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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00276


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Goes Big For Classic-Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardCountry music band Little Big Town perform at the Navy and Marine Corps Classic pre-basketball game concert for servicemembers and their families at the Naval Station Mayport, as part of the Week of Valor tribute. The game honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. Americas away team, the Navy and Marine Corps are reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, and above and below the sea as well ashore. Join the conversation in social media using #BBallOnDeck. Navy-Marine Corps Classic Held On Bataans Flight Deck USS Bataan Public AffairsSailors aboard the multipurpose amphibi ous assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) attended the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgetown Hoyas, Nov. 9. However, before the players could finish the contest, condensation on the court caused officials to stop the game out of concern for player safety. The game came to a close after 20 minutes of play ing time with the Florida Gators leading 27 to 23. We wanted to play, Georgetown Coach John Thompson III told reporters. We saw a lot of things I thought we could capitalize on in the second half. But once I walked from the baseline to half-court, I realized this is not a safe surface. The kids safety, both their team and our team, means too much. Over the course of the preceding week, Bataans flight deck was trans formed from a launch ing and landing zone for six different types of aircraft during flight quarters, to a basket ball court with bleach ers holding more than 1,000 people. The NavyMarine Corps Classic was the highlight of the city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Jacksonville and the surrounding communi ties have a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. The Week -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFans show their appreciation for military veterans by holding up signs during the Navy Marine Corps Classic game played onboard the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). See Classic, Page 17New Program Gives Sailors Flexibility In Timing Transition To ReservesFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy announced a new program Nov. 5 to allow greater flexibil ity for enlisted Sailors transitioning from Active Duty or Full Time Support to the Selected Reserve. According to NAVADMIN 329/12, the Active Component (AC) and Full Time Support (FTS) to Selected Reserve Delayed Affiliation Program (DAP) allows Sailors to delay in-rate affilia tion with the Reserve Component (RC) for up to six months after their Soft Expiration of Active Service (SEAOS) through a quota reser vation system. The program is tar geted towards Sailors who desire a delay in their affiliation into the Selected Reserves (SELRES), or who are unable to obtain a SELRES in-rate per form to serve (PTS) quota at SEAOS. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the DAP pro gram is designed to See Reserve, Page 15 -Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardSailors aboard the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) watch the Navy-Marine Corps Classic 2012 basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and Georgetown University Hoyas at Naval Station Mayport. Mayport Commissary will be open on Monday, Nov. 19 from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and closed on Thursday, Nov. 22. The Commissary will also be open on Monday, Dec. 24 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and closed on Tuesday, Dec. 25.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Public education is supported only by local (primarily property tax revenues), state, and federal funding. Most school districts rely heavily on these resources to support educational programming classroom instruction, extracurricular activities, faculty training, transpor tation, administrative ser vices and so much more. Our current economic conditions have placed most families, businesses, and governmental agen cies in the difficult posi tion of having to operate under severe budgetary constraints. Tighter bud gets have placed people and organizations in the position of having to scale down and, in some cases, eliminate services all together. School districts are no exception. Like most states, Florida has suffered the loss of tax and federal revenues. As a result, Governor Scott and state legislators have looked for ways to main tain state programs and services while monitoring an ever-shrinking budget. The Duval County School System has had to bear its share of these budgetary woes. Education leaders in the 16 states who are members of the Southern Regional Education Board, including Florida and Georgia, are working on various ways to deal with the economic chal lenges but its not easy! The federal government recognizes that districts like Duval County face added economic pres sure because real prop erty (land) in this area has been purchased for use by the military. This means that the county government is positioned to lose property tax rev enue which it might oth erwise have earned if the federal government had not acquired the prop erty. Compensation for this loss, known as Impact Aid, is paid for federal property which is used to support military installa tions, low-income hous ing, Indian lands, and for children whose parents who work on or live on federal property. To be eligible to receive Highly Impacted federal funds, a school district must have at least 40% of its student population con sidered federally con nected. In order to qualify for these funds, the local school district must verify the numbers of students served by its local schools. Each year, at the same time, local schools send home an FAP card and ask parents to complete it based on whether they are active duty military and/or work or live on federal property. There are some long-standing myths associated with the cards use. I will try to address some of those issues: The schools are making money off of our children NOT TRUE! Administered by the U.S. Department of Education, the Impact Aid program is one of the oldest edu cation programs, dating from 1950. Like most federal programs, it was fully funded in its early years. However, since about the mid-1970s, the program has been under funded. This means that local school districts, while receiving some fed eral funding, are still NOT being fully compensated for the costs of the educational services they pro vide. They are collecting too much personal infor mation one place. NOT TRUE! In fact, the infor mation which parents provide on the FAP card is basic contact informa tion and work-related information. Parents are not asked questions about salary or family income, nor are they asked to provide social security num bers or other important identifying data. If I do not return the FAP card, my childs school will know that I am angry about...NOT TRUE! Not complet ing the FAP card does not affect a districts or schools decisions about policies or procedures. Withholding the FAP card only denies the local dis trict the much needed funding required to maintain programs and ser vices. Its too much work to fill out all these forms again! NOT TRUE! Completing the FAP card will only take a moment. While it is true that EVERY child in a family will receive an FAP card, parents will quickly real ize there are a few simple questions which can be answered in two maybe three minutes. What else is needed? A signature! The FAP cards have already gone home with Duval students. Parents need to complete a sepa rate form for each child. And REMEMBER TO DOUBLE CHECK THE BACK OF THE CARD. Students at Finegan Elementary returning their cards will receive a special treat!!!! Without accurate numbers, the schools could miss out on grant opportunities such as the one granted to Mayport Middle School. DoDEAs Promoting Student Achievement at Schools Impacted by Military Force Structure Changes Grant earned by Mayport Middle School has allowed the school to enhance student achieve ment in science, technol ogy, engineering, math ematics, English language arts, and reading. A large portion of the grant has ensured integration of technology into the cur riculum. Teachers have had opportunities to strengthen their content knowledge and instruc tional skills through pro fessional development targeted to the new cur riculum. To qualify, a school must have a significant military student popula tion to meet the eligibility requirement. Specifically, elementary schools must have a military student population of least 25 percent and secondary schools must have a mili tary student population of at least 15 percent. So before Duval Schools can submit a grant appli cation to DoDEA, they must determine if these schools meet the eligibil ity criteria. Please com plete your FAP card. If you have misplaced it, please call the school for a replacement. Schools will begin returning cards to the district office in late November. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Support Federal Funding Of Local SchoolsTurn In Federal Assistance Program CardsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingEvery year the obser vance of Christmas seems to be coming earlier and earlier. As I write this Chaplains Corner we are barely into November and already the malls are putting up decora tions and displays, play ing Christmas music, and pushing products. I can certainly understand the excitement. There is a certainly a reason to cel ebrate Christmas. However, the ongoing focus on the marketplace creates a misunderstand ing of what Christmas is really about a season to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Furthermore it causes us to gloss over Thanksgiving and we jump right into the frantic world of non-stop shop ping and holiday parties. My wife recently saw the following post on Facebook, Black Friday: Because only in America, people trample others for sales exactly one day after being thankful for what they already have. While that statement may exaggerate our actu al behavior and inac curately reflect us indi vidually, the statement is certainly a compelling enough indictment of our culture. Bombarded by ads and the latest mov ies and gadgets, the day is defined by stuffing ourselves, taking a quick nap, then vying for a spot in the long line in front of Best Buy. The value system that shapes our observance of this holiday today is a far cry from the first Thanksgiving the Pilgrims observed, where the emphasis was to give thanks as opposed to what is on sale? The subtle truth in the humor ous Facebook post should cause us to pause. What actually are our thoughts, attitudes, and behavior towards things and other people? Next week we will be celebrating Thanksgiving. It is a day we are sup posed to be grateful for the blessings in life and a time to offer thanks to God. Even though things may not be perfect in our lives I am certain we can all find something we can be thankful for. Because Thanksgiving is only allotted one day on the official calendar, I think we move on too quickly and give in too willingly to our consum er appetite and simply let the media shape our expectations. We should be counting our blessings, and not how many hours are left till the outlet mall opens at midnight for Black Friday. This year, be deliber ate about Thanksgiving. Before you jump into the meal, identify your bless ings and share them with others. Invite your family and friends to do the same. Talk about what you are truly thankful for. Encourage one another to go beyond the consumer ism that shapes our every day, and embrace a life of thankfulness. The attitude we should be expressing on Thanksgiving Day should actually be the posture of our hearts daily. Thanksgiving should be a way of life! The Psalmist in the Bible says, I will bless the Lord at all times;his praise shall continually be in my mouth (Psalm 34:1, English Standard Version). My hope and prayer for you this year for Thanksgiving is simple: pray and give thanks to God for the many bless ings in life and make thankfulness a part of your daily living. In my family, before our big meal, we take a moment every Thanksgiving to read passages from the Bible and offer a prayer of Thanksgiving from the Book of Common Prayer. Below is a Thanksgiving prayer you may want to share and use in your own Thanksgiving celebrations this year: Accept, O Lord, our thanks and praise for all that you have done for us. We thank you for the splendor of the whole cre ation, for the beauty of this world, for the wonder of life, and for the mystery of love. We thank you for the blessing of family and friends, and for the lov ing care which surrounds us on every side. We thank you for setting us at tasks which demand our best efforts, and for leading us to accomplish ments which satisfy and delight us. We thank you also for those disappoint ments and failures that lead us to acknowl edge our dependence on you alone. Above all, we thank you for your Son Jesus Christ; for the truth of his Word and the example of his life; for his steadfast obedience, by which he over came temptation; for his dying, through which he overcame death; and for his rising to life again, in which we are raised to the life of your king dom. Grant us the gift of your Spirit, that we may know him and make him known; and through him, at all times and in all plac es, may give thanks to you in all things. Amen. Happy Thanksgiving, Mayport!Thanksgiving Isnt One Day, Its Way Of LifeCmdr. Jerome Cayangyang NS Mayport Chaplain CHAPLAINSFrom Mayport ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapels Catholic and Protestant communi ties are inviting all active, reserve, retired, DoD civilian families and singles to join them for a Thanksgiving dinner on Sunday, Nov. 18. Dinner with the tradi tional turkey, ham, stuff ing, and desserts will be served at 12:00pm in our outside classroom area. There is no cost for this dinner. Please RSVP to Alline Zwarycz either by call ing 270-5212 or e-mailing alline.zwarycz@navy.mil by Thursday, Nov. 15. Thanksgiving Dinner Invite From Chapel Catholic Charities USAPromoting social justice and human services since 1910A CFC participant. Provided as a public service1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Photo: Steve Liss, AmericanPoverty.org

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Mayport Holds Resident Energy Town HallThe Mirror editorDozens of residents from Naval Station Mayport got the oppor tunity to ask questions and voice concerns about the new Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) during three town hall meetings held on base last week. Slated to begin early 2013, RECP is part of the Office of the Secretary of Defenses (OSD) policy to make privatized mili tary housing more ener gy efficient. RECP was developed by the Navy to support the OSD efforts. For NS Mayport, the program will only affect homes located on base. Homes in the Ribault Bay Community will not be a part of the program. The town hall meetings gave base Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, and a team from Base Housing and Balfour Beatty a chance to explain what Housing res idents could expect from the new program. For the past few months, Balfour Beatty Communities has gath ered energy consumption information from the base housing units to provide a power consumption baseline. The baseline is based on like housing types and sizes, said Balfour Beatty Community Manager John Armstrong. That means a two-story renovated building would not be included in the baseline for a one-story unrenovated house. There are 15 like type hous ing groups broken down by neighborhood, size, construction type, stories above grade and type of dwelling (single family, duplex, townhome, etc.), he said. And if a home has been unoccupied or only par tially occupied during a month, it will not be included in that baseline. Each month, the average is calculated to come up with the baseline which will also Residents will begin to receive a monthly util ity usage report, or mock bill, in February designed to educate them on how much energy they con sume each month com pared to the baseline. You cant save, or you cant conserve, until you know what youre spend ing, Cochrane said during the Town Hall. Thats the bottom line of what Im going to tell you. And the base has already established tools to help residents iden tify energy-saving meth ods with a federal grant awarded to NS Mayport from the Department of Energy. Cochrane urged resi dents to sign up for Switch4Good, a pilot program provided by WattzOn, Yes Energy and Balfour Beatty. The Switch4Good, monitored by WattzOn, program allows Housing residents to have a Home energy coach visit their house and offer per sonalized energy sav ing tips;sign up for text or twitter messages with energy saving alerts; and be help NS Mayport win a Community Awards program grant for $500 for the community that reaches its energy saving goal. Anja Jacobs, Client Services director with Yes Energy, the company con tracted to perform meter reading, data, collection and billing, was also at the town hall meeting to answer questions about residents potentially pay ing for their utilities if they use too much or getting a rebate for energy con servation. Each month, the Navy sets a rate that it will pay for each residents utility use. Residents that stay within a buffer zone of 10 percent above and below the baseline, will not pay for their utilities. Those who go over the 10 per cent maximum, will have to pay the difference of cost. If the Navy allots $110 per month and the residents bill is $135, then the resident will be responsible for the addi tional $25. On the other hand, residents whose energy conservation keeps them below the bottom 10 per cent buffer zone can earn a refund that can be kept in a rainy day account or paid out to the resident. Jacobs said that the bills will also include a web site that residents can visit to get up to the minute information about their energy consumption. Weve had a lot of resi dents that make it a game to see how much they can save, she said. To sign up for Switch4Good, call 1800314-5997 or go to www. switch4good.net -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, talks with Housing residents during a town hall meeting held Nov. 6 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center.Residents Urged To Sign Up For Switch 4 Good Initiative Working together for stronger, healthier babiesa CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Vicksburg, HSM-46 Come HomeFrom USS VicksburgGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) returned to Mayport on Nov. 5 after an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of mari time security opera tions and theater security cooperation efforts. While in 5th Fleet, she served as Air Defense Commander for the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and served as Maritime Regional Air Defense Commander for the Arabian Sea and Arabian Gulf. Vicksburg, along with Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46 Detachment Six, traveled more than 24,000 miles and made seven port visits including Athens, Bahrain, Dubai, and Lisbon. Operationally, Vicksburg and Detachment Six flew more than 1,300 flight hours over the course of their deployment more than any other ship/detachment team on the East Coast. Vicksburg Sailors took advantage of the long deployment by improving their skills and advancing their careers. During deployment, 45 Sailors were advanced to the next paygrade, six officers were promoted, 48 Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare pins, and 11 officers achieved Surface Warfare Officer qualifica tion. Additionally, 25 Sailors reenlisted during deploy ment. Vicksburg will enjoy a well-deserved post-deploy ment leave period before resuming operations in the CTF 80 area of operations in December. -Photo by MCSN Damian BergChief Fire Controlman Shayne Campisi, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), greets his sons during the ships homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. Vicksburg completed a successful and final deployment after operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MCSN Damian BergFire Controlman1st Class Gregory Bosworth, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), meets his two-month old son for the first time during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by MCSN Damian BergGunners Mate 1st Class Norven Shultz, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), hugs his wife after returning from an eight-month deployment. -Photo by MCSN Damian BergFamily and friends await the arrival of their loved ones aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. By Paige GnannUSS Vicksburg Sailors and their Tigers wave to friends and family members waiting on the pier during the ships homecoming celebration.By Paige GnannWith a bunch of roses in hand, Electronics Technician 2nd Class Aaron Keller reunites with his wife Kristen pierside after returning to NS Mayport with USS Vicksburg.By Paige GnannChildren hold up signs to welcome home their father who is returning to Naval Station Mayport with USS Vicksburg.By Paige GnannBoatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Jesse Dixon is welcomed home by his wife, Christina during USS Vicksburgs homecoming celebration on Nov. 5.By Paige GnannNew dad Electronics Technician 3rd Class Ryan Healey kisses his wife Jenna after meeting his five-month-old daughter Grace for the first time.By Paige GnannSonar Technician Surface Seaman Karel Moyer holds his wife Jess after finding her pierside during USS Vicksburgs homecoming celebration.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 5 Tigers On Vicksburg Vicksburg Public AffairsU.S. Navy Sailors assigned to guided-mis sile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) arrived in at Mayport Naval Station on Nov. 5 after an eightmonth deployment to the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. During the last three days of deployment, Vicksburg embarked 82 Tigers, family and friends of Vicksburg Sailors. Over the course of their transit from Yorktown, Va., to homeport, the Tigers were able to see firsthand what Vicksburg and her crew has done for the past eight months as the ship was able to show case special evolutions and equipment. Engineering Department allowed Tigers access to one main propulsion engine and one gas generator mod ule, helped Tigers don firefighting gear, and demonstrated the ships maximum speed and ability to stop in short dis tances while using all four main propulsion engines. Weapons Department shot a Mk-45 54-caliber 5-inch gun, the Phalanx Close In Weapon System, and a 25mm gun. My favorite part was seeing my brother, but besides that, I really enjoyed the gun shoot which was something I saw for the first time, Ray Brobst, brother of execu tive officer Cmdr. Carl Brobst said. For lunch, a classic Navy steel beach picnic was served by Supply Department Culinary Specialists and Food Service Attendants. The Tigers were also assigned a Personal Qualification Standard (PQS). In order to receive a Tiger Surface Warfare pin, they had to complete tasks such as tying knots, opening a hatch, and steering at the helm. Sharing the Navy tra dition of knot-tying with the Tigers was a fun expe rience. Some caught on easier than others, but overall I think everyone got something out of it, said Seaman Corey Lentz. The crew was excited to have their loved ones aboard. When Vicksburg pulled into the Mayport basin, more than 1,500 family and friends greeted them on the pier. By Paige GnannSailors aboard USS Vicksburg take pictures and search the crowd for friends and family waiting for them as the ship pulls pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport from an eight month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.By Paige GnannNew dad Electronic Technician 2nd Class Jan Nicholson reunites with his family pierside during USS Vicksburgs homecoming.By Paige GnannVicksburg Tigers bus to the ship in Yorktown, Va., to be a part of USS Vicksburgs final leg of deployment.By Paige GnannNew dad Chief Engineman Jeremy Mayfield gives a big hug to his daughter Hannah, 3, before meeting his newest son, 6-week-old Finnegan.By Paige GnannEngineman 2nd Class (SW)Alex Black gets a welcome home kiss from his wife, Heather, as other crewmembers of USS Vicksburg disembark the ship during its homecoming celebration on Nov. 5.By Paige GnannGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class (SW) Trent Zywicki holds tight to his wife Courtney after returning to NS Mayport Nov. 5 with USS Vicksburg.

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Mayport FFSC Schedule Set For NovemberFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Nov. 15, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 19, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Nov. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 20, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 26-29, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Nov. 27, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 27, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 29, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Friday, Nov. 15 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association Unit #290 will hold a steak dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Road. Donation is $10. Open to the pub lic and take out orders are welcome by calling 2466855. Saturday, Nov. 17 To celebrate the fouryear anniversary of its grand opening, the Jacksonville Arboretum & Gardens will host Much Ado about Nature, a fam ily friendly event from 9 a.m. 1 p.m. The days activities will feature: Bees and Beekeeping lecture with the Arboretums beekeeper, Tony Hogg. All about Wildflowers lecture with Terry Zinn of Wildflowers of Florida Owl Encounter by Lesley Royce, featuring Merlin the barred owl Displays by Duval Audubon Society & Tree Hill Nature Center Guided nature walks along the Arboretums trails Arboretum member ships, wildflower seeds, honey, hive products, T-Shirts and other mer chandise will also be available. The event is free to Arboretum mem bers and children under 18 and $5 for non-mem ber adults. All chil dren (under 18) must be accompanied by an adult and no dogs are allowed. For more information on the Arboretum, please visit www.jacksonvil learboretum.org or our Facebook page. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., presents Words of Art: A Childrens Book Fair & Literacy Family Day from 12 to 4 p.m. Join us to meet your favorite Jacksonville authors and illustrators, while shopping for sto rybooks, picture books and graphic novels. Take part in a scavenger hunt, a studio art project, gal lery tours and Make Art Now! in the Gardens. This annual event will also feature hourly celebrity readings, music by Ajamu Mutima and a theatrical presentation of Emmas House of Sound. For more information, please call The Cummer Store at (904) 899-6035. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m for a presentation and leisurely guided hike through different Florida ecosystems on a quest to characterize tracks left by an assortment of critters. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Tuesday, Nov. 20 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be a Slide show presentation and narration of photos from BPCs Key West Trip. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Saturday, Nov. 24 Find out from a park ranger at 2 p.m what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so important. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary. The Jacksonville Light Parade will be held at 7 p.m. The event will be held in partnership with private organizations and local supporters, similar to the 2011 event. The City of Jacksonville invites boat captains and crews to register for the 2012 Jacksonville Light Parade. Registration is free. Boaters interested in participating can visit the website www.makeas cenedowntown.com for registration information.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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RGB Underway -Photos by ET1 Daniel K. Raley Above, Seaman Sean R. Gallagher oper ates the MK 38 Mod 1 25mm during a firing exercise aboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) while Gunners Mate 1st Class Lacarlos D. Knighten and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Bert G. Lynch provide guidance. Right, Engineman 2nd Class Edward J. Burgess of USS Robert G. Bradley references the Engineering Operating Sequencing System (EOSS) while responding to a engineering casualty drill. Port Engineers Get Formal CertificationFrom CNSLIn an early November ceremony conducted at Naval Station Mayport, 14 Mayport-based U.S. Navy Port Engineers were awarded formal certifica tion. Joe Marques, the Mayport Senior Port Engineer, presided at the ceremony where details of the U.S. Navy Port Engineer Certification program were explained. U.S. Navy Port Engineers must pass 110 exami nations on Core Knowledge topics and be certified in 47 Core Evolutions before being awarded working level certification. U.S. Navy Port Engineers are profes sional marine engineers who are civilian members of the Naval Surface Force Type Commanders staff. They are permanently assigned to individu al ships to oversee the administration of mainte nance. Port Engineer Certification is a new feature of the Navys 32-year-old Port Engineer program. Certification is designed to document each Port Engineers pro fessional qualifications in light of the serious responsibility that they shoulder. -Photo submittedDon Doyle (left) is presented with his Level IV Port Engineer Certification by Mayport Senior Port Engineer Joe Marques (right). The new certification program documents the Port Engineers qualifications. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Life At Sea Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Devon Marohl, from Oshkosh, Wis., cleans parts from a .50-caliber machine gun aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photos by MCSN Darien G. KenneyLogistics Specialist 2nd Class James Harris trains Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Ana Valentin on processing mail aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 9

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Mayport Vice Assists Rescue At SeaFrom HSL-48While on a routine 4th Fleet patrol in the Eastern Pacific, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) Four Eight Detachment Two, Mayport Vice, spotted a 40-foot fishing vessel adrift more than 80 miles from the nearest shore line. The crew of the distressed vessel, Hashu Antigua Costo, attempted to signal the approach ing helicopter by wav ing white sheets, mak ing smoke, and writing AUXILIO, Spanish for Help, on the deck. Observing the dis tressed fishermens behavior, VENOM 502 radioed back to USS Carr. Carr altered course and proceeded more than 40 nautical miles at max speed to assist the ves sel in distress. As Carr steamed towards the drifting fishing vessel, the helicopter remained over head and guided the ship into position. Once Carr arrived on scene, Sailors on board spoke with the fisher men and discovered they had been drifting for nine days without power and were surviving on small rations of rice and water. The captain of the vessel stated their water pump had failed and the engine had overheated before they were able to make it to shore. The crew had seen several vessels while adrift and had exhausted their supply of flares, yet was unsuccessful in get ting any vessels to stop and render assistance. The fishermen, origi nally from Vacamonte, Panama, had drifted more than 190 miles before being rescued. The crew of the vessel said that they attempted to contact four merchant ships with flares and mir rors, but received no help. They were rationing their food and water but were quickly running out; one of the crew members stated that he thought they were going to die, said special agent Carlos Castro, who is assigned to Carr. The captain of the ves sel also stated that the crew had given up hope of being rescued since their water was almost gone, their batteries were drained, and their supply of flares was exhausted. Carrs rescue and assis tance team conducted an inspection of the ves sels engine and found the water pump drive belt had failed, the ves sel was low on fuel and lubricating oil, and both marine batteries were completely drained. Carr supplied the four mem bers of the crew with food and water, replaced the drive belt, provided fuel, replenished their oil and charged both of their bat teries. Once the batteries were returned, the engine started and the vessel began to proceed toward the Panamanian coast. Carr followed the ves sel throughout the night to ensure there were no more issues and at first light, delivered more fuel and lube oil to ensure the vessel could make it the approximately 60 miles back to Panamanian waters. Over my two years in command of Carr, we have provided support to several vessels in distress. I am always impressed by the ability and profes sionalism of Carrs Sailors and helicopter detach ment. stated Carrs Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Patrick Kulakowski. It is very satisfying to know that we helped some mariners return to their families today. Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) Four Eight Detachment Two is homeported in Mayport, Fla., and USS Carr is homeported in Norfolk, Va. The units are current ly deployed in support of Operation Martillo, under operational con trol to U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and C4F (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) while conducting operations for Combat Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) in sup port of Joint Interagency Task Force South, U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM), and U.S. Coast Guard District Eleven. -Photo courtesy of HSL-48A makeshift distress sign reading Auxilio Estamos, (Help Us in Spanish) alerts the aircrew of HSL-48 Detachment Two to the need of the distressed vehicle, Hashu Antigua Costo. The 40-foot fishing vessel had been adrift for nine days without power. Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 11

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Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWRSwing And Hit For Salt Water Cowboys From MWRHarbor Ops Salt Water Cowboys softball team came out to win this week for the play-offs. The season tournament started Monday with De Wert 45 bringing down the undefeated Desron 14 in a close 7-6 victory. The Sullivans Lucky Charms werent so lucky as they fell short against Phil Sea Wardawgs with a final score of 28-11. Salt Water Cowboys took down the Marines Devil Dogs 25-6 and HSM 40 Airwolves sent SERMC Village Idiots back to the locker room with their 19-15 win. On Tuesday, the Wardawgs sent home De Wert 45 home in a 27-21 finish. Salt Water Cowboys sent the Airwolves off the field with a close 18-17 victory. The final game between Cowboys and De Wert stayed tight for the first six innings before the Salt Water Cowboys brought out the big guns in the seventh inning, firing six home runs and scoring 15 runs to win the tour nament with a final score of 26-14 Championship game. This brings the 2012 Sports season to a close. Captains Cup sports will begin again in January with the new Kickball league. Look for the 2013 Sports Calendar coming out this December. For more information on sports contact Rita at 904-270-5451.-Photo courtesy of MWRHarbor Ops Salt Water Cowboys are the 2012 Mayport softball championship. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Nov. 17: UFC 154: Pierre vs. Condit. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Nov. 21: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Nov. 23: Day After Thanksgiving Bowling Specials. 3 different spe cials, all day at Mayport Bowling Center. Daytime Special: 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus a lb. burger or hot dog with chips and a soda $10. Evening Special: 5-8 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus one item of Fast Lanes Grille Menu and a soda $13. Late Night Special: 8-11 p.m. 2 hours of Showtime Rock & Bowl, laser light show, and special drink specials $10. 270-5377 Nov. 23: Black Friday at Beachside Bingo. 6:30 p.m. Join us on Black Friday for specials, dou ble payouts and more. 270-7204 Nov. 16: No Shave November 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Upper Limit, free food, give aways and best/worst mustache contest. 2707205 Nov. 28: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. To purchase tickets in advance, please call (904) 270-5431. MWR The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Nov. 16: No Shave November 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Upper Limit, free food, give aways and best/worst mustache contest. 2707205 Nov. 17: UFC 154: Pierre vs. Condit. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Nov. 17: Jamfest Car and Truck Show. Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Transportation Only. Nov. 18: Sea World Orlando. Van departs 7:30 a.m. FREE with Salute to Military ticket. Sign up deadline Nov. 15. Nov. 19: First Base Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. Nov. 20: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 20: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Nov. 19. Nov. 21: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 21: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Nov. 22: Black Friday Shopping. Van departs 11 p.m. Transportation Only. Nov. 23: Day After Thanksgiving Bowling Specials. 3 different spe cials, all day at Mayport Bowling Center. Daytime Special: 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus a lb. burger or hot dog with chips and a soda $10. Evening Special: 5-8 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus one item of Fast Lanes Grille Menu and a soda $13. Late Night Special: 8-11 p.m. 2 hours of Showtime Rock & Bowl, laser light show, and spe cial drink specials $10. 270-5377 Nov. 24: Kennedy Space Center Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline Nov. 20. Nov. 25: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Tennessee Titans. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Nov. 26: Laser Tag. 7-9 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free. Nov. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 28: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. To purchase tickets in advance, please call (904) 270-5431. Nov. 29: Texas Holdem Tournament. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways. Nov. 30: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. LIBERTYNov. 16: Freedom FridayHarvest Festival 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 Nov. 30: Family Game Night 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Child must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 270-5680 KID Turkey Trot 5K Run Date ChangeFrom MWRDue to the construction project at the gym, the Turkey Trot 5K run has been rescheduled to Tuesday Nov. 20 with a start time of 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. For more information contact Rita Hammerstad at 904-270-5451.MWR Facilities Closed For ThanksgivingFrom MWRSeveral MWR facilities will be closed on Nov. 22 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.Closed facili ties include Auto Skills, Beachside Community Center, Castaways/Computer Cove, Bingo, Business Office/ Admin/Personnel, Child Development Centers/Child Development Homes, Mayport Bowling Center, ITT/ Recreation Ticket Vehicle, Ocean Breeze Conference Center/CPO Club, Pelican Roost RV Park, Pizza Hut, Pool, Outdoor Adventures, Recycling/Vehicle Storage, Surfside Fitness, Youth Activities/Teen Center. Facilities closed on Nov. 23 include Auto Skills, Business Office/Admin/Personnel, ITT/Recreation Ticket Vehicle, Ocean Breeze Conference Center/CPO Club, Outdoor Adventures, Pool, Recycling/Vehicle Storage and Surfside Fitness. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

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USS Bataan Marches On In Honor Of Fallen Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment Det. SoutheastSailors and Marines paid homage to two survivors of the WWII Bataan Death March during a ceremony held aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5) as a part of the city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor, Nov. 8. This ship was commis sioned in 1997 to honor the sacrifices of those who have gone before us, said Capt. Erik Ross, com manding officer of USS Bataan. The ceremony hon ored Donato Abalos and Patricio Ganio, both of whom marched nearly 60-miles during a forc ible transfer of more than 70,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war by the Imperial Japanese Army. The march followed the threemonth Battle of Bataan in the Philippines. These two individu als sacrificed, said Ross. Their dedication, their courage, their persever ance, and most remark able in my opinion, their humility in a time where humility is rare. Both of you are true heroes. During the march, many prisoners died from abuse, murder or exhaus tion while others were not given food or water until they had reached Balanga, the capital of Bataan. These acts of her oism were not lost on the crew attending the cer emony. I felt very honored to see them because everything they went through was extreme ly dangerous, said Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) Airman Apprentice Elizabeth Blanco. The reason why we honor them today is not only because our ship is named after their strug gle, but because there is a sense of pride and you have to be proud. Being in the Navy I am proud to serve my country, proud to wear the uniform. Whether its speaking to others about serving in the military or work ing long hours during flight operations. I want to thank them for giving us an example to do the same. I am happy to be here. After the ceremony, the service members were able shake hands with the survivors and many were moved by the experience. I was extremely hum bled and honored to be in the presence of real war heroes that in these days you dont come across that to much, said Lance Cpl. Ian Delacruz sta tioned in Camp Lejuene, N.C. To have the opportuni ty to hear what they have gone through and sur vived is very heartwarm ing. Im infantry so our job is to be on the front lines and put ourselves at risk. To hear what they have done, Im just hon ored to be able to shake their hands and when I did, I dont know if this is the right way to say it, but it just felt right. I feel like we are in the same line of work and they are my pre decessors. Im proud to be here today to pick up were they left off. Battan is the sec ond ship to be named in honor of the march. The first was USS Bataan (CVL-29/AVT-4), which was originally planned as USS Buffalo, but was renamed on June 2, 1942 after the tragedy occurred. A translator added that Ganio and Abalos were proud to be recognized after all of these years and were very thankful for the opportunity to there. Up In The Goodyear Blimp -Photo by Paige GnannMC1 John Parker takes a photo of Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Lindsey Hunter of USS Vicksburg during a ride in the Goodyear Blimp on Nov. 8 as a way for the company to say thank you to service members. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Sailors, Veterans Support Week Of ValorNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsMore than 50 activeduty service members and veterans from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport and other area military commands visit ed 70 elementary, middle and high school class rooms Nov. 5-9 in support of the Week of Valor. The city-sponsored initiative, Week of Valor, is designed to showcase Jacksonville as one of the most military-friendly cit ies in the country. Volunteers visited class rooms in small groups and spoke to students about what it means to serve in the military. They also stressed the importance of observing Veterans Day. According to Suzanne Speight, a public affairs special ist with Navy Region Southeast who coordi nated the visits, the efforts of those who volunteered are invaluable to main taining a good relation ship with the community. The Navy and the mili tary are such a big part of the First Coast commu nity and it is so important for people to know who we are and what we do, she said. Speight said she appre ciated the efforts of ser vice members from Blount Island Command and Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, as well. This was a tremendous joint effort with Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, along with veterans from the retired community, she said. Throughout the week, the groups spoke to students in dozens of schools, sharing personal experiences in the mili tary, views on Veterans Day and their own school-day experiences. They also answered hun dreds of questions about their careers and the mili tary in general. We were treated to a wonderful Veterans Day presentation dur ing our communitys Week of Valor, said Khaki Hager, an eighthgrade history teacher at Mandarin Middle School. Lieutenant Wilhelm, Lieutenant Commander Lazenka and Lieutenant Verducci spoke to our team of students and gave a fantastic presenta tion filled with valuable information. Our students learned so much and we know they are better prepared today for their futures. Southeast Region Master Chief Mack Ellis said he takes great pride in knowing that his Sailors had a positive impact on the students. In my opinion, our Sailors and Marines wear the cloth of our nation. Were role models and mentors for our youth, he said. We need to real ize the impact and the difference we can make by providing inspiration to the youth of our country. They are our future leaders and we need to be at the forefront of their development. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown spoke in a similar tone during his opening remarks at a military appreciation lun cheon Nov. 8. Our military and vet erans community already has given so much to our nation. Its an inspiring sight to see these brave men and women con tinue to give back in our schools, Brown said. This outreach effort is about pairing the leaders of today with the leaders of tomorrow. He also expressed his gratitude to the 900-plus veterans, active duty military members and military leaders in atten dance. Its always a humbling thought to think about the sacrifices made by the men and women of our military, Brown said. Im honored to work with so many dedicated business leaders and community partners to say thank you for their service and dedi cation. This years Week of Valor was the first time Jacksonville has hosted such an event, but the city plans to make it an annu al occasion. In addition to school speaking engage ments, the Week of Valor also featured a military appreciation luncheon, a job fair, a Veterans Day Parade, the Navy-Marine Corps Carrier Classic college basketball game between Florida and Georgetown aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5), and a military appreciation football game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts. -Photo courtesy of City of JacksonvilleIT2 William Hales and IT2 Jonathan Beckham from COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt and AC1 Floyd Nichols from NAS JAX pose with Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and staff mem bers, during a Week of Valor school visit at Highlands Middle School. Hales, Beckham and Nichols were part of a group of more than 50 Sailors from area commands who vis ited schools during the week of Nov. 5, to share personal experiences and talk about the meaning and history of Veterans Day.streamline Sailors tran sition between reserve and active service, while enabling the Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warf ighting needs. DAP enables this con tinuum by offering par ticipating Sailors a flex ible affiliation option, and helping to solidify Sailors reserve affiliation deci sions by providing them a predictable SELRES start date. By allowing Sailors more ability to time their transition into the reserves, this program will allow greater flexibility for Active and FTS Sailors to extend their Navy careers, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military personnel plans and policy. Not only will this program benefit our people, it also enables our Navy to retain the skills and talents of our highlytrained and experienced Sailors, making us more ready to meet the mis sion. Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP up to 90 days prior to their SEAOS through their chain of command. All separating AC and FTS Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP. Sailors will have up to six months from their AC/ FTS separation to affiliate with the SELRES. The number and timing of Sailors selected will be determined based on cur rent and projected man ning needs for the given rating. Sailors must also meet the age, service time, and physical qualifica tions required of all those entering the SELRES. In return for a quota reservation, Sailors shall satisfactorily participate in a Voluntary Training Unit (VTU) or a Variable Participation Unit (VPU) of the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). While in the IRR, Sailors may take advantage of continued benefits such as Servicemembers Group Life Insurance, access to base commis saries and exchanges, and use of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation services. Full details of the DAP program, including the process, requirements, and timeline are found in NAVADMIN 329/12 and MILPERSMAN 1133-062.From Page 1Reserve THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 15

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NAVFACSE Help Make Classic PossibleFrom NAVFACSENaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast employees worked hard oto bring the NavyMarine Corps Classic to Naval Station Mayport. The Classic was held Nov. 9 on board USS Bataan (LHD 5), a mul tipurpose amphibious assault ship. This is absolutely a first in my career, a really unique opportunity, said NS Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez. To both, see a production like this get put together, and to do it on a Navy warship of this size is extraordinary. Set-up for the event included construction of approximately 3,500 tem porary seats, a NCAA regulation basketball court, and infrastructure to sup port production (sound, video display boards, lighting) and broadcast (camera towers). To make this event a reality took nearly three months of production planning, logistical and security coordination, and countless site visits. Since Friday, Nov. 2, a contractor workforce of nearly 60 people have worked 10-12 hour days, in close coordination with the Bataan and NS Mayport personnel, to put the site together. Dieguez, NAVFAC Southeasts project offi cer for the game, became involved in preparations early on when the idea was first presented to the Secretary of the Navy to hold a college basketball game on a U.S. Navy war ship aboard NS Mayport. The NAVFAC team, approximately 30 person nel, handled everything from real estate contract ing to forming agree ments with the city of Jacksonville, leases for the ship, and a license agree ment for the real property on NS Mayport. Dieguezs team also worked the utilities and infrastructure sup port, basically anything that touches the physical plant of the base. His team coordinated with safety and the engineers from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to ensure the game day complex (bleachers, bas ketball court, sound sys tem, etc.) were safe and built to specifications. It makes me feel proud, said Dieguez. This is such a huge opportunity for both the U.S. Navy and the city of Jacksonville to put their best foot forward. Last years Quicken Loans Carrier Classic was hosted on the USS Carl Vinsons (CVN 70) flight deck in San Diego, Calif. This years event also featured a concert by Little Big Town and fan fest with food and bever age venders and military equipment static displays in the parking lot adjacent to USS Bataans mooring. Thirty-five hundred fans got a birds eye view of the basketball game, from bleachers erected 70 to 100 feet above sea level on the Bataans flight deck, but another 12,000 or so spectators enjoyed watching the game on large video monitors set up in the concert and stat ic display venue below. Danny Williams, NS Mayport Crane Program Manager and NAVFAC Southeast employee, directed the approximate ly 200 crane lifts required to get the equipment needed aboard the USS Bataan to build a basket ball stadium. Williams said it took about 30 hours using two cranes to prioritize and lift the disassembled bleachers, basketball court and other items to the flight deck of Bataan. Williams comment ed that it wasnt all that extraordinary of a job for him. He has completed similar operations many times when CVNs (carri ers) were home-ported at NS Mayport. He did say that it was unique com pared to normal port operations. We [were] happy to support ... and every thing [went] smoothly said PWD Mayport Production Officer Lt. Cheron Thornton. She was responsible for work ing the support issues between the Bataan and the base. Her team provided cranes, vehicles and utilities (power) to the ship. The NAVFAC team worked closely with sev eral contractors to put this all together. Jacksonvilles Presentation Resources Incorporated (PRI) Productions is the com pany leading the produc tion efforts for the event. PRI is coordinating with companies Sounds Good Audio (SGA) and SMG (formerly Spectacor Management Group) Jacksonville to set up the bleachers and the basket ball court respectively. Everybody has been fantastic. I could not be happier the interaction between the Navy, the pier, the ship, the Captain of the Bataan, everyone has been exceptionally fabulous to work with, said Steven Flatt of PRI. This is the first time the Navy has done some thing like this in coordi nation with a city gov ernment, said Dieguez. In this case, the city of Jacksonville is putting up the financial resources to make this happen. It real ly speaks well of the city of Jacksonville they really love having the military here. -Photo by Matt Simons, NAVFAC Southeast public affairs assistantNaval Station Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez (left) speaks with a contractor during setup efforts on the flightdeck of USS Bataan Nov 5, 2012. Dieguez is Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast's project officer for the game. USS Bataan (LHD 5), hosted the NCAA men's basketball game between the University of Florida and Georgetown Nov. 9. NAVFAC Southeast employees were integral to the effort to set-up for the event. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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of Valor honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. Jacksonville has always been a great Navy town, said the Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV). We are moving an amphibi ous ready group, includ ing a ship like this, to Jacksonville. It is one of the ways we connect the ship to the city and the U.S. Navy to the American people, because when we are doing our job we are usually a long way from home. During the first half of the game, the audience got an inside look at Navy life when the SECNAV reenlisted seven Sailors. After the re-enlistment oath, players from both teams shook the hands of the re-enlistees. Fewer than one per cent of America serves in the uniform, they keep the other 99 percent of us safe, said SECNAV. These seven Sailors who reenlisted are some of the best we have. Thank you everyone for making this event pos sible, said Thompson. Thank you for hosting us, and to all the Sailors who represent us out here. Its been an unbelievable experience for our guys just to be a part of this event and the fact that the game is ending doesnt take away from that. Many of the players from both teams agreed the game was a small way for them to give back to the Sailors who defend America. Its an amazing expe rience just to have the opportunity to come out here on a ship, said Otto Porter, team member of the Georgetown Hoyas. Its just one of those things where we got to come out here and sup port the Navy and soldiers back home. Sailors also savored the experience of the NavyMarine Corps basketball game. I thought the game was wonderful, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) Seaman(SW) Brianna Williams, a Bataan Sailor. I was amazed that they turned our ship into a stadium. The city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor presented Sailors with many lasting experiences, including watching the Jacksonville Jaguars practice and play a game against the Indianapolis Colts, par ticipating in a community relations project, and a free concert by country band Little Big Town. From Page 1Classic-Photo by MC2 Gary A. Prill The University of Florida Gators and Georgetown University Hoyas play basketball on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). Bataan hosted the event put on by the city of Jacksonville, which along with its surrounding communities has a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. Georgetown Hoyas, UF Gators Tour Bataan USS Battan Public AffairsPlayers from the University of Florida Gators and Georgetown University Hoyas mens basketball team toured the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), Nov. 8. The teams will play in the Navy Marine Corps Classic basketball game held on the ships flight deck, Nov. 9, during the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor while the ship is in port Naval Station Mayport. The tour was a rare opportunity for both the players and the Sailors aboard Bataan. Its a once-in-alifetime experience, said Brandon Bolden, power forward for the Georgetown University Hoyas. Not many people get to stand on top of the flight deck who are not part of the Navy. Im soak ing it in. The ships crew got a chance to meet the play ers as they toured the ships hangar bay and flight deck. It was really exciting, said Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) Airman Jarrett Keller, a Bataan Sailor. It is good to meet all the players and I think it is just as cool for them to meet us. The teams learned more about the ship they will be competing on. We wanted the play ers to embrace being able to play basketball here, and also what Bataan is about, her capabilities, and being in this Navy environment, said Ensign Romeo Garcia, a Bataan tour guide. The basketball players are curious about how the upcoming game will turn out with the court being in this unique location. Im just trying to get used to being in here, standing on a ship on the water, and playing on a court thats not on the ground, said Bolden. The warm-up is going to tell us how the game is going to be. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) the Honorable Ray Mabus performs a re-enlistment ceremony on basketball court constructed on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). The game honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. America's away team, the Navy and Marine Corps are reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, and above and below the sea as well ashore. Join the conversation in social media using #BBallOnDeck. -Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardMaster Chief Aviation Technician George Lean, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL 60), grills burgers during the Navy and Marine Corps Classic pre-basketball game concert for servicemembers and their families at the Naval Station Mayport as part a Week of Valor tribute. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyUniversity of Florida Gators center Patric Young talks with Ensign Romeo Garcia in the hangar bay of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 17

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Goes Big For Classic-Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardCountry music band Little Big Town perform at the Navy and Marine Corps Classic pre-basketball game concert for servicemembers and their families at the Naval Station Mayport, as part of the Week of Valor tribute. The game honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. Americas away team, the Navy and Marine Corps are reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, and above and below the sea as well ashore. Join the conversation in social media using #BBallOnDeck. Navy-Marine Corps Classic Held On Bataans Flight Deck USS Bataan Public AffairsSailors aboard the multipurpose amphibi ous assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) attended the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgetown Hoyas, Nov. 9. However, before the players could finish the contest, condensation on the court caused officials to stop the game out of concern for player safety. The game came to a close after 20 minutes of play ing time with the Florida Gators leading 27 to 23. We wanted to play, Georgetown Coach John Thompson III told reporters. We saw a lot of things I thought we could capitalize on in the second half. But once I walked from the baseline to half-court, I realized this is not a safe surface. The kids safety, both their team and our team, means too much. Over the course of the preceding week, Bataans flight deck was trans formed from a launch ing and landing zone for six different types of aircraft during flight quarters, to a basket ball court with bleach ers holding more than 1,000 people. The NavyMarine Corps Classic was the highlight of the city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Jacksonville and the surrounding communi ties have a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. The Week -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFans show their appreciation for military veterans by holding up signs during the Navy Marine Corps Classic game played onboard the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). See Classic, Page 17New Program Gives Sailors Flexibility In Timing Transition To ReservesFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy announced a new program Nov. 5 to allow greater flexibility for enlisted Sailors transitioning from Active Duty or Full Time Support to the Selected Reserve. According to NAVADMIN 329/12, the Active Component (AC) and Full Time Support (FTS) to Selected Reserve Delayed Affiliation Program (DAP) allows Sailors to delay in-rate affilia tion with the Reserve Component (RC) for up to six months after their Soft Expiration of Active Service (SEAOS) through a quota reser vation system. The program is tar geted towards Sailors who desire a delay in their affiliation into the Selected Reserves (SELRES), or who are unable to obtain a SELRES in-rate per form to serve (PTS) quota at SEAOS. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the DAP program is designed to See Reserve, Page 15 -Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardSailors aboard the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) watch the Navy-Marine Corps Classic 2012 basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and Georgetown University Hoyas at Naval Station Mayport. Mayport Commissary will be open on Monday, Nov. 19 from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and closed on Thursday, Nov. 22. The Commissary will also be open on Monday, Dec. 24 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and closed on Tuesday, Dec. 25.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Public education is supported only by local (primarily property tax revenues), state, and federal funding. Most school districts rely heavily on these resources to support educational programming classroom instruction, extracurricular activities, faculty training, transpor tation, administrative ser vices and so much more. Our current economic conditions have placed most families, businesses, and governmental agen cies in the difficult posi tion of having to operate under severe budgetary constraints. Tighter budgets have placed people and organizations in the position of having to scale down and, in some cases, eliminate services all together. School districts are no exception. Like most states, Florida has suffered the loss of tax and federal revenues. As a result, Governor Scott and state legislators have looked for ways to main tain state programs and services while monitoring an ever-shrinking budget. The Duval County School System has had to bear its share of these budgetary woes. Education leaders in the 16 states who are members of the Southern Regional Education Board, including Florida and Georgia, are working on various ways to deal with the economic chal lenges but its not easy! The federal government recognizes that districts like Duval County face added economic pres sure because real prop erty (land) in this area has been purchased for use by the military. This means that the county government is positioned to lose property tax rev enue which it might oth erwise have earned if the federal government had not acquired the prop erty. Compensation for this loss, known as Impact Aid, is paid for federal property which is used to support military installa tions, low-income hous ing, Indian lands, and for children whose parents who work on or live on federal property. To be eligible to receive Highly Impacted federal funds, a school district must have at least 40% of its student population con sidered federally con nected. In order to qualify for these funds, the local school district must verify the numbers of students served by its local schools. Each year, at the same time, local schools send home an FAP card and ask parents to complete it based on whether they are active duty military and/or work or live on federal property. There are some long-standing myths associated with the cards use. I will try to address some of those issues: The schools are making money off of our children NOT TRUE! Administered by the U.S. Department of Education, the Impact Aid program is one of the oldest edu cation programs, dating from 1950. Like most federal programs, it was fully funded in its early years. However, since about the mid-1970s, the program has been under funded. This means that local school districts, while receiving some federal funding, are still NOT being fully compensated for the costs of the educational services they pro vide. They are collecting too much personal infor mation one place. NOT TRUE! In fact, the infor mation which parents provide on the FAP card is basic contact informa tion and work-related information. Parents are not asked questions about salary or family income, nor are they asked to provide social security num bers or other important identifying data. If I do not return the FAP card, my childs school will know that I am angry about...NOT TRUE! Not complet ing the FAP card does not affect a districts or schools decisions about policies or procedures. Withholding the FAP card only denies the local dis trict the much needed funding required to maintain programs and ser vices. Its too much work to fill out all these forms again! NOT TRUE! Completing the FAP card will only take a moment. While it is true that EVERY child in a family will receive an FAP card, parents will quickly real ize there are a few simple questions which can be answered in two maybe three minutes. What else is needed? A signature! The FAP cards have already gone home with Duval students. Parents need to complete a sepa rate form for each child. And REMEMBER TO DOUBLE CHECK THE BACK OF THE CARD. Students at Finegan Elementary returning their cards will receive a special treat!!!! Without accurate numbers, the schools could miss out on grant opportunities such as the one granted to Mayport Middle School. DoDEAs Promoting Student Achievement at Schools Impacted by Military Force Structure Changes Grant earned by Mayport Middle School has allowed the school to enhance student achieve ment in science, technol ogy, engineering, math ematics, English language arts, and reading. A large portion of the grant has ensured integration of technology into the cur riculum. Teachers have had opportunities to strengthen their content knowledge and instruc tional skills through pro fessional development targeted to the new cur riculum. To qualify, a school must have a significant military student popula tion to meet the eligibility requirement. Specifically, elementary schools must have a military student population of least 25 percent and secondary schools must have a mili tary student population of at least 15 percent. So before Duval Schools can submit a grant appli cation to DoDEA, they must determine if these schools meet the eligibil ity criteria. Please com plete your FAP card. If you have misplaced it, please call the school for a replacement. Schools will begin returning cards to the district office in late November. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Support Federal Funding Of Local SchoolsTurn In Federal Assistance Program CardsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingEvery year the obser vance of Christmas seems to be coming earlier and earlier. As I write this Chaplains Corner we are barely into November and already the malls are putting up decora tions and displays, play ing Christmas music, and pushing products. I can certainly understand the excitement. There is a certainly a reason to cel ebrate Christmas. However, the ongoing focus on the marketplace creates a misunderstand ing of what Christmas is really about a season to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Furthermore it causes us to gloss over Thanksgiving and we jump right into the frantic world of non-stop shop ping and holiday parties. My wife recently saw the following post on Facebook, Black Friday: Because only in America, people trample others for sales exactly one day after being thankful for what they already have. While that statement may exaggerate our actu al behavior and inac curately reflect us indi vidually, the statement is certainly a compelling enough indictment of our culture. Bombarded by ads and the latest mov ies and gadgets, the day is defined by stuffing ourselves, taking a quick nap, then vying for a spot in the long line in front of Best Buy. The value system that shapes our observance of this holiday today is a far cry from the first Thanksgiving the Pilgrims observed, where the emphasis was to give thanks as opposed to what is on sale? The subtle truth in the humorous Facebook post should cause us to pause. What actually are our thoughts, attitudes, and behavior towards things and other people? Next week we will be celebrating Thanksgiving. It is a day we are sup posed to be grateful for the blessings in life and a time to offer thanks to God. Even though things may not be perfect in our lives I am certain we can all find something we can be thankful for. Because Thanksgiving is only allotted one day on the official calendar, I think we move on too quickly and give in too willingly to our consum er appetite and simply let the media shape our expectations. We should be counting our blessings, and not how many hours are left till the outlet mall opens at midnight for Black Friday. This year, be deliber ate about Thanksgiving. Before you jump into the meal, identify your blessings and share them with others. Invite your family and friends to do the same. Talk about what you are truly thankful for. Encourage one another to go beyond the consumerism that shapes our every day, and embrace a life of thankfulness. The attitude we should be expressing on Thanksgiving Day should actually be the posture of our hearts daily. Thanksgiving should be a way of life! The Psalmist in the Bible says, I will bless the Lord at all times;his praise shall continually be in my mouth (Psalm 34:1, English Standard Version). My hope and prayer for you this year for Thanksgiving is simple: pray and give thanks to God for the many bless ings in life and make thankfulness a part of your daily living. In my family, before our big meal, we take a moment every Thanksgiving to read passages from the Bible and offer a prayer of Thanksgiving from the Book of Common Prayer. Below is a Thanksgiving prayer you may want to share and use in your own Thanksgiving celebrations this year: Accept, O Lord, our thanks and praise for all that you have done for us. We thank you for the splendor of the whole cre ation, for the beauty of this world, for the wonder of life, and for the mystery of love. We thank you for the blessing of family and friends, and for the lov ing care which surrounds us on every side. We thank you for setting us at tasks which demand our best efforts, and for leading us to accomplishments which satisfy and delight us. We thank you also for those disappoint ments and failures that lead us to acknowl edge our dependence on you alone. Above all, we thank you for your Son Jesus Christ; for the truth of his Word and the example of his life; for his steadfast obedience, by which he over came temptation; for his dying, through which he overcame death; and for his rising to life again, in which we are raised to the life of your king dom. Grant us the gift of your Spirit, that we may know him and make him known; and through him, at all times and in all places, may give thanks to you in all things. Amen. Happy Thanksgiving, Mayport!Thanksgiving Isnt One Day, Its Way Of LifeCmdr. Jerome Cayangyang NS Mayport Chaplain CHAPLAINSFrom Mayport ChapelNaval Station Mayport Chapels Catholic and Protestant communi ties are inviting all active, reserve, retired, DoD civilian families and singles to join them for a Thanksgiving dinner on Sunday, Nov. 18. Dinner with the tradi tional turkey, ham, stuff ing, and desserts will be served at 12:00pm in our outside classroom area. There is no cost for this dinner. Please RSVP to Alline Zwarycz either by call ing 270-5212 or e-mailing alline.zwarycz@navy.mil by Thursday, Nov. 15. Thanksgiving Dinner Invite From Chapel Catholic Charities USAPromoting social justice and human services since 1910A CFC participant. Provided as a public service1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Photo: Steve Liss, AmericanPoverty.org

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Mayport Holds Resident Energy Town HallThe Mirror editorDozens of residents from Naval Station Mayport got the oppor tunity to ask questions and voice concerns about the new Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) during three town hall meetings held on base last week. Slated to begin early 2013, RECP is part of the Office of the Secretary of Defenses (OSD) policy to make privatized mili tary housing more ener gy efficient. RECP was developed by the Navy to support the OSD efforts. For NS Mayport, the program will only affect homes located on base. Homes in the Ribault Bay Community will not be a part of the program. The town hall meetings gave base Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, and a team from Base Housing and Balfour Beatty a chance to explain what Housing residents could expect from the new program. For the past few months, Balfour Beatty Communities has gath ered energy consumption information from the base housing units to provide a power consumption baseline. The baseline is based on like housing types and sizes, said Balfour Beatty Community Manager John Armstrong. That means a two-story renovated building would not be included in the baseline for a one-story unrenovated house. There are 15 like type hous ing groups broken down by neighborhood, size, construction type, stories above grade and type of dwelling (single family, duplex, townhome, etc.), he said. And if a home has been unoccupied or only par tially occupied during a month, it will not be included in that baseline. Each month, the average is calculated to come up with the baseline which will also Residents will begin to receive a monthly util ity usage report, or mock bill, in February designed to educate them on how much energy they con sume each month com pared to the baseline. You cant save, or you cant conserve, until you know what youre spend ing, Cochrane said during the Town Hall. Thats the bottom line of what Im going to tell you. And the base has already established tools to help residents iden tify energy-saving meth ods with a federal grant awarded to NS Mayport from the Department of Energy. Cochrane urged resi dents to sign up for Switch4Good, a pilot program provided by WattzOn, Yes Energy and Balfour Beatty. The Switch4Good, monitored by WattzOn, program allows Housing residents to have a Home energy coach visit their house and offer per sonalized energy sav ing tips;sign up for text or twitter messages with energy saving alerts; and be help NS Mayport win a Community Awards program grant for $500 for the community that reaches its energy saving goal. Anja Jacobs, Client Services director with Yes Energy, the company contracted to perform meter reading, data, collection and billing, was also at the town hall meeting to answer questions about residents potentially pay ing for their utilities if they use too much or getting a rebate for energy con servation. Each month, the Navy sets a rate that it will pay for each residents utility use. Residents that stay within a buffer zone of 10 percent above and below the baseline, will not pay for their utilities. Those who go over the 10 per cent maximum, will have to pay the difference of cost. If the Navy allots $110 per month and the residents bill is $135, then the resident will be responsible for the addi tional $25. On the other hand, residents whose energy conservation keeps them below the bottom 10 percent buffer zone can earn a refund that can be kept in a rainy day account or paid out to the resident. Jacobs said that the bills will also include a web site that residents can visit to get up to the minute information about their energy consumption. Weve had a lot of residents that make it a game to see how much they can save, she said. To sign up for Switch4Good, call 1800314-5997 or go to www. switch4good.net -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, talks with Housing residents during a town hall meeting held Nov. 6 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center.Residents Urged To Sign Up For Switch 4 Good Initiative Working together for stronger, healthier babiesa CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Vicksburg, HSM-46 Come HomeFrom USS VicksburgGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) returned to Mayport on Nov. 5 after an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of mari time security opera tions and theater security cooperation efforts. While in 5th Fleet, she served as Air Defense Commander for the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and served as Maritime Regional Air Defense Commander for the Arabian Sea and Arabian Gulf. Vicksburg, along with Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46 Detachment Six, traveled more than 24,000 miles and made seven port visits including Athens, Bahrain, Dubai, and Lisbon. Operationally, Vicksburg and Detachment Six flew more than 1,300 flight hours over the course of their deployment more than any other ship/detachment team on the East Coast. Vicksburg Sailors took advantage of the long deployment by improving their skills and advancing their careers. During deployment, 45 Sailors were advanced to the next paygrade, six officers were promoted, 48 Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare pins, and 11 officers achieved Surface Warfare Officer qualification. Additionally, 25 Sailors reenlisted during deployment. Vicksburg will enjoy a well-deserved post-deploy ment leave period before resuming operations in the CTF 80 area of operations in December. -Photo by MCSN Damian BergChief Fire Controlman Shayne Campisi, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), greets his sons during the ships homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. Vicksburg completed a successful and final deployment after operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MCSN Damian BergFire Controlman1st Class Gregory Bosworth, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), meets his two-month old son for the first time during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by MCSN Damian BergGunners Mate 1st Class Norven Shultz, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), hugs his wife after returning from an eight-month deployment. -Photo by MCSN Damian BergFamily and friends await the arrival of their loved ones aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. By Paige GnannUSS Vicksburg Sailors and their Tigers wave to friends and family members waiting on the pier during the ships homecoming celebration.By Paige GnannWith a bunch of roses in hand, Electronics Technician 2nd Class Aaron Keller reunites with his wife Kristen pierside after returning to NS Mayport with USS Vicksburg.By Paige GnannChildren hold up signs to welcome home their father who is returning to Naval Station Mayport with USS Vicksburg.By Paige GnannBoatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Jesse Dixon is welcomed home by his wife, Christina during USS Vicksburgs homecoming celebration on Nov. 5.By Paige GnannNew dad Electronics Technician 3rd Class Ryan Healey kisses his wife Jenna after meeting his five-month-old daughter Grace for the first time.By Paige GnannSonar Technician Surface Seaman Karel Moyer holds his wife Jess after finding her pierside during USS Vicksburgs homecoming celebration.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 5 Tigers On Vicksburg Vicksburg Public AffairsU.S. Navy Sailors assigned to guided-mis sile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) arrived in at Mayport Naval Station on Nov. 5 after an eightmonth deployment to the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. During the last three days of deployment, Vicksburg embarked 82 Tigers, family and friends of Vicksburg Sailors. Over the course of their transit from Yorktown, Va., to homeport, the Tigers were able to see firsthand what Vicksburg and her crew has done for the past eight months as the ship was able to showcase special evolutions and equipment. Engineering Department allowed Tigers access to one main propulsion engine and one gas generator mod ule, helped Tigers don firefighting gear, and demonstrated the ships maximum speed and ability to stop in short dis tances while using all four main propulsion engines. Weapons Department shot a Mk-45 54-caliber 5-inch gun, the Phalanx Close In Weapon System, and a 25mm gun. My favorite part was seeing my brother, but besides that, I really enjoyed the gun shoot which was something I saw for the first time, Ray Brobst, brother of execu tive officer Cmdr. Carl Brobst said. For lunch, a classic Navy steel beach picnic was served by Supply Department Culinary Specialists and Food Service Attendants. The Tigers were also assigned a Personal Qualification Standard (PQS). In order to receive a Tiger Surface Warfare pin, they had to complete tasks such as tying knots, opening a hatch, and steering at the helm. Sharing the Navy tra dition of knot-tying with the Tigers was a fun experience. Some caught on easier than others, but overall I think everyone got something out of it, said Seaman Corey Lentz. The crew was excited to have their loved ones aboard. When Vicksburg pulled into the Mayport basin, more than 1,500 family and friends greeted them on the pier. By Paige GnannSailors aboard USS Vicksburg take pictures and search the crowd for friends and family waiting for them as the ship pulls pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport from an eight month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.By Paige GnannNew dad Electronic Technician 2nd Class Jan Nicholson reunites with his family pierside during USS Vicksburgs homecoming.By Paige GnannVicksburg Tigers bus to the ship in Yorktown, Va., to be a part of USS Vicksburgs final leg of deployment.By Paige GnannNew dad Chief Engineman Jeremy Mayfield gives a big hug to his daughter Hannah, 3, before meeting his newest son, 6-week-old Finnegan.By Paige GnannEngineman 2nd Class (SW)Alex Black gets a welcome home kiss from his wife, Heather, as other crewmembers of USS Vicksburg disembark the ship during its homecoming celebration on Nov. 5.By Paige GnannGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class (SW) Trent Zywicki holds tight to his wife Courtney after returning to NS Mayport Nov. 5 with USS Vicksburg.

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Mayport FFSC Schedule Set For NovemberFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Nov. 15, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 19, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Nov. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 20, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 26-29, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Nov. 27, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 27, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 29, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Friday, Nov. 15 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association Unit #290 will hold a steak dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Road. Donation is $10. Open to the pub lic and take out orders are welcome by calling 2466855. Saturday, Nov. 17 To celebrate the fouryear anniversary of its grand opening, the Jacksonville Arboretum & Gardens will host Much Ado about Nature, a family friendly event from 9 a.m. 1 p.m. The days activities will feature: Bees and Beekeeping lecture with the Arboretums beekeeper, Tony Hogg. All about Wildflowers lecture with Terry Zinn of Wildflowers of Florida Owl Encounter by Lesley Royce, featuring Merlin the barred owl Displays by Duval Audubon Society & Tree Hill Nature Center Guided nature walks along the Arboretums trails Arboretum member ships, wildflower seeds, honey, hive products, T-Shirts and other mer chandise will also be available. The event is free to Arboretum mem bers and children under 18 and $5 for non-mem ber adults. All chil dren (under 18) must be accompanied by an adult and no dogs are allowed. For more information on the Arboretum, please visit www.jacksonvil learboretum.org or our Facebook page. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., presents Words of Art: A Childrens Book Fair & Literacy Family Day from 12 to 4 p.m. Join us to meet your favorite Jacksonville authors and illustrators, while shopping for sto rybooks, picture books and graphic novels. Take part in a scavenger hunt, a studio art project, gal lery tours and Make Art Now! in the Gardens. This annual event will also feature hourly celebrity readings, music by Ajamu Mutima and a theatrical presentation of Emmas House of Sound. For more information, please call The Cummer Store at (904) 899-6035. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m for a presentation and leisurely guided hike through different Florida ecosystems on a quest to characterize tracks left by an assortment of critters. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Tuesday, Nov. 20 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be a Slide show presentation and narration of photos from BPCs Key West Trip. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Saturday, Nov. 24 Find out from a park ranger at 2 p.m what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so important. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary. The Jacksonville Light Parade will be held at 7 p.m. The event will be held in partnership with private organizations and local supporters, similar to the 2011 event. The City of Jacksonville invites boat captains and crews to register for the 2012 Jacksonville Light Parade. Registration is free. Boaters interested in participating can visit the website www.makeascenedowntown.com for registration information.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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RGB Underway -Photos by ET1 Daniel K. Raley Above, Seaman Sean R. Gallagher operates the MK 38 Mod 1 25mm during a firing exercise aboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) while Gunners Mate 1st Class Lacarlos D. Knighten and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Bert G. Lynch provide guidance. Right, Engineman 2nd Class Edward J. Burgess of USS Robert G. Bradley references the Engineering Operating Sequencing System (EOSS) while responding to a engineering casualty drill. Port Engineers Get Formal CertificationFrom CNSLIn an early November ceremony conducted at Naval Station Mayport, 14 Mayport-based U.S. Navy Port Engineers were awarded formal certifica tion. Joe Marques, the Mayport Senior Port Engineer, presided at the ceremony where details of the U.S. Navy Port Engineer Certification program were explained. U.S. Navy Port Engineers must pass 110 exami nations on Core Knowledge topics and be certified in 47 Core Evolutions before being awarded working level certification. U.S. Navy Port Engineers are profes sional marine engineers who are civilian members of the Naval Surface Force Type Commanders staff. They are permanently assigned to individu al ships to oversee the administration of maintenance. Port Engineer Certification is a new feature of the Navys 32-year-old Port Engineer program. Certification is designed to document each Port Engineers pro fessional qualifications in light of the serious responsibility that they shoulder. -Photo submittedDon Doyle (left) is presented with his Level IV Port Engineer Certification by Mayport Senior Port Engineer Joe Marques (right). The new certification program documents the Port Engineers qualifications. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Life At Sea Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Devon Marohl, from Oshkosh, Wis., cleans parts from a .50-caliber machine gun aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). -Photos by MCSN Darien G. KenneyLogistics Specialist 2nd Class James Harris trains Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Ana Valentin on processing mail aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 9

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Mayport Vice Assists Rescue At SeaFrom HSL-48While on a routine 4th Fleet patrol in the Eastern Pacific, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) Four Eight Detachment Two, Mayport Vice, spotted a 40-foot fishing vessel adrift more than 80 miles from the nearest shore line. The crew of the distressed vessel, Hashu Antigua Costo, attempted to signal the approach ing helicopter by wav ing white sheets, mak ing smoke, and writing AUXILIO, Spanish for Help, on the deck. Observing the dis tressed fishermens behavior, VENOM 502 radioed back to USS Carr. Carr altered course and proceeded more than 40 nautical miles at max speed to assist the ves sel in distress. As Carr steamed towards the drifting fishing vessel, the helicopter remained overhead and guided the ship into position. Once Carr arrived on scene, Sailors on board spoke with the fisher men and discovered they had been drifting for nine days without power and were surviving on small rations of rice and water. The captain of the vessel stated their water pump had failed and the engine had overheated before they were able to make it to shore. The crew had seen several vessels while adrift and had exhausted their supply of flares, yet was unsuccessful in get ting any vessels to stop and render assistance. The fishermen, origi nally from Vacamonte, Panama, had drifted more than 190 miles before being rescued. The crew of the vessel said that they attempted to contact four merchant ships with flares and mirrors, but received no help. They were rationing their food and water but were quickly running out; one of the crew members stated that he thought they were going to die, said special agent Carlos Castro, who is assigned to Carr. The captain of the ves sel also stated that the crew had given up hope of being rescued since their water was almost gone, their batteries were drained, and their supply of flares was exhausted. Carrs rescue and assis tance team conducted an inspection of the ves sels engine and found the water pump drive belt had failed, the ves sel was low on fuel and lubricating oil, and both marine batteries were completely drained. Carr supplied the four mem bers of the crew with food and water, replaced the drive belt, provided fuel, replenished their oil and charged both of their batteries. Once the batteries were returned, the engine started and the vessel began to proceed toward the Panamanian coast. Carr followed the ves sel throughout the night to ensure there were no more issues and at first light, delivered more fuel and lube oil to ensure the vessel could make it the approximately 60 miles back to Panamanian waters. Over my two years in command of Carr, we have provided support to several vessels in distress. I am always impressed by the ability and profes sionalism of Carrs Sailors and helicopter detach ment. stated Carrs Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Patrick Kulakowski. It is very satisfying to know that we helped some mariners return to their families today. Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) Four Eight Detachment Two is homeported in Mayport, Fla., and USS Carr is homeported in Norfolk, Va. The units are currently deployed in support of Operation Martillo, under operational con trol to U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and C4F (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) while conducting operations for Combat Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) in sup port of Joint Interagency Task Force South, U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM), and U.S. Coast Guard District Eleven. -Photo courtesy of HSL-48A makeshift distress sign reading Auxilio Estamos, (Help Us in Spanish) alerts the aircrew of HSL-48 Detachment Two to the need of the distressed vehicle, Hashu Antigua Costo. The 40-foot fishing vessel had been adrift for nine days without power. Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 11

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Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWRSwing And Hit For Salt Water Cowboys From MWRHarbor Ops Salt Water Cowboys softball team came out to win this week for the play-offs. The season tournament started Monday with De Wert 45 bringing down the undefeated Desron 14 in a close 7-6 victory. The Sullivans Lucky Charms werent so lucky as they fell short against Phil Sea Wardawgs with a final score of 28-11. Salt Water Cowboys took down the Marines Devil Dogs 25-6 and HSM 40 Airwolves sent SERMC Village Idiots back to the locker room with their 19-15 win. On Tuesday, the Wardawgs sent home De Wert 45 home in a 27-21 finish. Salt Water Cowboys sent the Airwolves off the field with a close 18-17 victory. The final game between Cowboys and De Wert stayed tight for the first six innings before the Salt Water Cowboys brought out the big guns in the seventh inning, firing six home runs and scoring 15 runs to win the tour nament with a final score of 26-14 Championship game. This brings the 2012 Sports season to a close. Captains Cup sports will begin again in January with the new Kickball league. Look for the 2013 Sports Calendar coming out this December. For more information on sports contact Rita at 904-270-5451.-Photo courtesy of MWRHarbor Ops Salt Water Cowboys are the 2012 Mayport softball championship. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Nov. 17: UFC 154: Pierre vs. Condit. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Nov. 21: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Nov. 23: Day After Thanksgiving Bowling Specials. 3 different spe cials, all day at Mayport Bowling Center. Daytime Special: 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus a lb. burger or hot dog with chips and a soda $10. Evening Special: 5-8 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus one item of Fast Lanes Grille Menu and a soda $13. Late Night Special: 8-11 p.m. 2 hours of Showtime Rock & Bowl, laser light show, and special drink specials $10. 270-5377 Nov. 23: Black Friday at Beachside Bingo. 6:30 p.m. Join us on Black Friday for specials, dou ble payouts and more. 270-7204 Nov. 16: No Shave November 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Upper Limit, free food, give aways and best/worst mustache contest. 2707205 Nov. 28: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. To purchase tickets in advance, please call (904) 270-5431. MWR The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Nov. 16: No Shave November 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Upper Limit, free food, give aways and best/worst mustache contest. 2707205 Nov. 17: UFC 154: Pierre vs. Condit. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Nov. 17: Jamfest Car and Truck Show. Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Transportation Only. Nov. 18: Sea World Orlando. Van departs 7:30 a.m. FREE with Salute to Military ticket. Sign up deadline Nov. 15. Nov. 19: First Base Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. Nov. 20: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 20: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Nov. 19. Nov. 21: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 21: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Nov. 22: Black Friday Shopping. Van departs 11 p.m. Transportation Only. Nov. 23: Day After Thanksgiving Bowling Specials. 3 different spe cials, all day at Mayport Bowling Center. Daytime Special: 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus a lb. burger or hot dog with chips and a soda $10. Evening Special: 5-8 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus one item of Fast Lanes Grille Menu and a soda $13. Late Night Special: 8-11 p.m. 2 hours of Showtime Rock & Bowl, laser light show, and spe cial drink specials $10. 270-5377 Nov. 24: Kennedy Space Center Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline Nov. 20. Nov. 25: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Tennessee Titans. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Nov. 26: Laser Tag. 7-9 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free. Nov. 28: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 28: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. To purchase tickets in advance, please call (904) 270-5431. Nov. 29: Texas Holdem Tournament. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways. Nov. 30: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. LIBERTYNov. 16: Freedom FridayHarvest Festival 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Nov. 30: Family Game Night 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Child must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 270-5680 KID Turkey Trot 5K Run Date ChangeFrom MWRDue to the construction project at the gym, the Turkey Trot 5K run has been rescheduled to Tuesday Nov. 20 with a start time of 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. For more information contact Rita Hammerstad at 904-270-5451.MWR Facilities Closed For ThanksgivingFrom MWRSeveral MWR facilities will be closed on Nov. 22 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.Closed facili ties include Auto Skills, Beachside Community Center, Castaways/Computer Cove, Bingo, Business Office/ Admin/Personnel, Child Development Centers/Child Development Homes, Mayport Bowling Center, ITT/ Recreation Ticket Vehicle, Ocean Breeze Conference Center/CPO Club, Pelican Roost RV Park, Pizza Hut, Pool, Outdoor Adventures, Recycling/Vehicle Storage, Surfside Fitness, Youth Activities/Teen Center. Facilities closed on Nov. 23 include Auto Skills, Business Office/Admin/Personnel, ITT/Recreation Ticket Vehicle, Ocean Breeze Conference Center/CPO Club, Outdoor Adventures, Pool, Recycling/Vehicle Storage and Surfside Fitness. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

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USS Bataan Marches On In Honor Of Fallen Navy Public Affairs Support Element Det. SoutheastSailors and Marines paid homage to two survivors of the WWII Bataan Death March during a ceremony held aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5) as a part of the city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor, Nov. 8. This ship was commissioned in 1997 to honor the sacrifices of those who have gone before us, said Capt. Erik Ross, commanding officer of USS Bataan. The ceremony hon ored Donato Abalos and Patricio Ganio, both of whom marched nearly 60-miles during a forc ible transfer of more than 70,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war by the Imperial Japanese Army. The march followed the threemonth Battle of Bataan in the Philippines. These two individu als sacrificed, said Ross. Their dedication, their courage, their persever ance, and most remark able in my opinion, their humility in a time where humility is rare. Both of you are true heroes. During the march, many prisoners died from abuse, murder or exhaus tion while others were not given food or water until they had reached Balanga, the capital of Bataan. These acts of heroism were not lost on the crew attending the cer emony. I felt very honored to see them because everything they went through was extreme ly dangerous, said Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) Airman Apprentice Elizabeth Blanco. The reason why we honor them today is not only because our ship is named after their struggle, but because there is a sense of pride and you have to be proud. Being in the Navy I am proud to serve my country, proud to wear the uniform. Whether its speaking to others about serving in the military or work ing long hours during flight operations. I want to thank them for giving us an example to do the same. I am happy to be here. After the ceremony, the service members were able shake hands with the survivors and many were moved by the experience. I was extremely hum bled and honored to be in the presence of real war heroes that in these days you dont come across that to much, said Lance Cpl. Ian Delacruz sta tioned in Camp Lejuene, N.C. To have the opportunity to hear what they have gone through and sur vived is very heartwarm ing. Im infantry so our job is to be on the front lines and put ourselves at risk. To hear what they have done, Im just hon ored to be able to shake their hands and when I did, I dont know if this is the right way to say it, but it just felt right. I feel like we are in the same line of work and they are my predecessors. Im proud to be here today to pick up were they left off. Battan is the sec ond ship to be named in honor of the march. The first was USS Bataan (CVL-29/AVT-4), which was originally planned as USS Buffalo, but was renamed on June 2, 1942 after the tragedy occurred. A translator added that Ganio and Abalos were proud to be recognized after all of these years and were very thankful for the opportunity to there. Up In The Goodyear Blimp -Photo by Paige GnannMC1 John Parker takes a photo of Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Lindsey Hunter of USS Vicksburg during a ride in the Goodyear Blimp on Nov. 8 as a way for the company to say thank you to service members. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Sailors, Veterans Support Week Of ValorNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsMore than 50 activeduty service members and veterans from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport and other area military commands visit ed 70 elementary, middle and high school class rooms Nov. 5-9 in support of the Week of Valor. The city-sponsored initiative, Week of Valor, is designed to showcase Jacksonville as one of the most military-friendly cities in the country. Volunteers visited classrooms in small groups and spoke to students about what it means to serve in the military. They also stressed the importance of observing Veterans Day. According to Suzanne Speight, a public affairs special ist with Navy Region Southeast who coordi nated the visits, the efforts of those who volunteered are invaluable to main taining a good relation ship with the community. The Navy and the military are such a big part of the First Coast commu nity and it is so important for people to know who we are and what we do, she said. Speight said she appre ciated the efforts of ser vice members from Blount Island Command and Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, as well. This was a tremendous joint effort with Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, along with veterans from the retired community, she said. Throughout the week, the groups spoke to students in dozens of schools, sharing personal experiences in the mili tary, views on Veterans Day and their own school-day experiences. They also answered hun dreds of questions about their careers and the military in general. We were treated to a wonderful Veterans Day presentation dur ing our communitys Week of Valor, said Khaki Hager, an eighthgrade history teacher at Mandarin Middle School. Lieutenant Wilhelm, Lieutenant Commander Lazenka and Lieutenant Verducci spoke to our team of students and gave a fantastic presenta tion filled with valuable information. Our students learned so much and we know they are better prepared today for their futures. Southeast Region Master Chief Mack Ellis said he takes great pride in knowing that his Sailors had a positive impact on the students. In my opinion, our Sailors and Marines wear the cloth of our nation. Were role models and mentors for our youth, he said. We need to realize the impact and the difference we can make by providing inspiration to the youth of our country. They are our future leaders and we need to be at the forefront of their development. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown spoke in a similar tone during his opening remarks at a military appreciation luncheon Nov. 8. Our military and vet erans community already has given so much to our nation. Its an inspiring sight to see these brave men and women con tinue to give back in our schools, Brown said. This outreach effort is about pairing the leaders of today with the leaders of tomorrow. He also expressed his gratitude to the 900-plus veterans, active duty military members and military leaders in atten dance. Its always a humbling thought to think about the sacrifices made by the men and women of our military, Brown said. Im honored to work with so many dedicated business leaders and community partners to say thank you for their service and dedication. This years Week of Valor was the first time Jacksonville has hosted such an event, but the city plans to make it an annual occasion. In addition to school speaking engage ments, the Week of Valor also featured a military appreciation luncheon, a job fair, a Veterans Day Parade, the Navy-Marine Corps Carrier Classic college basketball game between Florida and Georgetown aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5), and a military appreciation football game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts. -Photo courtesy of City of JacksonvilleIT2 William Hales and IT2 Jonathan Beckham from COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt and AC1 Floyd Nichols from NAS JAX pose with Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and staff members, during a Week of Valor school visit at Highlands Middle School. Hales, Beckham and Nichols were part of a group of more than 50 Sailors from area commands who visited schools during the week of Nov. 5, to share personal experiences and talk about the meaning and history of Veterans Day.streamline Sailors tran sition between reserve and active service, while enabling the Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warf ighting needs. DAP enables this con tinuum by offering par ticipating Sailors a flex ible affiliation option, and helping to solidify Sailors reserve affiliation deci sions by providing them a predictable SELRES start date. By allowing Sailors more ability to time their transition into the reserves, this program will allow greater flexibility for Active and FTS Sailors to extend their Navy careers, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military personnel plans and policy. Not only will this program benefit our people, it also enables our Navy to retain the skills and talents of our highlytrained and experienced Sailors, making us more ready to meet the mis sion. Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP up to 90 days prior to their SEAOS through their chain of command. All separating AC and FTS Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP. Sailors will have up to six months from their AC/ FTS separation to affiliate with the SELRES. The number and timing of Sailors selected will be determined based on current and projected man ning needs for the given rating. Sailors must also meet the age, service time, and physical qualifica tions required of all those entering the SELRES. In return for a quota reservation, Sailors shall satisfactorily participate in a Voluntary Training Unit (VTU) or a Variable Participation Unit (VPU) of the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). While in the IRR, Sailors may take advantage of continued benefits such as Servicemembers Group Life Insurance, access to base commis saries and exchanges, and use of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation services. Full details of the DAP program, including the process, requirements, and timeline are found in NAVADMIN 329/12 and MILPERSMAN 1133-062.From Page 1Reserve THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 15

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NAVFACSE Help Make Classic PossibleFrom NAVFACSENaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast employees worked hard oto bring the NavyMarine Corps Classic to Naval Station Mayport. The Classic was held Nov. 9 on board USS Bataan (LHD 5), a mul tipurpose amphibious assault ship. This is absolutely a first in my career, a really unique opportunity, said NS Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez. To both, see a production like this get put together, and to do it on a Navy warship of this size is extraordinary. Set-up for the event included construction of approximately 3,500 tem porary seats, a NCAA regulation basketball court, and infrastructure to support production (sound, video display boards, lighting) and broadcast (camera towers). To make this event a reality took nearly three months of production planning, logistical and security coordination, and countless site visits. Since Friday, Nov. 2, a contractor workforce of nearly 60 people have worked 10-12 hour days, in close coordination with the Bataan and NS Mayport personnel, to put the site together. Dieguez, NAVFAC Southeasts project offi cer for the game, became involved in preparations early on when the idea was first presented to the Secretary of the Navy to hold a college basketball game on a U.S. Navy warship aboard NS Mayport. The NAVFAC team, approximately 30 person nel, handled everything from real estate contract ing to forming agree ments with the city of Jacksonville, leases for the ship, and a license agree ment for the real property on NS Mayport. Dieguezs team also worked the utilities and infrastructure sup port, basically anything that touches the physical plant of the base. His team coordinated with safety and the engineers from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to ensure the game day complex (bleachers, bas ketball court, sound sys tem, etc.) were safe and built to specifications. It makes me feel proud, said Dieguez. This is such a huge opportunity for both the U.S. Navy and the city of Jacksonville to put their best foot forward. Last years Quicken Loans Carrier Classic was hosted on the USS Carl Vinsons (CVN 70) flight deck in San Diego, Calif. This years event also featured a concert by Little Big Town and fan fest with food and bever age venders and military equipment static displays in the parking lot adjacent to USS Bataans mooring. Thirty-five hundred fans got a birds eye view of the basketball game, from bleachers erected 70 to 100 feet above sea level on the Bataans flight deck, but another 12,000 or so spectators enjoyed watching the game on large video monitors set up in the concert and static display venue below. Danny Williams, NS Mayport Crane Program Manager and NAVFAC Southeast employee, directed the approximately 200 crane lifts required to get the equipment needed aboard the USS Bataan to build a basket ball stadium. Williams said it took about 30 hours using two cranes to prioritize and lift the disassembled bleachers, basketball court and other items to the flight deck of Bataan. Williams comment ed that it wasnt all that extraordinary of a job for him. He has completed similar operations many times when CVNs (carri ers) were home-ported at NS Mayport. He did say that it was unique com pared to normal port operations. We [were] happy to support ... and every thing [went] smoothly said PWD Mayport Production Officer Lt. Cheron Thornton. She was responsible for working the support issues between the Bataan and the base. Her team provided cranes, vehicles and utilities (power) to the ship. The NAVFAC team worked closely with sev eral contractors to put this all together. Jacksonvilles Presentation Resources Incorporated (PRI) Productions is the com pany leading the produc tion efforts for the event. PRI is coordinating with companies Sounds Good Audio (SGA) and SMG (formerly Spectacor Management Group) Jacksonville to set up the bleachers and the basketball court respectively. Everybody has been fantastic. I could not be happier the interaction between the Navy, the pier, the ship, the Captain of the Bataan, everyone has been exceptionally fabulous to work with, said Steven Flatt of PRI. This is the first time the Navy has done some thing like this in coordi nation with a city gov ernment, said Dieguez. In this case, the city of Jacksonville is putting up the financial resources to make this happen. It really speaks well of the city of Jacksonville they really love having the military here. -Photo by Matt Simons, NAVFAC Southeast public affairs assistantNaval Station Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez (left) speaks with a contractor during setup efforts on the flightdeck of USS Bataan Nov 5, 2012. Dieguez is Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast's project officer for the game. USS Bataan (LHD 5), hosted the NCAA men's basketball game between the University of Florida and Georgetown Nov. 9. NAVFAC Southeast employees were integral to the effort to set-up for the event. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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of Valor honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. Jacksonville has always been a great Navy town, said the Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV). We are moving an amphibi ous ready group, includ ing a ship like this, to Jacksonville. It is one of the ways we connect the ship to the city and the U.S. Navy to the American people, because when we are doing our job we are usually a long way from home. During the first half of the game, the audience got an inside look at Navy life when the SECNAV reenlisted seven Sailors. After the re-enlistment oath, players from both teams shook the hands of the re-enlistees. Fewer than one per cent of America serves in the uniform, they keep the other 99 percent of us safe, said SECNAV. These seven Sailors who reenlisted are some of the best we have. Thank you everyone for making this event possible, said Thompson. Thank you for hosting us, and to all the Sailors who represent us out here. Its been an unbelievable experience for our guys just to be a part of this event and the fact that the game is ending doesnt take away from that. Many of the players from both teams agreed the game was a small way for them to give back to the Sailors who defend America. Its an amazing expe rience just to have the opportunity to come out here on a ship, said Otto Porter, team member of the Georgetown Hoyas. Its just one of those things where we got to come out here and sup port the Navy and soldiers back home. Sailors also savored the experience of the NavyMarine Corps basketball game. I thought the game was wonderful, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) Seaman(SW) Brianna Williams, a Bataan Sailor. I was amazed that they turned our ship into a stadium. The city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor presented Sailors with many lasting experiences, including watching the Jacksonville Jaguars practice and play a game against the Indianapolis Colts, par ticipating in a community relations project, and a free concert by country band Little Big Town. From Page 1Classic-Photo by MC2 Gary A. Prill The University of Florida Gators and Georgetown University Hoyas play basketball on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). Bataan hosted the event put on by the city of Jacksonville, which along with its surrounding communities has a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. Georgetown Hoyas, UF Gators Tour Bataan USS Battan Public AffairsPlayers from the University of Florida Gators and Georgetown University Hoyas mens basketball team toured the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), Nov. 8. The teams will play in the Navy Marine Corps Classic basketball game held on the ships flight deck, Nov. 9, during the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor while the ship is in port Naval Station Mayport. The tour was a rare opportunity for both the players and the Sailors aboard Bataan. Its a once-in-alifetime experience, said Brandon Bolden, power forward for the Georgetown University Hoyas. Not many people get to stand on top of the flight deck who are not part of the Navy. Im soaking it in. The ships crew got a chance to meet the play ers as they toured the ships hangar bay and flight deck. It was really exciting, said Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) Airman Jarrett Keller, a Bataan Sailor. It is good to meet all the players and I think it is just as cool for them to meet us. The teams learned more about the ship they will be competing on. We wanted the play ers to embrace being able to play basketball here, and also what Bataan is about, her capabilities, and being in this Navy environment, said Ensign Romeo Garcia, a Bataan tour guide. The basketball players are curious about how the upcoming game will turn out with the court being in this unique location. Im just trying to get used to being in here, standing on a ship on the water, and playing on a court thats not on the ground, said Bolden. The warm-up is going to tell us how the game is going to be. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) the Honorable Ray Mabus performs a re-enlistment ceremony on basketball court constructed on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). The game honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. America's away team, the Navy and Marine Corps are reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, and above and below the sea as well ashore. Join the conversation in social media using #BBallOnDeck. -Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardMaster Chief Aviation Technician George Lean, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL 60), grills burgers during the Navy and Marine Corps Classic pre-basketball game concert for servicemembers and their families at the Naval Station Mayport as part a Week of Valor tribute. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyUniversity of Florida Gators center Patric Young talks with Ensign Romeo Garcia in the hangar bay of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 15, 2012 17

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