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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00281


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Obama Noms New SECDEFAmerican Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama announced his nomi nations to serve as the next leaders of the Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency on Jan. 7. At a White House news conference, Obama announced his selection of Chuck Hagel to be next defense secretary and John Brennan as the next CIA director. If confirmed by the Senate, Hagel will replace Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, who confirmed his plans to retire. Brennan, if confirmed, will replace David H. Petraeus, who resigned as CIA director in November. Chuck Hagel is the leader that our troops deserve, Obama said. He is an American patri ot. He enlisted in the Army and volunteered for Vietnam. As a young private, and then sergeant, he served with honor alongside his own brother. Hagel, 66, a former U.S. senator from Nebraska, earned two Purple Hearts as an infantry squad leader in the Vietnam War. He later co-founded a cellular telephone company. Obama said Hagels brother rescued him when he was injured by shrapnel, and that Hagel did the same when his brother was wounded later, noting that his nominee to lead the Pentagon still bears the scars and shrapnel for battles he fought in our name. Chuck Hagels leadership of our military would be historic, the president said. Hed be the first person of enlisted rank to serve as secretary of defense, one of the few secretaries who have been wounded in war, and the first Vietnam veteran to lead the department. Obama noted Hagels dedication to service mem bers and their families, and said his experiences give him the ability to relate to troops. In Chuck Hagel, our troops see a decorated com bat veteran of character and strength they see one of their own, Obama said. Chuck is a cham pion of our troops, veterans and our military fami lies. With Chuck, our troops will always know -just like Sergeant Hagel was there for his own brother -Secretary Hagel will be there for you, he said. Hagels experience includes stints as depu -Photo by Paige GnannA car detours onto Oakhill Street from Baltimore Street as the new Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project begins with the closure of the intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore. The first phase of the project will reconstruct the intersection into a roundabout.From StaffTraffic is finding new routes around construc tion as the first phase of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project began this week. The intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore Street is closed to vehicular traffic and not expected to reopen until mid-March. The interesection is being reconstructed into a roundabout, a type of circular intersection in which road traffic flows in one direction around a central island. The Hanna Park/ Seminole Gate is also closed for inbound and outbound traffic until the completion of Phase I. Eastbound traffic on Moale Avenue will be restricted to local traffic only and will be detoured starting at Oriskany Street for access to Bennett Shores East Housing. Southbound traffic on Baltimore Street will be restricted to local traf fic only at B1868/Oak Hill Street and will be detoured through Oak Hill Street. Personnel residing in Bennett Shores East, Officer and Senior Enlisted areas, will have to exit the installa tion via Oak Hill Street or Oriskany Street. Drivers and pedestrians should use caution since traffic on Massey Avenue has increased. There are four phases of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement Project, which will continue through February 2014. School Bus Schedule There will be no chang es to the school bus stops during the road construc tion. Temporary side walks are being construct ed around the intersec tion construction site to allow school children safe passage to their bus stop locations. Mayport Takes Plunge For New Year -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyServicemembers, family and friends came out to Naval Station Mayport to celebrate the new year by taking a dive into the Atlantic Ocean as the base Morale, Welfare and Recreation held its first "Polar Plunge". Blue lines show the detour path around construction at Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue.Detour AheadSECDEF, Page 6NS Mayport will hold its quarterly blood drive on Jan. 29 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1, Room 104. NS Mayport will hold a Martin Luther King Jr. Observance on Jan. 18 from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at Beachside Community Center.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Happy New Year! I thank each of you for having a safe holiday season and returning fresh and recharged. As you all know, we cant execute our vital National Security mission without each and every Sailor, Government Service employee and contractor. Naval Station Mayport is poised for a fantastic 2013 and we have a busy and exciting year ahead! Global Presence and Power Projection start right here on the han gar decks and the waterfront of Naval Station Mayport where we provide the Finest Services to the Finest Fleet. Yesterday construction began on Phase I of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement Project. This is a 4-phase project, with the first phase affecting the intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore Street. The current four way, two stop sign configuration will be replaced by a Roundabout that will enable traffic to safely and quickly merge and continue without the use of the stop signs. As with all change, the most dif ficult part is the initial phase. I ask that everyone be patient, respect the traf fic laws on and off base, and pay keen attention to the safety of other drivers, pedestrians and your shipmates while improvements are being made to our Installation. Remember that no mat ter how vital it may seem at the time, there is not a single good reason to put your shipmates at risk. Please see NS Mayports Facebook page. It outlines road closures, access routes and contra traffic flows and times. Also valuable is the scrolling Marquee at the front gate for updates and changes. As we progress I will update through our Facebook page and The Mirror. All Installation E-6s get ready for the CPO exam later this month. The Ocean Breeze Conference Center will be the location for the 2013 E7 Navy-Wide Advancement Examination. The date of the examination is Jan. 17. I wish all candidates the best and look forward to seeing them advance in the near future. Also, E6, E5 and E4 exams will be held in March. Sexual Assault is still an issue of vital concern to all of us in the Naval Service. I cannot stress enough how important it is for us to take care of each other. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) hotline number is 563-1254. Again, Happy New Year to all my ship mates out there and I look forward to an incredibly successful year. We will con tinue to support the fleet and build lead ers while having fun doing it! I wish each and every one All The Best in 2013. Be safe and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSUp until recently little was known about how children were affected by long absenc es from parents who were deployed and the reintegration after their return home. The National Military Family Association commissioned a study by the RAND Corporation which addressed this issue. The research was among the first to explore the effects of deployment academically, socially, and emotionally on military children during an extended period of wartime. Results showed that children in the study were experiencing above average levels of emotional and behavioral difficul ties. The major points from the research included the following: Children in military fami lies experienced emotional and behavioral difficulties at rates above national averages. About one-third of the chil dren reported symptoms of anxiety, which is somewhat higher than the percentage reported in other studies of children. Self-reported problems var ied by age and gender: Older youths and boys reported more difficulties with school and more problem behaviors, such as fighting; greater numbers of younger children (compared with older children) and girls reported anxiety symptoms. The results also revealed challenges posed specifically by deployment: Longer periods of parental deployment (within the past three years) were linked to greater difficulties in childrens social and emotional function ing, at least based on caregiver reports. Deployment-related chal lenges varied by age and gen der: Older youths experienced greater schooland peer-related difficulties during deployment; girls experienced greater diffi culties than boys did during the period of reintegration. Children whose caregivers had better self-reported mental health were better able to cope with the deployment experi ence both during and after. Living on-base was linked with reduced difficulties both during and after deployment. The results represented an important first step in under standing the link between parental deployment and military child and family wellbeing. The findings suggest the need for more research and also highlight several avenues for possible intervention. For example, families may benefit from targeted support to deal with stressors from multiple months of deployment, rather than only during initial months. Further, families in which care givers face mental health issues may need more support for both caregiver and child. To provide the targeted sup port suggested by the study, Big Brothers Big Sisters has estab lished the Military Mentoring Program in Northeast Florida. Support will be provided to children of active duty parents/ guardians by caring adult men tors. The mentors will visit children enrolled in the pro gram at Finegan Elementary School one hour each week. This one-to-one mentoring is designed to help students focus on improving their grades, behavior, and self-confidence. The Big Brothers Big Sisters Military Mentoring program engages active duty, reserve or retired/separated military per sonnel, as well as civilians, as volunteer mentors. Staff care fully match adult mentors and youth mentees in long-term, one-to-one friendships and provide professional support for the volunteers, children and families throughout the life of the match. Contact Marilyn Hill by phone at (904) 7279797 X237 or by email at mhill@bbbsnefl. org for more information on becoming a mentor or to enroll your child in the BBBS Military Mentoring Program. Interested in Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program but not a military family? For more information, call Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida at (904) 727-9797. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Read the full report from the study Longer Parental Deployment Linked to More Emotional Challenges for Military Children at http:// www.rand,org/news/ press/2009//12/07.html. Big Brothers Big Sisters New Military Mentoring Program Available at FineganJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingIt is the first day of the 2013 and I am watch ing TV. Amazingly I am watching commercials of all things. Why? Not really sure, perhaps its because in this day of Hulu, Netflix, Apple TV, and TIVO I have forgotten what an infomercial looks like. Am I nostalgic? Sentimental? Bored? For whatever whimsical rea son I find myself watch ing that increasingly endangered item called the television advertise ment most remarked upon once a year during the Superbowl. But on this day, it is most definitely not Superbowl Sunday with snazzy, hilarious, inven tive commercials. This is the day one of the new year and after an hour or so I find myself looking at the fourth Weight Watchers com mercial of the day. The message is clear: lose weight and be happy, now is the time to be a better person. Who invented New Years resolutions? Why does this time of year see the gyms packed with well intentioned and moti vated people trying to do better, be better, do over? I am going to stop smok ing. I am going to drink less beer. This year I am going to get my finances in order. This year I am going to stress less. This year I am going to look fit and younger. This year I WILL be successful This year I am going to be happier. This year I am going to? It reminds me of when I was a child and I would play a game and start poorly. The next words out of my mouth would be Do over. Begin again, get off on a better foot. I think as an adults we long for the simplicity of those youthful days and games. But life rarely affords do overs in most circumstances. Maybe that is what New Years day and its traditions are all about? Maybe we have built into our lives one day of the year on the calendar where we can try and do over something in our live. I like the idea, I really do. I guess what is both ering me on this day is the message that is being delivered. The pursuit of happiness seems to be about changing my body or my appearance or my bank account or my career. Really? If I get a do over this is where I want to spend it. This will give more meaning to my life? The late Victor Frankel wrote a book called, Mans Search for Meaning. He was a philosopher, psycholo gist, and a survivor of a Nazi death camp called Auschwitz. He says in his book, Success like happi ness cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of ones dedi cation to a cause greater than oneself or as the byproduct of ones surren der to a person other than oneself. He goes on to say, I want you to listen to what your conscience com mands you to do then you will live to see that success will follow you. His message to his fel low human beings is that we dont choose what life dishes out but we do choose how we respond. Victor Frankel is what I am thinking about as the next infomercial pops on the screen. This one has Cindy Crawford in it and she is telling me about a facial crme made from a rare melon found in a secluded field in France that will turn back time and make me look young er and thereby also happier. What are your New Years resolutions? How about investing a little of your time into the spiri tual aspect of your life? How about committing to pursuing more meaning in your life? Here is your chance! Its Jan 2013, DO OVER!Chap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain CHAPLAINSSome Days It Would Be Nice To Call Do Over Free Volunteer Tax ServicesMayport Tax Center will open for busi ness starting Jan. 24. Tenative hours of operation are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., MondayThursday; 7:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Friday; and 8-4 p.m. Saturday. VITA is located 707A Everglades Ct in hous ing. Parking is avail able in the parking lot on the corner of Moale Ave. and Maine St.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Hu City, HSL-48 Back For HolidaysUSS Hu City Public AffairsFamilies and friends welcomed back the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) on Dec. 19, following the ships sixmonth deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. While the stay in Mayport will be shorter than usual this time, the return will be no less joy ous nor the achievements of Hu Sailors any less appreciated. The ship and her crew have done an awesome job on this deployment! said Command Master Chief (SW) Raymond Charest. This doesnt happen by accident. We have challenged our Sailors, and demand ed perfection. They answered every challenge with determination and have far exceeded our expectations. Hu City and her Golden Dragon crew of more than 350 Sailors spent their deploy ment serving as shot gun to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (IKE) and as Air Defense Commander in U.S 5th Fleet. Hu City pro vided an ever-present escort for IKE as the car rier launched aircraft in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and provided strategic deterrence in an effort to promote peace in the areas to which she was deployed. With her sophisticated AEGIS weapons system, Hu City acted as the primary pro tector for IKE and rarely left her side. High-risk evolutions were commonplace, too, as Hu conducted 14 sea and anchor evolutions, a dozen strait transits, and roughly one replenish ment-at-sea (RAS) per week, safely taking on board five million gallons of fuel. Though unforeseen circumstances sometimes made these evolutions even more dif ficult than normal, the crew dealt with them deft ly and avoided danger at even the most precarious of times. Meanwhile, Hu Citys SH-60B helicopter detachment, Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, Detachment 8, aided Carrier Strike Group 8s surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare efforts by flying more than 230 sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and presence operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. They also completed more than 900 landings. Consisting of nine aircrew and 18 maintenance per sonnel and two SH-60B helicopters, the detach ment achieved an 85 per cent mission capable rate and a 95 percent sortie completion rate. The HSL 48, Detachment 8 All Stars flew more than 700 mis hap free flight hours, 450 of them at night. I am very proud of our detach ment and all the obstacles they had to overcome to successfully com plete this deployment, said Lt. Ryan Rabbit Culbertson, a pilot with HSL-48, Detachment 8. While the crew spent most of deployment working hard, they had a handful of well-deserved port visits that served as a welcome break from the rigors of the sea. Hu City visited Cannes, France, Souda Bay, Greece, and Bahrain. The Sailors experiences ranged from those as familiar as going to a Navy Exchange to as exotic as having a mani cure by sticking their feet in a fish tank. Hu City performed superbly during the past six months, and now will enjoy a brief stay back home in Mayport before heading back out to com plete her assigned mis sions. This ship and her crew have improved in every way since we left Mayport on June 20, said Capt. Dan Uhls, the ships commanding officer. I expect more of the same when we commence deploy ment in just a couple months. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSanta Claus hands out candy to the children of Sailors off the USS Hu City during the ships homecoming on Dec. 19 at NS Mayport. Sailors assigned to Hu City returned home to Naval Station Mayport from a six-month deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergThe new fathers depart the ship to meet their children for the first time, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSonar Technician Surface 3rd Class Thomas Traske greets his wife on the pier for the traditional first kiss during the homecoming of USS Hue City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian Berg Family and friends await the arrival of their loved ones aboard the guided-missile cruis er USS Hu City (CG 66) during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 5 USS Hu City Runs Suez Canal 500 Marathon USS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsThe Suez Canal can be a long and navigation ally challenging transit as a ship sails with Egypt on one side and the Sinai Peninsula on the other. The transit is unlike any other because of the proximity of land and its narrow channel requiring attentive watch standers. For her outbound transit home, the Golden Dragon crew of USS Hu City (CG 66) ran a continuous relay around the main decks from sunrise to sunset as the ship sailed north. The Suez Canal is an artificial waterway in Egypt that opened in 1869, connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. Running 101 miles in length and stretching 984 feet in width, the Sailors of Hu City couldnt help but realize the impor tance the body of water holds in relation to the international community as they ran. The crew of Hu City ran a total of 505 miles, which equates to the length of five Suez Canal transits. The relay started when Hu City Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Ray Charest took to the track at sun rise as the guided-mis sile cruiser sailed past Port Suez, Egypt and ended when Hu Citys Commanding Officer, Capt. Dan Uhls took the baton as ship sailed passed Port Said and into the Mediterranean some eight hours later. With multiple runners on the weather decks at one time, the initially daunting feat was eas ily accomplished. All the Sailors ran with enthusi asm and didnt seem to tire as the transit contin ued. It was a great experi ence, said Chief Gunners Mate (SW) Joseph Mclendon. Everyone should have the opportu nity to do something like that. Relay organizers, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class (SW/EXW) Shana Alger, of Hu City, and Aviation Ordananceman 2nd Class (AW/SW) Lisa Broadfield, of the Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 Det. 8 AllStars, played a big role setting up the run. They even made a baton to be carried at all times by a runner. The baton was made out of a dogging wrench and braided line that really gave the run a relay-like feel. Wow! What a great experience, said Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 1st Class (SW) Jorge Siguenza. I will not lie. It was not an easy task, but it was an experience of a lifetime, and Im glad I did it. The run was coordinat ed beforehand with the help of sign up sheets that designated times slots for each runner. Each runner was required to carry the baton for fifteen minutes, but many ran for much longer. In fact, one officer from the embarked heli copter squadron, Lt. Mark Foris, ran for more than two hours. Water and music were stationed on the aft part of the ship as Sailors sporting their Navy physical training (PT) gear joined in on the fun throughout the day. It was really nice to run outside, said Foris. The weather cooperated and having land on either side was a nice change. A lot of Sailors you typi cally dont see running along the weather decks were out there enjoying themselves. The amount of participation was sur prising. All in all it was a suc cessful event allowing Sailors to get topside to see the sights while also partaking in some physi cal activity. It was an all hands effort as runners from all fitness levels participated together. All ran for different reasons, but on this day, Sailors from Hu City ran as a team and thats what was important. -Photos courtesy of USS Hu CityThe crew of USS Hu City ran a collective 505 miles as the ship sailed through the Suez Canal during its transit to its homeport of NS Mayport. Sailors cheer on their shipmates during the Suez Canal 500, a crew challenge to run more than 500 miles as the ship transited through the Suez Canal. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergYeomen 3rd Class Brice Lovan holds his son for the fist time, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian BergEnsign Jarrett Seibel greets his wife and for the first time, his 5-month-old son, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian BergGas Turbine System Technician Electrical 1st Class Pierre Rene hugs his wife and son, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66).-Photo by MC3 Damian BergFamily and friends await the arrival of their loved ones during USS Hu City's home coming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergFamily and friends of Electricians Mate 2nd Class Bradley hold a sign welcoming him back to Naval Station Mayport during the USS Hue City homecoming. Hue City was operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security, the ater security efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.

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Fiscal Cliff Legislation Affects Military, Civilian PaychecksFrom American Forces Press ServiceThe legislation that President Barack Obama signed Jan. 2 that post poned the fiscal cliff means changes to military and civilian paychecks, Defense Finance and Accounting Service offi cials said today. The legislation increas es Social Security with holding taxes to 6.2 per cent. For the past two years during the tax holiday the rate was 4.2 per cent. The increase in Social Security withholding taxes affects both military and civilian paychecks, officials said. For civilian employ ees, officials said, this will mean a 2 percent reduc tion in net pay. For military person nel, changes to net pay are affected by a variety of additional factors such as increases in basic allow ances for housing, subsis tence, longevity basic pay raises and promotions. Service members could see an increase in net pay, no change or a decrease, military personnel and readiness officials said. For military members, Social Security with holding is located on their leave and earnings statement in the blocks marked FICA taxes for Federal Insurance Contributions Act. DOD civilians will see the change on their leave and earnings statement under OASDI for old age, survivors, and disability insurance. Reserve component members will be the first to see potential changes in their net pay as a result of the law, DFAS officials said. Changes will be reflected in their January paychecks. Active duty military personnel will see pay adjustments in their January mid-month pay check and will be reflect ed on the January leave and earnings statement. DOD civilians will see social security withhold ing changes reflected in paychecks based on the pay period ending December 29, 2012, for pay dates beginning in January. DFAS stresses that all personnel should review pay statements carefully. Average BAH Rates Get Increase For 2013From Department of Defense Public AffairsThe Department of Defense released the 2013 Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rates, which take effect Jan. 1, 2013. Overall rates will increase an average of 3.8 percent this year. For members with dependents, average increases in BAH are approximately $60 per month. A typical E-6 with dependents, for exam ple, will find his/her BAH about $60 per month higher than last year, while an O-3 with depen dents will receive about $55 more than last year. In areas where rates will decrease, the decrease will only apply to members newly reporting to those locations. Members are protected by individual rate pro tection which ensures that those already assigned to a given location will not see their BAH rate decrease, however, they will receive the increase if the rate goes up. This assures that members who have made long-term commitments in the form of a lease or contract are not penalized if the areas housing costs decrease. Three components are included in the BAH computation: median current market rent; aver age utilities (including electricity, heat, and water/sewer) and average renters insurance. Total housing costs are calculated for six hous ing profiles (based on dwelling type and number of bedrooms) in each military housing area. Basic Allowance for Housing rates are then calculated for each pay grade, both with and without depen dents. An estimated $20 billion will be paid to more than 1 million service members in 2013. For more information on BAH, visit https:// www.defensetravel.dod.mil/site/bah.cfm. ty administrator for the Veterans Administration -now the Veterans Affairs Department -and as CEO and president of the USO. He served in the Senate from 1997 to 2009, where he was a member of the foreign relations and intelli gence committees. Hagel currently is a professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He is also chairman of the Atlantic Council and co-chair man of the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board. Obama called Brennan one of our nations most skilled and respected intelligence profession als. The president said Brennans 25 years of service in the CIA pro vides him with the knowledge of what the nations security demands are: intelligence that provides our lawmakers with the facts, strong analytic insight and the keen under standing of a dynamic world. Brennan, a 57-year-old New Jersey native, is the deputy national security advisor for homeland secu rity and counterterrorism. During his years at the CIA, he worked as a Near East and South Asia ana lyst, served as station chief in Saudi Arabia, and directed the National Counterterrorism Center. Having held senior manage ment, analytic and operational positions at the agency, Johns com mitted to investing in the range of intelligence capabilities we need, Obama said. John has an invaluable perspec tive on the forces, the history, the culture, the politics, economics, [and] the desire for human dignity driving so much of the changes in todays world, he added. Obama said the primary criteria in making his choices was a simple question -- Who is going to do the best job in securing America? These two leaders have dedicated their lives to protecting our country. I am confident they will do an outstand ing job. Obama congratulated Hagel and Brennan on their nominations and urged the U.S. Senate to act prompt ly to confirm them. When it comes to national secu rity, we dont like to leave a lot of gaps between the time that one set of leaders transitions out and another transitions in, he said. So we need to get moving quickly on this.From Page 1SECDEFMCPON Releases CPO 365 Guidance Defense Media ActivityThe role of the chief petty officer (CPO) has long been an integral part of our Navy. When Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens took office last year, he recognized that training chiefs for their new leadership role in six weeks, as the original CPO induction dictated, was hindering them in becoming as successful as possible. We recognized that we wouldnt always have the time that we would like to provide the training for our first class petty offi cers (FCPO) to become chiefs. So two years ago we implemented the CPO 365 training pro cess that would afford them a longer period of time to train, said Stevens. What weve done now is said, Why should we have a break six weeks prior to pinning and change the way weve been training? What weve decided to do is continue to train throughout the year, all the way up to the final night, and progressively make the training more intense and more relevant as they get ready to become chief petty officers. CPO 365, a year-long development and training for FCPOs, was first intro duced in 2010 under for mer MCPON Rick West. It includes two phases, the first of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all FCPOs will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are boardeligible or not. CPO 365 depends a lot on momentum, said Stevens. Its a continuous process of learning and development. What we dont want to do is have a clean break from CPO 365 where the FCPOs who were not selected to chief, are no longer involved in the training. We want to maintain that momen tum, and continue to train. We recognize that there will be some events where all FCPOs wont be able to participate in, but by and large, well keep them together and continue to do the train ing theyve been doing, because its vitally impor tant that all of our petty officers continue to learn and develop. Phase Two of training begins when CPO select ees are announced and concludes with the pin ning ceremony. Upon announcement, each command will hold a congratulatory meet-andgreet for the selectees and their families, after which they will continue with training while maintain ing good order and disci pline. Phase Two will contin ue to contain many timehonored traditions, such as CPO Charge Books and a capstone event focused on teamwork and resilience. We wanted to con tinue a program that set the conditions for every FCPO to be a successful and effective chief, and remove any road blocks that would interfere with that opportunity for suc cess. Well add in various things that would afford them a greater opportu nity to be successful chief petty officers. One pro cess that will no longer be a part of CPO 365 is the word induction. Effective immediately, were respectfully sundowning the word induc tion, and in its place well use CPO 365 as the pri mary term, said Stevens. I believe that induction is more about a moment in time, and CPO 365 and the development of our FCPOs to become CPOs is not about a moment in time. Its about a continuous time. This is some thing were going to do every day, 365 days a year, and so we want to make sure the term we are using is matching what we are doing. MCPON added that the term CPO 365 was coined by CPOs in the fleet, due to their belief that devel oping leaders is a yearround process. Additionally, Stevens said that although the CPO 365 is primarily geared towards FCPO and CPOs, all Sailors will ben efit from the training. To develop great lead ers we must have a train ing process that is ongo ing in a Sailors career, he said. If everything we do starts and stops with lead ership, then every Sailor will benefit from a more effective leader.NEX To Sell New All Weather CoatFrom NEXCOMSelect NEX Uniform Shops, the NEX Web Store, www.myNavyExchange.com and the Uniform Support Center now sell the recent ly approved optional All Weather Coat. On November 30, 2012, the Navy authorized the wearing of this new optional All Weather Coat in NAVADMIN 360/12. The new optional All Weather Coat is authorized for wear with the following uniforms: Dinner Dress Blues and Whites, Full Dress and Service Dress Blues and Whites, Service Khaki and Summer Whites, Enlisted Service Uniform and Coveralls. The black poly/cotton coat comes with a zip out liner for extra warmth. The cost of the new optional All Weather Coat is $97.40 for the mens coat and $91.85 for the womens coat. Select NEX Uniform Shops that will carry the optional All Weather Coat include NEX Norfolk, Va.; NEX Henderson Hall, Va.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill.; and NEX Bangor, Wash. Additional NEX Uniform Shops will begin selling the coat in 2013. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Engineman, Machinists Mate Ratings RealignFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Navy announced the realignment of approximately 2,000 Sailors from the Engineman (EN) rat ing to the Machinists Mate (MM) rating and disestablishment of the Full Time Support (FTS) EN rating according to a Navy message released Dec. 19. The move will enhance surface ship readiness and improve diesel engine proficiency and effectiveness, according to NAVADMIN 382/12. By realign ing Engineman and Machinists Mates who already have certain skills, the Navy will not only improve fleet readiness, but allow those Sailors to continue to have a viable career in the Navy, said Master Chief Machinists Mate (SW/AW) Jerome Tellis, MM technical advisor, Bureau of Naval Personnel/Millington. EN Sailors will be responsible for diesel operation, repair and maintenance. Current EN Sailors who have experience in diesel propulsion, as indicated by a combination of a primary Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) code and last billet filled, will remain an EN and those who have an auxiliary background will be con verted to MM. The following NECs will remain EN: 4302, 4303, 4304, 4305, 4306, 4308, 4310, 4314, 4324, 4333, 4334, 4340, 4342, 4343, 4346, 4366 and 4370. However, based on career progression in regards to pay grade, Sea Shore Flow and billet dis tribution, some EN Sailors with limited diesel pro pulsion experience will also remain EN, as deter mined by enlisted com munity managers. Sailors in the MM rating will not be affected by this realignment unless they desire to convert to EN. NAVADMIN 382/12 details realignment actions and timelines required by units with ENs and MMs. Sailors affected by the EN and MM realignment should have a career develop ment board with their chain of command to address all options as a result of the realignment. Enlisted community managers will make final determination on shifting personnel between EN and MM ratings to sup port overall community health and needs of the Navy. For E1-E9 activeduty and E6-E9 Reserve Sailors, official conver sion from EN or MM rated Sailors will be effective May 1, and E1-E5 Reserve conversions will be effec tive Oct. 1, 2013. The FTS EN rating, which has about 280 Sailors, will be disestab lished Oct. 1, 2013. After an extensive review of advancement opportu nity, career diversity and the reduction of FTS EN billets resulting from the EN/MM rating realign ment, officials decided to remove the EN rating from the FTS program. These Sailors can remain FTS and covert to another FTS rating that has convert-in quo tas; remain in the EN rating or convert to MM and reenlist in the active component; request early separation; or if eligible, transfer to the Fleet/ Reserve or retire by Sept. 30, 2013. For information read NAVADMIN 382/12 at www.npc.navy.mil.Obama Signs $633B Defense Authorization ActAmerican Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama signed the $633 billion fiscal 2013 National Defense Authorization Act into law last week. The legislation, which cleared Congress last month, authorizes the department to act in any number of instances. There are certain things that cannot be done without [the authorization act], said a senior defense official speaking on back ground. The act allows the department to institute pay raises, bonuses and incentive pay for person nel. All military construc tion has to be authorized under this act, the official said. It includes a 1.7 per cent pay raise for military personnel, and contains $527.5 billion for DODs base budget, $88.5 billion for overseas contingency operations and $17.8 bil lion for national security programs in the Energy Department and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. It also extends the Commanders Emergency Response Program that has been used in Afghanistan and Iraq. It authorizes a oneyear extension of the Afghan Infrastructure Fund and extends the Coalition Support Fund and the Pakistan Counterinsurgency Fund. In Iraq, the law authorizes U.S. training activities, the official said. The law also authorizes changes needed to deter sexual assault in the mili tary. In addition, it estab lishes the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission which will examine all aspects of military compensation. Officials stress that any possible changes to mili tary retirement benefits that the group recom mends will not affect cur rent service members. Air Force structure was of some concern to the department going into the process, but officials say they were pleased with the outcome. The Air Force also received 32 more C-130 aircraft than requested. But the Air Force is allowed to do everything else. They are allowed to do their divestures and moves, the official said. The only thing kept out of services force structure plan was we had to keep the Global Hawk Block 30 [unmanned aircraft]. The act raises the copay for medications under TRICARE through 2022. The legislation also limits any annual increases in pharmacy co-payments to increas es in retiree cost of living adjustments. It is a little bit toward what we need to start pay ing for how much health care is costing, the official said. The authorization also provides DOD funds for servicewomen who need abortions in case of rape or incest. So they dont have to take leave and come home or go out on the economy, the official said. This is the first time this has been approved. Among other programs, the act authorizes the defense biofuel initiative as well as counternarcotic authorities. We use this a little bit in Afghanistan, but its mostly in the southern border and Colombia, she said. It has to get done. Passage of the legisla tion is particularly impor tant this year because the department is operating on a continuing resolution through March which may be continued again through the rest of the fis cal year. The resolution maintains funding at 2012 budget levels. Without this authority, Things really do shut down, the official said. It actually is things that keep the war going and things that ... keep the economy going because it is pay, recruiting, military construction, the official said. NAVY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 7

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USS Halyburtons CSADD In ActionFom USS HalyburtonThe Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) has had their hands full on board USS Halyburton (FFG 40). CSADD is a peer men toring program for active and reserve Sailors aimed at promoting good deci sion-making and lead ership development at the most junior level. Although originally envi sioned as a response to frequent DUI cases in the mid-Atlantic region, the CSADD program quickly expanded to encompass a variety of issues and has spread fleet wide. Today, it is a peer-men toring program for all aspects of life in which Sailors face temptations to make unwise decisions. Halyburtons CSADD teams recent initiatives onboard manages to sig nificantly increase ships morale and successfully reduce destructive deci sions of junior Halyburton Sailors so they can focus on demanding tasks of a counter piracy deployment. Motivated junior Sailors from Halyburton are working togeth er to coordinate more than 50 alternate activi ties for Halyburtons 2012 Deployment. Halyburtons CSADD team executed and pro moted their mission in one of their first port calls, Souda Bay, Greece. With the assistance from the Moral, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Committee, CSADD arranged a command pizza party, which included a divisional sports tournament, video games and internet for the crew. It has become a cus tom on Halyburton to join together for monthly flight deck picnics and weekly ice cream socials, where the crew can take a well deserved break from day-to-day duties to relax and enjoy each others company. During the flight deck festivities, CSADD arranges mov ies on the big screen and karaoke nights for the crews entertainment. Monthly training is conducted at the nearly 300 chapters of CSADD fleet wide. To complete these trainings while on deployment, E5 and below calls are arranged by the Command Senior Chief (CMDCS) Lee C. Friedlander, in order to promote open floor dis cussions, conduct criti cal training, and receive feedback on the CSADD teams progress. CSADD Navy wide has been known for their creativ ity in presenting signifi cant training topics such as alcohol awareness, domestic violence, and physical health readiness. Part of CSADDs mis sion is to develop leader ship skills amongst junior Sailors. In order to do so, the CSADD Sponsor, Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) William J. Kanack, and the CSADD Advocate, OS3 (SW) Quintrel R. Brown, give each CSADD member the opportunity to cre ate their own monthly CSADD newsletter. It contains current events, upcoming CSADD activi ties, helpful informa tion on Navy benefits, and acknowledges one junior Sailor who has demonstrated outstand ing performance during that month. Halyburtons CSADD team continues to keep the momentum going as they organize movie jeopardy com petitions, best chicken wing sauce contests, and NFL Madden 2013 video game tournaments for E5 and below. With the help of the crew, CSADD was able to raise enough funds to buy a plane ticket home for a shipmate after suffering a family emer gency. CSADD always finds alternative activities on and off ship for junior Sailors to enjoy. With the assistance from Halyburtons Chaplain, Lt. Tom Chaps Bingol, they were able to coordinate a Community Relations (COMREL) project to a boys orphanage home while visiting Djibouti, Africa. Through programs like CSADD, Sailors are proving that helping their peers to achieve suc cess individually is vital to achieving success as a team. Junior Sailors should be allowed to maintain this program as designed. So much can be lost, if this initiative becomes just another mandated Navy program that is required rather than vol untary, says the CSADD Advocate, OS3 (SW) Brown. The CSADD team onboard the Halyburton will continue their efforts on encouraging their shipmates to make the right choice and reinforc ing both the core values of CSADD and the U.S. Navy. Halyburton is current ly deployed, participat ing in Operation OCEAN SHIELD as a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organizations (NATO) counter piracy Task Force 508. Operation Ocean Shield covers the Horn of Africa region, located within the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo courtesy of USS HalyburtonUSS Halyburtons CSADD team performs peer mentoring towards positive habits and decisions. From left to right: Seaman Pedro Duran, Seaman Jarad Lewis, Operations Specialist Third Class (SW) Quintrel Brown, Boatswains Mate Third Class Frank Charles, Operations Specialist First Class (SW) Sesten Surratt, Boatswains Mate Second Class (SW) Julian Haylock, Aviation Electricians Mate Second Class Johnathon Watkins, Culinary Specialist Third Class (SW) Emmanuel Appiahkubi. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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USS Halyburton Celebrates Christmas At Sea USS Halyburton Public AffairsUSS Halyburton (FFG 40) took a brief break from counter piracy operations to celebrate Christmas day. On the eve of Christmas, the crew was invited by Lt. Tom Chaps Bingol, Halyburtons Command Chaplain, to gather on the flight deck with flashlights to sing Christmas carols and follow the birth of Jesus Christ. The following morning, Halyburton Sailors were treated to memorable Christmas movies and music throughout the day leading up to an awards ceremony held on the flight deck. Halyburton Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Bertram C. Hodge, presented Navy/Marine Corp Achievement med als to Gas Turbine System Technician-Electrical 2nd Class (SW) John Brantley, Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Sesten Surratt, and Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Matthew Jackson. He also presented Letters of Commendation to Information Systems Technician Third Class Derrick Smith and Culinary Specialist Third Class, Surface Warfare, Emmanuel Appiakhubi for their outstanding per formance while onboard. After congratulating these five Sailors on a job well done, Hodge surprised the crew by announc ing the selectees for the Command Advancement Program (CAP). CAP allows the CO to select qualified Sailors and instantly advance them to the next pay grade. The two Halyburton Sailors who were selected were Surratt to first class petty officer and and Yeomans Mate 2nd Class Raymond Santana. This is one of the best Christmas presents I have ever received and I am truly honored, said Surratt. After the ceremony, the Halyburton crew gath ered on the mess decks to conduct a Christmas gift giveaway, sponsored by the Moral, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Committee. The MWR committee coordinated a gift giveaway where each Sailor randomly picked another Sailor to receive a gift. To finish off the day, the crew enjoyed a tra ditional holiday meal of honey ham, roasted tur key, baked macaroni and cheese, dressing, yams, collard greens mashed potatoes and gravy, and rolls. Overall, the day was filled with high spirits, big surprises, and good food. Halyburton Sailors continue to work hard on deployment; participat ing in Operation Ocean Shield as a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organizations (NATO) counter piracy Task Force 508. Operation Ocean Shield covers the Horn of Africa region, located within the 5th Fleet area of responsibility.USS Halyburton Crosses The Line USS Halyburton Public AffairsUSS Halyburton (FFG 40) crossed the equator in route to Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, on Dec. 7 and observed one of the Navys most interesting traditions to commemo rate this notable mile stone, the Crossing the Line ceremony. The Almighty Neptunus Rex, Ruler of the Raging Main, and Davy Jones returned to Halyburton to cleanse it of Pollywogs, sailors who have not crossed the equator. The Shellbacks, those who have been through the ceremony before, put them through a series of challenges that tested their mental and physical mettle in order to earn the title of Trusty Shellback. The challenges the Pollywogs endured dur ing the ceremony are kept secret in order for future Pollywogs to receive the full experience of this long-standing naval tradition. I remember when I went through the cross ing the line ceremony onboard last year. It was challenging, but I am glad I had a chance to be part of something so awe some, says Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Stephen Dodson. Left, Ensign Jeremiah Derrick emerges as a Trusty Shellback during the Crossing the Line Ceremony onboard USS Halyburton (FFG 40). -Photos by OS3(SW) Quintrel R. Brown Chief Boatswains Mate Senior (SW) Zsyrexe Agonoy watches as a group of Pollywogs wait for instructions during the Crossing the Line Ceremony onboard USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Chief Quarter Master Senior (SW) Randal King, as King Neptune, along with Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Matthew Fanning and Yeomans Mate 3rd Class (SW) Raymond Santana, makes a speech to all of the Pollywogs before the Ceremony begins. At the end, King Neptune will decide if each Pollywog is worthy of becoming a Trusty Shellback. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 9

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FFSC Class Schedule Set For JanuaryFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Jan. 10, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Jan. 14, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Jan. 14-16, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Ombudsman Training Class, FFSC Jan. 14-18, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Jan. 16-17, Family Readiness Group Leadership Training Bldg 1, Room 702 Jan. 16, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 16, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Jan. 19, 11:30-until, IA Childrens Circus Outing Veterans Memorial Arena Jan. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 23, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying, FFSC Room 702 Jan. 23, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course, FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 24, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training FFSC Room 1124 Jan. 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 28, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Jan. 29, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Jan. 29, 1-3 p.m., What About The Kids FFSC Room 702 Jan. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 31, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Holiday Cheer In Afghanistan -Photo by Capt. Leslie Reed, 115th Mobile Public Affairs DetachmentU.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer Tim Holloway (left), Regional Support Command East, NATO Training MissionAfghanistan and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Heather Lukesh (right), First Forward Support Depot, NATO Training MissionAfghanistan dish up sides during Christmas dinner at Forward Operating Base Lightning, Afghanistan, Dec. 25, 2012. The meal took more than two weeks of preparation. Hollow is on IA from Aviation Support Detachment Mayport until June.Saturday, Jan. 12 Knots arent just for tying your shoes. Untangle the history of knots and how to tie some of the basic knots that everyone should know. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The Jacksonville (FL) Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Incorporated hosts the 5K HEALTHY, FIT and SMART FAMILY RUN/ WALK at the Jacksonville Landing and is open to all runners and walkers teams and individuals. The 5K Walk/Run begins at 10 a.m. and the 1 Mile Family Fun Walk/Run begins at 11 a.m. The cost to register is for adults is $25 or $30 the day of the event: Online:https:// www.signmeup.com/ site/online-eventregistration/88568 On paper or in person: 1st Place Sports stores in store computers or mail in a completed entry form to the Race Office: 3931 Baymeadows Road, Jacksonville, Fl 32217. Make checks pay able to 1st Place Sports Running Club. Form:http:// www.1stplacesports.com/ images/healthy5k_ent.pdf Tuesday, Jan. 15 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be a presentation by James Brady covering develop ing and editing digital photos in Lightroom. This is a free event for people of all ability levels and all camera types. Come and learn more about photog raphy.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Jan. 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 15: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 15: Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 28. 270-5451 Jan. 18: Karaoke Night. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Belt it out at karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option Jan. 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available. Sponsored by the FLC JAX. For tickets, contact (904) 270-7178. Jan. 24: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Jan. 29: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 19. 270-5451 MWR The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Jan. 10: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. Jan. 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 12: Cosmic Ice Skating. Van departs 1 p.m. Cost $5. Jan. 13: Swampcon. Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Transportation only. Jan. 14: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 2:30 p.m. Jan. 15: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 15: Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 28. Jan. 15: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Free food for all attend ees. LIBERTY Running With Jingle Bells -Photo by Paige GnannRunners head off on the annual MWR 5k/10k Jingle Bell Fun Run and 3k Walk on Dec. 11. MWR holds 5k fun runs the second Tuesday of every month, unless otherwise posted. The next run will be Jan. 15 with the Kick Off the New Year 3k Walk/5k Run starting at 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Shipshape Start DateFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Jan. 22 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty per sonnel, adult dependents, and retir ees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calo ries, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more infor mation, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-270-5251 ext. 16. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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USS Gettysburg Sailors Earn National Award For Electronic Warfare USS Gettysburg Electronic War fare OfficerSailors aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) were presented with the 2012 Association of Old Crows Outstanding Unit Award for Excellence in Electronic Warfare recently at the 49th Annual Association of Old Crows International Electronic Warfare Symposium in Phoenix, Arizona. The award is given to the top U.S. Navy ship or sub marine each year in Electronic Warfare. Gettysburgs Technical Operations Division tracked more than 730 aircraft and naval vessels and produced 143 intelligence reports. They processed more than 26,000 National Signals of Interest, leading to 2,253,300 paths for more than 500,000 positions. The Sailors who earned the award were lead by Chief Warrant Officer 3 Michael Donato and Chief Technical Cryptologic Technician Sheenah Campos. The Sailors who con tributed to the work that earned the award are Chief Cryptologic Technician Collections Jason Agidius, Chief Intelligence Specialist Jessica Zackery, Chief Cryptologic Technician Collections Casey Combes, Cryptologic Technician Technical 1st Class David Barnes, Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class Maurice Macon, Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class Cameron Tranbarger, Cryptologic Technician Maintenance 2nd Class Matthew Langston, Cryptologic Technician Collections 2nd Class Benjamin Valenta, CTR2 Joel Libertini, Cryptologic Technician Collections 2nd Class Lauren Cash, Cryptologic Technician Collections 3rd Class, Technical Cryptologic Technician 3rd Class Christopher Castillo, Cryptologic Technician Collections 3rd Class Tristan Souza, and Cryptologic Technician Collections Seaman Apprentice Thomas Owens. -Photo courtesy of USS GettysburgOn Dec. 18, retired Lt. Cmdr. Don Richetti, the Executive Director of the Association of the Old Crow Committee, presented the award and Fleet Forces Command Letters of Commendation to the Sailors involved during a ceremony in front of the entire crew. Pictured is Chief Warrant Officer 3 Michael Donato, Electronics Warfare Officer Ensign Kiley Provenzano and the Electronic Warfare team.USS Gettysburg Awarded For Service Excellence USS Gettysburg Disbursing OfficerUSS Gettysburg received the Ship Store Retail and Service Excellence Award for its work to improve the quality of life for the ships Sailors. Gettysburg was pre sented the award by Navy Exchange Service Command for outstanding professionalism and significant contributions made by ships store per sonnel. The Navy Exchange and Commissary (NEXCOM) sponsors this award that recognizes excellence. Every ship that is con sidered for the prestigious Ship Store Retail and Service Excellence Award passed through a rigorous review of their operational savvy, as well as a critical review by their customers on board. Ships that are recipients of the award set the standard of excellent operation that crewmem bers represent, both in records and service. Chief Master at Arms Chief Reginald Chambers buys supplies from Ship's Servicemen 2nd Class Javonta Smith at USS Gettysburgs Ship Store. Gettysburg was award ed recently for Ship Store Retail and Service Excellence by the Navy Exchange and Commissary. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 11

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Ships Compete For Best Holiday Light DisplayCcontributorNaval Station Mayport hosted its annual holi day lighting contest for the ships home ported at Naval Station Mayport on Dec. 18. Six ships participated in this years contest, includ ing USS Carney, USS Gettysburg, USS Samuel B. Roberts, USS The Sullivans, USS Vicksburg and USCGC Valiant. Judges included Anne Cochrane, Darnel Conley, Amanda Patch, Liv Gardell, and Angi Thacker. The competition was fierce amongst all the vessels that participat ed in this years contest. Crewmembers stationed aboard the ships compet ed for the coveted Holiday lighting contest plaque and were recognized at an informal luncheon held at Bogeys. Three winners were recognized this year, including an honorable mention award. The winner of this years contest is USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), fol lowed by a close sec ond place finish to USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and third place finish to USS Gettysburg (CG 64). An honorable mention award was given to USCGC Valiant (WMEC 621). -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyHoliday lights shine from ships at Naval Station Mayport as each ship moored at the naval base participated in the annual holiday light display com petition. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyHoliday lights shine from guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) as it sits moored pier-side Naval Station Mayport. Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org -Photo by Katie CallawaySanta Claus and his helper elf ring on board the judges and welcome them with hot drinks and cookies. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Obama Noms New SECDEFAmerican Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama announced his nomi nations to serve as the next leaders of the Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency on Jan. 7. At a White House news conference, Obama announced his selection of Chuck Hagel to be next defense secretary and John Brennan as the next CIA director. If confirmed by the Senate, Hagel will replace Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, who confirmed his plans to retire. Brennan, if confirmed, will replace David H. Petraeus, who resigned as CIA director in November. Chuck Hagel is the leader that our troops deserve, Obama said. He is an American patri ot. He enlisted in the Army and volunteered for Vietnam. As a young private, and then sergeant, he served with honor alongside his own brother. Hagel, 66, a former U.S. senator from Nebraska, earned two Purple Hearts as an infantry squad leader in the Vietnam War. He later co-founded a cellular telephone company. Obama said Hagels brother rescued him when he was injured by shrapnel, and that Hagel did the same when his brother was wounded later, noting that his nominee to lead the Pentagon still bears the scars and shrapnel for battles he fought in our name. Chuck Hagels leadership of our military would be historic, the president said. Hed be the first person of enlisted rank to serve as secretary of defense, one of the few secretaries who have been wounded in war, and the first Vietnam veteran to lead the department. Obama noted Hagels dedication to service members and their families, and said his experiences give him the ability to relate to troops. In Chuck Hagel, our troops see a decorated combat veteran of character and strength they see one of their own, Obama said. Chuck is a cham pion of our troops, veterans and our military families. With Chuck, our troops will always know -just like Sergeant Hagel was there for his own brother -Secretary Hagel will be there for you, he said. Hagels experience includes stints as depu -Photo by Paige GnannA car detours onto Oakhill Street from Baltimore Street as the new Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project begins with the closure of the intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore. The first phase of the project will reconstruct the intersection into a roundabout.From StaffTraffic is finding new routes around construc tion as the first phase of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project began this week. The intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore Street is closed to vehicular traffic and not expected to reopen until mid-March. The interesection is being reconstructed into a roundabout, a type of circular intersection in which road traffic flows in one direction around a central island. The Hanna Park/ Seminole Gate is also closed for inbound and outbound traffic until the completion of Phase I. Eastbound traffic on Moale Avenue will be restricted to local traffic only and will be detoured starting at Oriskany Street for access to Bennett Shores East Housing. Southbound traffic on Baltimore Street will be restricted to local traf fic only at B1868/Oak Hill Street and will be detoured through Oak Hill Street. Personnel residing in Bennett Shores East, Officer and Senior Enlisted areas, will have to exit the installa tion via Oak Hill Street or Oriskany Street. Drivers and pedestrians should use caution since traffic on Massey Avenue has increased. There are four phases of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement Project, which will continue through February 2014. School Bus Schedule There will be no changes to the school bus stops during the road construction. Temporary side walks are being constructed around the intersec tion construction site to allow school children safe passage to their bus stop locations. Mayport Takes Plunge For New Year -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyServicemembers, family and friends came out to Naval Station Mayport to celebrate the new year by taking a dive into the Atlantic Ocean as the base Morale, Welfare and Recreation held its first "Polar Plunge". Blue lines show the detour path around construction at Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue.Detour AheadSECDEF, Page 6NS Mayport will hold its quarterly blood drive on Jan. 29 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1, Room 104. NS Mayport will hold a Martin Luther King Jr. Observance on Jan. 18 from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at Beachside Community Center.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Happy New Year! I thank each of you for having a safe holiday season and returning fresh and recharged. As you all know, we cant execute our vital National Security mission without each and every Sailor, Government Service employee and contractor. Naval Station Mayport is poised for a fantastic 2013 and we have a busy and exciting year ahead! Global Presence and Power Projection start right here on the han gar decks and the waterfront of Naval Station Mayport where we provide the Finest Services to the Finest Fleet. Yesterday construction began on Phase I of the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement Project. This is a 4-phase project, with the first phase affecting the intersection of Moale Avenue and Baltimore Street. The current four way, two stop sign configuration will be replaced by a Roundabout that will enable traffic to safely and quickly merge and continue without the use of the stop signs. As with all change, the most dif ficult part is the initial phase. I ask that everyone be patient, respect the traf fic laws on and off base, and pay keen attention to the safety of other drivers, pedestrians and your shipmates while improvements are being made to our Installation. Remember that no mat ter how vital it may seem at the time, there is not a single good reason to put your shipmates at risk. Please see NS Mayports Facebook page. It outlines road closures, access routes and contra traffic flows and times. Also valuable is the scrolling Marquee at the front gate for updates and changes. As we progress I will update through our Facebook page and The Mirror. All Installation E-6s get ready for the CPO exam later this month. The Ocean Breeze Conference Center will be the location for the 2013 E7 Navy-Wide Advancement Examination. The date of the examination is Jan. 17. I wish all candidates the best and look forward to seeing them advance in the near future. Also, E6, E5 and E4 exams will be held in March. Sexual Assault is still an issue of vital concern to all of us in the Naval Service. I cannot stress enough how important it is for us to take care of each other. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) hotline number is 563-1254. Again, Happy New Year to all my shipmates out there and I look forward to an incredibly successful year. We will con tinue to support the fleet and build leaders while having fun doing it! I wish each and every one All The Best in 2013. Be safe and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSUp until recently little was known about how children were affected by long absenc es from parents who were deployed and the reintegration after their return home. The National Military Family Association commissioned a study by the RAND Corporation which addressed this issue. The research was among the first to explore the effects of deployment academically, socially, and emotionally on military children during an extended period of wartime. Results showed that children in the study were experiencing above average levels of emotional and behavioral difficul ties. The major points from the research included the following: Children in military fami lies experienced emotional and behavioral difficulties at rates above national averages. About one-third of the chil dren reported symptoms of anxiety, which is somewhat higher than the percentage reported in other studies of children. Self-reported problems var ied by age and gender: Older youths and boys reported more difficulties with school and more problem behaviors, such as fighting; greater numbers of younger children (compared with older children) and girls reported anxiety symptoms. The results also revealed challenges posed specifically by deployment: Longer periods of parental deployment (within the past three years) were linked to greater difficulties in childrens social and emotional function ing, at least based on caregiver reports. Deployment-related chal lenges varied by age and gen der: Older youths experienced greater schooland peer-related difficulties during deployment; girls experienced greater diffi culties than boys did during the period of reintegration. Children whose caregivers had better self-reported mental health were better able to cope with the deployment experi ence both during and after. Living on-base was linked with reduced difficulties both during and after deployment. The results represented an important first step in under standing the link between parental deployment and military child and family wellbeing. The findings suggest the need for more research and also highlight several avenues for possible intervention. For example, families may benefit from targeted support to deal with stressors from multiple months of deployment, rather than only during initial months. Further, families in which care givers face mental health issues may need more support for both caregiver and child. To provide the targeted sup port suggested by the study, Big Brothers Big Sisters has estab lished the Military Mentoring Program in Northeast Florida. Support will be provided to children of active duty parents/ guardians by caring adult mentors. The mentors will visit children enrolled in the pro gram at Finegan Elementary School one hour each week. This one-to-one mentoring is designed to help students focus on improving their grades, behavior, and self-confidence. The Big Brothers Big Sisters Military Mentoring program engages active duty, reserve or retired/separated military per sonnel, as well as civilians, as volunteer mentors. Staff care fully match adult mentors and youth mentees in long-term, one-to-one friendships and provide professional support for the volunteers, children and families throughout the life of the match. Contact Marilyn Hill by phone at (904) 7279797 X237 or by email at mhill@bbbsnefl. org for more information on becoming a mentor or to enroll your child in the BBBS Military Mentoring Program. Interested in Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program but not a military family? For more information, call Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida at (904) 727-9797. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Read the full report from the study Longer Parental Deployment Linked to More Emotional Challenges for Military Children at http:// www.rand,org/news/ press/2009//12/07.html. Big Brothers Big Sisters New Military Mentoring Program Available at FineganJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingIt is the first day of the 2013 and I am watch ing TV. Amazingly I am watching commercials of all things. Why? Not really sure, perhaps its because in this day of Hulu, Netflix, Apple TV, and TIVO I have forgotten what an infomercial looks like. Am I nostalgic? Sentimental? Bored? For whatever whimsical rea son I find myself watch ing that increasingly endangered item called the television advertise ment most remarked upon once a year during the Superbowl. But on this day, it is most definitely not Superbowl Sunday with snazzy, hilarious, inven tive commercials. This is the day one of the new year and after an hour or so I find myself looking at the fourth Weight Watchers com mercial of the day. The message is clear: lose weight and be happy, now is the time to be a better person. Who invented New Years resolutions? Why does this time of year see the gyms packed with well intentioned and moti vated people trying to do better, be better, do over? I am going to stop smok ing. I am going to drink less beer. This year I am going to get my finances in order. This year I am going to stress less. This year I am going to look fit and younger. This year I WILL be successful This year I am going to be happier. This year I am going to? It reminds me of when I was a child and I would play a game and start poorly. The next words out of my mouth would be Do over. Begin again, get off on a better foot. I think as an adults we long for the simplicity of those youthful days and games. But life rarely affords do overs in most circumstances. Maybe that is what New Years day and its traditions are all about? Maybe we have built into our lives one day of the year on the calendar where we can try and do over something in our live. I like the idea, I really do. I guess what is both ering me on this day is the message that is being delivered. The pursuit of happiness seems to be about changing my body or my appearance or my bank account or my career. Really? If I get a do over this is where I want to spend it. This will give more meaning to my life? The late Victor Frankel wrote a book called, Mans Search for Meaning. He was a philosopher, psycholo gist, and a survivor of a Nazi death camp called Auschwitz. He says in his book, Success like happiness cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of ones dedi cation to a cause greater than oneself or as the byproduct of ones surren der to a person other than oneself. He goes on to say, I want you to listen to what your conscience com mands you to do then you will live to see that success will follow you. His message to his fel low human beings is that we dont choose what life dishes out but we do choose how we respond. Victor Frankel is what I am thinking about as the next infomercial pops on the screen. This one has Cindy Crawford in it and she is telling me about a facial crme made from a rare melon found in a secluded field in France that will turn back time and make me look younger and thereby also happier. What are your New Years resolutions? How about investing a little of your time into the spiri tual aspect of your life? How about committing to pursuing more meaning in your life? Here is your chance! Its Jan 2013, DO OVER!Chap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain CHAPLAINSSome Days It Would Be Nice To Call Do Over Free Volunteer Tax ServicesMayport Tax Center will open for busi ness starting Jan. 24. Tenative hours of operation are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., MondayThursday; 7:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Friday; and 8-4 p.m. Saturday. VITA is located 707A Everglades Ct in housing. Parking is avail able in the parking lot on the corner of Moale Ave. and Maine St.

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Hu City, HSL-48 Back For HolidaysUSS Hu City Public AffairsFamilies and friends welcomed back the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) on Dec. 19, following the ships sixmonth deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. While the stay in Mayport will be shorter than usual this time, the return will be no less joy ous nor the achievements of Hu Sailors any less appreciated. The ship and her crew have done an awesome job on this deployment! said Command Master Chief (SW) Raymond Charest. This doesnt happen by accident. We have challenged our Sailors, and demand ed perfection. They answered every challenge with determination and have far exceeded our expectations. Hu City and her Golden Dragon crew of more than 350 Sailors spent their deploy ment serving as shot gun to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (IKE) and as Air Defense Commander in U.S 5th Fleet. Hu City pro vided an ever-present escort for IKE as the car rier launched aircraft in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and provided strategic deterrence in an effort to promote peace in the areas to which she was deployed. With her sophisticated AEGIS weapons system, Hu City acted as the primary pro tector for IKE and rarely left her side. High-risk evolutions were commonplace, too, as Hu conducted 14 sea and anchor evolutions, a dozen strait transits, and roughly one replenish ment-at-sea (RAS) per week, safely taking on board five million gallons of fuel. Though unforeseen circumstances sometimes made these evolutions even more dif ficult than normal, the crew dealt with them deftly and avoided danger at even the most precarious of times. Meanwhile, Hu Citys SH-60B helicopter detachment, Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48, Detachment 8, aided Carrier Strike Group 8s surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare efforts by flying more than 230 sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and presence operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. They also completed more than 900 landings. Consisting of nine aircrew and 18 maintenance per sonnel and two SH-60B helicopters, the detach ment achieved an 85 per cent mission capable rate and a 95 percent sortie completion rate. The HSL 48, Detachment 8 All Stars flew more than 700 mis hap free flight hours, 450 of them at night. I am very proud of our detachment and all the obstacles they had to overcome to successfully com plete this deployment, said Lt. Ryan Rabbit Culbertson, a pilot with HSL-48, Detachment 8. While the crew spent most of deployment working hard, they had a handful of well-deserved port visits that served as a welcome break from the rigors of the sea. Hu City visited Cannes, France, Souda Bay, Greece, and Bahrain. The Sailors experiences ranged from those as familiar as going to a Navy Exchange to as exotic as having a mani cure by sticking their feet in a fish tank. Hu City performed superbly during the past six months, and now will enjoy a brief stay back home in Mayport before heading back out to complete her assigned mis sions. This ship and her crew have improved in every way since we left Mayport on June 20, said Capt. Dan Uhls, the ships commanding officer. I expect more of the same when we commence deploy ment in just a couple months. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSanta Claus hands out candy to the children of Sailors off the USS Hu City during the ships homecoming on Dec. 19 at NS Mayport. Sailors assigned to Hu City returned home to Naval Station Mayport from a six-month deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergThe new fathers depart the ship to meet their children for the first time, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian BergSonar Technician Surface 3rd Class Thomas Traske greets his wife on the pier for the traditional first kiss during the homecoming of USS Hue City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian Berg Family and friends await the arrival of their loved ones aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 5 USS Hu City Runs Suez Canal 500 Marathon USS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsThe Suez Canal can be a long and navigation ally challenging transit as a ship sails with Egypt on one side and the Sinai Peninsula on the other. The transit is unlike any other because of the proximity of land and its narrow channel requiring attentive watch standers. For her outbound transit home, the Golden Dragon crew of USS Hu City (CG 66) ran a continuous relay around the main decks from sunrise to sunset as the ship sailed north. The Suez Canal is an artificial waterway in Egypt that opened in 1869, connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. Running 101 miles in length and stretching 984 feet in width, the Sailors of Hu City couldnt help but realize the impor tance the body of water holds in relation to the international community as they ran. The crew of Hu City ran a total of 505 miles, which equates to the length of five Suez Canal transits. The relay started when Hu City Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Ray Charest took to the track at sun rise as the guided-mis sile cruiser sailed past Port Suez, Egypt and ended when Hu Citys Commanding Officer, Capt. Dan Uhls took the baton as ship sailed passed Port Said and into the Mediterranean some eight hours later. With multiple runners on the weather decks at one time, the initially daunting feat was eas ily accomplished. All the Sailors ran with enthusi asm and didnt seem to tire as the transit contin ued. It was a great experi ence, said Chief Gunners Mate (SW) Joseph Mclendon. Everyone should have the opportunity to do something like that. Relay organizers, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class (SW/EXW) Shana Alger, of Hu City, and Aviation Ordananceman 2nd Class (AW/SW) Lisa Broadfield, of the Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 Det. 8 AllStars, played a big role setting up the run. They even made a baton to be carried at all times by a runner. The baton was made out of a dogging wrench and braided line that really gave the run a relay-like feel. Wow! What a great experience, said Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 1st Class (SW) Jorge Siguenza. I will not lie. It was not an easy task, but it was an experience of a lifetime, and Im glad I did it. The run was coordinat ed beforehand with the help of sign up sheets that designated times slots for each runner. Each runner was required to carry the baton for fifteen minutes, but many ran for much longer. In fact, one officer from the embarked heli copter squadron, Lt. Mark Foris, ran for more than two hours. Water and music were stationed on the aft part of the ship as Sailors sporting their Navy physical training (PT) gear joined in on the fun throughout the day. It was really nice to run outside, said Foris. The weather cooperated and having land on either side was a nice change. A lot of Sailors you typi cally dont see running along the weather decks were out there enjoying themselves. The amount of participation was sur prising. All in all it was a suc cessful event allowing Sailors to get topside to see the sights while also partaking in some physi cal activity. It was an all hands effort as runners from all fitness levels participated together. All ran for different reasons, but on this day, Sailors from Hu City ran as a team and thats what was important. -Photos courtesy of USS Hu CityThe crew of USS Hu City ran a collective 505 miles as the ship sailed through the Suez Canal during its transit to its homeport of NS Mayport. Sailors cheer on their shipmates during the Suez Canal 500, a crew challenge to run more than 500 miles as the ship transited through the Suez Canal. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergYeomen 3rd Class Brice Lovan holds his son for the fist time, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian BergEnsign Jarrett Seibel greets his wife and for the first time, his 5-month-old son, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photo by MC3 Damian BergGas Turbine System Technician Electrical 1st Class Pierre Rene hugs his wife and son, during the homecoming of USS Hu City (CG 66).-Photo by MC3 Damian BergFamily and friends await the arrival of their loved ones during USS Hu City's home coming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC3 Damian BergFamily and friends of Electricians Mate 2nd Class Bradley hold a sign welcoming him back to Naval Station Mayport during the USS Hue City homecoming. Hue City was operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security, theater security efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.

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Fiscal Cliff Legislation Affects Military, Civilian PaychecksFrom American Forces Press ServiceThe legislation that President Barack Obama signed Jan. 2 that post poned the fiscal cliff means changes to military and civilian paychecks, Defense Finance and Accounting Service offi cials said today. The legislation increas es Social Security with holding taxes to 6.2 per cent. For the past two years during the tax holiday the rate was 4.2 per cent. The increase in Social Security withholding taxes affects both military and civilian paychecks, officials said. For civilian employ ees, officials said, this will mean a 2 percent reduc tion in net pay. For military person nel, changes to net pay are affected by a variety of additional factors such as increases in basic allow ances for housing, subsistence, longevity basic pay raises and promotions. Service members could see an increase in net pay, no change or a decrease, military personnel and readiness officials said. For military members, Social Security with holding is located on their leave and earnings statement in the blocks marked FICA taxes for Federal Insurance Contributions Act. DOD civilians will see the change on their leave and earnings statement under OASDI for old age, survivors, and disability insurance. Reserve component members will be the first to see potential changes in their net pay as a result of the law, DFAS officials said. Changes will be reflected in their January paychecks. Active duty military personnel will see pay adjustments in their January mid-month pay check and will be reflect ed on the January leave and earnings statement. DOD civilians will see social security withhold ing changes reflected in paychecks based on the pay period ending December 29, 2012, for pay dates beginning in January. DFAS stresses that all personnel should review pay statements carefully. Average BAH Rates Get Increase For 2013From Department of Defense Public AffairsThe Department of Defense released the 2013 Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rates, which take effect Jan. 1, 2013. Overall rates will increase an average of 3.8 percent this year. For members with dependents, average increases in BAH are approximately $60 per month. A typical E-6 with dependents, for example, will find his/her BAH about $60 per month higher than last year, while an O-3 with depen dents will receive about $55 more than last year. In areas where rates will decrease, the decrease will only apply to members newly reporting to those locations. Members are protected by individual rate pro tection which ensures that those already assigned to a given location will not see their BAH rate decrease, however, they will receive the increase if the rate goes up. This assures that members who have made long-term commitments in the form of a lease or contract are not penalized if the areas housing costs decrease. Three components are included in the BAH computation: median current market rent; aver age utilities (including electricity, heat, and water/sewer) and average renters insurance. Total housing costs are calculated for six housing profiles (based on dwelling type and number of bedrooms) in each military housing area. Basic Allowance for Housing rates are then calculated for each pay grade, both with and without dependents. An estimated $20 billion will be paid to more than 1 million service members in 2013. For more information on BAH, visit https:// www.defensetravel.dod.mil/site/bah.cfm. ty administrator for the Veterans Administration -now the Veterans Affairs Department -and as CEO and president of the USO. He served in the Senate from 1997 to 2009, where he was a member of the foreign relations and intelli gence committees. Hagel currently is a professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He is also chairman of the Atlantic Council and co-chair man of the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board. Obama called Brennan one of our nations most skilled and respected intelligence profession als. The president said Brennans 25 years of service in the CIA pro vides him with the knowledge of what the nations security demands are: intelligence that provides our lawmakers with the facts, strong analytic insight and the keen understanding of a dynamic world. Brennan, a 57-year-old New Jersey native, is the deputy national security advisor for homeland security and counterterrorism. During his years at the CIA, he worked as a Near East and South Asia ana lyst, served as station chief in Saudi Arabia, and directed the National Counterterrorism Center. Having held senior manage ment, analytic and operational positions at the agency, Johns committed to investing in the range of intelligence capabilities we need, Obama said. John has an invaluable perspective on the forces, the history, the culture, the politics, economics, [and] the desire for human dignity driving so much of the changes in todays world, he added. Obama said the primary criteria in making his choices was a simple question -- Who is going to do the best job in securing America? These two leaders have dedicated their lives to protecting our country. I am confident they will do an outstanding job. Obama congratulated Hagel and Brennan on their nominations and urged the U.S. Senate to act promptly to confirm them. When it comes to national security, we dont like to leave a lot of gaps between the time that one set of leaders transitions out and another transitions in, he said. So we need to get moving quickly on this.From Page 1SECDEFMCPON Releases CPO 365 Guidance Defense Media ActivityThe role of the chief petty officer (CPO) has long been an integral part of our Navy. When Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens took office last year, he recognized that training chiefs for their new leadership role in six weeks, as the original CPO induction dictated, was hindering them in becoming as successful as possible. We recognized that we wouldnt always have the time that we would like to provide the training for our first class petty offi cers (FCPO) to become chiefs. So two years ago we implemented the CPO 365 training pro cess that would afford them a longer period of time to train, said Stevens. What weve done now is said, Why should we have a break six weeks prior to pinning and change the way weve been training? What weve decided to do is continue to train throughout the year, all the way up to the final night, and progressively make the training more intense and more relevant as they get ready to become chief petty officers. CPO 365, a year-long development and training for FCPOs, was first introduced in 2010 under for mer MCPON Rick West. It includes two phases, the first of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all FCPOs will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are boardeligible or not. CPO 365 depends a lot on momentum, said Stevens. Its a continuous process of learning and development. What we dont want to do is have a clean break from CPO 365 where the FCPOs who were not selected to chief, are no longer involved in the training. We want to maintain that momen tum, and continue to train. We recognize that there will be some events where all FCPOs wont be able to participate in, but by and large, well keep them together and continue to do the train ing theyve been doing, because its vitally impor tant that all of our petty officers continue to learn and develop. Phase Two of training begins when CPO select ees are announced and concludes with the pin ning ceremony. Upon announcement, each command will hold a congratulatory meet-andgreet for the selectees and their families, after which they will continue with training while maintain ing good order and disci pline. Phase Two will contin ue to contain many timehonored traditions, such as CPO Charge Books and a capstone event focused on teamwork and resilience. We wanted to con tinue a program that set the conditions for every FCPO to be a successful and effective chief, and remove any road blocks that would interfere with that opportunity for suc cess. Well add in various things that would afford them a greater opportu nity to be successful chief petty officers. One pro cess that will no longer be a part of CPO 365 is the word induction. Effective immediately, were respectfully sundowning the word induction, and in its place well use CPO 365 as the pri mary term, said Stevens. I believe that induction is more about a moment in time, and CPO 365 and the development of our FCPOs to become CPOs is not about a moment in time. Its about a continuous time. This is some thing were going to do every day, 365 days a year, and so we want to make sure the term we are using is matching what we are doing. MCPON added that the term CPO 365 was coined by CPOs in the fleet, due to their belief that devel oping leaders is a yearround process. Additionally, Stevens said that although the CPO 365 is primarily geared towards FCPO and CPOs, all Sailors will benefit from the training. To develop great lead ers we must have a train ing process that is ongo ing in a Sailors career, he said. If everything we do starts and stops with leadership, then every Sailor will benefit from a more effective leader.NEX To Sell New All Weather CoatFrom NEXCOMSelect NEX Uniform Shops, the NEX Web Store, www.myNavyExchange.com and the Uniform Support Center now sell the recent ly approved optional All Weather Coat. On November 30, 2012, the Navy authorized the wearing of this new optional All Weather Coat in NAVADMIN 360/12. The new optional All Weather Coat is authorized for wear with the following uniforms: Dinner Dress Blues and Whites, Full Dress and Service Dress Blues and Whites, Service Khaki and Summer Whites, Enlisted Service Uniform and Coveralls. The black poly/cotton coat comes with a zip out liner for extra warmth. The cost of the new optional All Weather Coat is $97.40 for the mens coat and $91.85 for the womens coat. Select NEX Uniform Shops that will carry the optional All Weather Coat include NEX Norfolk, Va.; NEX Henderson Hall, Va.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill.; and NEX Bangor, Wash. Additional NEX Uniform Shops will begin selling the coat in 2013. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Engineman, Machinists Mate Ratings RealignFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Navy announced the realignment of approximately 2,000 Sailors from the Engineman (EN) rat ing to the Machinists Mate (MM) rating and disestablishment of the Full Time Support (FTS) EN rating according to a Navy message released Dec. 19. The move will enhance surface ship readiness and improve diesel engine proficiency and effectiveness, according to NAVADMIN 382/12. By realign ing Engineman and Machinists Mates who already have certain skills, the Navy will not only improve fleet readiness, but allow those Sailors to continue to have a viable career in the Navy, said Master Chief Machinists Mate (SW/AW) Jerome Tellis, MM technical advisor, Bureau of Naval Personnel/Millington. EN Sailors will be responsible for diesel operation, repair and maintenance. Current EN Sailors who have experience in diesel propulsion, as indicated by a combination of a primary Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) code and last billet filled, will remain an EN and those who have an auxiliary background will be con verted to MM. The following NECs will remain EN: 4302, 4303, 4304, 4305, 4306, 4308, 4310, 4314, 4324, 4333, 4334, 4340, 4342, 4343, 4346, 4366 and 4370. However, based on career progression in regards to pay grade, Sea Shore Flow and billet distribution, some EN Sailors with limited diesel pro pulsion experience will also remain EN, as deter mined by enlisted com munity managers. Sailors in the MM rating will not be affected by this realignment unless they desire to convert to EN. NAVADMIN 382/12 details realignment actions and timelines required by units with ENs and MMs. Sailors affected by the EN and MM realignment should have a career develop ment board with their chain of command to address all options as a result of the realignment. Enlisted community managers will make final determination on shifting personnel between EN and MM ratings to sup port overall community health and needs of the Navy. For E1-E9 activeduty and E6-E9 Reserve Sailors, official conver sion from EN or MM rated Sailors will be effective May 1, and E1-E5 Reserve conversions will be effec tive Oct. 1, 2013. The FTS EN rating, which has about 280 Sailors, will be disestab lished Oct. 1, 2013. After an extensive review of advancement opportu nity, career diversity and the reduction of FTS EN billets resulting from the EN/MM rating realign ment, officials decided to remove the EN rating from the FTS program. These Sailors can remain FTS and covert to another FTS rating that has convert-in quotas; remain in the EN rating or convert to MM and reenlist in the active component; request early separation; or if eligible, transfer to the Fleet/ Reserve or retire by Sept. 30, 2013. For information read NAVADMIN 382/12 at www.npc.navy.mil.Obama Signs $633B Defense Authorization ActAmerican Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama signed the $633 billion fiscal 2013 National Defense Authorization Act into law last week. The legislation, which cleared Congress last month, authorizes the department to act in any number of instances. There are certain things that cannot be done without [the authorization act], said a senior defense official speaking on background. The act allows the department to institute pay raises, bonuses and incentive pay for person nel. All military construction has to be authorized under this act, the official said. It includes a 1.7 per cent pay raise for military personnel, and contains $527.5 billion for DODs base budget, $88.5 billion for overseas contingency operations and $17.8 bil lion for national security programs in the Energy Department and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. It also extends the Commanders Emergency Response Program that has been used in Afghanistan and Iraq. It authorizes a oneyear extension of the Afghan Infrastructure Fund and extends the Coalition Support Fund and the Pakistan Counterinsurgency Fund. In Iraq, the law authorizes U.S. training activities, the official said. The law also authorizes changes needed to deter sexual assault in the military. In addition, it estab lishes the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission which will examine all aspects of military compensation. Officials stress that any possible changes to mili tary retirement benefits that the group recom mends will not affect current service members. Air Force structure was of some concern to the department going into the process, but officials say they were pleased with the outcome. The Air Force also received 32 more C-130 aircraft than requested. But the Air Force is allowed to do everything else. They are allowed to do their divestures and moves, the official said. The only thing kept out of services force structure plan was we had to keep the Global Hawk Block 30 [unmanned aircraft]. The act raises the copay for medications under TRICARE through 2022. The legislation also limits any annual increases in pharmacy co-payments to increas es in retiree cost of living adjustments. It is a little bit toward what we need to start paying for how much health care is costing, the official said. The authorization also provides DOD funds for servicewomen who need abortions in case of rape or incest. So they dont have to take leave and come home or go out on the economy, the official said. This is the first time this has been approved. Among other programs, the act authorizes the defense biofuel initiative as well as counternarcotic authorities. We use this a little bit in Afghanistan, but its mostly in the southern border and Colombia, she said. It has to get done. Passage of the legisla tion is particularly important this year because the department is operating on a continuing resolution through March which may be continued again through the rest of the fiscal year. The resolution maintains funding at 2012 budget levels. Without this authority, Things really do shut down, the official said. It actually is things that keep the war going and things that ... keep the economy going because it is pay, recruiting, military construction, the official said. NAVY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 7

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USS Halyburtons CSADD In ActionFom USS HalyburtonThe Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) has had their hands full on board USS Halyburton (FFG 40). CSADD is a peer men toring program for active and reserve Sailors aimed at promoting good deci sion-making and lead ership development at the most junior level. Although originally envi sioned as a response to frequent DUI cases in the mid-Atlantic region, the CSADD program quickly expanded to encompass a variety of issues and has spread fleet wide. Today, it is a peer-men toring program for all aspects of life in which Sailors face temptations to make unwise decisions. Halyburtons CSADD teams recent initiatives onboard manages to sig nificantly increase ships morale and successfully reduce destructive deci sions of junior Halyburton Sailors so they can focus on demanding tasks of a counter piracy deployment. Motivated junior Sailors from Halyburton are working togeth er to coordinate more than 50 alternate activi ties for Halyburtons 2012 Deployment. Halyburtons CSADD team executed and pro moted their mission in one of their first port calls, Souda Bay, Greece. With the assistance from the Moral, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Committee, CSADD arranged a command pizza party, which included a divisional sports tournament, video games and internet for the crew. It has become a cus tom on Halyburton to join together for monthly flight deck picnics and weekly ice cream socials, where the crew can take a well deserved break from day-to-day duties to relax and enjoy each others company. During the flight deck festivities, CSADD arranges mov ies on the big screen and karaoke nights for the crews entertainment. Monthly training is conducted at the nearly 300 chapters of CSADD fleet wide. To complete these trainings while on deployment, E5 and below calls are arranged by the Command Senior Chief (CMDCS) Lee C. Friedlander, in order to promote open floor dis cussions, conduct criti cal training, and receive feedback on the CSADD teams progress. CSADD Navy wide has been known for their creativ ity in presenting signifi cant training topics such as alcohol awareness, domestic violence, and physical health readiness. Part of CSADDs mis sion is to develop leader ship skills amongst junior Sailors. In order to do so, the CSADD Sponsor, Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) William J. Kanack, and the CSADD Advocate, OS3 (SW) Quintrel R. Brown, give each CSADD member the opportunity to cre ate their own monthly CSADD newsletter. It contains current events, upcoming CSADD activi ties, helpful informa tion on Navy benefits, and acknowledges one junior Sailor who has demonstrated outstand ing performance during that month. Halyburtons CSADD team continues to keep the momentum going as they organize movie jeopardy com petitions, best chicken wing sauce contests, and NFL Madden 2013 video game tournaments for E5 and below. With the help of the crew, CSADD was able to raise enough funds to buy a plane ticket home for a shipmate after suffering a family emer gency. CSADD always finds alternative activities on and off ship for junior Sailors to enjoy. With the assistance from Halyburtons Chaplain, Lt. Tom Chaps Bingol, they were able to coordinate a Community Relations (COMREL) project to a boys orphanage home while visiting Djibouti, Africa. Through programs like CSADD, Sailors are proving that helping their peers to achieve suc cess individually is vital to achieving success as a team. Junior Sailors should be allowed to maintain this program as designed. So much can be lost, if this initiative becomes just another mandated Navy program that is required rather than vol untary, says the CSADD Advocate, OS3 (SW) Brown. The CSADD team onboard the Halyburton will continue their efforts on encouraging their shipmates to make the right choice and reinforc ing both the core values of CSADD and the U.S. Navy. Halyburton is current ly deployed, participat ing in Operation OCEAN SHIELD as a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organizations (NATO) counter piracy Task Force 508. Operation Ocean Shield covers the Horn of Africa region, located within the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo courtesy of USS HalyburtonUSS Halyburtons CSADD team performs peer mentoring towards positive habits and decisions. From left to right: Seaman Pedro Duran, Seaman Jarad Lewis, Operations Specialist Third Class (SW) Quintrel Brown, Boatswains Mate Third Class Frank Charles, Operations Specialist First Class (SW) Sesten Surratt, Boatswains Mate Second Class (SW) Julian Haylock, Aviation Electricians Mate Second Class Johnathon Watkins, Culinary Specialist Third Class (SW) Emmanuel Appiahkubi. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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USS Halyburton Celebrates Christmas At Sea USS Halyburton Public AffairsUSS Halyburton (FFG 40) took a brief break from counter piracy operations to celebrate Christmas day. On the eve of Christmas, the crew was invited by Lt. Tom Chaps Bingol, Halyburtons Command Chaplain, to gather on the flight deck with flashlights to sing Christmas carols and follow the birth of Jesus Christ. The following morning, Halyburton Sailors were treated to memorable Christmas movies and music throughout the day leading up to an awards ceremony held on the flight deck. Halyburton Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Bertram C. Hodge, presented Navy/Marine Corp Achievement med als to Gas Turbine System Technician-Electrical 2nd Class (SW) John Brantley, Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Sesten Surratt, and Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Matthew Jackson. He also presented Letters of Commendation to Information Systems Technician Third Class Derrick Smith and Culinary Specialist Third Class, Surface Warfare, Emmanuel Appiakhubi for their outstanding per formance while onboard. After congratulating these five Sailors on a job well done, Hodge surprised the crew by announc ing the selectees for the Command Advancement Program (CAP). CAP allows the CO to select qualified Sailors and instantly advance them to the next pay grade. The two Halyburton Sailors who were selected were Surratt to first class petty officer and and Yeomans Mate 2nd Class Raymond Santana. This is one of the best Christmas presents I have ever received and I am truly honored, said Surratt. After the ceremony, the Halyburton crew gath ered on the mess decks to conduct a Christmas gift giveaway, sponsored by the Moral, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Committee. The MWR committee coordinated a gift giveaway where each Sailor randomly picked another Sailor to receive a gift. To finish off the day, the crew enjoyed a tra ditional holiday meal of honey ham, roasted tur key, baked macaroni and cheese, dressing, yams, collard greens mashed potatoes and gravy, and rolls. Overall, the day was filled with high spirits, big surprises, and good food. Halyburton Sailors continue to work hard on deployment; participat ing in Operation Ocean Shield as a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organizations (NATO) counter piracy Task Force 508. Operation Ocean Shield covers the Horn of Africa region, located within the 5th Fleet area of responsibility.USS Halyburton Crosses The Line USS Halyburton Public AffairsUSS Halyburton (FFG 40) crossed the equator in route to Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, on Dec. 7 and observed one of the Navys most interesting traditions to commemo rate this notable mile stone, the Crossing the Line ceremony. The Almighty Neptunus Rex, Ruler of the Raging Main, and Davy Jones returned to Halyburton to cleanse it of Pollywogs, sailors who have not crossed the equator. The Shellbacks, those who have been through the ceremony before, put them through a series of challenges that tested their mental and physical mettle in order to earn the title of Trusty Shellback. The challenges the Pollywogs endured dur ing the ceremony are kept secret in order for future Pollywogs to receive the full experience of this long-standing naval tradition. I remember when I went through the cross ing the line ceremony onboard last year. It was challenging, but I am glad I had a chance to be part of something so awe some, says Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Stephen Dodson. Left, Ensign Jeremiah Derrick emerges as a Trusty Shellback during the Crossing the Line Ceremony onboard USS Halyburton (FFG 40). -Photos by OS3(SW) Quintrel R. Brown Chief Boatswains Mate Senior (SW) Zsyrexe Agonoy watches as a group of Pollywogs wait for instructions during the Crossing the Line Ceremony onboard USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Chief Quarter Master Senior (SW) Randal King, as King Neptune, along with Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Matthew Fanning and Yeomans Mate 3rd Class (SW) Raymond Santana, makes a speech to all of the Pollywogs before the Ceremony begins. At the end, King Neptune will decide if each Pollywog is worthy of becoming a Trusty Shellback. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 9

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FFSC Class Schedule Set For JanuaryFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Jan. 10, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Jan. 14, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Jan. 14-16, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Ombudsman Training Class, FFSC Jan. 14-18, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Jan. 16-17, Family Readiness Group Leadership Training Bldg 1, Room 702 Jan. 16, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 16, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Jan. 19, 11:30-until, IA Childrens Circus Outing Veterans Memorial Arena Jan. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 23, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying, FFSC Room 702 Jan. 23, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course, FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 24, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training FFSC Room 1124 Jan. 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training FFSC Room 1616 Jan. 28, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Jan. 29, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Jan. 29, 1-3 p.m., What About The Kids FFSC Room 702 Jan. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 719 Jan. 31, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Holiday Cheer In Afghanistan -Photo by Capt. Leslie Reed, 115th Mobile Public Affairs DetachmentU.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer Tim Holloway (left), Regional Support Command East, NATO Training MissionAfghanistan and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Heather Lukesh (right), First Forward Support Depot, NATO Training MissionAfghanistan dish up sides during Christmas dinner at Forward Operating Base Lightning, Afghanistan, Dec. 25, 2012. The meal took more than two weeks of preparation. Hollow is on IA from Aviation Support Detachment Mayport until June.Saturday, Jan. 12 Knots arent just for tying your shoes. Untangle the history of knots and how to tie some of the basic knots that everyone should know. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The Jacksonville (FL) Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Incorporated hosts the 5K HEALTHY, FIT and SMART FAMILY RUN/ WALK at the Jacksonville Landing and is open to all runners and walkers teams and individuals. The 5K Walk/Run begins at 10 a.m. and the 1 Mile Family Fun Walk/Run begins at 11 a.m. The cost to register is for adults is $25 or $30 the day of the event: Online:https:// www.signmeup.com/ site/online-eventregistration/88568 On paper or in person: 1st Place Sports stores in store computers or mail in a completed entry form to the Race Office: 3931 Baymeadows Road, Jacksonville, Fl 32217. Make checks pay able to 1st Place Sports Running Club. Form:http:// www.1stplacesports.com/ images/healthy5k_ent.pdf Tuesday, Jan. 15 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be a presentation by James Brady covering develop ing and editing digital photos in Lightroom. This is a free event for people of all ability levels and all camera types. Come and learn more about photography.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Jan. 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 15: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 15: Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 28. 270-5451 Jan. 18: Karaoke Night. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Belt it out at karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Jan. 21: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option Jan. 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available. Sponsored by the FLC JAX. For tickets, contact (904) 270-7178. Jan. 24: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Jan. 29: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 19. 270-5451 MWR The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Jan. 10: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. Jan. 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 12: Cosmic Ice Skating. Van departs 1 p.m. Cost $5. Jan. 13: Swampcon. Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Transportation only. Jan. 14: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 2:30 p.m. Jan. 15: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 15: Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 28. Jan. 15: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Free food for all attend ees. LIBERTY Running With Jingle Bells -Photo by Paige GnannRunners head off on the annual MWR 5k/10k Jingle Bell Fun Run and 3k Walk on Dec. 11. MWR holds 5k fun runs the second Tuesday of every month, unless otherwise posted. The next run will be Jan. 15 with the Kick Off the New Year 3k Walk/5k Run starting at 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Shipshape Start DateFrom Health Promotion by the OceanNavy and Marine Corp Public Health Centers directed 8-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on Jan. 22 and runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty personnel, adult dependents, and retir ees. Topics to be discussed include food groups, nutrition labels, calo ries, serving sizes, grocery shopping, and food journaling. For more infor mation, call Health Promotion by the Ocean at 904-270-5251 ext. 16. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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USS Gettysburg Sailors Earn National Award For Electronic Warfare USS Gettysburg Electronic Warfare OfficerSailors aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) were presented with the 2012 Association of Old Crows Outstanding Unit Award for Excellence in Electronic Warfare recently at the 49th Annual Association of Old Crows International Electronic Warfare Symposium in Phoenix, Arizona. The award is given to the top U.S. Navy ship or sub marine each year in Electronic Warfare. Gettysburgs Technical Operations Division tracked more than 730 aircraft and naval vessels and produced 143 intelligence reports. They processed more than 26,000 National Signals of Interest, leading to 2,253,300 paths for more than 500,000 positions. The Sailors who earned the award were lead by Chief Warrant Officer 3 Michael Donato and Chief Technical Cryptologic Technician Sheenah Campos. The Sailors who con tributed to the work that earned the award are Chief Cryptologic Technician Collections Jason Agidius, Chief Intelligence Specialist Jessica Zackery, Chief Cryptologic Technician Collections Casey Combes, Cryptologic Technician Technical 1st Class David Barnes, Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class Maurice Macon, Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class Cameron Tranbarger, Cryptologic Technician Maintenance 2nd Class Matthew Langston, Cryptologic Technician Collections 2nd Class Benjamin Valenta, CTR2 Joel Libertini, Cryptologic Technician Collections 2nd Class Lauren Cash, Cryptologic Technician Collections 3rd Class, Technical Cryptologic Technician 3rd Class Christopher Castillo, Cryptologic Technician Collections 3rd Class Tristan Souza, and Cryptologic Technician Collections Seaman Apprentice Thomas Owens. -Photo courtesy of USS GettysburgOn Dec. 18, retired Lt. Cmdr. Don Richetti, the Executive Director of the Association of the Old Crow Committee, presented the award and Fleet Forces Command Letters of Commendation to the Sailors involved during a ceremony in front of the entire crew. Pictured is Chief Warrant Officer 3 Michael Donato, Electronics Warfare Officer Ensign Kiley Provenzano and the Electronic Warfare team.USS Gettysburg Awarded For Service Excellence USS Gettysburg Disbursing OfficerUSS Gettysburg received the Ship Store Retail and Service Excellence Award for its work to improve the quality of life for the ships Sailors. Gettysburg was pre sented the award by Navy Exchange Service Command for outstanding professionalism and significant contributions made by ships store per sonnel. The Navy Exchange and Commissary (NEXCOM) sponsors this award that recognizes excellence. Every ship that is con sidered for the prestigious Ship Store Retail and Service Excellence Award passed through a rigorous review of their operational savvy, as well as a critical review by their customers on board. Ships that are recipients of the award set the standard of excellent operation that crewmem bers represent, both in records and service. Chief Master at Arms Chief Reginald Chambers buys supplies from Ship's Servicemen 2nd Class Javonta Smith at USS Gettysburgs Ship Store. Gettysburg was award ed recently for Ship Store Retail and Service Excellence by the Navy Exchange and Commissary. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013 11

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Ships Compete For Best Holiday Light DisplayCcontributorNaval Station Mayport hosted its annual holi day lighting contest for the ships home ported at Naval Station Mayport on Dec. 18. Six ships participated in this years contest, including USS Carney, USS Gettysburg, USS Samuel B. Roberts, USS The Sullivans, USS Vicksburg and USCGC Valiant. Judges included Anne Cochrane, Darnel Conley, Amanda Patch, Liv Gardell, and Angi Thacker. The competition was fierce amongst all the vessels that participat ed in this years contest. Crewmembers stationed aboard the ships compet ed for the coveted Holiday lighting contest plaque and were recognized at an informal luncheon held at Bogeys. Three winners were recognized this year, including an honorable mention award. The winner of this years contest is USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), fol lowed by a close sec ond place finish to USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and third place finish to USS Gettysburg (CG 64). An honorable mention award was given to USCGC Valiant (WMEC 621). -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyHoliday lights shine from ships at Naval Station Mayport as each ship moored at the naval base participated in the annual holiday light display competition. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyHoliday lights shine from guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) as it sits moored pier-side Naval Station Mayport. Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org -Photo by Katie CallawaySanta Claus and his helper elf ring on board the judges and welcome them with hot drinks and cookies. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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