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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Navy Focus On Force LevelsFrom Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs OfficeThe Navy announced plans to suspend the Enlisted Early Transition Program (EETP) as leaders focus on maintaining current force levels, officials said Nov. 30. Todays challenges have shift ed from reducing the end strength to stabilizing the force and filling gaps at sea, said Chief of Naval Personnel, Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. EETP will remain sus pended until there is sufficient future need for this program. EETP is a force shaping program that allowed approved Sailors to voluntarily separate from the Navy prior to the end of their enlist ment. First implemented in 2008 to allow Sailors to request to sep arate up to 12 months early, the program was expanded in 2011 to allow eligible Sailors to separate up to 24 months early when the Navy experienced unprecedented reten tion and outstanding recruiting success. The voluntary early sepa ration of selected Sailors allowed further stabilization and alignment of the force. Since then, the Navy has made significant progress in balancing the force, according to Van Buskirk. Under NAVADMIN 359/12, released Nov. 30, Navy Personnel Command (NPC) will no longer accept requests to separate under this program. Requests received by NPC on or after the release date of NAVADMIN 359/12 will be USS Carr Offloads HSL-48, Tons of Cocaine At Mayport4th Fleet public affairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class guid edmissile frig ate USS Carr (FFG 52) and embarked Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) offloaded 1.5 tons of cocaine and almost two tons of mari juana worth an esti mated street value of $114.1 million at Naval Station Mayport Nov. 30. Carr was return ing from conducting Counter Transnational Organized Crime Operations (C-TOC) in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Since Operation Martillo began in January 2012, more than 134 tons of cocaine has been dis rupted at an estimated street value of nearly $3.3 billion. U.S. law enforce ment agencies took custody of the drugs after they were offloaded in Mayport for transfer, testing and disposal. Carr has been deployed since June 1, and after the offload will return to its home port in Norfolk, Va. The drugs were seized while the ship was assigned to U.S. 4th Fleet supporting Operation Martillo (Spanish for Hammer) in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific littoral areas off the coast of Central America. Operation Martillo is an inter agency mission that began in January 2012 to combat the spread of organized crime in Central America and the use of the Central American water ways and southern approaches to Mexico and the U.S. as routes to smuggle illicit drugs, weapons, and cash. While operating in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific Ocean, the Carr team inter dicted vessels smug gling drugs to Central America and even tually to the United States. During this -Photos by Lt. Cmdr Corey BarkerDeputy Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Jon Matheson visits with family members from Helicopter Squadron 48 "Vipers" detachment onboard USS Carr (FFG 52) during the units homecoming after a 4th Fleet deployment to support Operation Martillo. Crewmembers of Helicopter Squadron 48 "Vipers" detachment disembark Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Carr (FFG 52) at the units home coming after a 4th Fleet deployment to support Operation Martillo. The embarked helicopter detachment participated in six interdictions of 3.3 tons of illicit drugs worth an estimated street value of more than $114 Million.Mayport Holds Holiday Safety Stand DownNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment Southeast Naval Station Mayport along with the Navy Southeast Region Safety Department held a winter and holiday safety standdown at the Beachside Community Center Nov. 28. Ron Williamson, safety manager for Navy Region Southeast, opened the stand down with a brief on all the mishaps in the Southeast Region. This campaign highlights mis haps that happened in the Southeast Region in the past year. All our Sailor, Marine and base DOD personnel need to stay alert, aware, and safe this season, said Williamson. We need to utilize operation risk manage ment during the holiday season. The militarys goal is zero accidents or deaths, he added. According to Williamson, the holidays bring opportunities for celebration with family and friends; but, unfortu nately, they also account for a staggering increase in Navy accident rates. To help raise the aware ness the guest speaker Steve Verret, a comedian, did a skit on the subjects; vehicle safety, insurance, accidents, drunk driving and depression. My challenge for you all is to always wear your seat belts and turn on your headlight every single day, said Verret. We all need to realize the consequences when mak ing bad decisions dont affect just you. I will be sure to take my time driving and making sure I use all the safety devices my car has to offer, said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Juan Serret. The standdown emphasized how important our safety is and especially during this time of year. Holiday stress counter measures were empha sized during the stand down. Topics to watch out for during this time of year include depression, excessive alcohol use and staying in contact with loved ones. Closing out the safety stand down Williamson said, Please take your time, be careful and make smart decisions. We want everyone to have safe and happy holidays this year. -Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors assigned to Naval Station Mayport respond to a question during a base-wide safety standdown held at the base community center. The standdown covered topics such as vehicle safety, depression and preventative mea sures associated with mishaps during the holiday season. Safety Manager for Navy Region Southeast, Ron Williamson, gives a safety brief to Sailors at the Beachside Community Center onboard Naval Station Mayport during a base-wide safety standdown. See Offload, Page 7 See Transition, Page 6Housing Holiday Shop-a-Thon Balfour Beatty Communities will host a Holiday Shop-a-Thon at the Ribault Bay Community Center, 1201 Assisi Lane, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Dec. 15. This event is free and open to the public.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Welcome Home to Cmdr. Canady and the crew of USS Klakring, who glided into port Saturday morning it might have been misting a bit, but there were hundreds of smiling, shiny faces waiting for Daddy to come home! A special thanks to Navy Region Southeast Band for the entertainment while waiting for the ship to tie up, and the usual profes sional job by the Harbormasters, line handlers and Public Works employees for safely assisting the lines, brows and crane lifts. Merry Christmas shipmates, to you and all your families and loved ones! Congratulations to all of our new petty officers. Well done and Bravo Zulu! I am very proud of your hard work and per sonal commitment that enabled each one of you to achieve the next career milestone! For those who came up just short of advancing, dont get discour aged. You need to keep the press on and hit the books NOW. I would love to see a 100 percent advancement rate from the March 2013 advancement cycle lets do it! Another reminder for you first class petty officers, the E7 exam is approach ing so enjoy the holidays, but be pre pared on Jan. 17, 2013! Tonight we have another great MWR sponsored event Magical Christmas! Come on out to the Sea Otter pavilion, bring the kids and enjoy another first class MWR event! We just completed our Holiday Safety Stand-down. Once again, Naval Station Mayports Training Officer Willie Green put together an educational brief designed to heighten awareness dur ing this holiday season. Guest speaker Steve Verret emphasized vehicle safety and warned against drinking and driv ing. Please be vigilant and remember we have an excellent program in place called CLUB 2000. This free program is designed to assist active duty Mayport Sailors who may need a responsible ride home after drinking. CLUB 2000 2402401. I cannot stress enough about safety during this time of year. During your holiday travels, think safety. Check your routes, your equipment and always have a travel plan. Driving sleepy is as bad as driving drunk. Take the extra time and be safe. Lots of folks are not as fortunate as we are here at Planet Awesome. Some ideas for the Christmas season are: Navy Exchange Giving Tree, the USO Giving Bags and of course Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society. Be mindful of holiday scams. Protect you personal information and do not be a victim of identity theft. During the sea son we see a larger than normal amount of illegal scams designed to separate you from your money. Stay vigilant. Also, spend wisely, develop a budget and stay within your financial means. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) has finan cial advisors available to help educate you on money management and finan cial planning. Take advantage of these resources. Dec. 7 marks 71 years since the attack on Pearl Harbor. This Friday at 9 a.m., a pier side ceremony in remembrance of those lost during the 1941 attack at Pearl Harbor will be held aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). Mayport Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 is sponsoring this commemorative service. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) hotline number is 5631254. This is serious and it affects us all. It will not be tolerated and I challenge everyone to respond and report if they are subject to or witness sexual assault. It is an honor to serve with each and every one of you. Let us continue to be safe and take care of each other, especially during these holiday times. Continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSWhile being the child of a military service member can have a positive impact on the child, it can negatively impact his academic success. An article by Elaine Wilson in the American Forces Press Service reports that an Army study found that children whose par ents have deployed for a cumu lative 19 months or more had lower school achievement test scores than children whose par ents had deployed for a lesser time or not at all. Wilsons article shared the findings of a two-year study on the effects of deployments on military childrens academic success and emotional health. The study results placed the impact for children beginning at the 19-month mark of the parents cumulative deploy ment time with the cumulative amount of time a more signifi cant impact than the number of deployments. Researchers explored the findings to determine if they revealed differences such as location of deployment or age, gender, and rank of parent. But similar results were found in all the differences. What they did find was something people have known intuitively for some time: while many military fami lies are coping well with deployments, others are struggling. Wilson provided in her article a number of recommendations on how to assist children strug gling with deployment: Students need additional support with their homework and school work either online or in person, Installation leaders need to create a process to inform schools about which children are military and the status of parental deployment, School counselors need bet ter access to information on resources which can help mili tary families, and Installations need to widely advertise the presence of school liaison officers and encourage them to foster a more collaborative effort with school adminis trators. The U.S. Navy has certainly recognized the importance of these recommendations. School Liaison Officers (SLOs) have now been posted at every major Naval installation. The Navy SLOs have provided parents a myriad of resources available to military-connect ed families through indocs, Ombudsman assemblies, news paper articles, and web sites. The web links include a variety of resources including online tutoring at www.TUTOR.com and SOAR (www.militarystu dent.org), free test prep, and help for special needs children. SLOs also provide train ing to parents to better inform them of resources available to them from a variety of mili tary and civilian organizations. On November 13th, a Military Family Guidance Night was held at Finegan Elementary School. This event was designed to ensure that military parents have the tools to sup port their childrens academic, social, and emotional achieve ment and success. The focus of the program was on how the installations SLO and the schools guidance pro gram and teaching staff sup port the social and emotional implications of the transitioning student: deployment and sepa ration, building confidence and resiliency, and supporting chil dren through trauma and loss. The program shared guidance resources at the school and dis trict level which are available to dependent military children who are experiencing academic and/or behavioral issues. The presentation also shared what can be provided to mili tary families on the installation side and out in the commu nity, including CYP programs: child care, Youth Sponsorship, Teen Center, and sports; Fleet and Family Support Center pro grams: counseling, Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP), deployment sup port, and the Family Advocacy Program (FAP); MFLC; USO, Navy Marine Corps Relief, Military OneSource, and the American Red Cross. Sixty-nine family members attended the program which began with dinner in the school cafeteria. Following din ner, the families participated in an introduction to the program, including a welcome by Commanding Officer Douglas Cochrane. Jose Sanchez, Exceptional Family Member Liaison, provided an overview of the EFMP program and other Fleet and Family Service Center Programs available to assist the families academically, socially, and/or emotionally. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Deployments Impact Students Academic SuccessJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingHappy Belated Thanksgiving to the finest Sailors in the fleet! This time of year is a reflec tive time for Americans and in my mind the holi day season always starts with Thanksgiving Day and rolls right on through Christmas and into the New Year. It drives me a little crazy to see all those Christmas deco rations being put out at Halloween! Most of us have some fantastic memories of previous holidays when we have gathered with family and friends to celebrate another year of Gods blessings. Of course, the flip side is that this time of year is often when we miss our loved ones the most if we cant be with them for what ever reason. So I thought I would encourage us all to remember the true spirit of the holidays. I know how easy it is to get caught up in all the shopping and overall business of this time of year. I think the rea son I always start with Thanksgiving is because a thankful spirit is absolute ly critical to enjoying any holiday, but especially the big ones this time of year. Historically, Americans have always been a thank ful lot and for that I am grateful. One of the first things the Pilgrims did when they arrived on the Mayflower was to give thanks to Almighty God for a safe crossing of the Atlantic. Even though they arrived hundreds of miles off course and had faced all the hardships of crossing the Atlantic on such a small ship without any of the modern ame nities, they bowed their heads and hearts and gave thanks to God for the hope of a new begin ning and to look to Him for future blessings. And we have remained a gen erally thankful nation ever since. Of course there are times we do need to be reminded and prompted, because of our natural tendency to forget how good God has been to us and to take the bless ings we have for granted. President Washington, and eventually President Lincoln, began the national holiday known as Thanksgiving. Lincoln called upon the nation to give thanks in the mid dle of the bloodiest con flict of the Civil War. He knew that a thankful spirit would be essential to finding peace once again. How has God blessed you this year and what are you particularly grate ful for? I am thankful for my health, for my family (especially my beautiful and loving wife), and for the freedom I have as an American. I am thank ful for my calling as a chaplain and for serving with some of the most wonderful people on the planet. I am thankful for forgiveness (both from God and my neighbors) and the freedom to wor ship according to my con science. I am thankful to be an American where we still hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men (mankind) are created equal and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights includ ing life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And happiness always starts and ends with thanksgiv ing! Chap Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHappiness Always Starts With A Thankful Spirit CorrectionDue to a reporting error, the Nov. 22 edition of The Mirror incorrectly identified the baker of USS Taylors change of command cake as ship CSs. The baker was Katina McCoy. We regret the error. Hope Needs Your Help. 1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service.Photo: Steve Liss, AmericanPoverty.org

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Aircraft Carrier Enterprise InactivatedFrom USS Enterprise Public AffairsNearly 12,000 past and current crewmem bers, family and friends attended the inactiva tion of aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Dec. 1, 2012, at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Enterprise, the worlds first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, recently completed its 25th and final deployment and returned to its homeport of Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled inactivation, held prior to the ships terminal offload program and subsequent decommissioning. The inactivation cere mony was the last official public event for the ship, and served as a celebra tion of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 Sailors who served aboard. The Chief of Naval Operations, the Commander of United States Fleet Forces, nine of twenty-three prior commanding officers, many decorated war heroes, and thousands of Enterprise veterans attended the event. Enterprise is a spe cial ship and crew, and it was special long before I got here said Captain William C. Hamilton, Jr., the twenty-third and final commanding officer, during the cer emony. Before I took command of this ship, I learned the definition of enterprise, which is an especially daring and courageous undertak ing driven by a bold and adventurous spirit. Fiftyone years ago, this ship was every bit of that defi nition. Here we are 51 years later, he continued, cel ebrating the astonishing successes and accom plishments of this engi neering marvel that has roamed the seas for more than half the history of Naval Aviation. Daring, courageous, bold, and adventurous indeed. In honor of that spirit, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, in a video mes sage played at the cer emony, announced that the name Enterprise will live on as the officially passed the name to CVN80, the third Ford class carrier and the ninth ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name. Commissioned on November 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the Big E was the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific Ocean, and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conflict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conflict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enterprise was there. On September 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long deployment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big E once again took her place in history when she launched the first strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. More than 100,000 Sailors and Marines have served aboard Enterprise during its lifetime, which has included every major conflict since the Cuban Missile Crisis. It has been home ported in both Alameda, Calif., and Norfolk, Va., and has conducted operations in every region of the world. For more information on USS Enterprise, her legendary history, and Inactivation Week, please visit www.enterprise. navy.mil BOGEYSTHURSDAY, DEC 6BUFFALO CHICKEN WRAP WITH FF, CHIPS OR SLAW 7.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: CHICKEN COBB SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: CLAM CHOWDER CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00FRIDAY, DEC 7POT ROAST WITH WHIPPED POTATOES, GRAVY, VEGETABLE, ROLL 7.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 EGG SALAD SANDWICH WITH FF, CHIPS OR SLAW 4.25 SOUP OF THE DAY: CRAB BISQUE CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00MONDAY, DEC 10MEATBALL SUB SANDWICH WITH FF, CHIPS OR SLAW 7.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: GREEK CHICKEN SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: CHICKEN AND DUMPLING CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00TUESDAY, DEC 11STEAK FAJITA QUESADILLAS 6.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: CHICKEN COBB SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: CHILI CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00WEDNESDAY, DEC 128 OZ NY STRIP STEAK BLACKENED WITH ONION RINGS, SIDE SALAD, ROLL 9.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: CHICKEN COBB SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: POTATO BACON CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Klakring Returns From Final Sail USS Klakring Public AffairsUSS Klakring returned home from her final deployment on Dec. 1. Since her commission ing date of August 20, 1983, she has served the Navy through 29 years of service and 22 deploy ments, and she has had three homeports. She has traveled more than 3.2 million miles worldwide during her time of service with deployments to the Middle East, South America, Europe, and Africa. Klakring is currently commanded by Cmdr. Darrell S. Canady who was born and raised in Hope Mills, North Carolina. He earned a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1994 from North Carolina State University. Canady earned his commission through Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida. From there he com pleted the nuclear offi cer pipeline and served tours onboard USS John C. Stennis, at Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, USS Carr, USS Enterprise, USS Steven W. Groves, and USS Klakring. He has been Klakrings Commanding Officer since February 25, 2011. On her 2012 AFRICOM deployment, Klakring served in the C6F and C5F AORs in support of maritime security opera tions providing intelli gence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. During her time on station she completed more than 500 Fire Scout (MQ-8B) flight hours and conducted 14 replenishments-at-sea, during which she received more than 860,000 gallons of F-76, more than 20,000 gallons of JP-5, and more than 600 pallets of sup plies. Her port visits includ ed Augusta Bay, Sicily, Port Victoria, Seychelles, Djibouti, Djibouti, Port Louis, Mauritius and Souda Bay, Crete. During these visits, Klakring Sailors participated in six community relations projects varying from beautification of a natu ral preserve to spending time with children who have been diagnosed with autism, schizophrenia, and other mental disor ders. As this deployment comes to an end, the Sailors are excited to be reunited with their fami lies and friends. However this is a bitter sweet end ing for USS Klakring as she will decommission on March 22, 2013. She and her crew have proudly served this country keep ing the Navy core values of Honor, Courage, and Commitment close to their hearts and at the heart of their mission. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor from the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) is greeted by family and friends as the ship arrives at Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment to the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Coast of South America. While deployed, Klakring participated in intelligence surveillance reconnaissance in support of anti-piracy operations utilizing Fire Scout, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor from the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) is greeted by family and friends as the ship arrives at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyUSS Klakring returns to its homeport of Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment to the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Coast of South America. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFamily and friends wait at Naval Station Mayport for the return of the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring. -Photo by Paige GnannLt. Gary Pittman gets a big welcome home kiss from his wife, Angela.-Photo by Paige GnannLogistics Specialist Seaman Jonathan Winters holds his wife, Lauren, after the pair reunite pierside.-Photo by Paige GnannAviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Eric Demoraes is greeted pierside by his mother and sister after retuning to NS Mayport Saturday with USS Klakring.-Photo by Paige GnannLt. Adam Barry hugs his children, Hunter and Suzie, as his fiancee, Ada Stanford, watches the reunion pierside during USS Klakrings homecoming celebration on Saturday.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 5 Fire Scout Breaks Endurance Records On USS Klakring DeploymentFrom NAVAIRFour Fire Scout unmanned helicopters aboard USS Klakring (FFG 42) returned to Mayport, Fla. Dec. 1 after achieving several milestones during its six-month deployment. On its third deployment with the Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42 detachment, the Fire Scouts logged more than 500 flight hours in support of anti-piracy operations in the U.S. Africa Command Area of Responsibility and provided realtime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) support to combatant commanders. With a record number of unmanned helicopters aboard Klakring, Fire Scout regularly maintained 12-hour days on station, regularly switching aircraft to provide continuous and thorough support. The system accomplished a new single-day endurance record, providing continuous ISR support for an entire 24-hour period. For the first time, HSL-42 conducted dual air vehicle operations, allowing the ships commander to keep a constant watch on a target of interest. The real achievement on this deployment was a surge we executed to provide just over 24 continu ous hours of ISR coverage in late September, said Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lambert, HSL-42 detachment officer-incharge. Completing this milestone required ten sepa rate flights, refueling aircraft eight times, and having the ship setting flight quarters for launch or recovery twenty times. It took everyone on the air detachment and ship working together to make it happen and we are extremely proud of what we accomplished. Since 2006, the Northop Grumman-built Fire Scout system has flown for more than 5,000 flight hours with more than half of the flight hours completed in 2012 on ship-based and land based deployments. Fire Scout continues to perform with a very high success rate, providing vital information to combat ant commanders, said Capt. Patrick Smith, Fire Scout program manager. There is a tremendous amount of interest shown for Fire Scout in the helicopter commu nity. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySenior Chief Sonar Technician Surface Adam Obrien is greeted with a kiss from his daughter as he returns home to Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42). While deployed, Klakring participated in intelligence surveillance reconnaissance in support of anti-piracy operations utiliz ing Fire Scout, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyInformation Systems Technician 2nd Class Roarke Landin embraces his daughter as he returns home from a six-month deployment with USS Klakring.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyShip's Serviceman 2nd Class Rodricus Lewis is greeted with a hug from his daughter as he returns home to Naval Station Mayport with USS Klakring (FFG 42). -Photo by Paige GnannYoeman 2nd Class (SW) Kemario Latson talks with his one-year-old daughter, Aryanna, and wife Christa.-Photo by Paige GnannSenior Chief Naval Aircrewman John Chapman of HSL-42 hugs his daughter as he reunites with his family after returning with USS Klakring Saturday.

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returned without action. Requests sub mitted and received prior to the release of the NAVADMIN 359/12 will still be considered. Commanding officers may no lon ger separate Sailors early under EETP. Commanding officers may still authorize voluntary early separation up to 90 days early in accordance with MILPIRSMAN 1910-102. The Early Career Transition Program (ECTP) is unaffected and remains an option for Sailors seeking an early release from active duty with an intent to continue their careers in the Navy Reserve. For more information read NAVADMIN 359/12 or contact the NPC customer service center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC (1-866-827-5672). For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/npcFrom Page 1TransitionNavy Looks At New Outerwear OptionsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 360/12 announced the optional wear of the Army double breasted black all-weath er coat with all uniforms except the Navy Working Uniform (Type I, II and III) and Physical Training Uniforms, effective immediately. The Navy strives to provide Sailors with the best uniform options to maintain a professional appearance as well as improve protection from the weather, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, direc tor of Military Personnel Plans and Policy. The addition of this allweather coat provides Sailors with an additional choice. NAVADMIN 360/12 also announced a wear test evaluation beginning this month of two types of cold weather parkas (CWP) under consider ation for optional wear with service and service dress uniforms in cold weather environments. The test will include 100 Sailors assigned to selected commands and staffs in Navy District Washington and Navy Regions Northwest, Midwest, and the north east sector of the MidAtlantic Region. The test will run through March 31. The Army doublebreasted black all-weath er coat will be available in select Navy Exchange Uniform Centers, on-line, and NEX 1-800 call cen ters approximately sixty days after the release of the NAVADMIN. It is cur rently available at AAFES Uniform Centers. The optional all-weath er coat will eventually replace the current Navy all-weather coat accord ing to the NAVADMIN. Details, timeline and cost will be provided in a future NAVADMIN. For details on occasion for wear, manner of wear and authorized option al components for the optional all-weather coat are listed in NAVADMIN 360/12. For more information on uniforms and uni form policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters website at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ support/uniforms/pages/ default2.aspx. NAVYSouth Carolina Cyber Intrusions Prompt DoD To Notify TroopsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department and South Carolina officials are notifying military members and families who paid state income taxes there that they may have been victims of information/ identity theft as a result of several recent cyber intrusions. South Carolinas Department of Revenue reported nearly four mil lion Social Security num bers and several hundred thousand credit and debit card numbers belong ing to current and for mer taxpayers may have been stolen during cyber intrusions in August and September. While the vast major ity of the personal data is believed to have been protected by encryption, state revenue officials said about 16,000 accounts were not, and that any one who filed a South Carolina income tax return as far back as 1998 could be affected. The intrusions were discovered last month, officials said. While South Carolina officials believe their system is now secure, Gov. Nikki Haley said the state is offering one year of free credit monitoring and iden tity protection to anyone who might have been exposed and applies for it. The number of records breached requires an unprecedented, largescale response, she said. In addition to Social Security numbers and credit card information, defense officials said information usually found on the front of checks may also have been exposed. DOD personnel and their family members who are current or former South Carolina taxpayers, especially those who are living abroad, are urged to visit www.ProtectMyId. com/SCDOR or contact Experians national con sumer assistance cen ter at 1-866-578-5422 by January 31, 2013, to enroll in identity threat protec tion. In addition, current and former South Carolina business owners may also contact Dun & Bradstreet Credibility Corp., officials said. Visit www.DandB. com/SC to initiate the registration process or call 1-800-279-9881. An investigation into the source of the cyber intrusion continues. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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multinational operation, Carr worked with forces from our Partner Nations, including Panama, Colombia, and Costa Rica. In addition to Carrs interdictions, the ship disrupted the flow of 6,160 pounds of cocaine. Cmdr. Patrick Kulakowski, commanding office of Carr talked about the teamwork involved in the deployment. Carr Sailors demon strated flexibility and teamwork during this deployment, our mis sion required us to work with the Coast Guard, U.S. government agencies, and our partner nations. Despite the fact that this is Carrs final deployment, the crew performed as though it was the ships first deployment, said Kulakowski. Lt. Cmdr. Neil Kruger, executive officer of Carr emphasized how impor tant the flexibility of the crew was to the success of the mission. At the beginning of the deployment we oper ated in the Caribbean Sea, then on short notice we received orders to the Pacific, which required us to transit the Panama Canal, we did so success fully and continued our mission where we were needed. Senior Chief Aviation Electricians Mate (AW) Jacob Bristow, command master chief aboard Carr talked about not only the CTOC accomplishments of Carr but other milestones the crew achieved. Along with our success with C-TOC operations, 92 percent of our Sailors earned their enlisted surface warfare qualifi cations, and 49 percent of our Sailors who took the advancement exam advanced, the crew did all this while preparing the ship for decommission ing. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. 4th Fleet was on hand for the offload and discussed the importance of C-TOC and the success of Carr. Carrs deployment to Fourth Fleet in support of Operation Martillo was a huge success and dem onstrates our clear com mitment to work together with our partner nations and interagency community to combat the influ ence of organized crime and disrupt the flow of illicit drugs into the U.S. More than 80 percent of the narcotics entering Central America makes its way to U.S. markets via maritime littoral routes; with the main convey ance being by speedboats and submersible vessels. By teaming up with our partner nations and allied forces to scrutinize the lit torals, our goal is to deny them the ability to transit so that the sea lines are not free for illicit traffic, he said. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participa tion is being led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coor dinated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to com bat transnational orga nized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sus tain cooperative relation ships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space to enhance regional security and promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerSailors offload one-and-a-half tons of cocaine and almost 3 tons of marijuana from the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Carr (FFG 52). The drugs were seized while conducting Operation Martillo and are being turned over to federal authorities. The ship is returning after a six-month deployment to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibility conducting counter transnational organized crime operations. From Page 1Offload THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 7

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USS Robert G. Bradley Training At Sea -Photo by ET1 Daniel K. RaleyOnboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) the sailors from HSC-22 Det 5 refuel the MQ-8B Firescout in preparation for launch. Sailors from USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) conduct RHIB operations to transfer per sonnel between ships, with Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Hilliar as the Coxswain, Ensign Matthew L. McCain as the Boat Officer, and Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Anthony P. Woo as the SAR Swimmer.-Photo by ET1 Daniel K. RaleyOnboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Ships Serviceman 1st Class Anthony L. Wright instructs two other RGB Sailors during a Crash and Smash drill. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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USS Taylor Celebrates 29th Birthday USS Taylor PAOThe crew of USS Taylor (FFG 50) celebrated the birthday of the guided missile frigate while underway in support of IDCERTEX 13-2. The crew took a break from their daily activities to gather on the flight deck, pay tribute to Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, the ships namesake, and have some birthday cake. USS Taylor is a 4,100 ton, 453-foot-long, Oliver Hazard Perry class guided missile frig ate, commissioned on Dec. 1, 1984. The com missioning was spon sored by Commander Jesse Junior Taylors widow, Barbara A. Taylor. Taylor celebrates her 29th year of commis sioned service.Our namesake, Commander Jesse Junior Taylor, made a coura geous decision to try to safe a downed pilot even though it was not assigned mission, said Ensign Kevin Roberts. He is the reason Taylors motto is Proud Defender. -Photos courtesy of USS TaylorEnsign Kevin A. Roberts speaks to the crew of USS Taylor (FFG 50) about the history of the Guided Missile Frigate and the sacrifices of Commander Jesse Junior Taylor. Electronics Technician Second Class Petty Officer George P. Murphy cuts cake bearing the guided missile frigates name for her 28th birthday celebration. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsGive yourself a present this year by making a holiday budget and sticking to it, Navy leaders said Nov. 27. The rewards of spend ing within your means will last all year-but stick ing to your budget may be easier said than done. Resisting the kids pleadings for the latest gadget, or the pressure to buy gifts for everyone from schoolmates to ser vice people can be stress ful. I ts also hard to ignore the ads that tell you to buy now and pay noth ing until next year. This holiday season; dont go broke trying to save. You may not be able to control how long a sale lasts, but you do have the power to decide that its okay if you miss out on the best prices of the year for items that werent on your shopping list. A rm yourself with a plan and it will be eas ier to resist the allure of deep discounts on items youd never even consid ered before you got to the store! Make peace of mind a new holiday tradition. In terms of sales and traffic, the Saturday before Christmas day is the busiest shopping day of the year, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, per sonal financial manage ment specialist at the Fleet & Family Support Center in Millington, Tenn. If you did some planning and stick to your goals you can beat overspending during the holidays, all year and keep your peace of mind. Create a model of success you can enjoy for years to come. Dont Go Broke Trying To Save THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 11

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CNRSE Announces Sailor of the Year for 2012 Region Southeast Public AffairsAir Traffic Controlman (AC) 1st Class (AW/SW) Sara Bailey, of Naval Air Station (NAS) Joint Reserve Base (JRB) New Orleans, was named Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Sailor of the Year for 2012 during a ceremony on board NAS Jacksonville Nov. 28. The ceremony was the culmination of NRSE Sailor of the Year Week, during which five finalists selected from the regions 16 installations were invit ed to Jacksonville, Fla., to compete for the honor of Sailor of the Year and to participate in a series of recreational activi ties. During the week, the Sailors toured EverBank Field, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars, and visited St. Johns Town Center. All of our candidates for Sailor of the Year were outstanding Sailors and role models, said NRSE Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Mack Ellis. What made AC1 stand out was her sustained performance of duties primary as well as collat eral. She is always ready to take on more challeng ing assignments. According to Bailey, it was an honor to receive such a prestigious award. Its really incredible. It was a real shock to hear my name called because the rest of these Sailors here are all great exam ples of what a first class petty officer should be, she said. She also stressed that she could never have made it this far by herself. Im in the position Im in today because of my Sailors and everything theyve done. Honestly, theyre really the ones that deserve the recogni tion, she said. In addition to Bailey, the top five also included Personnel Specialist 1st Class (AW/SW) Nathaniel Ndikum of NAS JRB Fort Worth; Ships Serviceman 1st Class (SW) Danielle Bradford of Transient Personnel Unit NAS Jacksonville; Master-atArms 1st Class (SW/AW) Jessica Brown of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay; and Master-at-Arms 1st Class Adam Turner of NAS Whiting Field. Each Sailor was accom panied by a sponsor, who was either his or her com mand master chief or command senior chief. According to Ndikum, the time spent with their senior leaders was one of the most rewarding expe riences of the competi tion. Its a really unique experience to have this many master chiefs in the same place at the same time. Theyve offered a lot of encouragement, he said. Its also great to be with all of these great Sailors, too. The entire experience has been good. It provides a lot of motivation for us to take what we learned here back to our commands and continue to make our Sailors better. According to Bailey, the candidates were extreme ly nervous the day of the selection board, but the most successful approach was to be candid when answering questions. I went in there and just spoke the truth. If I didnt know the answer to a question, I didnt try to hide it. I just spoke from the heart and hoped for the best, and that approach apparently worked for me in the end, she said. While the board could only select one Sailor of the Year, all of the candi dates should be extremely proud to have made it as far as they did, according to Ellis. It is truly a great accomplishment, he said. To get from our deck plates to this competition, thats absolutely a great accomplishment. Bailey will go on to compete against Sailors from other regions for the honor of Commander, Naval Installations Command Sailor of the Year. The selectee from that competition will go on to compete for Chief of Naval Operations Sailor of the Year. Photo by MC1 Greg Johnson Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Sailor of the Year finalists wait as Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., the region commander, announces the 2012 Sailor of the Year during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville. During the ceremony, Air Traffic Controlman 1st Class (AW/SW) Sara Bailey of Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans was named NRSE Sailor of the Year. Dont accept defeat. F ight deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research HospitalA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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EN1 Mark Blasini, NS Mayport EN1 Nicholas Arias, NS Mayport EM1 Anthony Chavez, NS Mayport QM1 Daniel Daugherty Jr. NS Mayport ET1 Sammie Fowler, NS Mayport SH1 Billie Gibson, NS Mayport EM1 Jason Gooden, NS Mayport MA1 Jose Pacheco, NS Mayport BM1 Travis Page, NS Mayport Frockees OS1 Jason Spooner, NS Mayport EN1 Kenneth Harris, NS Mayport MA1 Vincent Ingellis de la Cruz, NS Mayport ET2 Louis Alvarez, NS Mayport MA2 Jerome Anderson, NS Mayport AC2 Brittney Arnold, NS Mayport AD2 Donna Beauman, NS Mayport MA2 Jessica Billings, NS Mayport QM2 Garrett Christian, NS Mayport BM2 Brian Fairbanks, NS Mayport STG2 Sarah Gladstone, NS Mayport GSE2 Mara Jackson, NS Mayport MA2 Wilmer Lazalajose, NS Mayport ABH2 Joshua Lyons, NS Mayport QM2 Nicholas Mazzeo, NS Mayport AC2 Michael Miller, NS Mayport YN2 Demario Smith, NS Mayport MM2 Kristen Strickland, NS Mayport DC2 Jarrod Thurston, NS Mayport CS2 Quentin Upshaw, NS Mayport EN2 Kirby Wright Jr. NS Mayport AC3 Trinity Batye, NS Mayport AC3 Jay Bryan, NS Mayport MA3 Joshua Cannon, NS Mayport MA3 Zachary Duguay, NS Mayport MA3 Rachel Gruetzner, NS Mayport MA3 Jeremy Toups, NS Mayport YN3 Raymond Kong, NS Mayport AE3 Courtney Morgan, NS Mayport AC3 Rylee Taylor, NS Mayport OS3 Travis M. Agee, USS Robert G. Bradley EM2 Marcus M. Armstrong, USS Robert G. Bradley GSM3 Quincy W. Brown, USS Robert G. Bradley STG3 David K. Burns, USS Robert G. Bradley LS3 Thomas C. Callea, USS Robert G. Bradley IT1 Richard A. Davis, USS Robert G. Bradley GS3 Sean R. Gallagher, USS Robert G. Bradley HT3 Alex D. Gilfoy, USS Robert G. Bradley FC2 Gregory A. Glover, USS Robert G. Bradley OS2 Karl T. Greenfield, USS Robert G. Bradley YN2 Miguel A. Hernandez, USS Robert G. Bradley OS1 Christifer D. Johnson, USS Robert G. Bradley BM2 Jeremiah K. Maldonado, USS Robert G. Bradley FC1 Adam S. McCracken, USS Robert G. Bradley CS1 Jerry T. McDuffey, USS Robert G. Bradley OS3 Jaquan S. McRae, USS Robert G. Bradley GSM3 Joseph C. Meade, USS Robert G. Bradley BM3 Marlon J. Narvaez, USS Robert G. Bradley ET2 Cuong V. Nguyen, USS Robert G. Bradley YN2 Kase K. Nichols, USS Robert G. Bradley PS1 Omar Nunez, USS Robert G. Bradley ET2 Michael C. Phillips Jr. USS Robert G. Bradley DC2 Jeffrey D. Reams, USS Robert G. Bradley IT2 Kayle D. Rivers, USS Robert G. Bradley ITT1 Andrew W. Sandeen, USS Robert G. Bradley CTT2 Tyson J. Schmidt, USS Robert G. Bradley OS3 Bryan D. Shannon, USS Robert G. Bradley IT2 Joshua A. Shouse, USS Robert G. Bradley OS2 Joseph S. Sloan, USS Robert G. Bradley LS3 Wesley A. Snyder, USS Robert G. Bradley STG2 Nicholas M. Szczepanski, USS Robert G. Bradley GSE3 Terrence A. Tucker, USS Robert G. Bradley BM2 Anthony P. Woo, USS Robert G. Bradley CS2 Reginald Abernathy, USS Halyburton EM2 Jorge Apolo, USS Halyburton ET2 Jeromeroman Baca, USS Halyburton OS1 Johnnie Bernard, USS Halyburton BM3 Frank Charles, USS Halyburton IT3 Carey Clark, USS Halyburton GSM3 Shawn Curlee, USS Halyburton SH3 Clarence Curry, USS Halyburton IC3 Jonathan Deyoung, USS Halyburton GSE3 Jing Ding, USS Halyburton CTT2 Jonathan Edwards, USS Halyburton EN2 Timothy Golden, USS Halyburton ET2 Adam Gossett, USS Halyburton BM2 Julian Haylock, USS Halyburton STG2 Shane Johnson, USS Halyburton OS3 Jacob Jones, USS Halyburton GM2 Robert Lauser, USS Halyburton DC2 Matthew Lockamy, USS Halyburton YN2 Cliffard Lomax, USS Halyburton BM3 Mark Mcshane, USS Halyburton QM2 Sky Mcspadden, USS Halyburton CTT2 Daniel Moore, USS Halyburton GSM2 Seth Moore, USS Halyburton EM2 Joseph Rice, USS Halyburton STG2 Tyler Sarff, USS Halyburton GM2 Brandon Scullion, USS Halyburton FC2 Nickolas Sibert, USS Halyburton GSM3 Jonathan Slater, USS Halyburton IT3 Chester Sumbry, USS Halyburton OS2 Sebastian Tuanda, USS Halyburton MAYPORT A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 13

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Dec. 6: Magical Christmas: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Childrens games and crafts, Kids Performances and a Special Appearance by Santa. 270-5680 Dec. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Dec. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 7: Ugly Sweater Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band EXIT. Get into the holiday spirit and bust out your ugliest holiday sweater. free food, prizes and more. 270-7205 Dec. 8: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 2705451. Dec. 8: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Dec. 9: Kids Christmas Bingo 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $10 per person (includes bingo, hot dogs, soda, cook ies, and prize drawing). Special appearance by Santa. 270-7204 or 2705145 Dec. 11: Jingle Bell 5K/10K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Dec. 11: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Dec. 12: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Dec. 12: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the NAVSTA CPOA. For tickets, contact (904) 2705126 x3115. Dec. 19: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 13: Christmas Karaoke 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Lets celebrate the holiday sea son with karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon con taining discounts at our pro shop from 5%-50%. Baked goods by Dawn Ferreria and beverages will be served. 270-5380 Dec. 29: UFC 155: Dos Santos vs Velasquez 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 MWR KIDDec. 6: Magical Christmas: 6:308:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Childrens games and crafts, Kids Performances and a Santa appearance Dec. 7: Youth Sponsorship Teen Bonfire 5:30-8:30 p.m. behind Pizza Hut. Free food and drinks. 2490347 Dec. 9: Kids Christmas Bingo 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $10 per person (includes bingo, hot dogs, soda, cookies, and prize drawing). Special appearance by Santa. 270-7204 or 270-5145 Dec. 13: Youth Drama Club Presents Its a Wonderful Life. 4:30 p.m. at the Youth Center. Dec. 15: Teen Trip to Avenues Mall. Depart Teen Center at 12:30 p.m.; return 5:30 p.m. Permission slip required. 246-0347 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 6: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Drink specials, half-price wings, music videos and light show! Dec. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 7: Ugly Sweater Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band EXIT. Get into the holiday spirit and bust out your ugliest holiday sweater. free food, prizes. Dec. 8: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside. Dec. 8: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Dec. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New York Jets. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Dec. 10: Liberty Focus Group. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. We need your input and this is your chance to tell us what you think of your Liberty Program. Free refresh ments and attendees will be entered to win a prize. LIBERTY Klakring Wives Work For Biggest Loser-Photo by Paige GnannSonia Gomez, Laura Aceituno, Ruth La, Brandy Hampton get in a last minute workout on Nov. 30 before their husbands return to Naval Station Mayport with USS Klakring (FFG 42). The wives participated with other Klakring spouses in a Biggest Loser contest coordinated by Gomez, a certified personal trainer. Held from July 10 to Nov. 27, the spouses exercised, adjusted their eating habits and collaborated on menus. They started an online support group to share recipes, daily checkins and weight loss ideas. They worked out as a team as well as on their own. Gomez also coordinated weekly reward motivation gifts and collaborated with local make up art ists hair dresses and photographers to hold a photo shoot of the spouses slimmer physiques. By the time the ship returned on Dec. 1, the spouses had lost a total of 219 pounds. I am very pleased to have been a part of their journey and proud to share a little of our world, hoping ou stories will inspire and encourage [others] to live a healthy lifestyle, Gomez said. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 15

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Coast Guardsmen Volunteer In AB, PVB U.S. Coast Guard Public AffairsCoast Guard men and women from two Jacksonville, Fla.,area units lent help ing hands by volunteer ing with Habitat for Humanity in Atlantic Beach, Fla., as well as the Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Restoration Project in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Nov. 30. Volunteers from Aids to Navigation Team Jacksonville Beach, Fla., helped attach roof sheet ing and siding to a Habitat for Humanity Wounded Warrior home off Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach. Contractors praised the Coast Guardsmen for their diligence and enthusiasm, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Christian Menendez, one of the vol unteers. This was a great expe rience for us, and we look forward to help ing with a future build in conjunction with Wounded Warrior Project and Beaches Habitat for Humanity, Menendez added. A second group of Coast Guard volun teers, assigned to Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, spent Friday morn ing at Guanna Tolomato Matanzas Research Reserve in Ponte Vedra Beach collecting and bagging oyster shells, which will eventually be returned to the water to restore a lost shoreline and lure oysters to rebuild oyster beds where they once lived. -Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Zack Burgess Petty Officer 2nd Class Juan Caraballo and Fireman Jacob Owens of Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Team Jacksonville Beach, Fla., install roof sheeting to a Habitat for Humanity Wounded Warrior home off Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. Contractors praised the Coast Guardsmen for their dili gence and enthusiasm while volunteering. -U.S. Coast Guard photo Coast Guard men and women from Aids to Navigation Team Jacksonville Beach, Fla., volunteered at a Habitat for Humanity Wounded Warrior home off Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. The volunteers said they enjoyed their time working on the home and plan to volunteer again in the future. -Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael MorrealeCoast Guardsmen assigned to Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., collect and bag oyster shells while volunteering at Guanna Tolomato Matanzas Research Reserve in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. Their efforts were in support of the Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Restoration Project, with a goal of restoring a lost shoreline and luring oysters to rebuild oyster beds where they once lived.-Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael MorrealeCoast Guardsmen assigned to Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., volunteered to collect and bag oyster shells at Guanna Tolomato Matanzas Research Reserve in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. Their efforts were in support of the Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Restoration Project, with a goal of restoring a lost shoreline and luring oysters to rebuild oyster beds where they once lived. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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U.S. Coast Guard Public Affairs The Atlantic Beach, Fla.,-based Coast Guard Cutter Hammer and its crew celebrated 50 years of serving boaters and the public in the coast al waters of Florida and southern Georgia Nov. 29. The cutters crew dressed the ship a maritime tradition reserved for special occasions donned more formal uniforms for themselves and took a few minutes to reflect on the cutters past in honor of the milestone anniversary. Hammer is an inland construction tender homeported at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, is com prised of a 75-foot tug pushing a 68-foot barge and was placed in service Nov. 30, 1962, with a pri mary mission of marine construction of aids to navigation and piers. Equipped with a 70-foot crane and piledriving device, Hammer is manned by 14 enlist ed personnel who are responsible for approximately 1,400 fixed aids to navigation from Sapelo Sound in Georgia south to Melbourne, Fla., and the St. Johns River from Mayport, Fla., to Sanford, Fla. This area encompass es more than 420 miles of inland waterways. People often see us and wonder what we do, said Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott Kahle, offi cer in charge of Hammer. The improvements we make, along with the other local aids to navigation teams, provide a huge service to those who transit on the river and rely on the aids for safe navigation. Kahle served on the Hammer for three years from 2001 to 2004 as a second class petty officer and said hes extremely grateful and honored to be back as the officer in charge. He said although ATON is not the most glamor ous Coast Guard mission, its one of the oldest and has an enormous impact on the entire community, and the crewmembers know the value of their work. Throughout the last 50 years, the Hammer has gone through 18 changes of command, numerous engineering plant mod ernizations, and advances in navigational position ing from the use of sex tants to todays increased accuracy through the use of GPS. The cutters mission of providing safe and navi gable waterways for the public and commerce remains unchanged Although Hammer is primarily responsible for constructing and main taining aids to navigation, like all other cutters, it is a multi-mission asset and has been uti lized in many different ways. Some examples of these secondary missions are marine environmen tal protection; marine safety; law enforcement; and ports, waterways, and coastal security. Hammer was construct ed by Gibbs Shipyard, Inc. in Jacksonville, Fla., but its original home port was Ft. Pierce, Fla. It was relocated to Sector Jacksonville in July 1986.-Photo by PO1 Lauren Jorgensen Atlantic Beach-based Coast Guard cutter celebrates 50 years of service Coast Guardsmen man the rails aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Hammer at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., in celebration of the cutters 50th year serv ing boaters and the public in the coastal waters of Florida and southern Georgia Nov. 29. Hammer joined the Coast Guards aids to navigation fleet Nov. 30, 1962, and was tasked primarily with marine construction of aids to navigation and piers, which its crew continues to do today. Atlantic Beach-Based Coast Guard Cutter Celebrates 50 Years Of ServiceFFSC Workshop, Class Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Dec. 6, 10-11 a.m., Craft Hour, USO Dec. 6, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 7, 6:30-9:30 p.m., IA Childrens Christmas Party, CPO Club Dec. 10, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Military Spouses 101 Workshop Building 1, Room 702 Dec. 10, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course Building 1 Room 1616 Dec. 11, 8-11 a.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course Building 1 Room 1616 Dec. 11, 1-3 p.m., CFS Forum, FFSC Room 1616 Dec. 11, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Dec. 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 13, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 702 Dec. 18, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17-21, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Dec. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Friday, Dec. 7 Mayor Alvin Brown invites residents to attend the inaugural Holiday at St. James celebration. The event will feature a craft bazaar from 11 a.m.-3 p.m in Hemming Plaza, carol ers, crafts for kids, an eve ning open house at City Hall,117 West Duval St., and will culminate with a lighting of the St. James Holiday tree in Hemming Plaza from 4:30-7 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to come and experience St. James for the holidays. Event is free and open to the public. Call (904) 6303690 for application infor mation. Saturday, Dec. 8 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural commu nities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 9 Celebrate Christmas at Christ United Methodist Churchs fourth annual Childrens Christmas Celebration and Cookie Cantata starting at 11:30 a.m. Homemade cook ies will be sold to support our various ministries. Crafts and fun activities will be available for chil dren and their families and a visit from the jolly old elf himself will high light the day. Join us in Wilson Fellowship Hall immediately following the choral cantata during the worship service. Call the church office at 249-5370 for information. www. neptunebeach-umc.org Children eat a pan cake breakfast with Santa & Mrs. Claus and then tell Santa what you want for Christmas at Isle of Faith UMC. Tickets are $3 for children, $5 adults and may be purchased at the door. Photos may be purchased. Two seat ings; 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Benefits the Isle of Faith Dominican Republic Medical Mission. Friday, Dec. 14 Duval County Extension Agency, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., will hold a Right Tree Right Place Workshop from 9 a.m.12:15 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. This seminar will demonstrate how to complete a project by learning the importance of knowing your land scape codes, understand ing the planting site and the selecting of the right tree for the site. Whether you are a homeowner, HOA, developer, contrac tor, landscape architect, or government employee, this seminar will edu cate and enlighten you. Speakers include UF/ IFAS Extension Agents, JEA Arborist, and City of Jacksonville Code Enforcement. FNGLA and ISA CEUs available. Register online at: http:// www.fufc.org/rtrp_jack sonville_registration.html Or make checks out to Florida Urban Forestry Council and send to: Larry Figart, Duval County Extension, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32254 Saturday, Dec. 15 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This rang er-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR FRGs USS Halyburton family readiness group will meet from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Dec. 6. USS Simpson family readiness group will meet from 3-9 p.m. on Dec. 7. USS Carney family readiness group will meet from 9-1 p.m. on Dec. 8. USS Farragut family readiness group will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 11. USS Simpson family readiness group will meet from 3-9 p.m. on Dec. 13. USS Underwood family readiness group will meet from 6-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 20. No Dough Dinner USO will hold a No Dough Dinner from 5-7 p.m. on Dec. 10. Pizza, salad and dessert will be on the menu. Closed For Holiday USO will be closed Dec. 22-25 for the holidays. It will reopen on Dec. 26 from 9-4 p.m. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 17

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Navy Focus On Force LevelsFrom Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs OfficeThe Navy announced plans to suspend the Enlisted Early Transition Program (EETP) as leaders focus on maintaining current force levels, officials said Nov. 30. Todays challenges have shift ed from reducing the end strength to stabilizing the force and filling gaps at sea, said Chief of Naval Personnel, Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. EETP will remain sus pended until there is sufficient future need for this program. EETP is a force shaping program that allowed approved Sailors to voluntarily separate from the Navy prior to the end of their enlist ment. First implemented in 2008 to allow Sailors to request to sep arate up to 12 months early, the program was expanded in 2011 to allow eligible Sailors to separate up to 24 months early when the Navy experienced unprecedented reten tion and outstanding recruiting success. The voluntary early sepa ration of selected Sailors allowed further stabilization and alignment of the force. Since then, the Navy has made significant progress in balancing the force, according to Van Buskirk. Under NAVADMIN 359/12, released Nov. 30, Navy Personnel Command (NPC) will no longer accept requests to separate under this program. Requests received by NPC on or after the release date of NAVADMIN 359/12 will be USS Carr Offloads HSL-48, Tons of Cocaine At Mayport4th Fleet public affairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class guid edmissile frig ate USS Carr (FFG 52) and embarked Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) offloaded 1.5 tons of cocaine and almost two tons of mari juana worth an esti mated street value of $114.1 million at Naval Station Mayport Nov. 30. Carr was return ing from conducting Counter Transnational Organized Crime Operations (C-TOC) in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Since Operation Martillo began in January 2012, more than 134 tons of cocaine has been dis rupted at an estimated street value of nearly $3.3 billion. U.S. law enforce ment agencies took custody of the drugs after they were offloaded in Mayport for transfer, testing and disposal. Carr has been deployed since June 1, and after the offload will return to its homeport in Norfolk, Va. The drugs were seized while the ship was assigned to U.S. 4th Fleet supporting Operation Martillo (Spanish for Hammer) in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific littoral areas off the coast of Central America. Operation Martillo is an inter agency mission that began in January 2012 to combat the spread of organized crime in Central America and the use of the Central American water ways and southern approaches to Mexico and the U.S. as routes to smuggle illicit drugs, weapons, and cash. While operating in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific Ocean, the Carr team inter dicted vessels smug gling drugs to Central America and even tually to the United States. During this -Photos by Lt. Cmdr Corey BarkerDeputy Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Jon Matheson visits with family members from Helicopter Squadron 48 "Vipers" detachment onboard USS Carr (FFG 52) during the units homecoming after a 4th Fleet deployment to support Operation Martillo. Crewmembers of Helicopter Squadron 48 "Vipers" detachment disembark Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Carr (FFG 52) at the units home coming after a 4th Fleet deployment to support Operation Martillo. The embarked helicopter detachment participated in six interdictions of 3.3 tons of illicit drugs worth an estimated street value of more than $114 Million.Mayport Holds Holiday Safety Stand DownNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment Southeast Naval Station Mayport along with the Navy Southeast Region Safety Department held a winter and holiday safety standdown at the Beachside Community Center Nov. 28. Ron Williamson, safety manager for Navy Region Southeast, opened the stand down with a brief on all the mishaps in the Southeast Region. This campaign highlights mis haps that happened in the Southeast Region in the past year. All our Sailor, Marine and base DOD personnel need to stay alert, aware, and safe this season, said Williamson. We need to utilize operation risk manage ment during the holiday season. The militarys goal is zero accidents or deaths, he added. According to Williamson, the holidays bring opportunities for celebration with family and friends; but, unfortu nately, they also account for a staggering increase in Navy accident rates. To help raise the awareness the guest speaker Steve Verret, a comedian, did a skit on the subjects; vehicle safety, insurance, accidents, drunk driving and depression. My challenge for you all is to always wear your seat belts and turn on your headlight every single day, said Verret. We all need to realize the consequences when making bad decisions dont affect just you. I will be sure to take my time driving and making sure I use all the safety devices my car has to offer, said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Juan Serret. The standdown emphasized how important our safety is and especially during this time of year. Holiday stress counter measures were empha sized during the stand down. Topics to watch out for during this time of year include depression, excessive alcohol use and staying in contact with loved ones. Closing out the safety stand down Williamson said, Please take your time, be careful and make smart decisions. We want everyone to have safe and happy holidays this year. -Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors assigned to Naval Station Mayport respond to a question during a base-wide safety standdown held at the base community center. The standdown covered topics such as vehicle safety, depression and preventative mea sures associated with mishaps during the holiday season. Safety Manager for Navy Region Southeast, Ron Williamson, gives a safety brief to Sailors at the Beachside Community Center onboard Naval Station Mayport during a base-wide safety standdown. See Offload, Page 7 See Transition, Page 6Housing Holiday Shop-a-Thon Balfour Beatty Communities will host a Holiday Shop-a-Thon at the Ribault Bay Community Center, 1201 Assisi Lane, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Dec. 15. This event is free and open to the public.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Welcome Home to Cmdr. Canady and the crew of USS Klakring, who glided into port Saturday morning it might have been misting a bit, but there were hundreds of smiling, shiny faces waiting for Daddy to come home! A special thanks to Navy Region Southeast Band for the entertainment while waiting for the ship to tie up, and the usual profes sional job by the Harbormasters, line handlers and Public Works employees for safely assisting the lines, brows and crane lifts. Merry Christmas shipmates, to you and all your families and loved ones! Congratulations to all of our new petty officers. Well done and Bravo Zulu! I am very proud of your hard work and per sonal commitment that enabled each one of you to achieve the next career milestone! For those who came up just short of advancing, dont get discour aged. You need to keep the press on and hit the books NOW. I would love to see a 100 percent advancement rate from the March 2013 advancement cycle lets do it! Another reminder for you first class petty officers, the E7 exam is approaching so enjoy the holidays, but be pre pared on Jan. 17, 2013! Tonight we have another great MWR sponsored event Magical Christmas! Come on out to the Sea Otter pavilion, bring the kids and enjoy another first class MWR event! We just completed our Holiday Safety Stand-down. Once again, Naval Station Mayports Training Officer Willie Green put together an educational brief designed to heighten awareness dur ing this holiday season. Guest speaker Steve Verret emphasized vehicle safety and warned against drinking and driv ing. Please be vigilant and remember we have an excellent program in place called CLUB 2000. This free program is designed to assist active duty Mayport Sailors who may need a responsible ride home after drinking. CLUB 2000 2402401. I cannot stress enough about safety during this time of year. During your holiday travels, think safety. Check your routes, your equipment and always have a travel plan. Driving sleepy is as bad as driving drunk. Take the extra time and be safe. Lots of folks are not as fortunate as we are here at Planet Awesome. Some ideas for the Christmas season are: Navy Exchange Giving Tree, the USO Giving Bags and of course Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society. Be mindful of holiday scams. Protect you personal information and do not be a victim of identity theft. During the season we see a larger than normal amount of illegal scams designed to separate you from your money. Stay vigilant. Also, spend wisely, develop a budget and stay within your financial means. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) has financial advisors available to help educate you on money management and finan cial planning. Take advantage of these resources. Dec. 7 marks 71 years since the attack on Pearl Harbor. This Friday at 9 a.m., a pier side ceremony in remembrance of those lost during the 1941 attack at Pearl Harbor will be held aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). Mayport Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 is sponsoring this commemorative service. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) hotline number is 5631254. This is serious and it affects us all. It will not be tolerated and I challenge everyone to respond and report if they are subject to or witness sexual assault. It is an honor to serve with each and every one of you. Let us continue to be safe and take care of each other, especially during these holiday times. Continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSWhile being the child of a military service member can have a positive impact on the child, it can negatively impact his academic success. An article by Elaine Wilson in the American Forces Press Service reports that an Army study found that children whose parents have deployed for a cumulative 19 months or more had lower school achievement test scores than children whose parents had deployed for a lesser time or not at all. Wilsons article shared the findings of a two-year study on the effects of deployments on military childrens academic success and emotional health. The study results placed the impact for children beginning at the 19-month mark of the parents cumulative deploy ment time with the cumulative amount of time a more signifi cant impact than the number of deployments. Researchers explored the findings to determine if they revealed differences such as location of deployment or age, gender, and rank of parent. But similar results were found in all the differences. What they did find was something people have known intuitively for some time: while many military families are coping well with deployments, others are struggling. Wilson provided in her article a number of recommendations on how to assist children struggling with deployment: Students need additional support with their homework and school work either online or in person, Installation leaders need to create a process to inform schools about which children are military and the status of parental deployment, School counselors need better access to information on resources which can help mili tary families, and Installations need to widely advertise the presence of school liaison officers and encourage them to foster a more collaborative effort with school adminis trators. The U.S. Navy has certainly recognized the importance of these recommendations. School Liaison Officers (SLOs) have now been posted at every major Naval installation. The Navy SLOs have provided parents a myriad of resources available to military-connect ed families through indocs, Ombudsman assemblies, newspaper articles, and web sites. The web links include a variety of resources including online tutoring at www.TUTOR.com and SOAR (www.militarystu dent.org), free test prep, and help for special needs children. SLOs also provide train ing to parents to better inform them of resources available to them from a variety of mili tary and civilian organizations. On November 13th, a Military Family Guidance Night was held at Finegan Elementary School. This event was designed to ensure that military parents have the tools to sup port their childrens academic, social, and emotional achieve ment and success. The focus of the program was on how the installations SLO and the schools guidance pro gram and teaching staff sup port the social and emotional implications of the transitioning student: deployment and separation, building confidence and resiliency, and supporting chil dren through trauma and loss. The program shared guidance resources at the school and district level which are available to dependent military children who are experiencing academic and/or behavioral issues. The presentation also shared what can be provided to mili tary families on the installation side and out in the commu nity, including CYP programs: child care, Youth Sponsorship, Teen Center, and sports; Fleet and Family Support Center programs: counseling, Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP), deployment sup port, and the Family Advocacy Program (FAP); MFLC; USO, Navy Marine Corps Relief, Military OneSource, and the American Red Cross. Sixty-nine family members attended the program which began with dinner in the school cafeteria. Following din ner, the families participated in an introduction to the program, including a welcome by Commanding Officer Douglas Cochrane. Jose Sanchez, Exceptional Family Member Liaison, provided an overview of the EFMP program and other Fleet and Family Service Center Programs available to assist the families academically, socially, and/or emotionally. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Deployments Impact Students Academic SuccessJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingHappy Belated Thanksgiving to the finest Sailors in the fleet! This time of year is a reflec tive time for Americans and in my mind the holi day season always starts with Thanksgiving Day and rolls right on through Christmas and into the New Year. It drives me a little crazy to see all those Christmas deco rations being put out at Halloween! Most of us have some fantastic memories of previous holidays when we have gathered with family and friends to celebrate another year of Gods blessings. Of course, the flip side is that this time of year is often when we miss our loved ones the most if we cant be with them for what ever reason. So I thought I would encourage us all to remember the true spirit of the holidays. I know how easy it is to get caught up in all the shopping and overall business of this time of year. I think the rea son I always start with Thanksgiving is because a thankful spirit is absolutely critical to enjoying any holiday, but especially the big ones this time of year. Historically, Americans have always been a thankful lot and for that I am grateful. One of the first things the Pilgrims did when they arrived on the Mayflower was to give thanks to Almighty God for a safe crossing of the Atlantic. Even though they arrived hundreds of miles off course and had faced all the hardships of crossing the Atlantic on such a small ship without any of the modern ame nities, they bowed their heads and hearts and gave thanks to God for the hope of a new begin ning and to look to Him for future blessings. And we have remained a gen erally thankful nation ever since. Of course there are times we do need to be reminded and prompted, because of our natural tendency to forget how good God has been to us and to take the bless ings we have for granted. President Washington, and eventually President Lincoln, began the national holiday known as Thanksgiving. Lincoln called upon the nation to give thanks in the mid dle of the bloodiest con flict of the Civil War. He knew that a thankful spirit would be essential to finding peace once again. How has God blessed you this year and what are you particularly grateful for? I am thankful for my health, for my family (especially my beautiful and loving wife), and for the freedom I have as an American. I am thank ful for my calling as a chaplain and for serving with some of the most wonderful people on the planet. I am thankful for forgiveness (both from God and my neighbors) and the freedom to wor ship according to my conscience. I am thankful to be an American where we still hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men (mankind) are created equal and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights includ ing life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And happiness always starts and ends with thanksgiv ing! Chap Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHappiness Always Starts With A Thankful Spirit CorrectionDue to a reporting error, the Nov. 22 edition of The Mirror incorrectly identified the baker of USS Taylors change of command cake as ship CSs. The baker was Katina McCoy. We regret the error. Hope Needs Your Help. 1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service.Photo: Steve Liss, AmericanPoverty.org

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Aircraft Carrier Enterprise InactivatedFrom USS Enterprise Public AffairsNearly 12,000 past and current crewmem bers, family and friends attended the inactiva tion of aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Dec. 1, 2012, at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Enterprise, the worlds first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, recently completed its 25th and final deployment and returned to its homeport of Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled inactivation, held prior to the ships terminal offload program and subsequent decommissioning. The inactivation cere mony was the last official public event for the ship, and served as a celebra tion of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 Sailors who served aboard. The Chief of Naval Operations, the Commander of United States Fleet Forces, nine of twenty-three prior commanding officers, many decorated war heroes, and thousands of Enterprise veterans attended the event. Enterprise is a spe cial ship and crew, and it was special long before I got here said Captain William C. Hamilton, Jr., the twenty-third and final commanding officer, during the cer emony. Before I took command of this ship, I learned the definition of enterprise, which is an especially daring and courageous undertak ing driven by a bold and adventurous spirit. Fiftyone years ago, this ship was every bit of that definition. Here we are 51 years later, he continued, cel ebrating the astonishing successes and accom plishments of this engi neering marvel that has roamed the seas for more than half the history of Naval Aviation. Daring, courageous, bold, and adventurous indeed. In honor of that spirit, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, in a video mes sage played at the cer emony, announced that the name Enterprise will live on as the officially passed the name to CVN80, the third Ford class carrier and the ninth ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name. Commissioned on November 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the Big E was the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific Ocean, and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conflict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conflict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enterprise was there. On September 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long deployment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big E once again took her place in history when she launched the first strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. More than 100,000 Sailors and Marines have served aboard Enterprise during its lifetime, which has included every major conflict since the Cuban Missile Crisis. It has been home ported in both Alameda, Calif., and Norfolk, Va., and has conducted operations in every region of the world. For more information on USS Enterprise, her legendary history, and Inactivation Week, please visit www.enterprise. navy.mil BOGEYSTHURSDAY, DEC 6BUFFALO CHICKEN WRAP WITH FF, CHIPS OR SLAW 7.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: CHICKEN COBB SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: CLAM CHOWDER CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00FRIDAY, DEC 7POT ROAST WITH WHIPPED POTATOES, GRAVY, VEGETABLE, ROLL 7.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 EGG SALAD SANDWICH WITH FF, CHIPS OR SLAW 4.25 SOUP OF THE DAY: CRAB BISQUE CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00MONDAY, DEC 10MEATBALL SUB SANDWICH WITH FF, CHIPS OR SLAW 7.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: GREEK CHICKEN SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: CHICKEN AND DUMPLING CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00TUESDAY, DEC 11STEAK FAJITA QUESADILLAS 6.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: CHICKEN COBB SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: CHILI CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00WEDNESDAY, DEC 128 OZ NY STRIP STEAK BLACKENED WITH ONION RINGS, SIDE SALAD, ROLL 9.95 BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.50 BLACKENED TILAPIA SANDWICH WITH FRIES, CHIPS OR SLAW 6.95 SALAD OF THE DAY: CHICKEN COBB SALAD 7.95 SOUP OF THE DAY: POTATO BACON CUP 3.00 BOWL 4.00 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Klakring Returns From Final Sail USS Klakring Public AffairsUSS Klakring returned home from her final deployment on Dec. 1. Since her commission ing date of August 20, 1983, she has served the Navy through 29 years of service and 22 deploy ments, and she has had three homeports. She has traveled more than 3.2 million miles worldwide during her time of service with deployments to the Middle East, South America, Europe, and Africa. Klakring is currently commanded by Cmdr. Darrell S. Canady who was born and raised in Hope Mills, North Carolina. He earned a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1994 from North Carolina State University. Canady earned his commission through Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida. From there he com pleted the nuclear offi cer pipeline and served tours onboard USS John C. Stennis, at Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, USS Carr, USS Enterprise, USS Steven W. Groves, and USS Klakring. He has been Klakrings Commanding Officer since February 25, 2011. On her 2012 AFRICOM deployment, Klakring served in the C6F and C5F AORs in support of maritime security opera tions providing intelli gence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. During her time on station she completed more than 500 Fire Scout (MQ-8B) flight hours and conducted 14 replenishments-at-sea, during which she received more than 860,000 gallons of F-76, more than 20,000 gallons of JP-5, and more than 600 pallets of sup plies. Her port visits includ ed Augusta Bay, Sicily, Port Victoria, Seychelles, Djibouti, Djibouti, Port Louis, Mauritius and Souda Bay, Crete. During these visits, Klakring Sailors participated in six community relations projects varying from beautification of a natu ral preserve to spending time with children who have been diagnosed with autism, schizophrenia, and other mental disor ders. As this deployment comes to an end, the Sailors are excited to be reunited with their fami lies and friends. However this is a bitter sweet end ing for USS Klakring as she will decommission on March 22, 2013. She and her crew have proudly served this country keep ing the Navy core values of Honor, Courage, and Commitment close to their hearts and at the heart of their mission. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor from the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) is greeted by family and friends as the ship arrives at Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment to the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Coast of South America. While deployed, Klakring participated in intelligence surveillance reconnaissance in support of anti-piracy operations utilizing Fire Scout, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor from the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) is greeted by family and friends as the ship arrives at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyUSS Klakring returns to its homeport of Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment to the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Coast of South America. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFamily and friends wait at Naval Station Mayport for the return of the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring. -Photo by Paige GnannLt. Gary Pittman gets a big welcome home kiss from his wife, Angela.-Photo by Paige GnannLogistics Specialist Seaman Jonathan Winters holds his wife, Lauren, after the pair reunite pierside.-Photo by Paige GnannAviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Eric Demoraes is greeted pierside by his mother and sister after retuning to NS Mayport Saturday with USS Klakring.-Photo by Paige GnannLt. Adam Barry hugs his children, Hunter and Suzie, as his fiancee, Ada Stanford, watches the reunion pierside during USS Klakrings homecoming celebration on Saturday.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 5 Fire Scout Breaks Endurance Records On USS Klakring DeploymentFrom NAVAIRFour Fire Scout unmanned helicopters aboard USS Klakring (FFG 42) returned to Mayport, Fla. Dec. 1 after achieving several milestones during its six-month deployment. On its third deployment with the Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42 detachment, the Fire Scouts logged more than 500 flight hours in support of anti-piracy operations in the U.S. Africa Command Area of Responsibility and provided realtime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) support to combatant commanders. With a record number of unmanned helicopters aboard Klakring, Fire Scout regularly maintained 12-hour days on station, regularly switching aircraft to provide continuous and thorough support. The system accomplished a new single-day endurance record, providing continuous ISR support for an entire 24-hour period. For the first time, HSL-42 conducted dual air vehicle operations, allowing the ships commander to keep a constant watch on a target of interest. The real achievement on this deployment was a surge we executed to provide just over 24 continu ous hours of ISR coverage in late September, said Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lambert, HSL-42 detachment officer-incharge. Completing this milestone required ten separate flights, refueling aircraft eight times, and having the ship setting flight quarters for launch or recovery twenty times. It took everyone on the air detachment and ship working together to make it happen and we are extremely proud of what we accomplished. Since 2006, the Northop Grumman-built Fire Scout system has flown for more than 5,000 flight hours with more than half of the flight hours completed in 2012 on ship-based and land based deployments. Fire Scout continues to perform with a very high success rate, providing vital information to combat ant commanders, said Capt. Patrick Smith, Fire Scout program manager. There is a tremendous amount of interest shown for Fire Scout in the helicopter community. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySenior Chief Sonar Technician Surface Adam Obrien is greeted with a kiss from his daughter as he returns home to Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42). While deployed, Klakring participated in intelligence surveillance reconnaissance in support of anti-piracy operations utilizing Fire Scout, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyInformation Systems Technician 2nd Class Roarke Landin embraces his daughter as he returns home from a six-month deployment with USS Klakring.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyShip's Serviceman 2nd Class Rodricus Lewis is greeted with a hug from his daughter as he returns home to Naval Station Mayport with USS Klakring (FFG 42). -Photo by Paige GnannYoeman 2nd Class (SW) Kemario Latson talks with his one-year-old daughter, Aryanna, and wife Christa.-Photo by Paige GnannSenior Chief Naval Aircrewman John Chapman of HSL-42 hugs his daughter as he reunites with his family after returning with USS Klakring Saturday.

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returned without action. Requests sub mitted and received prior to the release of the NAVADMIN 359/12 will still be considered. Commanding officers may no lon ger separate Sailors early under EETP. Commanding officers may still authorize voluntary early separation up to 90 days early in accordance with MILPIRSMAN 1910-102. The Early Career Transition Program (ECTP) is unaffected and remains an option for Sailors seeking an early release from active duty with an intent to continue their careers in the Navy Reserve. For more information read NAVADMIN 359/12 or contact the NPC customer service center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC (1-866-827-5672). For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/npcFrom Page 1TransitionNavy Looks At New Outerwear OptionsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 360/12 announced the optional wear of the Army double breasted black all-weath er coat with all uniforms except the Navy Working Uniform (Type I, II and III) and Physical Training Uniforms, effective immediately. The Navy strives to provide Sailors with the best uniform options to maintain a professional appearance as well as improve protection from the weather, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, direc tor of Military Personnel Plans and Policy. The addition of this allweather coat provides Sailors with an additional choice. NAVADMIN 360/12 also announced a wear test evaluation beginning this month of two types of cold weather parkas (CWP) under consider ation for optional wear with service and service dress uniforms in cold weather environments. The test will include 100 Sailors assigned to selected commands and staffs in Navy District Washington and Navy Regions Northwest, Midwest, and the north east sector of the MidAtlantic Region. The test will run through March 31. The Army doublebreasted black all-weath er coat will be available in select Navy Exchange Uniform Centers, on-line, and NEX 1-800 call cen ters approximately sixty days after the release of the NAVADMIN. It is cur rently available at AAFES Uniform Centers. The optional all-weath er coat will eventually replace the current Navy all-weather coat accord ing to the NAVADMIN. Details, timeline and cost will be provided in a future NAVADMIN. For details on occasion for wear, manner of wear and authorized option al components for the optional all-weather coat are listed in NAVADMIN 360/12. For more information on uniforms and uni form policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters website at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ support/uniforms/pages/ default2.aspx. NAVYSouth Carolina Cyber Intrusions Prompt DoD To Notify TroopsAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department and South Carolina officials are notifying military members and families who paid state income taxes there that they may have been victims of information/ identity theft as a result of several recent cyber intrusions. South Carolinas Department of Revenue reported nearly four mil lion Social Security numbers and several hundred thousand credit and debit card numbers belong ing to current and for mer taxpayers may have been stolen during cyber intrusions in August and September. While the vast major ity of the personal data is believed to have been protected by encryption, state revenue officials said about 16,000 accounts were not, and that any one who filed a South Carolina income tax return as far back as 1998 could be affected. The intrusions were discovered last month, officials said. While South Carolina officials believe their system is now secure, Gov. Nikki Haley said the state is offering one year of free credit monitoring and iden tity protection to anyone who might have been exposed and applies for it. The number of records breached requires an unprecedented, largescale response, she said. In addition to Social Security numbers and credit card information, defense officials said information usually found on the front of checks may also have been exposed. DOD personnel and their family members who are current or former South Carolina taxpayers, especially those who are living abroad, are urged to visit www.ProtectMyId. com/SCDOR or contact Experians national con sumer assistance cen ter at 1-866-578-5422 by January 31, 2013, to enroll in identity threat protec tion. In addition, current and former South Carolina business owners may also contact Dun & Bradstreet Credibility Corp., officials said. Visit www.DandB. com/SC to initiate the registration process or call 1-800-279-9881. An investigation into the source of the cyber intrusion continues. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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multinational operation, Carr worked with forces from our Partner Nations, including Panama, Colombia, and Costa Rica. In addition to Carrs interdictions, the ship disrupted the flow of 6,160 pounds of cocaine. Cmdr. Patrick Kulakowski, commanding office of Carr talked about the teamwork involved in the deployment. Carr Sailors demon strated flexibility and teamwork during this deployment, our mis sion required us to work with the Coast Guard, U.S. government agencies, and our partner nations. Despite the fact that this is Carrs final deployment, the crew performed as though it was the ships first deployment, said Kulakowski. Lt. Cmdr. Neil Kruger, executive officer of Carr emphasized how impor tant the flexibility of the crew was to the success of the mission. At the beginning of the deployment we operated in the Caribbean Sea, then on short notice we received orders to the Pacific, which required us to transit the Panama Canal, we did so successfully and continued our mission where we were needed. Senior Chief Aviation Electricians Mate (AW) Jacob Bristow, command master chief aboard Carr talked about not only the CTOC accomplishments of Carr but other milestones the crew achieved. Along with our success with C-TOC operations, 92 percent of our Sailors earned their enlisted surface warfare qualifi cations, and 49 percent of our Sailors who took the advancement exam advanced, the crew did all this while preparing the ship for decommission ing. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. 4th Fleet was on hand for the offload and discussed the importance of C-TOC and the success of Carr. Carrs deployment to Fourth Fleet in support of Operation Martillo was a huge success and dem onstrates our clear com mitment to work together with our partner nations and interagency community to combat the influ ence of organized crime and disrupt the flow of illicit drugs into the U.S. More than 80 percent of the narcotics entering Central America makes its way to U.S. markets via maritime littoral routes; with the main convey ance being by speedboats and submersible vessels. By teaming up with our partner nations and allied forces to scrutinize the littorals, our goal is to deny them the ability to transit so that the sea lines are not free for illicit traffic, he said. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participa tion is being led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coor dinated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to com bat transnational orga nized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relation ships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space to enhance regional security and promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerSailors offload one-and-a-half tons of cocaine and almost 3 tons of marijuana from the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Carr (FFG 52). The drugs were seized while conducting Operation Martillo and are being turned over to federal authorities. The ship is returning after a six-month deployment to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibility conducting counter transnational organized crime operations. From Page 1Offload THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 7

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USS Robert G. Bradley Training At Sea -Photo by ET1 Daniel K. RaleyOnboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) the sailors from HSC-22 Det 5 refuel the MQ-8B Firescout in preparation for launch. Sailors from USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) conduct RHIB operations to transfer personnel between ships, with Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Hilliar as the Coxswain, Ensign Matthew L. McCain as the Boat Officer, and Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Anthony P. Woo as the SAR Swimmer.-Photo by ET1 Daniel K. RaleyOnboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) Ships Serviceman 1st Class Anthony L. Wright instructs two other RGB Sailors during a Crash and Smash drill. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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USS Taylor Celebrates 29th Birthday USS Taylor PAOThe crew of USS Taylor (FFG 50) celebrated the birthday of the guided missile frigate while underway in support of IDCERTEX 13-2. The crew took a break from their daily activities to gather on the flight deck, pay tribute to Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, the ships namesake, and have some birthday cake. USS Taylor is a 4,100 ton, 453-foot-long, Oliver Hazard Perry class guided missile frigate, commissioned on Dec. 1, 1984. The com missioning was spon sored by Commander Jesse Junior Taylors widow, Barbara A. Taylor. Taylor celebrates her 29th year of commis sioned service.Our namesake, Commander Jesse Junior Taylor, made a coura geous decision to try to safe a downed pilot even though it was not assigned mission, said Ensign Kevin Roberts. He is the reason Taylors motto is Proud Defender. -Photos courtesy of USS TaylorEnsign Kevin A. Roberts speaks to the crew of USS Taylor (FFG 50) about the history of the Guided Missile Frigate and the sacrifices of Commander Jesse Junior Taylor. Electronics Technician Second Class Petty Officer George P. Murphy cuts cake bearing the guided missile frigates name for her 28th birthday celebration. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsGive yourself a present this year by making a holiday budget and sticking to it, Navy leaders said Nov. 27. The rewards of spend ing within your means will last all year-but stick ing to your budget may be easier said than done. Resisting the kids pleadings for the latest gadget, or the pressure to buy gifts for everyone from schoolmates to ser vice people can be stressful. I ts also hard to ignore the ads that tell you to buy now and pay nothing until next year. This holiday season; dont go broke trying to save. You may not be able to control how long a sale lasts, but you do have the power to decide that its okay if you miss out on the best prices of the year for items that werent on your shopping list. A rm yourself with a plan and it will be eas ier to resist the allure of deep discounts on items youd never even consid ered before you got to the store! Make peace of mind a new holiday tradition. In terms of sales and traffic, the Saturday before Christmas day is the busiest shopping day of the year, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, per sonal financial manage ment specialist at the Fleet & Family Support Center in Millington, Tenn. If you did some planning and stick to your goals you can beat overspending during the holidays, all year and keep your peace of mind. Create a model of success you can enjoy for years to come. Dont Go Broke Trying To Save THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 11

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CNRSE Announces Sailor of the Year for 2012 Region Southeast Public AffairsAir Traffic Controlman (AC) 1st Class (AW/SW) Sara Bailey, of Naval Air Station (NAS) Joint Reserve Base (JRB) New Orleans, was named Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Sailor of the Year for 2012 during a ceremony on board NAS Jacksonville Nov. 28. The ceremony was the culmination of NRSE Sailor of the Year Week, during which five finalists selected from the regions 16 installations were invited to Jacksonville, Fla., to compete for the honor of Sailor of the Year and to participate in a series of recreational activi ties. During the week, the Sailors toured EverBank Field, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars, and visited St. Johns Town Center. All of our candidates for Sailor of the Year were outstanding Sailors and role models, said NRSE Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Mack Ellis. What made AC1 stand out was her sustained performance of duties primary as well as collat eral. She is always ready to take on more challenging assignments. According to Bailey, it was an honor to receive such a prestigious award. Its really incredible. It was a real shock to hear my name called because the rest of these Sailors here are all great exam ples of what a first class petty officer should be, she said. She also stressed that she could never have made it this far by herself. Im in the position Im in today because of my Sailors and everything theyve done. Honestly, theyre really the ones that deserve the recogni tion, she said. In addition to Bailey, the top five also included Personnel Specialist 1st Class (AW/SW) Nathaniel Ndikum of NAS JRB Fort Worth; Ships Serviceman 1st Class (SW) Danielle Bradford of Transient Personnel Unit NAS Jacksonville; Master-atArms 1st Class (SW/AW) Jessica Brown of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay; and Master-at-Arms 1st Class Adam Turner of NAS Whiting Field. Each Sailor was accompanied by a sponsor, who was either his or her command master chief or command senior chief. According to Ndikum, the time spent with their senior leaders was one of the most rewarding expe riences of the competi tion. Its a really unique experience to have this many master chiefs in the same place at the same time. Theyve offered a lot of encouragement, he said. Its also great to be with all of these great Sailors, too. The entire experience has been good. It provides a lot of motivation for us to take what we learned here back to our commands and continue to make our Sailors better. According to Bailey, the candidates were extreme ly nervous the day of the selection board, but the most successful approach was to be candid when answering questions. I went in there and just spoke the truth. If I didnt know the answer to a question, I didnt try to hide it. I just spoke from the heart and hoped for the best, and that approach apparently worked for me in the end, she said. While the board could only select one Sailor of the Year, all of the candi dates should be extremely proud to have made it as far as they did, according to Ellis. It is truly a great accomplishment, he said. To get from our deck plates to this competition, thats absolutely a great accomplishment. Bailey will go on to compete against Sailors from other regions for the honor of Commander, Naval Installations Command Sailor of the Year. The selectee from that competition will go on to compete for Chief of Naval Operations Sailor of the Year. Photo by MC1 Greg Johnson Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Sailor of the Year finalists wait as Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., the region commander, announces the 2012 Sailor of the Year during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville. During the ceremony, Air Traffic Controlman 1st Class (AW/SW) Sara Bailey of Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans was named NRSE Sailor of the Year. Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research HospitalA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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EN1 Mark Blasini, NS Mayport EN1 Nicholas Arias, NS Mayport EM1 Anthony Chavez, NS Mayport QM1 Daniel Daugherty Jr. NS Mayport ET1 Sammie Fowler, NS Mayport SH1 Billie Gibson, NS Mayport EM1 Jason Gooden, NS Mayport MA1 Jose Pacheco, NS Mayport BM1 Travis Page, NS Mayport Frockees OS1 Jason Spooner, NS Mayport EN1 Kenneth Harris, NS Mayport MA1 Vincent Ingellis de la Cruz, NS Mayport ET2 Louis Alvarez, NS Mayport MA2 Jerome Anderson, NS Mayport AC2 Brittney Arnold, NS Mayport AD2 Donna Beauman, NS Mayport MA2 Jessica Billings, NS Mayport QM2 Garrett Christian, NS Mayport BM2 Brian Fairbanks, NS Mayport STG2 Sarah Gladstone, NS Mayport GSE2 Mara Jackson, NS Mayport MA2 Wilmer Lazalajose, NS Mayport ABH2 Joshua Lyons, NS Mayport QM2 Nicholas Mazzeo, NS Mayport AC2 Michael Miller, NS Mayport YN2 Demario Smith, NS Mayport MM2 Kristen Strickland, NS Mayport DC2 Jarrod Thurston, NS Mayport CS2 Quentin Upshaw, NS Mayport EN2 Kirby Wright Jr. NS Mayport AC3 Trinity Batye, NS Mayport AC3 Jay Bryan, NS Mayport MA3 Joshua Cannon, NS Mayport MA3 Zachary Duguay, NS Mayport MA3 Rachel Gruetzner, NS Mayport MA3 Jeremy Toups, NS Mayport YN3 Raymond Kong, NS Mayport AE3 Courtney Morgan, NS Mayport AC3 Rylee Taylor, NS Mayport OS3 Travis M. Agee, USS Robert G. Bradley EM2 Marcus M. Armstrong, USS Robert G. Bradley GSM3 Quincy W. Brown, USS Robert G. Bradley STG3 David K. Burns, USS Robert G. Bradley LS3 Thomas C. Callea, USS Robert G. Bradley IT1 Richard A. Davis, USS Robert G. Bradley GS3 Sean R. Gallagher, USS Robert G. Bradley HT3 Alex D. Gilfoy, USS Robert G. Bradley FC2 Gregory A. Glover, USS Robert G. Bradley OS2 Karl T. Greenfield, USS Robert G. Bradley YN2 Miguel A. Hernandez, USS Robert G. Bradley OS1 Christifer D. Johnson, USS Robert G. Bradley BM2 Jeremiah K. Maldonado, USS Robert G. Bradley FC1 Adam S. McCracken, USS Robert G. Bradley CS1 Jerry T. McDuffey, USS Robert G. Bradley OS3 Jaquan S. McRae, USS Robert G. Bradley GSM3 Joseph C. Meade, USS Robert G. Bradley BM3 Marlon J. Narvaez, USS Robert G. Bradley ET2 Cuong V. Nguyen, USS Robert G. Bradley YN2 Kase K. Nichols, USS Robert G. Bradley PS1 Omar Nunez, USS Robert G. Bradley ET2 Michael C. Phillips Jr. USS Robert G. Bradley DC2 Jeffrey D. Reams, USS Robert G. Bradley IT2 Kayle D. Rivers, USS Robert G. Bradley ITT1 Andrew W. Sandeen, USS Robert G. Bradley CTT2 Tyson J. Schmidt, USS Robert G. Bradley OS3 Bryan D. Shannon, USS Robert G. Bradley IT2 Joshua A. Shouse, USS Robert G. Bradley OS2 Joseph S. Sloan, USS Robert G. Bradley LS3 Wesley A. Snyder, USS Robert G. Bradley STG2 Nicholas M. Szczepanski, USS Robert G. Bradley GSE3 Terrence A. Tucker, USS Robert G. Bradley BM2 Anthony P. Woo, USS Robert G. Bradley CS2 Reginald Abernathy, USS Halyburton EM2 Jorge Apolo, USS Halyburton ET2 Jeromeroman Baca, USS Halyburton OS1 Johnnie Bernard, USS Halyburton BM3 Frank Charles, USS Halyburton IT3 Carey Clark, USS Halyburton GSM3 Shawn Curlee, USS Halyburton SH3 Clarence Curry, USS Halyburton IC3 Jonathan Deyoung, USS Halyburton GSE3 Jing Ding, USS Halyburton CTT2 Jonathan Edwards, USS Halyburton EN2 Timothy Golden, USS Halyburton ET2 Adam Gossett, USS Halyburton BM2 Julian Haylock, USS Halyburton STG2 Shane Johnson, USS Halyburton OS3 Jacob Jones, USS Halyburton GM2 Robert Lauser, USS Halyburton DC2 Matthew Lockamy, USS Halyburton YN2 Cliffard Lomax, USS Halyburton BM3 Mark Mcshane, USS Halyburton QM2 Sky Mcspadden, USS Halyburton CTT2 Daniel Moore, USS Halyburton GSM2 Seth Moore, USS Halyburton EM2 Joseph Rice, USS Halyburton STG2 Tyler Sarff, USS Halyburton GM2 Brandon Scullion, USS Halyburton FC2 Nickolas Sibert, USS Halyburton GSM3 Jonathan Slater, USS Halyburton IT3 Chester Sumbry, USS Halyburton OS2 Sebastian Tuanda, USS Halyburton MAYPORT 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 13

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Dec. 6: Magical Christmas: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Childrens games and crafts, Kids Performances and a Special Appearance by Santa. 270-5680 Dec. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Dec. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 7: Ugly Sweater Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band EXIT. Get into the holiday spirit and bust out your ugliest holiday sweater. free food, prizes and more. 270-7205 Dec. 8: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 2705451. Dec. 8: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Dec. 9: Kids Christmas Bingo 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $10 per person (includes bingo, hot dogs, soda, cook ies, and prize drawing). Special appearance by Santa. 270-7204 or 2705145 Dec. 11: Jingle Bell 5K/10K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Dec. 11: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Dec. 12: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Dec. 12: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the NAVSTA CPOA. For tickets, contact (904) 2705126 x3115. Dec. 19: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 13: Christmas Karaoke 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Lets celebrate the holiday season with karaoke with DJ Tom Turner. 270-7205 Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from 5%-50%. Baked goods by Dawn Ferreria and beverages will be served. 270-5380 Dec. 29: UFC 155: Dos Santos vs Velasquez 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 MWR KIDDec. 6: Magical Christmas: 6:308:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Childrens games and crafts, Kids Performances and a Santa appearance Dec. 7: Youth Sponsorship Teen Bonfire 5:30-8:30 p.m. behind Pizza Hut. Free food and drinks. 2490347 Dec. 9: Kids Christmas Bingo 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. $10 per person (includes bingo, hot dogs, soda, cookies, and prize drawing). Special appearance by Santa. 270-7204 or 270-5145 Dec. 13: Youth Drama Club Presents Its a Wonderful Life. 4:30 p.m. at the Youth Center. Dec. 15: Teen Trip to Avenues Mall. Depart Teen Center at 12:30 p.m.; return 5:30 p.m. Permission slip required. 246-0347 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 6: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Drink specials, half-price wings, music videos and light show! Dec. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 7: Ugly Sweater Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band EXIT. Get into the holiday spirit and bust out your ugliest holiday sweater. free food, prizes. Dec. 8: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside. Dec. 8: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Dec. 9: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New York Jets. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Dec. 10: Liberty Focus Group. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. We need your input and this is your chance to tell us what you think of your Liberty Program. Free refresh ments and attendees will be entered to win a prize. LIBERTY Klakring Wives Work For Biggest Loser-Photo by Paige GnannSonia Gomez, Laura Aceituno, Ruth La, Brandy Hampton get in a last minute workout on Nov. 30 before their husbands return to Naval Station Mayport with USS Klakring (FFG 42). The wives participated with other Klakring spouses in a Biggest Loser contest coordinated by Gomez, a certified personal trainer. Held from July 10 to Nov. 27, the spouses exercised, adjusted their eating habits and collaborated on menus. They started an online support group to share recipes, daily checkins and weight loss ideas. They worked out as a team as well as on their own. Gomez also coordinated weekly reward motivation gifts and collaborated with local make up artists hair dresses and photographers to hold a photo shoot of the spouses slimmer physiques. By the time the ship returned on Dec. 1, the spouses had lost a total of 219 pounds. I am very pleased to have been a part of their journey and proud to share a little of our world, hoping ou stories will inspire and encourage [others] to live a healthy lifestyle, Gomez said. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 15

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Coast Guardsmen Volunteer In AB, PVB U.S. Coast Guard Public AffairsCoast Guard men and women from two Jacksonville, Fla.,area units lent help ing hands by volunteer ing with Habitat for Humanity in Atlantic Beach, Fla., as well as the Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Restoration Project in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Nov. 30. Volunteers from Aids to Navigation Team Jacksonville Beach, Fla., helped attach roof sheet ing and siding to a Habitat for Humanity Wounded Warrior home off Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach. Contractors praised the Coast Guardsmen for their diligence and enthusiasm, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Christian Menendez, one of the volunteers. This was a great expe rience for us, and we look forward to help ing with a future build in conjunction with Wounded Warrior Project and Beaches Habitat for Humanity, Menendez added. A second group of Coast Guard volun teers, assigned to Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, spent Friday morn ing at Guanna Tolomato Matanzas Research Reserve in Ponte Vedra Beach collecting and bagging oyster shells, which will eventually be returned to the water to restore a lost shoreline and lure oysters to rebuild oyster beds where they once lived. -Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Zack Burgess Petty Officer 2nd Class Juan Caraballo and Fireman Jacob Owens of Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Team Jacksonville Beach, Fla., install roof sheeting to a Habitat for Humanity Wounded Warrior home off Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. Contractors praised the Coast Guardsmen for their dili gence and enthusiasm while volunteering. -U.S. Coast Guard photo Coast Guard men and women from Aids to Navigation Team Jacksonville Beach, Fla., volunteered at a Habitat for Humanity Wounded Warrior home off Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. The volunteers said they enjoyed their time working on the home and plan to volunteer again in the future. -Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael MorrealeCoast Guardsmen assigned to Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., collect and bag oyster shells while volunteering at Guanna Tolomato Matanzas Research Reserve in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. Their efforts were in support of the Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Restoration Project, with a goal of restoring a lost shoreline and luring oysters to rebuild oyster beds where they once lived.-Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael MorrealeCoast Guardsmen assigned to Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., volunteered to collect and bag oyster shells at Guanna Tolomato Matanzas Research Reserve in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. Their efforts were in support of the Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Restoration Project, with a goal of restoring a lost shoreline and luring oysters to rebuild oyster beds where they once lived. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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U.S. Coast Guard Public Affairs The Atlantic Beach, Fla.,-based Coast Guard Cutter Hammer and its crew celebrated 50 years of serving boaters and the public in the coast al waters of Florida and southern Georgia Nov. 29. The cutters crew dressed the ship a maritime tradition reserved for special occasions donned more formal uniforms for themselves and took a few minutes to reflect on the cutters past in honor of the milestone anniversary. Hammer is an inland construction tender homeported at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, is comprised of a 75-foot tug pushing a 68-foot barge and was placed in service Nov. 30, 1962, with a pri mary mission of marine construction of aids to navigation and piers. Equipped with a 70-foot crane and piledriving device, Hammer is manned by 14 enlist ed personnel who are responsible for approximately 1,400 fixed aids to navigation from Sapelo Sound in Georgia south to Melbourne, Fla., and the St. Johns River from Mayport, Fla., to Sanford, Fla. This area encompasses more than 420 miles of inland waterways. People often see us and wonder what we do, said Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott Kahle, offi cer in charge of Hammer. The improvements we make, along with the other local aids to navigation teams, provide a huge service to those who transit on the river and rely on the aids for safe navigation. Kahle served on the Hammer for three years from 2001 to 2004 as a second class petty officer and said hes extremely grateful and honored to be back as the officer in charge. He said although ATON is not the most glamor ous Coast Guard mission, its one of the oldest and has an enormous impact on the entire community, and the crewmembers know the value of their work. Throughout the last 50 years, the Hammer has gone through 18 changes of command, numerous engineering plant mod ernizations, and advances in navigational position ing from the use of sex tants to todays increased accuracy through the use of GPS. The cutters mission of providing safe and navi gable waterways for the public and commerce remains unchanged Although Hammer is primarily responsible for constructing and main taining aids to navigation, like all other cutters, it is a multi-mission asset and has been uti lized in many different ways. Some examples of these secondary missions are marine environmen tal protection; marine safety; law enforcement; and ports, waterways, and coastal security. Hammer was constructed by Gibbs Shipyard, Inc. in Jacksonville, Fla., but its original home port was Ft. Pierce, Fla. It was relocated to Sector Jacksonville in July 1986.-Photo by PO1 Lauren Jorgensen Atlantic Beach-based Coast Guard cutter celebrates 50 years of service Coast Guardsmen man the rails aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Hammer at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., in celebration of the cutters 50th year serv ing boaters and the public in the coastal waters of Florida and southern Georgia Nov. 29. Hammer joined the Coast Guards aids to navigation fleet Nov. 30, 1962, and was tasked primarily with marine construction of aids to navigation and piers, which its crew continues to do today. Atlantic Beach-Based Coast Guard Cutter Celebrates 50 Years Of ServiceFFSC Workshop, Class Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Dec. 6, 10-11 a.m., Craft Hour, USO Dec. 6, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 7, 6:30-9:30 p.m., IA Childrens Christmas Party, CPO Club Dec. 10, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Military Spouses 101 Workshop Building 1, Room 702 Dec. 10, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course Building 1 Room 1616 Dec. 11, 8-11 a.m., SAPR VA Refresher Course Building 1 Room 1616 Dec. 11, 1-3 p.m., CFS Forum, FFSC Room 1616 Dec. 11, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Dec. 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 13, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 702 Dec. 18, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Dec. 17-21, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Dec. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Dec. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Friday, Dec. 7 Mayor Alvin Brown invites residents to attend the inaugural Holiday at St. James celebration. The event will feature a craft bazaar from 11 a.m.-3 p.m in Hemming Plaza, carolers, crafts for kids, an evening open house at City Hall,117 West Duval St., and will culminate with a lighting of the St. James Holiday tree in Hemming Plaza from 4:30-7 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to come and experience St. James for the holidays. Event is free and open to the public. Call (904) 6303690 for application information. Saturday, Dec. 8 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural commu nities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 9 Celebrate Christmas at Christ United Methodist Churchs fourth annual Childrens Christmas Celebration and Cookie Cantata starting at 11:30 a.m. Homemade cook ies will be sold to support our various ministries. Crafts and fun activities will be available for chil dren and their families and a visit from the jolly old elf himself will high light the day. Join us in Wilson Fellowship Hall immediately following the choral cantata during the worship service. Call the church office at 249-5370 for information. www. neptunebeach-umc.org Children eat a pan cake breakfast with Santa & Mrs. Claus and then tell Santa what you want for Christmas at Isle of Faith UMC. Tickets are $3 for children, $5 adults and may be purchased at the door. Photos may be purchased. Two seat ings; 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Benefits the Isle of Faith Dominican Republic Medical Mission. Friday, Dec. 14 Duval County Extension Agency, 1010 N. McDuff Ave., will hold a Right Tree Right Place Workshop from 9 a.m.12:15 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. This seminar will demonstrate how to complete a project by learning the importance of knowing your land scape codes, understanding the planting site and the selecting of the right tree for the site. Whether you are a homeowner, HOA, developer, contrac tor, landscape architect, or government employee, this seminar will edu cate and enlighten you. Speakers include UF/ IFAS Extension Agents, JEA Arborist, and City of Jacksonville Code Enforcement. FNGLA and ISA CEUs available. Register online at: http:// www.fufc.org/rtrp_jack sonville_registration.html Or make checks out to Florida Urban Forestry Council and send to: Larry Figart, Duval County Extension, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32254 Saturday, Dec. 15 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This ranger-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR FRGs USS Halyburton family readiness group will meet from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Dec. 6. USS Simpson family readiness group will meet from 3-9 p.m. on Dec. 7. USS Carney family readiness group will meet from 9-1 p.m. on Dec. 8. USS Farragut family readiness group will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 11. USS Simpson family readiness group will meet from 3-9 p.m. on Dec. 13. USS Underwood family readiness group will meet from 6-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 20. No Dough Dinner USO will hold a No Dough Dinner from 5-7 p.m. on Dec. 10. Pizza, salad and dessert will be on the menu. Closed For Holiday USO will be closed Dec. 22-25 for the holidays. It will reopen on Dec. 26 from 9-4 p.m. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 6, 2012 17

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