepared a local bread-fruit for all to enjoy. As the Sailors enjoyed the snack, Mrs. Ernesta shared a local saying- Once you have eaten the bread-fruit, you will come back to Seychelles again. The Sailors concluded the COMREL by distribut ing school supplies, fris bees, items donated by the NFLs Green Bay Packers and Carolina Panthers; baseballs, t-shirts, and key chains from the Charlotte Knights, and soccer balls to the 14 orphan boys, ranging from ages 4 to 16, living there. COMRELs are some thing that I love doing. It makes me realize that love and peace can prevail, said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Emmanuel Appiahkupi. If we teach children how to honor natures gifts, the joy and beauty of the outdoors will be here forever. Chaplain Tom Bingol, Halyburtons COMREL organizer, shared that the orphanage projects provide Halyburton Sailors with an excellent opportunity to help those in need and expand their worldviews. Even with a major holiday, busy in-port schedule, and some severe weather courtesy of a pass ing tropical cyclone, Team Haly-B comes through when there is a chance to lend a helping hand. Special thanks to Halyburtons chapter of CSADD, and Ms. Gail Self of Concord, North Carolina, who coordinated with the Packers, Panthers, and Knights and provided soccer balls for the event. USS Halyburton is deployed off of the coast of Africa in support of Operation Ocean Shield. Photos by MC2 Jamar Perry Above left, Halyburton volunteers help pull weeds and plant flowers outside of the Foyer De Nazareth Boys Orphanage in Victoria, Seychelles. Bottom left, Boatwains Mate 3rd Class Frank Charles (Left) and Lt. Tom (CHAPS) Bingol (Center) help pull weeds to help beautify the orphanage. Above, all of the volunteers from Halyburton with the boys from the orphanage and the nuns and volunteers who run the orphanage. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 11

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Thursday, Jan. 17 North Jacksonville Baptist Church, located at 8531 North Main St., will host the exciting Jubilee Tour, featuring talented Christian recording art ists, The Booth Brothers, Greater Vision and Legacy Five. The Jublee con cert will begin at 7 p.m. Reserve tickets online at www.imcconcerts.com by phone at 1-800-9659324 or in person at the North Jacksonville Baptist Church in Jacksonville. Friday, Jan. 18 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association #290 will hold a Mexican dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Rd. Donations are $8. The dinner is open to the public. Take out orders are welcome. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, Jan. 19 North Atlantic right whales visit Northeast Florida waters to give birth to calves December through March. Join a ranger to learn about one of the worlds most endangered large mam mals. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens will hold its annual CSX Train Days promotion on Jan. 19-20. For these two days the Zoo will only charge $1 per person for train rides, sponsored by CSX Corporation. CSX employees will act as honorary train conduc tors for part of the twoday period. For more information on the Zoo, log on to www.jackson villezoo.org. Tuesday, Jan. 22 The Jacksonville Public Library and The Artist Series proudly present the 11th Annual Family Night on Broadway, dur ing opening night of Mary Poppins during preshow at 6:30 p.m. and inter mission. Family-friendly activities will include a Mary Poppins sing-along, face painting, color ing tables, arts and crafts, green screen photos, and an origami kite station inspired by the song Lets Go Fly a Kite. Guests can sign up for library cards and check out books at the show. All Family Night activities are free with paid admission tick ets. Discounted Family Night tickets are available through The Artist Series. Buy one adult ticket and get a childs ticket free with the passcode: CHILD when you order online at www.artistseriesjax.org. For more information call (904) 442-BWAY (2929). Restrictions apply. Saturday, Jan. 26 Join a Park Ranger at 1 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural com munities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park and is part of the Timucuan Adventure Day event. No reservations are necessary and the program is free.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR FRGs USS Taylor private party on Jan. 18 from 6-8 p.m. USS Hue City Family Readiness Group on Jan. 22 from 7-8 p.m. USS Halyburton Family Readiness Group on Jan. 25 from 6-8:30 p.m. No Dough Dinner There will be a No Dough Dinner on Jan. 28 from 5-7 p.m. featuring chicken and broccoli cas serole. Sponsored by Atria Humana Challenge Weekend Join the World Golf Hall of Fame in honor ing Bob Hope Jan. 17-20. The World Golf Hall of Fame is celebrating the Humana Challenge, for merly the Bob Hope Classic. Guests can enjoy the Halls Bob Hope: Shanks for the Memory exhibit while watching the tournament in the Bob Hope Theater. Visitors can also participate in a spe cial Bob Hope scavenger hunt in the museum for a chance to win a Humana Challenge Prize pack (no purchase necessary to enter). Active and retired military receive free admission to Museum, and St. Johns County residents will receive 30 per cent off admission. Free JaxCERT Emergency Preparedness Course The American Legion Auxiliary-Post 316 in Atlantic Beach will be offering a FREE emergency preparedness course for anyone interested. The program is free and open to the public. Classes began on Wednesday, Jan. 16 and meet weekly from 6:30-9 p.m. Free JaxCERT Emergency Preparedness Course The American Legion Auxiliary-Post 316 in Atlantic Beach will be offering a FREE emergency preparedness course for anyone interested. The program is free and open to the public. Classes began on Wednesday, Jan. 16 and meet weekly from 6:30-9 p.m. Military Wives Vendor Show Come out and sup port your local military spouse businesses at the Mayport USO on Feb. 3 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and get a head start on your Valentines Day shopping. This event is free and open to the public. MLS Soccer Match Coming To Jacksonville On Feb. 15, 2013, the Philadelphia Union will face another MLS team, to be announced in the near future, at Everbank Field starting at 7:30 p.m. Use the link and password listed below and $2 for every ticket will be donated back to your local Jacksonville USO office. Come out and support this great event and our local Military Men and Women. There will also be a FREE youth clinic at 5:30 p.m before the game. PASSWORD USOJAX www.ticketmaster.com/ event/2200498AA0DC 6031?did=uso COMPASS: A Course For Navy Life Upcoming Course For Navy Spouses COMPASS is a 12-hour Team mentoring program developed by spouses for spouses. Come make new friends as you learn about the Navy lifestyle and gain knowledge and skills to successfully meet the challenges ahead. COMPASS is FREE and open to ALL Navy spous es! For more information and to register for the upcoming February session, please visit: http:// www.gocompass.org/ jacksonville.html 2013 Players Championship Birdies For Charity Campaign The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased once again to be participating in the 2013 Players Championship Birdies for Charity Campaign held in May in conjunction with The Players Championship. For more information visit www.birdiesforchar ity.playerschampionship. com to participate and become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. 2nd Annual Jax Area USO Chili Cook Off Do you think you make the best chili around? Would you like a chance to prove it? The 2nd annual Jax Area USO Chili Cook off will be held February 23rd from 12:00-5:00pm at the Fleet Reserve on Collins Road. For more information and registration, visit www. jaxusochilicookoff.com. Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submission of a current military identification card and proof of Florida residency. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. NEWS 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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NS Mayport FFSC Sets Workshop, Class ScheduleFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Jan. 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Jan. 19, 11:30-until, IA Childrens Circus Outing Veterans Memorial Arena Jan. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 23, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying, FFSC Room 702 Jan. 23, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course, FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 24, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training FFSC Room 1124 Jan. 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 28, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Jan. 29, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Jan. 29, 1-3 p.m., What About The Kids FFSC Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. Jan. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 31, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend.Financial ManagementFinancial management is a key quality of life issue that affects every Sailor, family member and the command. Sailors experiencing financial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their command financial specialist to develop a budget, explore options for military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other strategies. Visit www.MilitarySaves.org to learn more.NEX Online Offers Flat Rate ShippingFrom NEXCOMThe NEX online store, www.myNavy Exchange.com, now offers flat rate shipping on all merchandise. NEX customers can shop confidently knowing what to expect when it is time to check out, said Tess Paquette, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Chief Merchandising Officer. By having flat rate ship ping on all orders, cus tomers can calculate the total cost of their order before they check out. Customers will pay $5.95 for standard deliv ery (7 10 business days); $12.95 for priority delivery (3-5 business days); and $17.95 for express delivery (1-3 business days). Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 13

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Jan. 18: Karaoke Night. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Belt it out at karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FLC JAX. For tickets, con tact (904) 270-7178. Jan. 24: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Jan. 29: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 19. 270-5451 Feb. 1: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Feb. 1: Sugar & Spice Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Aftershock. Free food, beverage specials, giveaways and more. 2707205 Feb. 2: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 2: UFC 156Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Feb. 3: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 3: Superbowl XLVII at Castaways Lounge. Pre-game at 5:30 p.m. Kick off at 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. Free t-shirts for the first 100 attendees through the door. 2707205 Feb. 5: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Feb. 6: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Feb. 6: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Feb. 6: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 6: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Feb. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 11-13: Pre-Season Softball Tournament Sign up by Feb. 4. Feb. 12: Mardi Gras 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 12: Mardi Gras Party 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring DJ entertain ment. Free food, Mardi Gras trivia, prizes Feb. 13: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the SERMC. For tickets, con tact (904) 270-5431. Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Special. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. There will be double payouts on all warm-ups, $150 payouts on all hard cards, free desserts and dauber, plus, when you bring your significant other, they will receive a free paper pack. 270-7204 Feb. 18: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 MWRJan. 18: Freedom FridayNight at the Drive-In. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 25: Teen Trip: Als Pizza and Beaches Area. Depart Teen Center at 6 p.m.; return 10 p.m. Please bring money for dinner; Permission slip required. 246-0347 Feb. 1: Teen Base Round Up. 7 p.m. at the Teen Center. Follow up the Base Round up with soda and sliders at the Teen Center. Permission slip required. 246-0347 Feb. 2: Freedom FridayFootball Fanatics. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 3: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb 14: Youth Drama Club Presents Charlie Browns Valentine. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680 Feb. 15: Freedom FridayCupid Shuffle. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 16: Teen Lock In 7 p.m.7 a.m. at the Teen Center. Enjoy a bonfire, smores, hot dogs, games, ice cream break fast and more. Permission slip required; cost is $15 advanced sign-up and $20 day of, space permitting. 246-0347 Feb. 23: Teen Bowling Trip. Depart Teen Center at 7 p.m.; return 10 p.m. Permission slip required. KID 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Jan. 18: Karaoke Night 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Belt it out at karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Jan. 20: Disc Golf. Van departs 11 a.m. FREE; equipment provided. Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 23: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FLC JAX. For tickets, con tact (904) 270-7178. Jan. 24: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: LifeSized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Jan. 26: Hoggetowne Medieval Faire. Van departs 9 a.m. Cost $7. Jan. 27: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE; Transportation only Jan. 29: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 19. 270-5451 Jan. 30: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 31: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 1: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Feb. 1: Sugar & Spice Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Aftershock. Free food, beverage specials, giveaways and more. 2707205 Feb. 2: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 2: UFC 156Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Feb. 3: Superbowl XLVII at Castaways Lounge. Pre-game at 5:30 p.m. Kick off at 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. Free t-shirts for the first 100 attendees through the door. 2707205 Feb. 4: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 & 1587 and get the latest news on your Liberty program. Feb. 5: WWE Smackdown. Van departs 5 p.m. FREE. Must be in uniform. Feb. 6: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Feb. 6: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 6: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Feb. 6: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 7: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. Feb. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 LIBERTY Thursday, Jan 24 7:30 pm at Castaways Lounge LOUNGECASTAWAYS G2 A1 M3 E1 N1 I1 G2 H2 T1 More info? (904) 270-7205www.facebook.com/castawaysloungemayport Food! Fun! Prizes!Enjoy a night of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more! THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013 15

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Experts Weigh-In On Staying, Getting FitFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsGetting fit rates high among resolutions peo ple make at the start of the New Year, and Navys Physical Readiness Program has resources and information to help Sailors and families achieve their fitness goals, officials said Jan. 8. Whether you exer cise and want to increase your current level of fit ness or you are looking to start a routine to attain a healthy level of fitness we can help, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Focusing on the wellness of Sailors and their fami lies by providing the skills and tools for fitness and nutrition is one of our primary objectives. While it is common for Sailors to skip or reduce workouts over the holi days according to Moore, Sailors should be able to resume their normal fit ness routine if little time elapsed between work outs over the holidays. Most commands wrap up their fall physical fit ness assessments before Thanksgiving and there are gatherings and shop ping that may eat into fitness time over the holi days, so it is natural for people to exercise less, said Moore. Missing four to five days of exercise over the holidays should have little impact on fit ness routines. Sailors who missed more than six days between workouts may experience some muscle soreness when resuming their routine. For those who havent worked out since the last semiannual physi cal readiness test Moore recommends starting off slowly and building up slowly. Start with a shorter duration for cardio-respiratory exercise and less weight for strength train ing. Build up from there, said Moore. Sailors can start with 20 minutes of some sort of exercise two or three days per week, slowly increasing time by five minutes per week until they reach their desired level of activity. If you have truly been inactive and want to start a routine, then you should consult your physician before performing exer cise, he added. Once you establish fit ness routine Moore rec ommends making it part of a weekly schedule. Consistency is the key, he said, adding that whether serving on shore duty, on board ship or submarine, or in the dirt and sand, the Navy pro vides its Sailors resources and equipment to remain fit to fight. Navy guidance recommends Sailors complete at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week and perform strength-training exer cises at least twice a week to work all major muscle groups. Examples of moderateintensity cardio-respi ratory activities include brisk walking (3 mph or faster), bicycling (slower than 10 mph) and water aerobics. High-intensity activities include jogging or running, lap swim ming, jumping rope and circuit training. Strength training includes push ups, lifting weights, and working with resistance bands. Including two ses sions per week of 8-10 exercises that work all the different parts of the body (legs, hips, back, chest, abs, shoulders and arms) repeated for 10-12 reps each can improve fitness, decrease muscle loss and help maintain a healthy weight. The Navy Physical Readiness Program website at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/support/physical/ Pages/default2.aspx has links to sample warmups and workouts users may choose. One sam ple workout specifically addresses techniques to improve performance on the Navys physical readi ness test. Sailors and families will also find links to nutrition information that when followed compliment a good fitness routine. No matter what your fitness goals are, good nutrition can help improve your exercise performance, decrease your recovery time from strenuous exercise, pre vent injuries due to fatigue, and provide the fuel required during times of high-intensity train ing and weight control, said Lt. Cmdr Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Physical Readiness Program. The site also contains a Navy registered dieti tian locator so Sailors and family members may meet face-to-face with an expert and learn more about incorporating proper nutrition to maximize the benefits of their fit ness routine. Whether it is maintaining or seeking to attain a healthy level of fitness the Navy provides Sailors and family mem bers the tools to reach their goals, according to Moore. Get ShipShape With Health PromoFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Jan. 22 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty personnel, adult dependents, and retir ees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calo ries, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more infor mation, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-270-5251 ext. 16. Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Want to see more mus cles in the mirror? Perfect your form and technique in a resistance training class designed to maxi mize muscle strength. This full body strength training class will chal lenge every major mus cle group and includes core training specifically designed to build and strengthen the muscles of the abdomen and back. Get ready to get ripped! 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Reap the benefits of flexibility training in this 30-minute class designed for increasing range of movement of limbs and improving circulation. Stretching assists with relaxation, flexibility, strength and injury pre vention. Class includes active and passive stretches as well as myofascial release. Learn proper stretching techniques for every muscle in the body and tissue management techniques that can be used after every workout to aide in recovery. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training Tuesday 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Wednesday 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Open Sandbox 2:30-4:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp HIT At the Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7:30 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT 12 p.m., Intro to HIT Saturday 9:30 a.m., HIT 10:30 a.m. Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. After completion of the course, participants will be issued a card which will allow them to use the facility when accompa nied by a parent or legal guardian. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor This incentive program develops muscu lar strength and power needed to attain the Steel Anchor Award. Structured and progres sive training targets muscles to increase your bench press, squat, and dead-lift. Participants will utilize multiple piec es of free weight, selec torized and plate loaded strength equipment in the gym. Steel Anchor award includes a shirt and plaque recognition. 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning This 45-minute indoor cycling class will enhance your speed and strength and burn mega calories without compromising joint health. Good for all fitness levels. Meets at the back of the temp Gym weightroom. Thursday 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing MWR 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 17, 2013