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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00280


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Remembers Pearl Harbor DayMock Bills Headed To HousingThe Mirror editorNaval Station Mayport on base Housing resi dents will receive a letter from base Commanding Officer, Capt. Douglas Cochrane, in the mail this week preparing them for the launch of the new util ity billing and awareness program. The newest phase of the program includes sending on base residents a mock billing statement starting Jan. 1 that outlines each households energy con sumption. The mock billing peri od allows enough time for you and your fam ily to review your energy consumption and be pro active in implementing energy conservation mea sures throughout your home prior to the actual billing phase, Cochrane, stated in the letter. The mock bills will include the residents name, address and account number, the type of utility (electric or gas) and consumption as well as provide a comparison of the residents usage to others. There will also be a summary of the account balance and energy con servation titps. Over the past several months, NS Mayport has moved towards joining the Resident Conservation Program (RECP), part of the Office of the Secretary of Defense policy to make privatized military hous ing more energy efficient. RECP was developed by the Navy to support the OSD efforts. Homes in Ribault Bay Community will not be affected. Cochrane, along with representatives from Balfour Beatty Communities, Yes Energy and Switch4Good met with concerned residents in November during three town hall meeting to dis cuss the program and explain the new billing process and make them aware of a new energy conservation program available to all residents on or off base. The Switch4Good, monitored by WattzOn, program allows Housing residents to have a Home energy coach visit their house and offer per sonalized energy sav ing tips; sign up for text or twitter messages with energy saving alerts; and be help NS Mayport win a Community Awards program grant for $500 for the community that reaches its energy saving goal. To sign up for Switch4Good, call 1800314-5997 or go to www. switch4good.netFrom StaffMore than 100 vet erans and guests gath ered aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45) Dec. 7 to honor and remem ber those who lost their lives during the attack on Pearl Harbor 71years ago. Mayports Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) Branch 290 has hosted the annual memorial service in conjunction with Naval Station Mayport since 1966. De Werts crew stood proudly in ranks as special guest speaker Joseph McKinney spoke to the guests and three survivors in atten dance. Edward Kmiec, 95, Chuck Ellis, 90 and Duane Reyelts, 90, were in attendance during the pierside ceremony on board De Wert. Each Pearl Harbor survivor who attend ed the ceremony was able to recall exactly where they were when the bombs began to fly during that fateful day of Dec. 7, 1941. At the end of this years remembrance ceremony, the survi vors, families and vet erans tossed bouquets into the sea in memo ry of the deceased.Enlisted Sea Shore Flow Updated -Photo by MC3 Damian BergCmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45), escorts retired U.S. Navy Aviation Machinsts Mate 1st Class Edward Kmiec, a survivor of the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, to a Pearl Harbor Day ceremony aboard De Wert. The ceremony commemorated the anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsSailors from ten enlist ed communities will see their Sea Shore Flow (SSF) Enlisted Career Paths adjusted in the Navys latest Sea Shore Flow Update, officials said Dec. 4. Changes to the enlisted sea duty and shore duty billet base require periodic tour length updates to ensure proper manning of our ships, submarines, aviation squadrons, and other operational units, said Navy Personnel Command (NPC) Force Master Chief (AW/SW/ NAC) Jon Port. This years Sea Shore Flow update released in NAVADMIN 361/12 is on a much smaller scale than the Sea Shore Flow revision implemented in 2011. Last year was the first revision to Sea Shore Flow since it was implemented in 2008 and impacted 44 out of 84 enlisted commu nities with over 118,000 Sailors facing longer sea tour lengths. This year, only 10 enlisted com munities will be impact ed and fewer than 9,000 Sailors will see longer sea tour lengths. Last year, the Navy also began a concerted effort to balance SSF for sea-intensive ratings by increasing in-rate shore duty billets in Regional Maintenance Centers (RMCs), Afloat Training Groups (ATGs), and Fleet Readiness Centers (FRCs) among other critical shore activities. These billets provide rating enhancing shore tour opportunities within Fleet concentration areas Go Navy! Beat Army!-Photo by Paige GnannA member of USS Klakrings flag football team runs the ball as he evades teammembers from the U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion at the annual NS Mayport Army vs. Navy flag football game on Dec. 8 behind the bar racks. The game match up was in honor of the annual Army Vs. Navy college football game held the same day. Army Recruiting beat NS Mayport in the first game of the day, but lost to Klakring during the second match.See Sea Shore, Page 6 Christmas Cantata At ChapelFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold a Christmas Cantata with the Protestant Choir at the 10:30 a.m. worship service on Dec. 16. In addition, the Protestant Chapel will be having a Christmas Eve Candle Light Service at 7 p.m. on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24. All are wel come to add this to their Christmas Eve list of fes tivities. The Chapel Protestant holiday calendar includes Mens Prayer Breakfast at 9 a.m. on Dec. 15 and family dinner at 6:30 p.m.; Advent Service at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 23; Sixth day of Christmas at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 30 and the Ephiphany of the Lord Childrens Christmas Pageant Communion Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on Jan. 6. Catholic holiday calen dar includes 9 a.m. Mass on Dec. 16 and Dec. 23; Christmas Eve mass at 5 p.m. on Dec. 25; Midnight Mass at midnight on Dec. See Chapel, Page 3

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Ow, Christmas Tree! By Lisa Smith Molinari My hands looked like theyd been hit by shrap nel. The Persian rug was imbedded with sawdust, pine needles and sticky spots of sap. The trunk of our Christmas tree, which could be clearly seen through the sparse branches, was warped in the middle. Thats what I got for tell ing my husband to pick out the tree without me. That day, base looked like a winter wonderland with fluffy white snow stuck to every surface. Neighbors merrily buzzed about, bundling kids for sledding and stocking up on holiday provisions. I dropped my husband and our son off to help sell Christmas trees for the Boy Scout troop, and witnessed a sweet scene: twinkle lights draped, music playing, kids savor ing candy canes, fire crackling. Dads could be heard wishing custom ers a Merry Christmas as uniformed boys loaded trees onto cars. Whatever cockles are, mine were warmed, and I couldnt wait for them to come home with a beauti ful tree. I had the perfect afternoon planned: bring decorations up from basement, put up tree, make hot cocoa, set up train, play Christmas music while whole family deco rates, gaze at tree while snuggled in family room. I love this time of year. Three hours later the boys came home with a wrapped tree, and start ed to put the trunk in the stand. My husband has never been handy, and moments like these are always tense. Sensing he needed assistance, I grabbed the top of the tree. Ow! I wailed, look ing down at four tiny pin holes in my thumb. What kind of tree is this, any way? I dont knowa fir, a spruce, how the heck do I know, he stammered. Wearing gloves, we secured the tree in its stand and began to lift. Uh oh, I said when the tree was at ten oclock. What? my husband barked, nervously. Its not going to fit. How tall is this thing, any way? I dont knowbut we have high ceilings, right? No, Hon, we have low ceilings, remember? I said, trying to remain calm. My husband had always refered to hardware stores as haunted houses, so home repairs were gener ally handled by me. But in the spirit of holiday tra dition, we thought it best to not reverse conven tional gender roles, espe -Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesThe holidays are upon us, and our children will be asking for additional money to buy presents for teachers, for friends, and for family. Some families will hold the line at the amount the child has saved over the past year. Chores, allowances, special gifts may have gone into a special account which can now be tapped into for holiday buying. In other homes, parents will provide those extra dollars for holiday purchases. Before you just hand over that money, consider this: Eighty-three percent of college students have at least one credit card with an average debt of over three thousand dollars. Brandon Elliot, a financial education consultant for Young Biz Magazine, thinks that, this all stems from their earlier years in junior high and high school when mom and dad had a chance to sit down with their kids and talk to them point blank and didnt. Parents should be doing more to teach their kids to be financially independent starting as early as elementary school. The American Savings Education Council agrees with Elliot that the importance of parents in teaching financial responsibility should not be overlooked or underestimated. In an address to the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas, David W. Wilcox, US Treasury Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy, offered his own personal list of concepts parents can teach their children about personal finance: The concept of a budget constraint: Your child should understand that resources are finite, and, accordingly, that choices have to be made. A dollar spent on something today means either that dollar less is available for spending on other items, or that dollar less is available for saving for a goal your child has established. The concept of present value: Your child should understand that a dollar today is worth more than a dollar in the future. This is difficult for most adults to understand much less children. That is why it is so important to talk to your children about the importance of saving and spending money wisely. The concept of risk: Your child should understand that the money market is a very uncertain place. When they do get a job, they could make more money than they expected, but with the declining value of the dollar and rising taxes, it might not be as much as it seems. What else? These suggested financial principles to impress upon children from the Kids Money Top Ten List: pay for it, you cant afford it. you cant afford it. you receive whether it is from a gift or a paycheck. a financial goal. greed is not good. So if you havent been discussing financial responsibility with your children, this holiday season may be a good time to begin. Start with a few simple concepts which will explain the concept of financial responsibility. Then by the time your child finishes high school, he will understand those three concepts of personal finance outlined above. For Additional Information on Financial Responsibility, check out www.militaryonesource.com then click on Budgeting for the Holidays Center at http://www.cnic. navy.mil. Look Under FFSC and click on Personal Finances Association at http://www. militaryfamily.org/get-info/ support-family/ then click on Finances Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Teaching Students About Financial ResponsibilityJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowingcially while the kids were watching. My husband emerged from our basement with a saw, and stood befuddled over our tree. Id seen this look on his face a thou sand times, and knew he had no clue what to do. Quickly measuring the tree and ceiling heights, I declared, According to my calculations, you need to cut off one foot eight inches. He took a step forward, and I yelled, No! Not from the top! Wincing, I held the spiky middle while my husband timidly sliced at the barbed trunk. A few painful minutes later, the bottom of the tree surrendered, and we were able to get the tree upright in the stand. It looks so small now, our son observed as we gawked at the maimed tree surrounded by saw dust and needles. And its crooked too. Over the next hour, we disguised the problem with as many lights as possible. Are we ever gonna put the ornaments on? our youngest whined for the thousandth time. After drowning their disap pointment in several mugs of hot cocoa, the kids finally abandoned us and ran off to play. Around five-o-clock, the tree looked OK, but my husband still lay on the floor with the train set, emitting various exple tives. Having found the manual too confusing, he winged it. Not surpris ingly, the train would not budge. I didnt want to rein force his if-I-screw-thisup-shell-fix-it-anyway habit, but I couldnt take it anymore. I opened the manual, found the dia gram of track configu rations, assembled an elongated circle, stripped the wires to expose fresh copper, inserted the wir ing into the correct termi nal, properly positioned the wheels, turned on the power, and away she went like the wind. Exhausted by the fiasco, I ordered Chinese take away for dinner. Great job with the train, Dad, our mid dle child said as she crunched into a spring roll. And the tree looks ter rific, too, Dad, our son offered with a mouthful of rice. Yea, thanks Dad! our youngest exclaimed as she threw her arms around Francis neck. Youre quite welcome, kids, my husband said with a wink, thats what dads are for. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com I was reading on the internet about Christmas and found some generally interesting facts about the origin of Christmas and how it has evolved over time. I thought I would share some of what I found. How Did Christmas Start? Some theorists have surmised that the cel ebration of Christmas is related to the Jewish Festival of Lights, during which Jesus was born. Others associate it with the Roman holiday of Saturnalia, which was a celebration of the births of several Roman gods. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia online, Christmas (or Mass of Christ) was not one of the earliest cel ebrations of the Catholic Church. However, in vari ous places around the Holy Land, starting in about 200 AD, masses celebrating Christs birth became annual events. In the fourth century, the date of December 25 was settled on by most churches as the annual celebration. Some of the early mass es included dramatic representations of the Nativity. As early as the fourth century, hymns and carols became part of these dramatic events. It was not until 1223 that St. Francis of Assisi present ed the nativity in the form of the crib or crche that we now know. How Did the Celebration Change? Elements of various pagan celebrations that took place around the month of January gradu ally worked themselves into Christmas celebra tions. Among these ele ments were gift giving, greeting cards, and the Yule log, which was based on a practice of a land lord providing a tenant with wood on the birth of a child. Various other elements, such as the Christmas tree and vis its from Saint Nicholas as Santa Claus were based on other holidays and practices. Over time, Christmas became a major feast day with special foods, such as minced meat, goose, and hot mulled spirits, not eaten the rest of the year. Other saints days, such as Saint Lucias Day in Sweden, also became associated with the Christmas holidays. The Christmas tree, which was probably based on pagan sym bols, became a symbol of everlasting life and hope, especially in Europe and North America. Adorned in lights (initially candles) and smelling of the outdoors, it became an important part of the Christmas celebration. Gifts were originally hung on the tree and they now take a place of honor under the tree. The holy leaf is also an evergreen symbol of everlasting life and is also associated with the crown of thorns Jesus wore when he was crucified. Santa Claus has been around in one form or another since the fourth century. Santa Claus, Old St. Nick, and all of the other incarnations of Father Christmas are based on St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children and sailors. To recap then, Christmas was, none theless, consistently a time for families to come together to cel ebrate the birth of Jesus and to worship together. The religious activities were enhanced by food, drink, decorations, and an appreciation of the winter season as a doorway to the renewal of spring. With that being said, may all the blessings of Christmas be yours this year.Chap Steven Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSFamilies Together Is Blessing At Christmas

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NORAD Provides Web site, Apps to Track Santa ClausFrom a North American Aero space Defense Command News ReleaseChildren of all ages will be able to track Santa Claus on his annual jour ney, thanks to the North American Aerospace Defense Command. The NORAD Tracks Santa website at http:// www.noradsanta.org is up and running. The site features a holiday count down, games and daily activities, video messag es from students around the world and more, offi cials said, and it is avail able in English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Chinese. Official apps also are available in the Windows Store, Apple Store, and Google Play so parents and children can count down the days until Santas launch on their smartphones and tablets. Tracking opportunities also offered on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google Plus. Santa fol lowers just need to type @noradsanta into each search engine to get start ed. Starting at midnight Mountain Standard Time on Dec. 24, website visi tors can watch Santa make the preparations for his flight. Then, at 4 a.m. Mountain time, track ers worldwide can speak with a live phone opera tor to inquire as to Santas whereabouts by dial ing the toll-free num ber 1-877-Hi-NORAD (1-877-446-6723) or by sending an email to noradtrackssanta@out look.com. NORADs Santa Cams also will stream videos as Santa makes his way over various locations. NORAD Tracks Santa is possible, in large part, to the efforts and services of numerous program con tributors, officials said. New to this years program are Bing, HP, iLink-Systems, Kids.gov, Microsofts Windows Azure, BeMerry! Santa, and SiriusXM. Returning collaborators include the 21st Space Wing, Acuity Scheduling, Air Canada, American Forces Network, Analytical Graphics Inc., Avaya, Citadel Mall, Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Council, CradlePoint, Defense Video Imagery Distribution System, the Federal Aviation Administration, First Choice Awards and Gifts, Globelink Foreign Language Center, the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, Meshbox, the National Tree Lighting Ceremony, Naturally Santas, the Newseum, OnStar, PCI Broadband, the Pentagon Channel, RadiantBlue, Space Foundation, TurboSquid, twtelecom, UGroup Media, Verizon and VisionBox. Santas Countdown Calendar and the Santa Cam videos will feature music by military bands, including the Naden Band of the Maritime Forces Pacific, the Air Force Academy Band, the Air Force Band of Liberty, the Air Force Band of the Golden West, the Air Force Band of the West, the Air Force Band, the Air Force Heartland of America Band, the U.S. Army Ground Forces Band, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Band, the Air Force Band of Mid-America, and the West Point Band. It all started in 1955, when a local media advertisement directed children to call Santa direct but the number was misprinted. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone rang through to the crew com mander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. NORAD has car ried the tradition on since the command was created in 1958.NEXCOM Provides Free Phone Cards To Deployed ShipsFrom NEXCOMThe Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced that military members underway or forward deployed during the holi day season will be given a free $10 phone card to call loved ones back home. This is the 11th holiday in a row that NEXCOM has offered free phone cards to deployed military members. We are honored to again be able to give free phone cards to our mili tary men and women who sacrifice so much throughout the year to protect our country, said Jennie Zack, NEXCOM personal telecommuni cations specialist. These free phone cards are our way of thanking them for their service especially during the holiday season when they are away from their loved ones. NEXCOM will distrib ute $10 AT&T prepaid phone cards to those ships with AT&T Direct Ocean Service that will be deployed and away from their home ports for the December holiday sea son. NEXCOM expects to distribute nearly 40,000 free phone cards during the holidays. Ships that will be receiving the free phone cards are USS Denver (LPD 9), USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Germantown (LSD 42), USS Tortuga (LSD 46), USS Stethem (DDG 63), USS Lassen (DDG 82), USS McCampbell (DDG 85), USS Mustin (DDG 89), USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), USS Cowpens CG 63), USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS George Washington (CVN-73), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Kidd (DDG 100), USS Dewey (DDG 104), USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), USS Decatur (DDG 73), USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Farragut (DDG 99). 25 and the Nativity of the Lord at 10 a.m.; The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph at 9 a.m. on Dec. 30; Solemnity of Blessed Virgin Mary at 10 a.m. on Jan. 1 and The Epiphany of the Lord at 9 a.m. on Jan. 6 and Clearing of the Chapel at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call the Base Chapel at 270-5212.From Page 1Chapel THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Mayport Families Enjoy FestivitiesMWR Hosts Annual Magical Christmas EventFrom StaffFamilies of Naval Station Mayport Sailors bun dled up and kept warm with fun activities at the annual MWR Magical Christmas on Dec. 6 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. This years festivities included music by the Navy Southeast Holiday Brass Band and performances by the Youth Activities Center. Santa and Mrs. Claus listened to the childrens Christmas wish lists. The kids also got a chance to enjoy free arts and crafts and mini-games at the event. For more information about events happening throughout 2012, call MWR at 270-5228. -Photo by Paige GnannCeleste Halavin,8, tries out her Santa Claus beard whistle after winning the prize at MWR Magical Christmas on Dec. 6 at Sea Otter Pavilion.-Photo by Paige GnannFamilies gather around a fire pit to roast marshmallows at the annual MWR Magical Christmas. -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyHannah Banker, 4, takes a break at Santas Workshop.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyEngineman 1st Class Mark Blasini, Keysha Taron, and Mark A Blasini (1 year old) enjoy a cup of hot chocolate at the family festival hosted by MWR.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemySanta and Mrs. Claus pose for a picture after visiting with children during the annual MWR Magical Christmas.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyA young girl pulls a lollypop prize at one of the stations set up for the children.-Photo by Paige GnannChildren design their own Christmas cards with stickers and construction paper.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 5 -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyLucas Dobbs, 15 months, tries to throw a ring around a candy cane at one of the many games set up for the children at this years event.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyBailey Borsman, 6, and Savannah Smith, 5, take a break in Santas sleigh during this years Magical Christmas.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyChildren from the Youth Activities Center perform at Magical Christmas in front of a crowd of friends and family.-Photo by Paige GnannChildren from the Youth Activities Center look for a little extra help to get them started during their Magical Christmas performance.-Photo by Paige GnannChildren from the Child Development Center perform with Frosty the Snowman in front of the crowds attending the annual MWR Magical Christmas Dec. 6 at Sea Otter Pavilion.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyA snowstorm hits Naval Station Mayport during Magical Christmas as flurries fill the air thanks to a snow machine provided by MWR.-Photo by Paige GnannOlivia Silver, 10, watches after her brother, Charlie, 3, as he gets ready to take off in an airplane.

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Revamped Transition Assistance Program Aids Separating Service MembersAmerican Forces Press ServiceMajor changes announced to the Transition Assistance Program will revolution ize the way the military prepares people leaving the services, with manda tory participation in pro grams throughout their military careers to help set them up for a success ful transition. The redesigned pro gram, called Transition Goals Planning Success or Transition GPS, was unveiled by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. It is a multi-agency response to President Barack Obamas call to improve career readi ness for separating ser vice members, explained Susan S. Kelly, principal director of the Defense Departments Transition to Veterans Program Office. The president hinted at the most-sweeping change to the Transition Assistance Program in two decades during a speech this summer to the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Obama called it the centerpiece to a broader federal effort to help ser vice members transi tion to civilian life and to reduce veterans unem ployment. During the three-phase rollout of the Transition GPS program that will continue through 2014, the many, but often dis connected, activities con ducted across the U.S. government to support veterans and their fami lies will be melded into one comprehensive effort, Kelly said. The Defense Department and depart ments of Veterans Affairs and Labor aligned their most successful pro grams to deliver bet ter and more compre hensive services to help make service members career ready for civil ian employment, offi cials said. They reached out to the Department of Education to integrate the latest teaching meth ods and tapped into the resources of the Office of Personnel Management and the Small Business Administration. One of the biggest changes in the new pro gram is that participation is no longer voluntary. Based on a law that took effect Nov. 21, service members can no longer opt out of the transition assistance program. All, including reservists and Guardsmen demobilized after 180 days of active duty, must now attend specific training sessions and take concrete steps to prepare for separation. During phase one of the rollout, being imple mented immediately, all separating service mem bers will receive counsel ing about Department of Veterans benefits, Kelly said. In addition, most will be required to attend newly revamped employ ment workshops run by the Department of Labor. These workshops incorporate new cur riculum such as how to explore career interests, use search tools to find job opportunities, write a resume, interview for a position and negotiate a salary, said John Moran, DOLs deputy assistant secretary for Veterans Employment and Training Service. While fulfilling the con gressional mandate to reach out to all separat ing service members, the interagency team went a step beyond the law to further enhance the effort, Kelly said. Separating service members must now take financial planning train ing, and complete a 12-month budget that fac tors in the cost of where they decide to live after leaving the military. They must evaluate how their military-acquired educa tion, training and experi ence translate into civil ian career qualifications and prepare an individual transition plan. The task force ran a pilot program last sum mer at seven installations to evaluate this core cur riculum, gathering assess ments from about 950 military members who participated. Many in the pilot pro grams found it eye-open ing, Kelly said. The seven pilot sites continue to offer the DOL workshops, but the instruction will be avail able service-wide by January, Moran said. The programs second phase, to be tested during 2013 and implemented by the years end, establishes requirements for separat ing service members who plan to go on to college or technical or career train ing or to start their own businesses. Those electing higher education or other train ing will be required to show an acceptance letter from that institution, or have an application filled out and ready to submit, Kelly said. They also will be required to establish a contact with a counselor to follow up with after leaving the military. Also during phase two, service members who hope to become entre preneurs will be required to connect with the Small Business Administration for help in drafting and evaluating their small business plans. The final phase of the rollout to be implement ed by the end of 2014 will integrate transition prep aration throughout the service members military career. The idea, Kelly explained, is to begin preparations for transi tion long before a service member prepares to leave the military. The end state that we are shooting for is to embed this across the military lifecycle, she said. Each service will devel op a plan designating points along a service members career path for this training, Kelly said. improving geographic stability for our Sailors and their families, said Rear Adm. Annie Andrews, Director Navy Total Force Division (OPNAV N12). As an added benefit, inrate shore duty billets in the RMCs, ATGs, and FRSs increase the total number of Sailors return ing back to sea as skilled journeymen and supervi sors; expand Fleet training capacity; and ulti mately result in better personnel, training, and material readiness condi tions on our ships, sub marines and aviation squadrons. Sea and shore tour lengths are set via the Sea Shore Flow NAVADMIN and are driven by the total number of sea and shore duty billets each enlisted community needs to fill. Every attempt is made to balance a Sailors person al and career goals and desires with ensuring the Navys sea duty manning needs are properly met. Among the chang es announced in NAVADMIN 361/12, four ratings have increased sea tour lengths; two rat ings have decreased sea tour lengths; two rat ings have decreased shore tour lengths; one rating has decreased both sea and shore tour lengths; and one rating has decreased sea tour lengths and increased shore tour lengths. A summary of the changes for the 10 impacted com munities and specific SSF Enlisted Career Paths for all ratings are listed in the NAVADMIN. Detailers will review the records of Sailors in the affected communities and make PRD adjustments as required. Once all of the PRD adjustments have been completed a for mal notification will be issued and commands can review their EDVR (enlisted distribution and verification report) for the changes. According to mes sage, Sailors with PRDs prior to August 2013 will not have their current PRD adjusted under the updated SSF tour lengths. Rating detailers at NPC will determine what PRD adjustments all other Sailors will face based on the new policy and Fleet readiness. Sea Shore Flow was first implemented in 2008 to replace pay-grade driv en Sea Shore Rotation. Sea Shore Flow Enlisted Career Paths are designed to ensure proper man ning of all sea duty and front line operational bil lets. At the same time, SSF helps to provide a more desirable work-life bal ance throughout a Sailors career by working to offset the often arduous nature of sea duty with predict able periods of meaning ful work ashore.From Page 1Sea Shore 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Navy Accepts Delivery Of Future USS ArlingtonFrom Team Ships Public AffairsThe Navy accepted delivery of the eighth LPD 17 class amphibi ous transport dock ship, the future USS Arlington (LPD 24), from Huntington Ingalls Industries Dec. 7. Accepting delivery of Arlington represents the official transfer of the ship from the shipbuilder to the Navy and is a major milestone in the ships transition to operational status. This is the third San Antonio class ship to be delivered to the Navy within the last 12 months, said Capt. Darren Plath, LPD 17 class program manager for the Navys Program Executive Office for Ships. It illustrates the signifi cant efforts and teamwork of the shipbuilder and Navy team and provides the Fleet with three vital war-fighting assets in a one-year period. San Antonio class ships are a key element of the Navys seabase transfor mation. Functionally replacing more than 41 ships (LPD 4, LSD 36, LKA 113, and LST 1179 class es of amphibious ships), these ships provide the Navy and Marine Corps with modern platforms that are networked and survivable. Their princi pal mission is to deploy the combat and sup port elements of Marine Expeditionary Units and Brigades, projecting power ashore through the high speed landing craft, air cushion (LCAC) and the Osprey tilt-rotor air craft (MV-22). The LPD 17 class com bines various unique sys tems with special emphasis on projecting combat power ashore, quality of life improvements for Sailors and Marines and mission flexibility. Among the ships innovations are state-of-the-art com bat control and electron ics systems; the Ship Self Defense System, which provides the key integra tion and control portion of the ships total combat system, including sensors, weapons, data links and the Cooperative Engagement Capability; and the Shipboard Wide Area Network, a fiberoptic, ship-wide area computer network that includes both classified and unclassified compo nents. The ship is named for the county of Arlington, Va., honoring the first responders and the 184 victims who died when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. Steel recovered from the Pentagon will be displayed onboard once the ship is commissioned, which is planned for next spring in its homeport of Norfolk, Va. As one of the Defense Departments largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibi ous ships, special mis sion and support ships, and special warfare craft. Currently, the majority of shipbuilding programs managed by PEO Ships are benefiting from serial production efficiencies, which are critical to deliv ering ships on cost and schedule. -Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman ShipbuildingThe future USS Arlington (LPD 24) launched Nov. 23 from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding's Pascagoula shipyard, marking a key milestone in the ship's construction process. Arlington honors the 184 victims who died when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon Sept. 11, 2001, as well as the first responders from the county. Keel Ceremony For Future USNS John GlennFrom Team Ships Public AffairsGeneral Dynamics NASSCO held a keel lay ing ceremony for the future USNS John Glenn (MLP 2), Dec. 4, in San Diego, Calif. MLP 2 is the second ship in the Mobile Landing Platform program that will provide the Navy with the capa bility to transfer vehicles and equipment at sea and to interface with surface connectors to deliver the vehicles and equipment ashore. The ships name hon ors the Hon. John Glenn, a decorated Marine Corps pilot, who was in atten dance for the ceremony. A distinguished astro naut, the first American to orbit the Earth and a former U.S. Senator from Ohio, Glenn flew 59 com bat missions during his service with the Marine Corps in World War II, and a combined 90 mis sions over the course of two tours in the Korean War. It is fitting that this ship is named in honor of a transformative fig ure like Senator John Glenn, said Capt. Henry Stevens, Strategic Sealift and Theater Sealift pro gram manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. MLP will be the center piece of the Navys sea basing capability and transform how the Navy and Marine Corps team operates from the sea. Keel laying recognizes the first joining together of a ships components. While modern shipbuild ing processes allow fab rication of individual modules to begin months earlier, keel laying repre sents the formal begin ning of a ship. The keel was co-authenticated by Lyn Glenn, ships sponsor, and Helen Toolan, spouse of Lieutenant General John A. Toolan, Jr., USMC, Commanding General I Marine Expeditionary Force. Acting as a mobile sea base, MLP will be part of the critical access infra structure that supports the deployment of forces and supplies to provide prepositioned equipment and supplies with flexible distribution. MLPs are based on an existing commer cial NASSCO design, the Alaska-class crude oil car rier, ensuring design stability and lower develop ment costs. MLP will have a maximum speed of 15 knots and range of 9500 nautical miles. At 837 feet long, MLP displaces over 80,000 tons when loaded. The ship with its modu lar core capability set includes a 25,000 sq. ft. raised vehicle deck, sideport ramp, large mooring fenders, and berths for up to three Landing Craft Air Cushioned vessels (LCAC). These ships serve as a highly flexible, modu lar platform that may be used across a broad range of military operations, including humanitar ian support and sustain ment of traditional mili tary missions. They will operate within Maritime Prepositioning Ship Squadrons to The ability to establish support facili ties at sea assures U.S. military forces access to areas previously denied. The USNS Montford Point (MLP 1), lead ship of the class, launched Nov. 13. MLP 2 is expect ed to launch and be chris tened in Fall 2013. The contract for the third ship, the future USNS Lewis Puller, was awarded to NASSCO in February 2012. Currently, the majority of shipbuilding programs managed by PEO Ships are benefiting from serial production efficiencies. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 7

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DOD Clarifies TA ExpectationsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department has issued new policy guidelines intended to provide better protection for members of the military and veterans who seek tuition assistance for post-secondary degrees. The departments revised voluntary education partnership policy specifies the expectations and agreements that colleges, universities and technical schools must adhere to in order to receive DOD underwriting, said Carolyn Baker, chief of voluntary education for DODs military community family and policy office. The guidelines, part of a new memorandum of understanding, ensure certain protections for military members [so] that they have a quality education, she added. Tuition assistance is a benefit available to Guardsmen, reservists, active duty members and veterans allowing a degree from a Department of Education-accredited college or university. To receive it, participating institutions must sign the MOU, and provide the student with clear information about financial procedures, course information and graduation rates. [The MOU] protects service members in providing them with information so a service member can make a wise choice as to the institution [they attend], Baker said. We ask that all institutions provide service members with an education plan that states [course requirements] and evaluates credits earned at other schools [so] the service member can move forward and actually obtain their degree. The new guidelines clarify oversight, enforcement, and accountability for educational institutions receiving military tuition assistance, Baker said. Currently about 2,000 institutions participate in the tuition assistance program and Baker said she encourages more to do the same. The overall initiative supports the executive order establishing the Presidents Principles of Excellence, Baker said. Those were issued in response to reports of aggressive and deceptive targeting of service members, veterans, and their families by some educational institutions after the Post-9/11 GI Bill became law. The guidelines pertain only to institutions accepting Title 4 funding, Baker said.Saluting Military Families -Photo by FC2 Bobby LeonardNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, reads a copy of We Salute The Military, part of the city of Jacksonvilles book series offered through the Mayors Book Club, on air during Finegan Elementary Schools WFIN broadcast.DeCA Scholarship Applications OutFrom DeCAApplications for the 2013 Scholarships for Military Children Program are available at commissaries world wide or online through a link at http://www.mili taryscholar.org. Scholarship awards will be based on funds avail able, but the program awards at least $1,500 at each commissary. If there are no eligible appli cants from a particular commissary, the funds designated for that com missary will be awarded as an additional scholar ship at another store. The Scholarships for Military Children Program cele brated a major milestone in 2012 as it reached more than $10 million in scholarships awarded to 6,742 students from around the globe. The scholarship program was created to recognize military fami lies contributions to the readiness of U.S. Armed forces and to celebrate the commissarys role in the military community. DeCA is focused on supporting a good qual ity of life for our military and their families, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. We do that by delivering a great commissary benefit, while our industry partners and public donations help the scholarship program provide money for higher education to many worth while students. To apply for a scholar ship, a student must be a dependent, unmarried child of an active duty service member, reserv ist, guardsman, retiree, or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty, or survivor of a retiree, and must be younger than 21 or 23, if enrolled as a full-time stu dent at a college or uni versity. Eligibility is deter mined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Applicants should ensure that they, as well as their sponsor, are enrolled in the DEERS database and have a cur rent military ID card. An applicant must also be planning to attend or already attending an accredited college or uni versity, full time, in the fall of 2013, or be enrolled in a program of studies designed to transfer into a four-year program. Applicants must sub mit an essay available Dec. 3 on http://www. militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by Feb. 22. For questions,call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers. com. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Heading Back Home Spouse Surveys Critical To Family Support American Forces Press ServiceDefense Department officials are sending a new spouse survey to select active-duty families to assist in determining programs that best suit their needs. During an inter view with the Pentagon Channel, Cathy Flynn, a program analyst with the Pentagons military com munity and family poli cy office, discussed how these surveys affect future programs serving military families. The Active Duty Spouse Survey is a sur vey thats sent out to a representative sample of active-duty spouses every two years, she said. Its really a chance for spous es to give their feedback, their input, and their experiences ... back to us here in the Department of Defense. The departments first spouse survey was in 2006, and the first activeduty spouse survey was in 2008. The department now surveys active-duty spouses in even-num bered years and reservecomponent spouses in odd-numbered years. The new active-duty spouse survey launch es today and will be in the field for about three months as long as we get enough response, Flynn said. The questions cover all areas of military life things that we hope are important to the spous es, Flynn said. Things like [permanent changeof-station] moves, your experiences with deploy ment, your experiences with your children, your experiences with military programs. Flynn said these results are analyzed and used to make decisions on poli cies and programs to con tinue to better serve mili tary families. In 2010, we learned that 85 percent of spouses want or need to work, she said. Of our population of spouses, 57 percent are in the labor force; how ever, 26 percent of those spouses were unem ployed. So using that data really helped us to boost employment and educa tion support programs for spouses. So it was really critical to have that feed back to have the facts to use with our leaders. Flynn said the survey will help to guide deci sions about family pro grams in an era of budget challenges. The government is trying to make decisions about what programs to keep, she said. Its really important that we have the facts about what your experiences are like, what spouses lives are like, and what programs theyre using and what programs theyre benefitting from. DOD leaders want to make really good choic es about what programs to keep and which pro grams to beef up to con tinue supporting military families, Flynn added, and responses to the survey will inform those decisions. Each demographic is surveyed for all service branches, Flynn said, to provide officials with an understanding of spous es experiences in all ser vices.In this survey, its all brought together so we can understand across the board whats happen ing where services might look different and where they look the same, Flynn said. Flynn emphasized the importance of spouses participating in these sur veys to improve or sustain support programs. Its a random sample, ... and about one in 10 65,000 spouses will be invited to take this sur vey, she said. Whats really important about that is if youre selected to participate in this sur vey, youre representing, essentially, 10 spouses who have similar back grounds as you do. Flynn explained select ed families will be invited by mail to take the survey or can participate online. The survey takes 20 to 30 minutes to complete, she added. It takes a little bit of time, because there are a lot of areas to cover, she explained. Were trying to cover the entire breadth of experiences of military life. It is really important that people take this sur vey seriously, and give us their feedback, she con tinued. The Active Duty Spouse Survey is really your opportunity to get your feedback all the way up to the leaders in the Department of Defense.-Photo by MC1 Nathanael MillerThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) transits the the Mediterranean Sea. Hu City is returning to homeport at Mayport after operating with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibil ity in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. Commissary Hours For HolidaysMayport Commissary holiday hours will be in effect from Dec. 23-Jan. 5. Store hours are as follows: Sunday, Dec. 23: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 24: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 25: Closed Wednesday-Friday, Dec. 26-28: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 29: 9 a.m.6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31: Closed Tuesday, Jan. 1: Closed Wednesday, Jan. 2: 9 a.m.7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 5: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 9

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USS Taylor Visits Port Everglades USS Taylor PAOUSS Taylor (FFG 50) conducted an eventful, high priority port visit in Port Everglades, Florida from Dec. 4. The Proud Defenders participated in multiple community events, stay ing busy while inter acting with the Fort Lauderdale Navy League, Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station Museum, Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital, and Joe Dimaggios Children Hospital. The crew attended the 67th Flight 19 Memorial Ceremony, held annually by the Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station Museum. Flight 19, com monly referred to as The Lost Patrol, was the designation of five TBM Avenger torpedo bombers that disappeared on Dec. 5, 1945, during an over water navigation train ing flight from Naval Air Station Fort Lauderdale, Florida. All 14 airmen on the flight were lost, as were all 13 crew members of the lost PBM Mariner flying boat which con ducted a search and res cue mission to attempt to recover The Lost Patrol. Taylors Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Dennis J. Volpe, was the ceremonys guest speaker. The Mayor of Fort Lauderdale, John P. Sieler, numerous World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War veterans were in attendance to include one of the last of the Tuskegee airmen. The Officers and crew enjoyed the opportunity to inter act with the impressive collection of veterans present at the ceremony. We were honored to spend part of our time in Port Everglades com memorating part of our Naval History, said Boatswain Mate 2nd Class Justin Plank. Plank had the honor of ringing the bell for all of the names of the Flight 19 and PBM Mariner aircrew members who lost their lives. The Proud Defenders also spent time at the Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital in Miami, Florida and the Joe Dimaggios Children Hospital in Fort Lauderdale. The Veterans Home visit provided the Officers and crew the oppor tunity to interact with a large number of vet erans from World War Two, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm as well as gain a better understand ing of the services avail able from the Veterans Administration. The Childrens hospital visit and the time spent with the children was a great experience for all of the Proud Defenders who participated. It was clear that the employees and doctors we met at the VA Hospital cared a lot about their work and their patients, said Sonar Technician (Geographical) 2nd Class Joseph B. Troupe. It was great to see dedication in caring for veterans that were dedicated to the country. USS Taylor (FFG 50) is stationed in Naval Station Mayport, Florida and is assigned to Commander Destroyer Squadron 14.Crew members from USS Taylor (FFG 50) visit the Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital in Miami, FL. PFC Bruce W. Carter is a Vietnam-era Marine who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his selfless and heroic actions in defense of his fellow Marines in the Quang Tri Province during combat opera tions in 1969. The Proud Defenders met with Dr. Alberto A. Martinez-Arizala, MD, head of the Spinal Cord Center as well as numerous veterans throughout the hospital. From left: Volpe, Sonar Technician (Geographical) 2nd Class Joseph B. Troupe, Dr. Martinez-Arizala, Fire Controlman 1st Class Christopher D. Carr, Ensign Jessica A. Gray, and Command Master Chief Joseph D. Gardner. Boatswain Mate 2nd Class Justin M. Plank rings the cer emonial bell at the 67th Flight 19 Memorial for the Lost Patrol, honoring the lost members of that fateful flight. The unexplained disappearance of 5 Avenger TBMs and the PBM Mariner Search and Rescue crew of the Lost Patrol is now one of the central elements of the infamous Bermuda Triangle.-Photos courtesy of USS TaylorCmdr. Dennis J. Volpe, Commanding Officer of USS Taylor (FFG 50) speaks at the 67th Flight 19 Memorial. Our motto Proud Defender is a daily reminder of the heroic actions and bravery of, our namesake, Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, said Commander Volpe. These same attributes are shared by the 13 man crew of the PBM Mariner sent out to search for Flight 19 on that fateful day in 1945. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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FFSC Workshop, Class Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Ave. Dec. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 13, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 702 Dec. 18, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17-21, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota. Dec. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Setting Up For Baby -Photo by Paige GnannAngelique Guilbeaux watches her father Mitch Mouton and her husband, Gas Turbine System Technician 2nd Class (SW) Andy Guilbeaux of SERMC, load up a new crib set donated through Operation Shower and Birdies For The Brave. Guilbeaux and 29 other military and depen dent moms-to-be attended Babies For The Brave, a baby shower honoring military families held Nov. 30 at TPC Sawgrass. The event was cohosted by Cathy Justice, wife of Greenbrier Resort Owner Jim Justice, and Amy Mickelson, wife of PGA Tour player Phil Mickelson. Each mom received several gifts, including baby bottles, clothing, bedding, diaper bags and toys. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Friday, Dec. 14 Duval County Extension Agency, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., will hold a Right Tree Right Place Workshop from 9 a.m.12:15 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. This seminar will demonstrate how to complete a project by learning the importance of knowing your landscape codes, understand ing the planting site and the selecting of the right tree for the site. Whether you are a homeowner, HOA, developer, contrac tor, landscape architect, or government employee, this seminar will edu cate and enlighten you. Speakers include UF/ IFAS Extension Agents, JEA Arborist, and City of Jacksonville Code Enforcement. FNGLA and ISA CEUs available. Register online at: http:// www.fufc.org/rtrp_jack sonville_registration.html Or make checks out to Florida Urban Forestry Council and send to: Larry Figart, Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32254 Saturday, Dec. 15 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This rang er-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Dec. 22 Visitors from other lands have made much of North East Florida their home. They slowly and quietly creep their way into native forests. Come learn about these invasive exotics and how you can help your park rangers protect The Real Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park at 2 p.m. No reservations are necessary and the pro gram is free. Thursday, Dec. 27 National Naval Officers Association meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Contact CWO3 Lionel Jeffcoat at (904)594-6908 or lionel.c.jeffcoat@uscg. mil or retired Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Saturday, Dec. 29 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many different species of waterfowl that can be seen. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations necessary and the program is free. Thursday, Jan. 24 National Naval Officers Association meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Contact CWO3 Lionel Jeffcoat at (904)594-6908 or lionel.c.jeffcoat@uscg. mil or retired Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org From BBCBalfour Beatty Communities will host a Holiday Shop-aThon at the Ribault Bay Community Center, 1201 Assisi Lane, from 10 a.m.2 p.m. on Dec. 15. There will be more than 20 vendors selling arts and crafts, holiday and more. Kids can enjoy aa giant slide, bounce house, sno cone station and more. This event is free and open to the public.Mayport Housing Holiday Shop-a-Thon THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 13

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Dec. 19: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 13: Christmas Karaoke 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Lets celebrate the holiday sea son with karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from Dawn Ferreria and bever ages will be served. 2705380 Dec. 29: UFC 155: Dos Santos vs Velasquez 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 MWR The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 13: Trans Siberian Orchestra. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $40. Sign up deadline Dec. 10 Dec. 13: Christmas Karaoke 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Lets celebrate the holiday sea son with karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon con taining discounts at our Baked goods by Dawn Ferreria and beverages will be served. 270-5380 Dec. 14: St Augustine Amphitheater Trip. Ice skating, sleigh rides, ice slides and more! Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Transportation only. Dec. 15-16: Universal: Islands of Adventure & Universal Studios Trip Includes FREE Universal military ticket, one-night hotel stay and transporta tion. Van departs at 8:30 a.m. Cost $25. Sign up deadline Dec. 12. Dec. 17: Christmas Shopping Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. FREE. Transportation Only. Dec. 19: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 2:30 p.m. Sign up deadline Dec. 17. Dec. 19: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not LIBERTY about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 20: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Dec. 22: Sea World Orlando. Van departs 7:30 a.m. FREE with Salute to Military ticket. Sign up deadline Dec. 20. Dec. 23: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New England Patriots. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Dec. 27: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 29: UFC 155: Dos Santos vs Velasquez 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Dec. 30 : Hooters Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. Dec. 13: Youth Drama Club Presents Its a Wonderful Life. 4:30 p.m. at the Youth Center. 27-5680 Dec. 15: Teen Trip to Avenues Mall. Depart Teen Center at 12:30 p.m.; return 5:30 p.m. Permission slip required. 246-0347 Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. KID 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastThe Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Auto Skills Center is offering Sailors a free 27-point vehicle inspection through Dec. 15 in order to help ensure safe travel during the upcoming hol iday season. The inspection covers everything from the vehicles tires to the gas and brake pedals. The inspec tion also covers the vehi cles entire brake system. Were going to be inspecting vehicles, front to back, top to bottom. Were checking for every thing and anything that might give you a prob lem in the short term, as well as anything that may effect your vehicle down the road, stated Richard Eaton, Head Mechanic, MWR Auto Skills Center. Nobody wants their car to break down and to be stranded on the side of the road. That can cost a lot of money. Were trying to help prevent that with this free inspection. The Auto skills Center offers discounted rates throughout the year, but is offering this free, thor ough inspection prior to the upcoming holiday season. The employees at the MWR Auto Skills Center expressed what a plea sure it is to be able to help Sailors and their families during the holiday sea son. Were doing this free pre-leave vehicle inspec tion for Sailors and their dependents. Before everyone goes on the long trip to visit their fami lies over the holidays, we want to make sure that they will be safe on the road, said Randy Barclay, Program Manager MWR Auto Skills Center. Were always here, so come in whether you just need to know how to put air in your tires or how to properly check your flu ids. Even if you just have a question in general, just ask any of our employees here, the information we provide is always free of charge. The MWR Auto Skills Center strongly urges Sailors and their depen dents to schedule an appointment from Dec. 1-15 in order to get a free vehicle inspection prior to going on leave. Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series NOFFS (Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series) is a pro gram designed to improve the operational perfor mance of Navy personnel through fitness and nutrition. Emphasis is placed on injury prevention via tissue management and refueling. This is a 4-week program for CFLs and ACFLs only. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training Learn how to train using the unique and innovative TRX Suspension Training System. This class is reserved for those entire ly new to TRX training. This class will result in increased strength, coor dination, balance and CORE-power. Class size limited to 25. 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWR MWR Auto Skills Center Provides Sailors With Free Pre-Holiday Vehicle Inspection-Photo by MC2 Salton CebeRichard Eaton the Head Mechanic at Morale Welfare and Recreation Auto Skills Center on board Naval Station Mayport looks over Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Damian Bergs car during a free 27 point inspection. MWR Auto Skills Center is offering Sailors a free 27 point vehicle inspection until Dec. 15 in order to help ensure safe travel during the upcoming holiday season. Tailgating At Beachside -Photo by Paige GnannAttendees sign up for a football pool at the Army Navy Football Party Dec. 8 at Beachside Community Center. MWR set up a 20-foot screen at the center for the party, which included giveaways, trivia and tailgating eats. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 15

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FRGs USS Simpson family readiness group will meet from 3-9 p.m. on Dec. 13. USS Underwood family readiness group will meet from 6-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 20. Closed For Holiday USO will be closed Dec. 22-25 for the holidays. It will reopen on Dec. 26 from 9-4 p.m. Holiday Helping Hand Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is still collecting food dona tions to lend a helping hand to military families in need this holiday sea son. Donations can be dropped off at both the Mayport and NAS USO centers throughout the holiday season. Free Jacksonville University Basketball Admission Sea Best Seafood has bought out the Veterans Memorial Arena for the JU basketball double header on Tuesday, Dec. 18. Bring your family and friends out to this free event and watch the JU womens team take on Troy State at 5 p.m. and the JU mens team take on Wofford at 7:15pm. Upward Flag Footbal And Cheerleading-Free Signups Does your son or daughter love flag foot ball or cheerleading? Dependent children with a parent of legal guard ian deployed at anytime during the Upward Flag Football season can par ticipate free of charge. Jacksonville Giants Basketball Military members and their families can enjoy free admission to the Jacksonville Giants home games. Simply show your military ID at the box office for free admission. K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an indi vidual annual pass and $30 on a family annual pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addi tion, honorably dis charged veterans who have service connected disabilities, and surviv ing spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifications and nec essary forms to receive these discounts, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org/ United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 17 TRICARE App To Access Pharmacy BenefitsFrom TRICARETRICARE beneficia ries have new pharmacy options available and accessible in the palm of their hand just by using TRICARE pharmacy contractor Express Scripts enhanced mobile applica tion. The new additions let beneficiaries use their smartphone to safely and securely manage their TRICARE pharmacy ben efit. So how convenient are the latest enhancements? The updated app includes medication reminders and an account registration tool. The reminder feature gives beneficiaries the option to set up daily alerts to make sure they take their medications as prescribed and dont skip a dose. The account registration fea ture lets beneficiaries cre ate their ESI account right on their smart phone. The Express Rx mobile app gives ben eficiaries access to their prescription informa tion anytime, anywhere, said Rear Adm. Thomas J. McGinnis, chief of TRICARE Pharmacy Operations. Currently, the Express Rx app and mobileoptimized website allow beneficiaries to register for TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and change current prescrip tions over to home deliv ery. They can also order home delivery refills and check order status. Another feature lets ben eficiaries look up infor mation on their current prescriptions. For GPSenabled smart phones, the app can direct benefi ciaries to the nearest net work retail pharmacy. Smartphone users can download the app for free by going to www.expressscripts.com/mobile or using services like the Apple App Store or Android Marketplace. The mobile-optimized phar macy website is accessi ble at http://m.esrx.com. Other available free apps to down load through the Apple App Store or Android Marketplace are the TriWest mobile app and the Defense Manpower Data Centers milConnect mobile app. Beneficiaries in the South Region can make use of the mobile Humana Military web site, https://m.humanamilitary.com/ while ben eficiaries in the North Region can use the mobile Health Net mobile site, https://m.healthnet. com. For more information about TRICARE pharma cy program, visit www.tri care.mil/pharmacy. Learn how to switch to TRICARE pharmacy home delivery at www.tricare.mil/homedelivery. HEALTHCooler Months Mean Its Time For Flu VaccineTRICARE health news, straight from the desk of Brig. Gen. W. Bryan Gamble, M.D. Its that time of year again flu season. Time for you and your family to get flu shots. Not only will you signif icantly lower your chance of getting the flu this win ter, but you can make an important contribution to public health by limiting the spread of this danger ous disease. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states flu seasons are unpredictable and can be severe. All family mem bers, six months and older, should be immu nized every year, since the flu virus changes slightly season to season, requir ing yearly vaccinations. This is especially true for people at high risk of catching the flu or with a risk of flu-related com plications, such as chil dren, pregnant women, people 65 and older and those with chronic medi cal conditions such as asthma. A complete list of people at higher risk of complications is available at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website: www.cdc.gov/ flu/groups.htm Some people worry flu shots dont work. It is pos sible to get the flu, even after getting immunized. There are different strains of the flu virus in circu lation, meaning you can be exposed to a version of the virus youre not immunized against. Some even believe the flu vac cine causes the flu. This is incorrect. Flu shots con tain only pieces of killed flu virus that cannot infect the body. Some recipients report mild flu-like symptoms, which result from antibodies your body pro duces that help fight off the actual flu. Getting a flu shot is easy and inexpensive for TRICARE beneficiaries. You can get your flu vac cine from any military medical clinic or hospital at no cost to you, or from your pharmacist at one of 45,000 network pharma cies that administer vac cines to TRICARE benefi ciaries. Find a participating pharmacy near you at www.express-scripts. com/tricare/pharmacy, or by calling Express Scripts at 1-877-363-1303. You can also be vaccinated by your doctor, or at one of the retail health clinics found inside many phar macies. Keep in mind this is considered a medical visit, so you may have cost shares or copays. Generally, if the phar macist administers the vaccine, it is at no cost to you. If another healthcare professional administers the vaccine, it is a medical visit and you must pay the associated copays. Although getting vacci nated is the best way to prevent the flu, there are additional steps you can follow to avoid the flu. One of the most impor tant is to wash your hands regularly with soap and water, or use an alcoholbased hand sanitizer when those are not avail able. Here are some other tips from www.flu.gov : eyes, nose, or mouth. with sick people. habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food. mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw your used tissue in the trash. flu-like illness, stay home until at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (without the use of feverreducing medicine). Its important to get a flu shot every year your chances of staying healthy this winter increase dra matically if you do. For more information on this years flu season, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. To learn more about TRICARE coverage of flu shots, visit www.tricare.mil/flu. Catching Conjunctivitis Can Catch You TooTRICARE Management ActivityConjuncti-what? Conjunctivitis is a common eye condition that affects people worldwide. Its uncomfortable and highly contagious, so how can TRICARE beneficiaries prevent themselves from catching the infection? Conjunctivitis is often called pink eye or red eye because it can cause the white of the eye to take on a pink or red color, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Viruses, bacteria and allergies are common causes of pink eye. Common symptoms include pink or red color in the white of the eye, discharge from the eye, itchy or scratchy eyes, and crusting of eyelids or lashes. There are three forms of conjunctivitis: viral, bac terial and allergic conjunctivitis. Viral and bacterial conjunctivitis are caused when a virus or bacterium enter and infect the eye. Both viral and bacterial conjunctivitis usually begin in one eye and progress to the second eye, with symptoms that are typi cally mild and clear up within 2-3 weeks. Allergic conjunctivitis happens when the body reacts to irritants or allergens such as pollen, dust mites, molds, pet dander, contact lenses and cosmetics. Symptoms are mild and are similar to viral and bac terial conjunctivitis. Signs, symptoms and a patients history will help a doctor, nurse or healthcare provider diagnose conjunctivitis. Treatment for pink eye depends on the cause and severity; its not always necessary to seek medical treatment. However, the CDC recom mends seeking medical attention if the following symptoms are present: Moderate to severe pain in the eye(s) Vision problems, such as sensitivity to light or blurred vision Intense redness in the eye(s) Symptoms become worse or persist Treatment with antibiotics does not begin to improve after 24 hours Most cases of conjunctivitis will clear up without treatment, but some severe cases require antibiot ics to help speed up recovery and stop the spread of infection. TRICARE covers most prescribed anti biotics at no cost through military treatment facility pharmacies, and for minimal out-of-pocket costs at retail network pharmacies. The best way to prevent the spread of conjuncti vitis is to practice good hygiene habits. To limit the spread of conjunctivitis to other people follow these steps from the CDC: Wash hands often with soap and water Avoid touching or rubbing eyes Wash pillowcases, sheets, washcloths, towels and blankets Do not share eye makeup, face make-up, makeup brushes, contact lenses and containers or eye glasses Dont use swimming pools Theres no vaccine to prevent conjunctivitis, but there are ways to avoid catching and spreading the crud by good hygiene practices. More information about conjunctivitis can be found at www.cdc.gov/ conjunctivitis. TRICARE makes healthy living the easy choice, learn more at www.tricare.mil/heal thyliving.Keep Your Cholesterol Levels In CheckTRICARE Management ActivityEveryone has heard the saying, too much of a good thing can be bad. The saying holds true for cholesterol levels. The body produces all the cholesterol it needs, but depending on a persons diet, cholesterol can soar to dangerous levels put ting them at risk for heart disease. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance pro duced by the body, that is also found in many foods. Too much cholesterol in the blood can contribute to the buildup of choles terol on the walls of arter ies. This buildup of fatty deposits and other items known as plaque can reduce the flexibility of arteries. Over time, plaque causes them to become narrow and blood flow to and from the heart to decrease and at times become blocked, says the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend hav ing a blood test called a lipoprotein profile, also known as a lipid panel, to check cholesterol levels. TRICARE covers a lipid panel once every five years beginning at the age of 18. A lipoprotein profile is a blood test measuring total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (bad choles terol or LDL), high-den sity lipoprotein (good cholesterol or HDL) and triglycerides, another form of fat in the body. This information can determine whether or not cholesterol is in the right range and what actions are needed. Treatment for high cholesterol begins with lifestyle changes, but is often treated by combin ing lifestyle changes and prescription medications from a health care pro vider. According to CDC, there are several types of drugs available to lower cholesterol including statins, bile acid seques trants, nicotinic acid, fibric acids and cholester ol absorption inhibitors. Treatment goals include lowering the LDL level, raising the HDL level and reducing the risk of devel oping heart disease or having a heart attack. Several factors affect cholesterol levels includ ing diet, weight, physical activity, age, gender and heredity. CDC lists several ways people can maintain lower cholesterol levels through lifestyle changes including: Eat a healthy diet Maintain a healthy weight Exercise regularly Dont smoke Treat high cholesterol Beneficiaries should pay attention to nutri tional information located on food labels including cholesterol and saturated fats content in foods and strive to keep their choles terol levels in the healthy range. To learn more on TRICARE cholesterol test ing coverage go to www. tricare.mil/coveredser vices More facts and resourc es about lowering cho lesterol can be found at www.cdc.gov/cholesterol.Resolve To Start New Year RightTRICARE Management ActivityThe New Year is quickly approaching, and another year means another reso lution. TRICARE offers an easy way to jump start the New Year with a regular exercise program for the entire family. Healthy resolutions make healthy beneficia ries. Uniformed service members know the importance of staying physically fit. Being physically fit has a direct impact on their level of combat readi ness, mental and physical health, and their produc tivity, but its also benefi cial to those who arent in uniform. Physical activity is important for general health and weight man agement and can reduce the risk of cardiovas cular disease, diabe tes and other diseases. Beneficiaries curious about the amount of calo ries burned from various activities can visit www. cdc.gov/healthyweight/ physical_activity/index. html. Before starting an exer cise program, beneficia ries should check with their primary care provid er, especially if they have pre-existing medical con ditions. Doctors can help deter mine the right amount of activity based on personal condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recom mend 30 minutes of daily physical activity for adults and 60 minutes for chil dren. Everyday activities can provide opportunities for being more active. CDC offers some ways to stay healthy everyday: etc., to work, school, store or place of worship away from your destina tion of the elevator or escalator ing small trips on foot to get your body moving walking or doing desk exercises instead of taking cigarette breaks. home repair activities. The Defense Department currently unveiled their brand new health campaign, OPERATION: Live Well, which is dedicated to making healthy living the easy choice and social norm. The campaign out lines the importance of overall prepared ness of the nations war riors and their families. To learn more about the campaign go to, www. defense.gov/home/features/2012/0812_livewell/. Health starts by making healthy choices. TRICARE has educational programs and covers most preven tive services for all benefi ciaries. Visit the healthy liv ing page at www.tricare. mil/healthyliving to learn more.

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Remembers Pearl Harbor DayMock Bills Headed To HousingThe Mirror editorNaval Station Mayport on base Housing resi dents will receive a letter from base Commanding Officer, Capt. Douglas Cochrane, in the mail this week preparing them for the launch of the new utility billing and awareness program. The newest phase of the program includes sending on base residents a mock billing statement starting Jan. 1 that outlines each households energy con sumption. The mock billing period allows enough time for you and your fam ily to review your energy consumption and be pro active in implementing energy conservation measures throughout your home prior to the actual billing phase, Cochrane, stated in the letter. The mock bills will include the residents name, address and account number, the type of utility (electric or gas) and consumption as well as provide a comparison of the residents usage to others. There will also be a summary of the account balance and energy con servation titps. Over the past several months, NS Mayport has moved towards joining the Resident Conservation Program (RECP), part of the Office of the Secretary of Defense policy to make privatized military hous ing more energy efficient. RECP was developed by the Navy to support the OSD efforts. Homes in Ribault Bay Community will not be affected. Cochrane, along with representatives from Balfour Beatty Communities, Yes Energy and Switch4Good met with concerned residents in November during three town hall meeting to dis cuss the program and explain the new billing process and make them aware of a new energy conservation program available to all residents on or off base. The Switch4Good, monitored by WattzOn, program allows Housing residents to have a Home energy coach visit their house and offer per sonalized energy sav ing tips; sign up for text or twitter messages with energy saving alerts; and be help NS Mayport win a Community Awards program grant for $500 for the community that reaches its energy saving goal. To sign up for Switch4Good, call 1800314-5997 or go to www. switch4good.netFrom StaffMore than 100 vet erans and guests gathered aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45) Dec. 7 to honor and remem ber those who lost their lives during the attack on Pearl Harbor 71years ago. Mayports Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) Branch 290 has hosted the annual memorial service in conjunction with Naval Station Mayport since 1966. De Werts crew stood proudly in ranks as special guest speaker Joseph McKinney spoke to the guests and three survivors in atten dance. Edward Kmiec, 95, Chuck Ellis, 90 and Duane Reyelts, 90, were in attendance during the pierside ceremony on board De Wert. Each Pearl Harbor survivor who attend ed the ceremony was able to recall exactly where they were when the bombs began to fly during that fateful day of Dec. 7, 1941. At the end of this years remembrance ceremony, the survi vors, families and veterans tossed bouquets into the sea in memory of the deceased.Enlisted Sea Shore Flow Updated -Photo by MC3 Damian BergCmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45), escorts retired U.S. Navy Aviation Machinsts Mate 1st Class Edward Kmiec, a survivor of the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, to a Pearl Harbor Day ceremony aboard De Wert. The ceremony commemorated the anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsSailors from ten enlist ed communities will see their Sea Shore Flow (SSF) Enlisted Career Paths adjusted in the Navys latest Sea Shore Flow Update, officials said Dec. 4. Changes to the enlisted sea duty and shore duty billet base require periodic tour length updates to ensure proper manning of our ships, submarines, aviation squadrons, and other operational units, said Navy Personnel Command (NPC) Force Master Chief (AW/SW/ NAC) Jon Port. This years Sea Shore Flow update released in NAVADMIN 361/12 is on a much smaller scale than the Sea Shore Flow revision implemented in 2011. Last year was the first revision to Sea Shore Flow since it was implemented in 2008 and impacted 44 out of 84 enlisted communities with over 118,000 Sailors facing longer sea tour lengths. This year, only 10 enlisted com munities will be impact ed and fewer than 9,000 Sailors will see longer sea tour lengths. Last year, the Navy also began a concerted effort to balance SSF for sea-intensive ratings by increasing in-rate shore duty billets in Regional Maintenance Centers (RMCs), Afloat Training Groups (ATGs), and Fleet Readiness Centers (FRCs) among other critical shore activities. These billets provide rating enhancing shore tour opportunities within Fleet concentration areas Go Navy! Beat Army!-Photo by Paige GnannA member of USS Klakrings flag football team runs the ball as he evades teammembers from the U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion at the annual NS Mayport Army vs. Navy flag football game on Dec. 8 behind the barracks. The game match up was in honor of the annual Army Vs. Navy college football game held the same day. Army Recruiting beat NS Mayport in the first game of the day, but lost to Klakring during the second match.See Sea Shore, Page 6 Christmas Cantata At ChapelFrom Base ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapel will hold a Christmas Cantata with the Protestant Choir at the 10:30 a.m. worship service on Dec. 16. In addition, the Protestant Chapel will be having a Christmas Eve Candle Light Service at 7 p.m. on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24. All are wel come to add this to their Christmas Eve list of fes tivities. The Chapel Protestant holiday calendar includes Mens Prayer Breakfast at 9 a.m. on Dec. 15 and family dinner at 6:30 p.m.; Advent Service at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 23; Sixth day of Christmas at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 30 and the Ephiphany of the Lord Childrens Christmas Pageant Communion Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on Jan. 6. Catholic holiday calen dar includes 9 a.m. Mass on Dec. 16 and Dec. 23; Christmas Eve mass at 5 p.m. on Dec. 25; Midnight Mass at midnight on Dec. See Chapel, Page 3

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Ow, Christmas Tree! By Lisa Smith Molinari My hands looked like theyd been hit by shrap nel. The Persian rug was imbedded with sawdust, pine needles and sticky spots of sap. The trunk of our Christmas tree, which could be clearly seen through the sparse branches, was warped in the middle. Thats what I got for telling my husband to pick out the tree without me. That day, base looked like a winter wonderland with fluffy white snow stuck to every surface. Neighbors merrily buzzed about, bundling kids for sledding and stocking up on holiday provisions. I dropped my husband and our son off to help sell Christmas trees for the Boy Scout troop, and witnessed a sweet scene: twinkle lights draped, music playing, kids savoring candy canes, fire crackling. Dads could be heard wishing custom ers a Merry Christmas as uniformed boys loaded trees onto cars. Whatever cockles are, mine were warmed, and I couldnt wait for them to come home with a beautiful tree. I had the perfect afternoon planned: bring decorations up from basement, put up tree, make hot cocoa, set up train, play Christmas music while whole family deco rates, gaze at tree while snuggled in family room. I love this time of year. Three hours later the boys came home with a wrapped tree, and start ed to put the trunk in the stand. My husband has never been handy, and moments like these are always tense. Sensing he needed assistance, I grabbed the top of the tree. Ow! I wailed, looking down at four tiny pinholes in my thumb. What kind of tree is this, any way? I dont knowa fir, a spruce, how the heck do I know, he stammered. Wearing gloves, we secured the tree in its stand and began to lift. Uh oh, I said when the tree was at ten oclock. What? my husband barked, nervously. Its not going to fit. How tall is this thing, anyway? I dont knowbut we have high ceilings, right? No, Hon, we have low ceilings, remember? I said, trying to remain calm. My husband had always refered to hardware stores as haunted houses, so home repairs were gener ally handled by me. But in the spirit of holiday tradition, we thought it best to not reverse conven tional gender roles, espe-Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesThe holidays are upon us, and our children will be asking for additional money to buy presents for teachers, for friends, and for family. Some families will hold the line at the amount the child has saved over the past year. Chores, allowances, special gifts may have gone into a special account which can now be tapped into for holiday buying. In other homes, parents will provide those extra dollars for holiday purchases. Before you just hand over that money, consider this: Eighty-three percent of college students have at least one credit card with an average debt of over three thousand dollars. Brandon Elliot, a financial education consultant for Young Biz Magazine, thinks that, this all stems from their earlier years in junior high and high school when mom and dad had a chance to sit down with their kids and talk to them point blank and didnt. Parents should be doing more to teach their kids to be financially independent starting as early as elementary school. The American Savings Education Council agrees with Elliot that the importance of parents in teaching financial responsibility should not be overlooked or underestimated. In an address to the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas, David W. Wilcox, US Treasury Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy, offered his own personal list of concepts parents can teach their children about personal finance: The concept of a budget constraint: Your child should understand that resources are finite, and, accordingly, that choices have to be made. A dollar spent on something today means either that dollar less is available for spending on other items, or that dollar less is available for saving for a goal your child has established. The concept of present value: Your child should understand that a dollar today is worth more than a dollar in the future. This is difficult for most adults to understand much less children. That is why it is so important to talk to your children about the importance of saving and spending money wisely. The concept of risk: Your child should understand that the money market is a very uncertain place. When they do get a job, they could make more money than they expected, but with the declining value of the dollar and rising taxes, it might not be as much as it seems. What else? These suggested financial principles to impress upon children from the Kids Money Top Ten List: pay for it, you cant afford it. you cant afford it. you receive whether it is from a gift or a paycheck. a financial goal. greed is not good. So if you havent been discussing financial responsibility with your children, this holiday season may be a good time to begin. Start with a few simple concepts which will explain the concept of financial responsibility. Then by the time your child finishes high school, he will understand those three concepts of personal finance outlined above. For Additional Information on Financial Responsibility, check out www.militaryonesource.com then click on Budgeting for the Holidays Center at http://www.cnic. navy.mil. Look Under FFSC and click on Personal Finances Association at http://www. militaryfamily.org/get-info/ support-family/ then click on Finances Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Teaching Students About Financial ResponsibilityJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowingcially while the kids were watching. My husband emerged from our basement with a saw, and stood befuddled over our tree. Id seen this look on his face a thou sand times, and knew he had no clue what to do. Quickly measuring the tree and ceiling heights, I declared, According to my calculations, you need to cut off one foot eight inches. He took a step forward, and I yelled, No! Not from the top! Wincing, I held the spiky middle while my husband timidly sliced at the barbed trunk. A few painful minutes later, the bottom of the tree surrendered, and we were able to get the tree upright in the stand. It looks so small now, our son observed as we gawked at the maimed tree surrounded by saw dust and needles. And its crooked too. Over the next hour, we disguised the problem with as many lights as possible. Are we ever gonna put the ornaments on? our youngest whined for the thousandth time. After drowning their disap pointment in several mugs of hot cocoa, the kids finally abandoned us and ran off to play. Around five-o-clock, the tree looked OK, but my husband still lay on the floor with the train set, emitting various exple tives. Having found the manual too confusing, he winged it. Not surpris ingly, the train would not budge. I didnt want to rein force his if-I-screw-thisup-shell-fix-it-anyway habit, but I couldnt take it anymore. I opened the manual, found the dia gram of track configu rations, assembled an elongated circle, stripped the wires to expose fresh copper, inserted the wir ing into the correct terminal, properly positioned the wheels, turned on the power, and away she went like the wind. Exhausted by the fiasco, I ordered Chinese take away for dinner. Great job with the train, Dad, our mid dle child said as she crunched into a spring roll. And the tree looks ter rific, too, Dad, our son offered with a mouthful of rice. Yea, thanks Dad! our youngest exclaimed as she threw her arms around Francis neck. Youre quite welcome, kids, my husband said with a wink, thats what dads are for. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com I was reading on the internet about Christmas and found some generally interesting facts about the origin of Christmas and how it has evolved over time. I thought I would share some of what I found. How Did Christmas Start? Some theorists have surmised that the cel ebration of Christmas is related to the Jewish Festival of Lights, during which Jesus was born. Others associate it with the Roman holiday of Saturnalia, which was a celebration of the births of several Roman gods. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia online, Christmas (or Mass of Christ) was not one of the earliest cel ebrations of the Catholic Church. However, in various places around the Holy Land, starting in about 200 AD, masses celebrating Christs birth became annual events. In the fourth century, the date of December 25 was settled on by most churches as the annual celebration. Some of the early masses included dramatic representations of the Nativity. As early as the fourth century, hymns and carols became part of these dramatic events. It was not until 1223 that St. Francis of Assisi present ed the nativity in the form of the crib or crche that we now know. How Did the Celebration Change? Elements of various pagan celebrations that took place around the month of January gradu ally worked themselves into Christmas celebra tions. Among these ele ments were gift giving, greeting cards, and the Yule log, which was based on a practice of a land lord providing a tenant with wood on the birth of a child. Various other elements, such as the Christmas tree and vis its from Saint Nicholas as Santa Claus were based on other holidays and practices. Over time, Christmas became a major feast day with special foods, such as minced meat, goose, and hot mulled spirits, not eaten the rest of the year. Other saints days, such as Saint Lucias Day in Sweden, also became associated with the Christmas holidays. The Christmas tree, which was probably based on pagan sym bols, became a symbol of everlasting life and hope, especially in Europe and North America. Adorned in lights (initially candles) and smelling of the outdoors, it became an important part of the Christmas celebration. Gifts were originally hung on the tree and they now take a place of honor under the tree. The holy leaf is also an evergreen symbol of everlasting life and is also associated with the crown of thorns Jesus wore when he was crucified. Santa Claus has been around in one form or another since the fourth century. Santa Claus, Old St. Nick, and all of the other incarnations of Father Christmas are based on St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children and sailors. To recap then, Christmas was, none theless, consistently a time for families to come together to cel ebrate the birth of Jesus and to worship together. The religious activities were enhanced by food, drink, decorations, and an appreciation of the winter season as a doorway to the renewal of spring. With that being said, may all the blessings of Christmas be yours this year.Chap Steven Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSFamilies Together Is Blessing At Christmas

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NORAD Provides Web site, Apps to Track Santa ClausFrom a North American Aerospace Defense Command News ReleaseChildren of all ages will be able to track Santa Claus on his annual journey, thanks to the North American Aerospace Defense Command. The NORAD Tracks Santa website at http:// www.noradsanta.org is up and running. The site features a holiday count down, games and daily activities, video messag es from students around the world and more, offi cials said, and it is avail able in English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Chinese. Official apps also are available in the Windows Store, Apple Store, and Google Play so parents and children can count down the days until Santas launch on their smartphones and tablets. Tracking opportunities also offered on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google Plus. Santa fol lowers just need to type @noradsanta into each search engine to get started. Starting at midnight Mountain Standard Time on Dec. 24, website visi tors can watch Santa make the preparations for his flight. Then, at 4 a.m. Mountain time, track ers worldwide can speak with a live phone opera tor to inquire as to Santas whereabouts by dial ing the toll-free num ber 1-877-Hi-NORAD (1-877-446-6723) or by sending an email to noradtrackssanta@out look.com. NORADs Santa Cams also will stream videos as Santa makes his way over various locations. NORAD Tracks Santa is possible, in large part, to the efforts and services of numerous program con tributors, officials said. New to this years program are Bing, HP, iLink-Systems, Kids.gov, Microsofts Windows Azure, BeMerry! Santa, and SiriusXM. Returning collaborators include the 21st Space Wing, Acuity Scheduling, Air Canada, American Forces Network, Analytical Graphics Inc., Avaya, Citadel Mall, Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Council, CradlePoint, Defense Video Imagery Distribution System, the Federal Aviation Administration, First Choice Awards and Gifts, Globelink Foreign Language Center, the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, Meshbox, the National Tree Lighting Ceremony, Naturally Santas, the Newseum, OnStar, PCI Broadband, the Pentagon Channel, RadiantBlue, Space Foundation, TurboSquid, twtelecom, UGroup Media, Verizon and VisionBox. Santas Countdown Calendar and the Santa Cam videos will feature music by military bands, including the Naden Band of the Maritime Forces Pacific, the Air Force Academy Band, the Air Force Band of Liberty, the Air Force Band of the Golden West, the Air Force Band of the West, the Air Force Band, the Air Force Heartland of America Band, the U.S. Army Ground Forces Band, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Band, the Air Force Band of Mid-America, and the West Point Band. It all started in 1955, when a local media advertisement directed children to call Santa direct but the number was misprinted. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone rang through to the crew commander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. NORAD has car ried the tradition on since the command was created in 1958.NEXCOM Provides Free Phone Cards To Deployed ShipsFrom NEXCOMThe Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced that military members underway or forward deployed during the holi day season will be given a free $10 phone card to call loved ones back home. This is the 11th holiday in a row that NEXCOM has offered free phone cards to deployed military members. We are honored to again be able to give free phone cards to our mili tary men and women who sacrifice so much throughout the year to protect our country, said Jennie Zack, NEXCOM personal telecommuni cations specialist. These free phone cards are our way of thanking them for their service especially during the holiday season when they are away from their loved ones. NEXCOM will distrib ute $10 AT&T prepaid phone cards to those ships with AT&T Direct Ocean Service that will be deployed and away from their home ports for the December holiday sea son. NEXCOM expects to distribute nearly 40,000 free phone cards during the holidays. Ships that will be receiving the free phone cards are USS Denver (LPD 9), USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Germantown (LSD 42), USS Tortuga (LSD 46), USS Stethem (DDG 63), USS Lassen (DDG 82), USS McCampbell (DDG 85), USS Mustin (DDG 89), USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), USS Cowpens CG 63), USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS George Washington (CVN-73), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Kidd (DDG 100), USS Dewey (DDG 104), USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), USS Decatur (DDG 73), USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Farragut (DDG 99). 25 and the Nativity of the Lord at 10 a.m.; The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph at 9 a.m. on Dec. 30; Solemnity of Blessed Virgin Mary at 10 a.m. on Jan. 1 and The Epiphany of the Lord at 9 a.m. on Jan. 6 and Clearing of the Chapel at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call the Base Chapel at 270-5212.From Page 1Chapel THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Mayport Families Enjoy FestivitiesMWR Hosts Annual Magical Christmas EventFrom StaffFamilies of Naval Station Mayport Sailors bun dled up and kept warm with fun activities at the annual MWR Magical Christmas on Dec. 6 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. This years festivities included music by the Navy Southeast Holiday Brass Band and performances by the Youth Activities Center. Santa and Mrs. Claus listened to the childrens Christmas wish lists. The kids also got a chance to enjoy free arts and crafts and mini-games at the event. For more information about events happening throughout 2012, call MWR at 270-5228. -Photo by Paige GnannCeleste Halavin,8, tries out her Santa Claus beard whistle after winning the prize at MWR Magical Christmas on Dec. 6 at Sea Otter Pavilion.-Photo by Paige GnannFamilies gather around a fire pit to roast marshmallows at the annual MWR Magical Christmas. -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyHannah Banker, 4, takes a break at Santas Workshop.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyEngineman 1st Class Mark Blasini, Keysha Taron, and Mark A Blasini (1 year old) enjoy a cup of hot chocolate at the family festival hosted by MWR.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemySanta and Mrs. Claus pose for a picture after visiting with children during the annual MWR Magical Christmas.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyA young girl pulls a lollypop prize at one of the stations set up for the children.-Photo by Paige GnannChildren design their own Christmas cards with stickers and construction paper.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 5 -Photo by Sarah BarthelemyLucas Dobbs, 15 months, tries to throw a ring around a candy cane at one of the many games set up for the children at this years event.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyBailey Borsman, 6, and Savannah Smith, 5, take a break in Santas sleigh during this years Magical Christmas.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyChildren from the Youth Activities Center perform at Magical Christmas in front of a crowd of friends and family.-Photo by Paige GnannChildren from the Youth Activities Center look for a little extra help to get them started during their Magical Christmas performance.-Photo by Paige GnannChildren from the Child Development Center perform with Frosty the Snowman in front of the crowds attending the annual MWR Magical Christmas Dec. 6 at Sea Otter Pavilion.-Photo by Sarah BarthelemyA snowstorm hits Naval Station Mayport during Magical Christmas as flurries fill the air thanks to a snow machine provided by MWR.-Photo by Paige GnannOlivia Silver, 10, watches after her brother, Charlie, 3, as he gets ready to take off in an airplane.

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Revamped Transition Assistance Program Aids Separating Service MembersAmerican Forces Press ServiceMajor changes announced to the Transition Assistance Program will revolution ize the way the military prepares people leaving the services, with mandatory participation in pro grams throughout their military careers to help set them up for a successful transition. The redesigned pro gram, called Transition Goals Planning Success or Transition GPS, was unveiled by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. It is a multi-agency response to President Barack Obamas call to improve career readi ness for separating ser vice members, explained Susan S. Kelly, principal director of the Defense Departments Transition to Veterans Program Office. The president hinted at the most-sweeping change to the Transition Assistance Program in two decades during a speech this summer to the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Obama called it the centerpiece to a broader federal effort to help ser vice members transi tion to civilian life and to reduce veterans unem ployment. During the three-phase rollout of the Transition GPS program that will continue through 2014, the many, but often dis connected, activities con ducted across the U.S. government to support veterans and their fami lies will be melded into one comprehensive effort, Kelly said. The Defense Department and depart ments of Veterans Affairs and Labor aligned their most successful pro grams to deliver bet ter and more compre hensive services to help make service members career ready for civil ian employment, offi cials said. They reached out to the Department of Education to integrate the latest teaching meth ods and tapped into the resources of the Office of Personnel Management and the Small Business Administration. One of the biggest changes in the new pro gram is that participation is no longer voluntary. Based on a law that took effect Nov. 21, service members can no longer opt out of the transition assistance program. All, including reservists and Guardsmen demobilized after 180 days of active duty, must now attend specific training sessions and take concrete steps to prepare for separation. During phase one of the rollout, being imple mented immediately, all separating service mem bers will receive counsel ing about Department of Veterans benefits, Kelly said. In addition, most will be required to attend newly revamped employ ment workshops run by the Department of Labor. These workshops incorporate new cur riculum such as how to explore career interests, use search tools to find job opportunities, write a resume, interview for a position and negotiate a salary, said John Moran, DOLs deputy assistant secretary for Veterans Employment and Training Service. While fulfilling the congressional mandate to reach out to all separat ing service members, the interagency team went a step beyond the law to further enhance the effort, Kelly said. Separating service members must now take financial planning train ing, and complete a 12-month budget that factors in the cost of where they decide to live after leaving the military. They must evaluate how their military-acquired educa tion, training and experi ence translate into civil ian career qualifications and prepare an individual transition plan. The task force ran a pilot program last sum mer at seven installations to evaluate this core cur riculum, gathering assessments from about 950 military members who participated. Many in the pilot pro grams found it eye-open ing, Kelly said. The seven pilot sites continue to offer the DOL workshops, but the instruction will be avail able service-wide by January, Moran said. The programs second phase, to be tested during 2013 and implemented by the years end, establishes requirements for separat ing service members who plan to go on to college or technical or career train ing or to start their own businesses. Those electing higher education or other train ing will be required to show an acceptance letter from that institution, or have an application filled out and ready to submit, Kelly said. They also will be required to establish a contact with a counselor to follow up with after leaving the military. Also during phase two, service members who hope to become entre preneurs will be required to connect with the Small Business Administration for help in drafting and evaluating their small business plans. The final phase of the rollout to be implement ed by the end of 2014 will integrate transition prep aration throughout the service members military career. The idea, Kelly explained, is to begin preparations for transi tion long before a service member prepares to leave the military. The end state that we are shooting for is to embed this across the military lifecycle, she said. Each service will devel op a plan designating points along a service members career path for this training, Kelly said. improving geographic stability for our Sailors and their families, said Rear Adm. Annie Andrews, Director Navy Total Force Division (OPNAV N12). As an added benefit, inrate shore duty billets in the RMCs, ATGs, and FRSs increase the total number of Sailors return ing back to sea as skilled journeymen and supervi sors; expand Fleet training capacity; and ulti mately result in better personnel, training, and material readiness condi tions on our ships, sub marines and aviation squadrons. Sea and shore tour lengths are set via the Sea Shore Flow NAVADMIN and are driven by the total number of sea and shore duty billets each enlisted community needs to fill. Every attempt is made to balance a Sailors personal and career goals and desires with ensuring the Navys sea duty manning needs are properly met. Among the chang es announced in NAVADMIN 361/12, four ratings have increased sea tour lengths; two rat ings have decreased sea tour lengths; two rat ings have decreased shore tour lengths; one rating has decreased both sea and shore tour lengths; and one rating has decreased sea tour lengths and increased shore tour lengths. A summary of the changes for the 10 impacted com munities and specific SSF Enlisted Career Paths for all ratings are listed in the NAVADMIN. Detailers will review the records of Sailors in the affected communities and make PRD adjustments as required. Once all of the PRD adjustments have been completed a for mal notification will be issued and commands can review their EDVR (enlisted distribution and verification report) for the changes. According to mes sage, Sailors with PRDs prior to August 2013 will not have their current PRD adjusted under the updated SSF tour lengths. Rating detailers at NPC will determine what PRD adjustments all other Sailors will face based on the new policy and Fleet readiness. Sea Shore Flow was first implemented in 2008 to replace pay-grade driv en Sea Shore Rotation. Sea Shore Flow Enlisted Career Paths are designed to ensure proper man ning of all sea duty and front line operational bil lets. At the same time, SSF helps to provide a more desirable work-life bal ance throughout a Sailors career by working to offset the often arduous nature of sea duty with predict able periods of meaning ful work ashore.From Page 1Sea Shore 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Navy Accepts Delivery Of Future USS ArlingtonFrom Team Ships Public AffairsThe Navy accepted delivery of the eighth LPD 17 class amphibi ous transport dock ship, the future USS Arlington (LPD 24), from Huntington Ingalls Industries Dec. 7. Accepting delivery of Arlington represents the official transfer of the ship from the shipbuilder to the Navy and is a major milestone in the ships transition to operational status. This is the third San Antonio class ship to be delivered to the Navy within the last 12 months, said Capt. Darren Plath, LPD 17 class program manager for the Navys Program Executive Office for Ships. It illustrates the signifi cant efforts and teamwork of the shipbuilder and Navy team and provides the Fleet with three vital war-fighting assets in a one-year period. San Antonio class ships are a key element of the Navys seabase transfor mation. Functionally replacing more than 41 ships (LPD 4, LSD 36, LKA 113, and LST 1179 class es of amphibious ships), these ships provide the Navy and Marine Corps with modern platforms that are networked and survivable. Their princi pal mission is to deploy the combat and sup port elements of Marine Expeditionary Units and Brigades, projecting power ashore through the high speed landing craft, air cushion (LCAC) and the Osprey tilt-rotor air craft (MV-22). The LPD 17 class com bines various unique systems with special emphasis on projecting combat power ashore, quality of life improvements for Sailors and Marines and mission flexibility. Among the ships innovations are state-of-the-art com bat control and electron ics systems; the Ship Self Defense System, which provides the key integra tion and control portion of the ships total combat system, including sensors, weapons, data links and the Cooperative Engagement Capability; and the Shipboard Wide Area Network, a fiberoptic, ship-wide area computer network that includes both classified and unclassified compo nents. The ship is named for the county of Arlington, Va., honoring the first responders and the 184 victims who died when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. Steel recovered from the Pentagon will be displayed onboard once the ship is commissioned, which is planned for next spring in its homeport of Norfolk, Va. As one of the Defense Departments largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibi ous ships, special mis sion and support ships, and special warfare craft. Currently, the majority of shipbuilding programs managed by PEO Ships are benefiting from serial production efficiencies, which are critical to delivering ships on cost and schedule. -Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman ShipbuildingThe future USS Arlington (LPD 24) launched Nov. 23 from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding's Pascagoula shipyard, marking a key milestone in the ship's construction process. Arlington honors the 184 victims who died when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon Sept. 11, 2001, as well as the first responders from the county. Keel Ceremony For Future USNS John GlennFrom Team Ships Public AffairsGeneral Dynamics NASSCO held a keel lay ing ceremony for the future USNS John Glenn (MLP 2), Dec. 4, in San Diego, Calif. MLP 2 is the second ship in the Mobile Landing Platform program that will provide the Navy with the capa bility to transfer vehicles and equipment at sea and to interface with surface connectors to deliver the vehicles and equipment ashore. The ships name hon ors the Hon. John Glenn, a decorated Marine Corps pilot, who was in atten dance for the ceremony. A distinguished astro naut, the first American to orbit the Earth and a former U.S. Senator from Ohio, Glenn flew 59 combat missions during his service with the Marine Corps in World War II, and a combined 90 mis sions over the course of two tours in the Korean War. It is fitting that this ship is named in honor of a transformative fig ure like Senator John Glenn, said Capt. Henry Stevens, Strategic Sealift and Theater Sealift pro gram manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. MLP will be the center piece of the Navys sea basing capability and transform how the Navy and Marine Corps team operates from the sea. Keel laying recognizes the first joining together of a ships components. While modern shipbuild ing processes allow fab rication of individual modules to begin months earlier, keel laying repre sents the formal begin ning of a ship. The keel was co-authenticated by Lyn Glenn, ships sponsor, and Helen Toolan, spouse of Lieutenant General John A. Toolan, Jr., USMC, Commanding General I Marine Expeditionary Force. Acting as a mobile sea base, MLP will be part of the critical access infra structure that supports the deployment of forces and supplies to provide prepositioned equipment and supplies with flexible distribution. MLPs are based on an existing commer cial NASSCO design, the Alaska-class crude oil carrier, ensuring design stability and lower develop ment costs. MLP will have a maximum speed of 15 knots and range of 9500 nautical miles. At 837 feet long, MLP displaces over 80,000 tons when loaded. The ship with its modu lar core capability set includes a 25,000 sq. ft. raised vehicle deck, sideport ramp, large mooring fenders, and berths for up to three Landing Craft Air Cushioned vessels (LCAC). These ships serve as a highly flexible, modu lar platform that may be used across a broad range of military operations, including humanitar ian support and sustain ment of traditional mili tary missions. They will operate within Maritime Prepositioning Ship Squadrons to The ability to establish support facilities at sea assures U.S. military forces access to areas previously denied. The USNS Montford Point (MLP 1), lead ship of the class, launched Nov. 13. MLP 2 is expect ed to launch and be christened in Fall 2013. The contract for the third ship, the future USNS Lewis Puller, was awarded to NASSCO in February 2012. Currently, the majority of shipbuilding programs managed by PEO Ships are benefiting from serial production efficiencies. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 7

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DOD Clarifies TA ExpectationsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department has issued new policy guidelines intended to provide better protection for members of the military and veterans who seek tuition assistance for post-secondary degrees. The departments revised voluntary education partnership policy specifies the expectations and agreements that colleges, universities and technical schools must adhere to in order to receive DOD underwriting, said Carolyn Baker, chief of voluntary education for DODs military community family and policy office. The guidelines, part of a new memorandum of understanding, ensure certain protections for military members [so] that they have a quality education, she added. Tuition assistance is a benefit available to Guardsmen, reservists, active duty members and veterans allowing a degree from a Department of Education-accredited college or university. To receive it, participating institutions must sign the MOU, and provide the student with clear information about financial procedures, course information and graduation rates. [The MOU] protects service members in providing them with information so a service member can make a wise choice as to the institution [they attend], Baker said. We ask that all institutions provide service members with an education plan that states [course requirements] and evaluates credits earned at other schools [so] the service member can move forward and actually obtain their degree. The new guidelines clarify oversight, enforcement, and accountability for educational institutions receiving military tuition assistance, Baker said. Currently about 2,000 institutions participate in the tuition assistance program and Baker said she encourages more to do the same. The overall initiative supports the executive order establishing the Presidents Principles of Excellence, Baker said. Those were issued in response to reports of aggressive and deceptive targeting of service members, veterans, and their families by some educational institutions after the Post-9/11 GI Bill became law. The guidelines pertain only to institutions accepting Title 4 funding, Baker said.Saluting Military Families -Photo by FC2 Bobby LeonardNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, reads a copy of We Salute The Military, part of the city of Jacksonvilles book series offered through the Mayors Book Club, on air during Finegan Elementary Schools WFIN broadcast.DeCA Scholarship Applications OutFrom DeCAApplications for the 2013 Scholarships for Military Children Program are available at commissaries world wide or online through a link at http://www.mili taryscholar.org. Scholarship awards will be based on funds avail able, but the program awards at least $1,500 at each commissary. If there are no eligible applicants from a particular commissary, the funds designated for that com missary will be awarded as an additional scholar ship at another store. The Scholarships for Military Children Program cele brated a major milestone in 2012 as it reached more than $10 million in scholarships awarded to 6,742 students from around the globe. The scholarship program was created to recognize military fami lies contributions to the readiness of U.S. Armed forces and to celebrate the commissarys role in the military community. DeCA is focused on supporting a good qual ity of life for our military and their families, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. We do that by delivering a great commissary benefit, while our industry partners and public donations help the scholarship program provide money for higher education to many worthwhile students. To apply for a scholar ship, a student must be a dependent, unmarried child of an active duty service member, reserv ist, guardsman, retiree, or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty, or survivor of a retiree, and must be younger than 21 or 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a college or uni versity. Eligibility is determined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Applicants should ensure that they, as well as their sponsor, are enrolled in the DEERS database and have a cur rent military ID card. An applicant must also be planning to attend or already attending an accredited college or uni versity, full time, in the fall of 2013, or be enrolled in a program of studies designed to transfer into a four-year program. Applicants must sub mit an essay available Dec. 3 on http://www. militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by Feb. 22. For questions,call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers. com. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Heading Back Home Spouse Surveys Critical To Family Support American Forces Press ServiceDefense Department officials are sending a new spouse survey to select active-duty families to assist in determining programs that best suit their needs. During an inter view with the Pentagon Channel, Cathy Flynn, a program analyst with the Pentagons military com munity and family poli cy office, discussed how these surveys affect future programs serving military families. The Active Duty Spouse Survey is a sur vey thats sent out to a representative sample of active-duty spouses every two years, she said. Its really a chance for spouses to give their feedback, their input, and their experiences ... back to us here in the Department of Defense. The departments first spouse survey was in 2006, and the first activeduty spouse survey was in 2008. The department now surveys active-duty spouses in even-num bered years and reservecomponent spouses in odd-numbered years. The new active-duty spouse survey launch es today and will be in the field for about three months as long as we get enough response, Flynn said. The questions cover all areas of military life things that we hope are important to the spous es, Flynn said. Things like [permanent changeof-station] moves, your experiences with deploy ment, your experiences with your children, your experiences with military programs. Flynn said these results are analyzed and used to make decisions on poli cies and programs to continue to better serve mili tary families. In 2010, we learned that 85 percent of spouses want or need to work, she said. Of our population of spouses, 57 percent are in the labor force; how ever, 26 percent of those spouses were unem ployed. So using that data really helped us to boost employment and educa tion support programs for spouses. So it was really critical to have that feed back to have the facts to use with our leaders. Flynn said the survey will help to guide deci sions about family pro grams in an era of budget challenges. The government is trying to make decisions about what programs to keep, she said. Its really important that we have the facts about what your experiences are like, what spouses lives are like, and what programs theyre using and what programs theyre benefitting from. DOD leaders want to make really good choic es about what programs to keep and which pro grams to beef up to con tinue supporting military families, Flynn added, and responses to the survey will inform those decisions. Each demographic is surveyed for all service branches, Flynn said, to provide officials with an understanding of spous es experiences in all ser vices.In this survey, its all brought together so we can understand across the board whats happening where services might look different and where they look the same, Flynn said. Flynn emphasized the importance of spouses participating in these surveys to improve or sustain support programs. Its a random sample, ... and about one in 10 65,000 spouses will be invited to take this sur vey, she said. Whats really important about that is if youre selected to participate in this sur vey, youre representing, essentially, 10 spouses who have similar back grounds as you do. Flynn explained select ed families will be invited by mail to take the survey or can participate online. The survey takes 20 to 30 minutes to complete, she added. It takes a little bit of time, because there are a lot of areas to cover, she explained. Were trying to cover the entire breadth of experiences of military life. It is really important that people take this sur vey seriously, and give us their feedback, she con tinued. The Active Duty Spouse Survey is really your opportunity to get your feedback all the way up to the leaders in the Department of Defense.-Photo by MC1 Nathanael MillerThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) transits the the Mediterranean Sea. Hu City is returning to homeport at Mayport after operating with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. Commissary Hours For HolidaysMayport Commissary holiday hours will be in effect from Dec. 23-Jan. 5. Store hours are as follows: Sunday, Dec. 23: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 24: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 25: Closed Wednesday-Friday, Dec. 26-28: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 29: 9 a.m.6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31: Closed Tuesday, Jan. 1: Closed Wednesday, Jan. 2: 9 a.m.7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 5: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 9

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USS Taylor Visits Port Everglades USS Taylor PAOUSS Taylor (FFG 50) conducted an eventful, high priority port visit in Port Everglades, Florida from Dec. 4. The Proud Defenders participated in multiple community events, stay ing busy while inter acting with the Fort Lauderdale Navy League, Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station Museum, Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital, and Joe Dimaggios Children Hospital. The crew attended the 67th Flight 19 Memorial Ceremony, held annually by the Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station Museum. Flight 19, com monly referred to as The Lost Patrol, was the designation of five TBM Avenger torpedo bombers that disappeared on Dec. 5, 1945, during an over water navigation train ing flight from Naval Air Station Fort Lauderdale, Florida. All 14 airmen on the flight were lost, as were all 13 crew members of the lost PBM Mariner flying boat which con ducted a search and res cue mission to attempt to recover The Lost Patrol. Taylors Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Dennis J. Volpe, was the ceremonys guest speaker. The Mayor of Fort Lauderdale, John P. Sieler, numerous World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War veterans were in attendance to include one of the last of the Tuskegee airmen. The Officers and crew enjoyed the opportunity to inter act with the impressive collection of veterans present at the ceremony. We were honored to spend part of our time in Port Everglades com memorating part of our Naval History, said Boatswain Mate 2nd Class Justin Plank. Plank had the honor of ringing the bell for all of the names of the Flight 19 and PBM Mariner aircrew members who lost their lives. The Proud Defenders also spent time at the Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital in Miami, Florida and the Joe Dimaggios Children Hospital in Fort Lauderdale. The Veterans Home visit provided the Officers and crew the oppor tunity to interact with a large number of vet erans from World War Two, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm as well as gain a better understand ing of the services avail able from the Veterans Administration. The Childrens hospital visit and the time spent with the children was a great experience for all of the Proud Defenders who participated. It was clear that the employees and doctors we met at the VA Hospital cared a lot about their work and their patients, said Sonar Technician (Geographical) 2nd Class Joseph B. Troupe. It was great to see dedication in caring for veterans that were dedicated to the country. USS Taylor (FFG 50) is stationed in Naval Station Mayport, Florida and is assigned to Commander Destroyer Squadron 14.Crew members from USS Taylor (FFG 50) visit the Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital in Miami, FL. PFC Bruce W. Carter is a Vietnam-era Marine who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his selfless and heroic actions in defense of his fellow Marines in the Quang Tri Province during combat operations in 1969. The Proud Defenders met with Dr. Alberto A. Martinez-Arizala, MD, head of the Spinal Cord Center as well as numerous veterans throughout the hospital. From left: Volpe, Sonar Technician (Geographical) 2nd Class Joseph B. Troupe, Dr. Martinez-Arizala, Fire Controlman 1st Class Christopher D. Carr, Ensign Jessica A. Gray, and Command Master Chief Joseph D. Gardner. Boatswain Mate 2nd Class Justin M. Plank rings the ceremonial bell at the 67th Flight 19 Memorial for the Lost Patrol, honoring the lost members of that fateful flight. The unexplained disappearance of 5 Avenger TBMs and the PBM Mariner Search and Rescue crew of the Lost Patrol is now one of the central elements of the infamous Bermuda Triangle.-Photos courtesy of USS TaylorCmdr. Dennis J. Volpe, Commanding Officer of USS Taylor (FFG 50) speaks at the 67th Flight 19 Memorial. Our motto Proud Defender is a daily reminder of the heroic actions and bravery of, our namesake, Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, said Commander Volpe. These same attributes are shared by the 13 man crew of the PBM Mariner sent out to search for Flight 19 on that fateful day in 1945. a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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FFSC Workshop, Class Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Ave. Dec. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 13, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 702 Dec. 18, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17-21, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota. Dec. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Setting Up For Baby -Photo by Paige GnannAngelique Guilbeaux watches her father Mitch Mouton and her husband, Gas Turbine System Technician 2nd Class (SW) Andy Guilbeaux of SERMC, load up a new crib set donated through Operation Shower and Birdies For The Brave. Guilbeaux and 29 other military and dependent moms-to-be attended Babies For The Brave, a baby shower honoring military families held Nov. 30 at TPC Sawgrass. The event was cohosted by Cathy Justice, wife of Greenbrier Resort Owner Jim Justice, and Amy Mickelson, wife of PGA Tour player Phil Mickelson. Each mom received several gifts, including baby bottles, clothing, bedding, diaper bags and toys. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Friday, Dec. 14 Duval County Extension Agency, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., will hold a Right Tree Right Place Workshop from 9 a.m.12:15 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. This seminar will demonstrate how to complete a project by learning the importance of knowing your landscape codes, understanding the planting site and the selecting of the right tree for the site. Whether you are a homeowner, HOA, developer, contrac tor, landscape architect, or government employee, this seminar will edu cate and enlighten you. Speakers include UF/ IFAS Extension Agents, JEA Arborist, and City of Jacksonville Code Enforcement. FNGLA and ISA CEUs available. Register online at: http:// www.fufc.org/rtrp_jack sonville_registration.html Or make checks out to Florida Urban Forestry Council and send to: Larry Figart, Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32254 Saturday, Dec. 15 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This ranger-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Dec. 22 Visitors from other lands have made much of North East Florida their home. They slowly and quietly creep their way into native forests. Come learn about these invasive exotics and how you can help your park rangers protect The Real Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park at 2 p.m. No reservations are necessary and the pro gram is free. Thursday, Dec. 27 National Naval Officers Association meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Contact CWO3 Lionel Jeffcoat at (904)594-6908 or lionel.c.jeffcoat@uscg. mil or retired Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Saturday, Dec. 29 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many different species of waterfowl that can be seen. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations necessary and the program is free. Thursday, Jan. 24 National Naval Officers Association meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Contact CWO3 Lionel Jeffcoat at (904)594-6908 or lionel.c.jeffcoat@uscg. mil or retired Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org From BBCBalfour Beatty Communities will host a Holiday Shop-aThon at the Ribault Bay Community Center, 1201 Assisi Lane, from 10 a.m.2 p.m. on Dec. 15. There will be more than 20 vendors selling arts and crafts, holiday and more. Kids can enjoy aa giant slide, bounce house, sno cone station and more. This event is free and open to the public.Mayport Housing Holiday Shop-a-Thon THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 13

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Dec. 19: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 13: Christmas Karaoke 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Lets celebrate the holiday season with karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from Dawn Ferreria and beverages will be served. 2705380 Dec. 29: UFC 155: Dos Santos vs Velasquez 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 MWR The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 13: Trans Siberian Orchestra. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $40. Sign up deadline Dec. 10 Dec. 13: Christmas Karaoke 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Lets celebrate the holiday season with karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our Baked goods by Dawn Ferreria and beverages will be served. 270-5380 Dec. 14: St Augustine Amphitheater Trip. Ice skating, sleigh rides, ice slides and more! Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Transportation only. Dec. 15-16: Universal: Islands of Adventure & Universal Studios Trip Includes FREE Universal military ticket, one-night hotel stay and transportation. Van departs at 8:30 a.m. Cost $25. Sign up deadline Dec. 12. Dec. 17: Christmas Shopping Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. FREE. Transportation Only. Dec. 19: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 2:30 p.m. Sign up deadline Dec. 17. Dec. 19: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not LIBERTY about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 20: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Dec. 22: Sea World Orlando. Van departs 7:30 a.m. FREE with Salute to Military ticket. Sign up deadline Dec. 20. Dec. 23: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New England Patriots. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Dec. 27: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 29: UFC 155: Dos Santos vs Velasquez 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Dec. 30 : Hooters Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. Dec. 13: Youth Drama Club Presents Its a Wonderful Life. 4:30 p.m. at the Youth Center. 27-5680 Dec. 15: Teen Trip to Avenues Mall. Depart Teen Center at 12:30 p.m.; return 5:30 p.m. Permission slip required. 246-0347 Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. KID 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Navy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastThe Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Auto Skills Center is offering Sailors a free 27-point vehicle inspection through Dec. 15 in order to help ensure safe travel during the upcoming holiday season. The inspection covers everything from the vehicles tires to the gas and brake pedals. The inspection also covers the vehi cles entire brake system. Were going to be inspecting vehicles, front to back, top to bottom. Were checking for everything and anything that might give you a prob lem in the short term, as well as anything that may effect your vehicle down the road, stated Richard Eaton, Head Mechanic, MWR Auto Skills Center. Nobody wants their car to break down and to be stranded on the side of the road. That can cost a lot of money. Were trying to help prevent that with this free inspection. The Auto skills Center offers discounted rates throughout the year, but is offering this free, thor ough inspection prior to the upcoming holiday season. The employees at the MWR Auto Skills Center expressed what a plea sure it is to be able to help Sailors and their families during the holiday sea son. Were doing this free pre-leave vehicle inspec tion for Sailors and their dependents. Before everyone goes on the long trip to visit their fami lies over the holidays, we want to make sure that they will be safe on the road, said Randy Barclay, Program Manager MWR Auto Skills Center. Were always here, so come in whether you just need to know how to put air in your tires or how to properly check your flu ids. Even if you just have a question in general, just ask any of our employees here, the information we provide is always free of charge. The MWR Auto Skills Center strongly urges Sailors and their depen dents to schedule an appointment from Dec. 1-15 in order to get a free vehicle inspection prior to going on leave. Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series NOFFS (Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series) is a pro gram designed to improve the operational perfor mance of Navy personnel through fitness and nutrition. Emphasis is placed on injury prevention via tissue management and refueling. This is a 4-week program for CFLs and ACFLs only. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals Learn basic strength training with focus on form and proper tech nique utilizing dumbbells, barbells, resistance bands and medicine balls. The results will be an overall increase in energy and endurance, a more effi cient metabolism, health ier posture and much more! 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional pro gramming that will take your workout to the next level. Both open Sandbox hours and instructor led classes are provided by Olympic Lift and Crossfit certified Mayport Fitness Team members. Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training Learn how to train using the unique and innovative TRX Suspension Training System. This class is reserved for those entire ly new to TRX training. This class will result in increased strength, coor dination, balance and CORE-power. Class size limited to 25. 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic This clinic is designed for children ages 10-14. It teaches how to safely use fitness equipment and provides general information on exercise and fit ness workouts. Held at Surfside Fitness Center. Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWR MWR Auto Skills Center Provides Sailors With Free Pre-Holiday Vehicle Inspection-Photo by MC2 Salton CebeRichard Eaton the Head Mechanic at Morale Welfare and Recreation Auto Skills Center on board Naval Station Mayport looks over Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Damian Bergs car during a free 27 point inspection. MWR Auto Skills Center is offering Sailors a free 27 point vehicle inspection until Dec. 15 in order to help ensure safe travel during the upcoming holiday season. Tailgating At Beachside -Photo by Paige GnannAttendees sign up for a football pool at the Army Navy Football Party Dec. 8 at Beachside Community Center. MWR set up a 20-foot screen at the center for the party, which included giveaways, trivia and tailgating eats. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 15

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FRGs USS Simpson family readiness group will meet from 3-9 p.m. on Dec. 13. USS Underwood family readiness group will meet from 6-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 20. Closed For Holiday USO will be closed Dec. 22-25 for the holidays. It will reopen on Dec. 26 from 9-4 p.m. Holiday Helping Hand Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is still collecting food dona tions to lend a helping hand to military families in need this holiday sea son. Donations can be dropped off at both the Mayport and NAS USO centers throughout the holiday season. Free Jacksonville University Basketball Admission Sea Best Seafood has bought out the Veterans Memorial Arena for the JU basketball double header on Tuesday, Dec. 18. Bring your family and friends out to this free event and watch the JU womens team take on Troy State at 5 p.m. and the JU mens team take on Wofford at 7:15pm. Upward Flag Footbal And Cheerleading-Free Signups Does your son or daughter love flag foot ball or cheerleading? Dependent children with a parent of legal guard ian deployed at anytime during the Upward Flag Football season can par ticipate free of charge. Jacksonville Giants Basketball Military members and their families can enjoy free admission to the Jacksonville Giants home games. Simply show your military ID at the box office for free admission. K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a family annual pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addi tion, honorably dis charged veterans who have service connected disabilities, and surviv ing spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifications and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org/ United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 13, 2012 17 TRICARE App To Access Pharmacy BenefitsFrom TRICARETRICARE beneficia ries have new pharmacy options available and accessible in the palm of their hand just by using TRICARE pharmacy contractor Express Scripts enhanced mobile application. The new additions let beneficiaries use their smartphone to safely and securely manage their TRICARE pharmacy ben efit. So how convenient are the latest enhancements? The updated app includes medication reminders and an account registration tool. The reminder feature gives beneficiaries the option to set up daily alerts to make sure they take their medications as prescribed and dont skip a dose. The account registration fea ture lets beneficiaries create their ESI account right on their smart phone. The Express Rx mobile app gives ben eficiaries access to their prescription informa tion anytime, anywhere, said Rear Adm. Thomas J. McGinnis, chief of TRICARE Pharmacy Operations. Currently, the Express Rx app and mobileoptimized website allow beneficiaries to register for TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and change current prescrip tions over to home deliv ery. They can also order home delivery refills and check order status. Another feature lets ben eficiaries look up infor mation on their current prescriptions. For GPSenabled smart phones, the app can direct beneficiaries to the nearest net work retail pharmacy. Smartphone users can download the app for free by going to www.expressscripts.com/mobile or using services like the Apple App Store or Android Marketplace. The mobile-optimized phar macy website is accessi ble at http://m.esrx.com. Other available free apps to down load through the Apple App Store or Android Marketplace are the TriWest mobile app and the Defense Manpower Data Centers milConnect mobile app. Beneficiaries in the South Region can make use of the mobile Humana Military web site, https://m.humanamilitary.com/ while ben eficiaries in the North Region can use the mobile Health Net mobile site, https://m.healthnet. com. For more information about TRICARE pharma cy program, visit www.tricare.mil/pharmacy. Learn how to switch to TRICARE pharmacy home delivery at www.tricare.mil/homedelivery. HEALTHCooler Months Mean Its Time For Flu VaccineTRICARE health news, straight from the desk of Brig. Gen. W. Bryan Gamble, M.D. Its that time of year again flu season. Time for you and your family to get flu shots. Not only will you significantly lower your chance of getting the flu this winter, but you can make an important contribution to public health by limiting the spread of this dangerous disease. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states flu seasons are unpredictable and can be severe. All family mem bers, six months and older, should be immu nized every year, since the flu virus changes slightly season to season, requir ing yearly vaccinations. This is especially true for people at high risk of catching the flu or with a risk of flu-related com plications, such as chil dren, pregnant women, people 65 and older and those with chronic medi cal conditions such as asthma. A complete list of people at higher risk of complications is available at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website: www.cdc.gov/ flu/groups.htm. Some people worry flu shots dont work. It is possible to get the flu, even after getting immunized. There are different strains of the flu virus in circu lation, meaning you can be exposed to a version of the virus youre not immunized against. Some even believe the flu vac cine causes the flu. This is incorrect. Flu shots con tain only pieces of killed flu virus that cannot infect the body. Some recipients report mild flu-like symptoms, which result from antibodies your body produces that help fight off the actual flu. Getting a flu shot is easy and inexpensive for TRICARE beneficiaries. You can get your flu vac cine from any military medical clinic or hospital at no cost to you, or from your pharmacist at one of 45,000 network pharma cies that administer vac cines to TRICARE benefi ciaries. Find a participating pharmacy near you at www.express-scripts. com/tricare/pharmacy, or by calling Express Scripts at 1-877-363-1303. You can also be vaccinated by your doctor, or at one of the retail health clinics found inside many phar macies. Keep in mind this is considered a medical visit, so you may have cost shares or copays. Generally, if the phar macist administers the vaccine, it is at no cost to you. If another healthcare professional administers the vaccine, it is a medical visit and you must pay the associated copays. Although getting vacci nated is the best way to prevent the flu, there are additional steps you can follow to avoid the flu. One of the most impor tant is to wash your hands regularly with soap and water, or use an alcoholbased hand sanitizer when those are not available. Here are some other tips from www.flu.gov: eyes, nose, or mouth. with sick people. habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food. mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw your used tissue in the trash. flu-like illness, stay home until at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (without the use of feverreducing medicine). Its important to get a flu shot every year your chances of staying healthy this winter increase dra matically if you do. For more information on this years flu season, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. To learn more about TRICARE coverage of flu shots, visit www.tricare.mil/flu. Catching Conjunctivitis Can Catch You TooTRICARE Management ActivityConjuncti-what? Conjunctivitis is a common eye condition that affects people worldwide. Its uncomfortable and highly contagious, so how can TRICARE beneficiaries prevent themselves from catching the infection? Conjunctivitis is often called pink eye or red eye because it can cause the white of the eye to take on a pink or red color, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Viruses, bacteria and allergies are common causes of pink eye. Common symptoms include pink or red color in the white of the eye, discharge from the eye, itchy or scratchy eyes, and crusting of eyelids or lashes. There are three forms of conjunctivitis: viral, bacterial and allergic conjunctivitis. Viral and bacterial conjunctivitis are caused when a virus or bacterium enter and infect the eye. Both viral and bacterial conjunctivitis usually begin in one eye and progress to the second eye, with symptoms that are typi cally mild and clear up within 2-3 weeks. Allergic conjunctivitis happens when the body reacts to irritants or allergens such as pollen, dust mites, molds, pet dander, contact lenses and cosmetics. Symptoms are mild and are similar to viral and bacterial conjunctivitis. Signs, symptoms and a patients history will help a doctor, nurse or healthcare provider diagnose conjunctivitis. Treatment for pink eye depends on the cause and severity; its not always necessary to seek medical treatment. However, the CDC recommends seeking medical attention if the following symptoms are present: Moderate to severe pain in the eye(s) Vision problems, such as sensitivity to light or blurred vision Intense redness in the eye(s) Symptoms become worse or persist Treatment with antibiotics does not begin to improve after 24 hours Most cases of conjunctivitis will clear up without treatment, but some severe cases require antibiot ics to help speed up recovery and stop the spread of infection. TRICARE covers most prescribed antibiotics at no cost through military treatment facility pharmacies, and for minimal out-of-pocket costs at retail network pharmacies. The best way to prevent the spread of conjunctivitis is to practice good hygiene habits. To limit the spread of conjunctivitis to other people follow these steps from the CDC: Wash hands often with soap and water Avoid touching or rubbing eyes Wash pillowcases, sheets, washcloths, towels and blankets Do not share eye makeup, face make-up, makeup brushes, contact lenses and containers or eyeglasses Dont use swimming pools Theres no vaccine to prevent conjunctivitis, but there are ways to avoid catching and spreading the crud by good hygiene practices. More information about conjunctivitis can be found at www.cdc.gov/ conjunctivitis. TRICARE makes healthy living the easy choice, learn more at www.tricare.mil/heal thyliving.Keep Your Cholesterol Levels In CheckTRICARE Management ActivityEveryone has heard the saying, too much of a good thing can be bad. The saying holds true for cholesterol levels. The body produces all the cholesterol it needs, but depending on a persons diet, cholesterol can soar to dangerous levels put ting them at risk for heart disease. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance pro duced by the body, that is also found in many foods. Too much cholesterol in the blood can contribute to the buildup of choles terol on the walls of arteries. This buildup of fatty deposits and other items known as plaque can reduce the flexibility of arteries. Over time, plaque causes them to become narrow and blood flow to and from the heart to decrease and at times become blocked, says the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend hav ing a blood test called a lipoprotein profile, also known as a lipid panel, to check cholesterol levels. TRICARE covers a lipid panel once every five years beginning at the age of 18. A lipoprotein profile is a blood test measuring total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol or LDL), high-den sity lipoprotein (good cholesterol or HDL) and triglycerides, another form of fat in the body. This information can determine whether or not cholesterol is in the right range and what actions are needed. Treatment for high cholesterol begins with lifestyle changes, but is often treated by combin ing lifestyle changes and prescription medications from a health care pro vider. According to CDC, there are several types of drugs available to lower cholesterol including statins, bile acid seques trants, nicotinic acid, fibric acids and cholesterol absorption inhibitors. Treatment goals include lowering the LDL level, raising the HDL level and reducing the risk of developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Several factors affect cholesterol levels includ ing diet, weight, physical activity, age, gender and heredity. CDC lists several ways people can maintain lower cholesterol levels through lifestyle changes including: Eat a healthy diet Maintain a healthy weight Exercise regularly Dont smoke Treat high cholesterol Beneficiaries should pay attention to nutri tional information located on food labels including cholesterol and saturated fats content in foods and strive to keep their cholesterol levels in the healthy range. To learn more on TRICARE cholesterol testing coverage go to www. tricare.mil/coveredser vices. More facts and resources about lowering cho lesterol can be found at www.cdc.gov/cholesterol.Resolve To Start New Year RightTRICARE Management ActivityThe New Year is quickly approaching, and another year means another reso lution. TRICARE offers an easy way to jump start the New Year with a regular exercise program for the entire family. Healthy resolutions make healthy beneficia ries. Uniformed service members know the importance of staying physically fit. Being physically fit has a direct impact on their level of combat readi ness, mental and physical health, and their produc tivity, but its also benefi cial to those who arent in uniform. Physical activity is important for general health and weight man agement and can reduce the risk of cardiovas cular disease, diabe tes and other diseases. Beneficiaries curious about the amount of calories burned from various activities can visit www. cdc.gov/healthyweight/ physical_activity/index. html. Before starting an exer cise program, beneficia ries should check with their primary care provider, especially if they have pre-existing medical conditions. Doctors can help determine the right amount of activity based on personal condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recom mend 30 minutes of daily physical activity for adults and 60 minutes for chil dren. Everyday activities can provide opportunities for being more active. CDC offers some ways to stay healthy everyday: etc., to work, school, store or place of worship away from your destina tion of the elevator or escalator ing small trips on foot to get your body moving walking or doing desk exercises instead of taking cigarette breaks. home repair activities. The Defense Department currently unveiled their brand new health campaign, OPERATION: Live Well, which is dedicated to making healthy living the easy choice and social norm. The campaign out lines the importance of overall prepared ness of the nations war riors and their families. To learn more about the campaign go to, www. defense.gov/home/features/2012/0812_livewell/. Health starts by making healthy choices. TRICARE has educational programs and covers most preven tive services for all beneficiaries. Visit the healthy liv ing page at www.tricare. mil/healthyliving to learn more.

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