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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00275


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Gets Set For ClassicFrom StaffMayor Alvin Brown joined Capt. Doug Cochrane, Naval Station Mayport com manding officer, Rear Admiral John Scorby, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, and Mark S. Lee, Vice President of Brand Development & Marketing Communications for Florida Blue to welcome the arrival of the USS Bataan and Commanding Officer Capt. Erik Ross on Nov. 2. Mayor Brown pre sented Captain Ross and his crew with the key to the city. USS Bataan will serve as the platform for the 2012 Navy-Marine Corps Classic mens college bas ketball game presented by Florida Blue. The ship is part of the representa tional amphibious ready group ships that U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced will be homeported in the Jacksonville area. I am proud and hon ored at the arrival of the USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport, Mayor Brown said. Our commu nity enjoys substantial ties to the active duty military members who drive our economy and our qual ity of life. Thats why I elevated military affairs to a cabinet-level office in my administration, and its why we work every day to ensure a great relationship with our current and retired service members. The ships arrival sig naled the start of the Week of Valor on Monday, Nov. 5, a week of events highlighting the ser vice and sacrifice of Jacksonvilles military and veterans community with an emphasis on jobs and veteran services. The Navy is proud to be a part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor, said Rear Admiral Scorby. This is just the latest example of our long-standing friend ship that makes the Jacksonville area the most requested duty station in the Navy. The week will also feature two nationallytelevised events: the Thursday night matchup between the Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts at EverBank Field and Fridays Navy-Marine Corps Classic on the flight deck of the USS Bataan for ticket holders. Before the basketball game, the country music group, Little Big Town, will per form on the pier with Bataan as its backdrop. Tickets are available at the MWR ITT office for the free Little Big Town concert at Naval Station Mayport on Nov. 9. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. and the concert begins at 6 p.m. Tickets for this concert have been donated for the use of military per sonnel (active, reserve and retired) and DOD employees and their families. Must have base access (or be accompa nied by someone with base access). Active Duty personnel are required to wear uniforms to the concert (Navy Working Uniforms/ NWUs or Service Equivalent). Each service member or DOD employee is allowed a ticket for themselves and up to three more for their fami lies and/or accompanied guests. Tickets are non-trans ferrable and shall not be resold on the open mar ket. Following the con cert, watch the University of Florida Gators take on the Georgetown Hoyas on the JUMBOTRONS. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. The city will host a Veterans Job Fair at the Prime Osborne Convention Center start ing at 8:30 a.m. The Week of Valor will conclude with the City of Jacksonvilles Veterans Recognition Breakfast on Nov. 12, followed immedi ately by the celebration of the Veterans Day Parade in Downtown. For more information please go to: www.coj.net/ MilitaryAffairs or http:// www.facebook.com/ WeekOfValor Vicksburg Returns -Photo by MCSN Damian BergChief Operations Specialist Robert Laird Jr., assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), kisses his son as his son hi-fives a Sailor walking by dur ing the ships homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. Vicksburg com pleted a successful and final deployment after operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security coopera tion efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. See the complete story and photos in the Nov. 15 edition of The Mirror. -Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardConstruction continues on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) for the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game scheduled for Nov. 9 between University of Florida and Georgetown University at Naval Station Mayport. The Navy-Marine Corps Classic is hosted by the city of Jacksonville which, along with its surrounding communities, has a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. The game honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. America's away team, the Navy and Marine Corps are reli able, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, above and below the sea as well as ashore. Join the conversation in social media using #BBallOnDeck. November Opens For PCS OrdersFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) application phase is scheduled to begin Nov. 8, and remain open until 5 a.m. Nov. 20 for Sailors in their per manent change of station (PCS) orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the webbased program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when its time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at https:// www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. Sailors are in their orders negotiation win dow when they are with in nine through seven months from their pro jected rotation date (PRD). This is the first application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a July 2013 PRD and the last applica tion phase for Sailors with a June 2013 PRD. These Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS/ ID or through a command career counselor (CCC). The application phase is typically 10 days, allow ing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their fam ily and chain of command before making applica tions before the applica tion phase closes. Updated detailing busi ness rules announced earlier this year in NAVADMIN 226/12 elimi nated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers fill all advertised active-duty billets each month using the avail able Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be See PCS, Page 4

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Cyber bullying is an pervasive and invasive form of bullying which uses the internet. A new study by cyber bully ing experts, authors, and Profs. Sameer Hinduja and Justin Patchin has created new awareness and accompanying help for the only age group (1019) showing an upward trend in suicide (com pared to the 28.5% decline in suicide for youth over all), and despite a down ward trend in traditional bullying. Other studies suggest that cyber bul lying alone is affecting a significant number of school-age children, with nearly 25 percent to 35 percent of respondents claiming to have been bullied in chat rooms, through email, and via text messages. Cyber bullying is a complex problem. These are examples of how students bully each other in the high-tech world. Email: A student will send a threatening email to another, then forward it to other people. Harassment : Sending severe or persistent hurt ful text or email messages to someone. Impersonation: A student may impersonate another student to make unpopular online com ments. These comments can lead to the imperson ated student being ostra cized or further bullied in a more traditional way. Outing: This is the public display, posting, or forwarding of personal communication or images which contain sensitive personal information or images which are sexual in nature. Cell phone or laptop cameras are used as part of outing bullying. Exclusion: This is the process of designat ing who is in and who is out of a particular group at school. Frequently girls will exclude certain other girls from email lists or chat room conversations. As a result of their study, Patchin and Hinduja believe that [e] xperience with peer harassment (most often as a target but also as a perpetrator) contributes to depression, decreased selfworth, hopeless ness, and loneliness all of which are precursors to suicidal thoughts and behavior. So preven tion and intervention must focus on the stu dent much more than the technology. For they have found in a survey of 2,00 randomly selected middle-schoolers in one of the USs largest school districts that Traditional bullying victims were 1.7 times more likely and tradi tional bullying offenders were 2.1 times more likely to have attempted sui cide than those who were not traditional victims or offenders. Cybe rbullying vic tims were 1.9 times more likely and cyber bully ing offenders were 1.5 times more likely to have attempted suicide than those who were not cyber bullying victims or offenders (note the vulnerability of bullies as well as targets, school counselors, and the need to care for both). While the authors of the study concluded that suicide prevention and intervention should be included in schools bul lying and cyber bullying response programs, par ents can also assist with prevention and interven tion. Parents who notice changes in their childs behavior should pay par ticular attention to the fol lowing: The child appears upset after internet use. The child is using his computer late at night more than usual. There is some evidence that the child is covering his online tracks. The childs school life is suffering (declining grades, poor attendance, reported misbehavior). Here are some tips to help parents if they sus pect their child is being cyber bullied. Maintain calm and open communication. Let them know that you trust them and that you are willing to help with whatever problem they are dealing with. Explain that revenge will not solve the problem and could make it worse. Help your child keep records of chat tran scripts, photos, or emails for evidence. Report the abuse to the perpetrators internet service provider or cell phone service provider. Communicate the abuse to the schools des ignated administrator. If the child will not share the problem with you, call the childs school counselor and ask if she will talk to your child about your concerns. It is important to stop the bullying and the suicides. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. For More Information: www.netfamilynews. org articles: Parenting & the digital drama overload Cyber bullying & bullying-related sui cides: 1 way to help our digital-age kids com munity.norton.com/t5/ Ask-Marian/Increased Media Consumption and Impact on Youth: 7 Steps for Controlling Runaway Media Use www.connectsafety.org articles: Tips to Prevent Sexting Online Safety 3.0: Empowering and Protecting YouthCyber Bullying And Suicide: Watch For SignsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThe Bible has a lot to say to us on a variety of issues and subjects. One of the things it asks us to do is treat others with love and respect. It asks us to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. On this note, I read an internet blog the other day written by Tony Kriz (10/15/12) who penned the article title that you see above. Intrigued, I read the arti cle. It made me stop and think. I thought I would share some excepts with you and perhaps it may do the same for you. I was brought up in a very nice world. We lived in nice houses in nice neighborhoods. My par ents always drove appro priately nice cars and we went to a nice church. When we traveled across town they were careful to drive around and or up and over any neighbor hoods that were not nice like ours. There is this capacity within me, maybe it is an addiction or maybe just an ignorance, but it allows me to dismiss people who are sitting right in front of me. Some people I simply dismiss their words, others I look right through. There is a homeless couple that lives in my neighborhood. Their names are Richard and Rosemary. Everyday Richard pushes Rosemary in her war-machine wheelchair through the crosswalks before the glazed eyes of Sedans and SUVs. Then he ramps her onto the sidewalks on the other side. Like every body else, I never saw them. If I dare to be hon est, I fear that I cant see them. It seems I relegate the humans around me into two categories. Some people are characters in my play, a play about me. Others are simply props, no more significant than a vase or a lamp stand or a figure on the backdrop. This middle aged cou ple, these neighbors, they live in a metal shed behind a dilapidated house. No water. No elec tricity. Just four rusted walls holding up the most minimal definition of a roof. They traveled to Portland from Florida on the promise of a job. They spent every last penny. When they arrived the job was a lie. Richard works hard. He will give an afternoons labor to anyone for $20. Rosemary is always with him. How did I come to see them? It was my wife. She saw them. She met them. She listened to them and invited them over. Richard and Rosemary come by our house most every week. Two weeks ago, Rosemary was in the hospital. She was slowly dying. We drove Richard to visit her and at the end of our visit we prayed togeth er. Richard turned to Rosemary and said, I cant remember the last time we prayed with somebody else. I want ed to cry. I wanted to tell him they had given more to us than we could ever give them. How does one heal from selective sight? Truly, something to think about.We Were Blind: How A Homeless Couple Taught Us To SeeChap Stephen Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSPresident Proclaims November As Military Family MonthFrom American Forces Press ServiceIn our military fami lies, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come, President Barack Obama said in his proc lamation issued today declaring the month of November as Military Family Month. The proclamation reads: Since our Nations earliest days, courageous men and women of all backgrounds and beliefs have banded together to fight for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each of them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse proud family members who share the weight of deployment and make profound sacrifices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our mil itary families and recom mit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation. In our military fami lies, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the val ues that will preserve our greatness for centu ries to come. With loved ones serving far from home, military spouses take on the work of two. Their children show cour age and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each community they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patri otism. We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their fami lies as well as they serve us. Through First Lady Michelle Obamas and Dr. Jill Bidens Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to fulfill this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and sup port they have earned. Last year, we challenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 vet erans and military spous es by the end of 2013. To date, they have already exceeded that challenge, hiring over 125,000 veter ans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep fighting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their fami lies. When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a com bat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their fami lies feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patri ots who keep our coun try safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have per ished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up our military families not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by vir tue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby pro claim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation. Mayport Federal Health Fair SetFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will host a 2013 Federal Employee Health Fair on Nov. 13 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Base Chapel, Building 350. Federal Employees will have the opportunity to choose health, dental and vision insurance cover age for 2013 and determine whether to contribute to a health and/or dependent care flexible spend ing account.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 3

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USS Robert G. Bradley Deploys To Sixth Fleet USS Robert G. Bradley PAOUSS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), home ported in Mayport, Florida, depart ed on Oct. 31 for deploy ment to the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. USS Robert G. Bradley will return to Africa for a third time after complet ing a six month Africom Deployment in 2011. While off the coast of Africa, USS Robert G. Bradley will be supporting Sixth Fleet. Sixth Fleet, headquar tered at Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy conducts the full range of Maritime Operations and Theater Security Cooperation missions in concert with coali tion, joint, interagency and other parties in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa. Since USS Robert G. Bradleys last deploy ment, RGB completed a highly successful train ing cycle including a Supply Management Certification and 3M Assessment. Additionally, RGB excelled at a congressionally mandat ed underway material inspection (INSURV) and participated in UNITAS, a multinational exercise. The crew is looking for ward to getting back on the open ocean. Many of the new sailors have not had the opportunity to travel abroad. Ensign Patrick Hearn, who reported onboard USS Robert G. Bradley a few weeks before deploy ment says, It will be my first deployment and I look forward to and am excited for missions in Africa. This will be USS Robert G. Bradleys last deploy ment; decommissioning is scheduled for December 2013. RGB was commissioned Aug. 11, 1984 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire as the 41st Oliver Hazard Perry Class Guided Missile Frigate. -Photo courtesy of USS Robert G. BradleyShips Serviceman 1st Class(SW) Anthony L. Wright prepares to shift colors as USS Robert G. Bradley gets underway for its last deployment. more proactive in get ting an assignment of their choice by maximiz ing their choices. Data shows that Sailors rarely apply for more than two advertised jobs. Officials recommend using all five choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference sec tion under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill billets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, Fleet readiness require ments are the guid ing factor in filling bil lets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay (SDIP) or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP) to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea bil lets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when match ing Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, quali fications, career pro gression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to adver tised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Sailors can learn more about CMS/ID from their CCC or access CMS/ID by selecting the CMS/ID link on the Navy Personnel Command website at www.npc.navy.mil.> For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/ npc/.From Page 1PCS 4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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EOD Personnel Assist GTMO With Removal Of Potentially Hazardous Device Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Public AffairsNavy divers at Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, discovered an object that appeared to be unexploded ord nance, Oct. 30. Located approximately 20 feet offshore of the installa tions Windward Ferry Landing beach, the object was spotted as NS Guantanamo Bays dive team inspected the sur rounding waters for safe public use. All beaches at NS Guantanamo Bay remain closed for debris remov al left in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Initially there was a 1,250 square foot cor don established, said NS Guantanamo Bay Emergency Manager Mark Kennedy. Facilities inside the cordon were evacuated. An incident command was set up and the installations Weapons officer served as the inci dent commander (IC). The IC requested sup port of the Emergency Operation Center (EOC). As emergency response representatives from the installations Security, Fire, Port Operations, and other respective depart ments manned the EOC, base officials shifted Ferry transportation services to an alternate location near the Bayview restaurant. The entire proce dure was in line with the Incident Command System and the National Incident Management System, said Kennedy. We treated this event as an actual emergency and took every precaution necessary to ensure the community was protect ed. Technicians attached to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 6, Mayport, Fla., were contacted and departed for NS Guantanamo Bay to assist with the identification and removal of the object in question. Our lead EOD techni cian did close reconnais sance on the object and based on internal and external features, he was able to determine that it was, in fact, a practice device and that it did not pose a hazard, said EODMU 6 Officer-inCharge Lt. j.g. Matthew Grove. It was certified as inert and the non-haz ardous device was turned over to Weapons depart ment for proper disposal in accordance with base regulations and direc tives. According to Chief Navy Diver Michael Linzy, command diving officer, the practice device weighed approximately 100 pounds. At approxi mately 9:30 p.m. that eve ning, the all clear was passed base wide via the installations Facebook page, base information television channel, and through a command-wide press release, informing residents that normal Ferry transportation oper ations had been restored. In a case like this, we absolutely have to do due-diligence to make sure everyone is protect ed, said Grove. Based on the initial findings, we built a worse case scenario and did a thor ough threat assessment to make sure everyone would be protected in the case of an accidental detonation. We were able to get here quickly, deter mine there were no haz ards, and get traffic mov ing again. My brother grabbed the chrome knob of our Buicks radio and cranked it up, hoping Mom wouldnt complain. From the back seat, I could hear the grinding voice of Ted Nugent and see my brothers elbow jerk to the rhythm of his air guitar. I just dont get it, Mom piped up over the screeching sounds, Why on Earth would a cat scratch a beaver? That just doesnt make sense ecologically. My brother and I were mortal enemies, but he grinned at me to share our mutual opinion that Mom was totally uncool. She was notorious for embarrassing us by botching lyrics and doing cheesy mom dances to our favorite songs. My brother and I shriveled in humiliation when Mom pointed her thumbs alter nately into the air to the beat, or did the Mashed Potato to Rod Stewarts Da Ya Think Im Sexy or KC & The Sunshine Bands Shake, Shake, Shake Your Booty. She mustve been born uncool, we thought, and were thankful that we would never suffer the same fate. But then, life played its cruel joke, and I became a middle-aged mom. Although fully entrenched in denial, I sometimes get the feeling that, much like my moth er before me, I have no idea whats cool anymore. I reluctantly allow my kids to control the radio on our way to school, and am forced to listen to the repertoire of new rock alternative and pop tunes that only serve to keep me from hearing the news and weather. As cool as I think I am, Im just realizing who Foo Fighters and Train are. Itll take me another five years before I can wrap my mind around Mumford & Sons, Fun and Young the Giant. Recently, our kids want ed to go to a base concert featuring a band named Switchfoot. All our friends were going, so despite the fact that we couldnt iden tify the music off the top of our heads, we jumped on the bandwagon like groupies. The morning of the concert, my husband and I figured wed better do our research. With the assistance of our teenage daughter, we played snip pets of Switchfoots songs on iTunes. Hey, Ive heard this one before! I said, and my husband and I gyrat ed to the beat while our kids rolled their eyes. Oooo, this ones actually pretty good, my husband exclaimed upon hearing another familiar song. Yea, hmmm, uhuh, da, da -HEY, we are the Dark Horses!! he belted at the top of his lungs. Later at the concert, my husband and I were ready to prove that we hadnt lost our cool. Pairing mid dle-aged dance moves with inaccurate lyrics, we appeared to be hav ing a blast. An hour later, my husband asked me to search my purse for ibu prophen for a pain in his lower back. Another hour later, we began to yawn and complain about the noise. Finally, in the last hour of the concert, we just wanted to go home, take our fiber tablets, and go to bed. No matter how obvious it is that were not cool anymore, we middle-aged parents never want to face reality. Sounds like a xylo phone. Whats the name of this band, Honey? I asked my teenage daugh ter last week while driving our minivan to school. Gotye, she answered with a slight eye roll. Sheesh. Kids these days just dont know good music. Why would any one name a band Goiter anyway? I thought to myself, secure in the knowledge that Id always be cool. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&Potatoes a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 5

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6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Underwood Returns From Final Deployment Southern Seas 2012 Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class guidedmissile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) returned to Naval Station Mayport from its final deployment, Southern Seas 2012 to Central and South America and the Caribbean, Oct. 30. Underwood, with embarked Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Four Eight Detachment Three (HSL-48 Det. 3), com pleted a 190-day deploy ment in the 4th Fleet area of responsibility. The ship will be decommissioned in March 2013. Underwood announced its arrival in the Mayport harbor with a 36-gun salute. Family and friends waited on the pier. It is a wonderful feel ing to return home after Underwoods final deployment, said Cmdr. Peter T. Mirisola, the commanding officer of the ship. The crew per formed admirably and I could not be more proud of them. They justifiably earned the accolades and admiration of our part ners in South America and the Caribbean and represented the United States of America, our Navy and the thousands of Sailors who served on Underwood for three decades exceptionally well. The ship departed Mayport April 23 to par ticipate in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) before pro ceeding to Peru for its first international exercise in May. Throughout the cruise, Underwood made 23 port visits, to include Peru, Chile, Panama, Colombia, Jamaica, Curacao, Trinidad and Tobago, Guantanamo Bay, Honduras, and Key West. Twice they tran sited the Panama Canal. The deployment involved theater security coopera tion and counter-narcotic operations. They participated in the multinational exercises UNITAS Atlantic, UNITAS Pacific, and Silent Forces Exercise (SIFOREX). Bilateral exercises with Chile and Colombia and a group sail with Brazil were part of the the ater security operations in which Underwood participated. During August and October, Underwood directly supported Operation Martillo, a countertransnational organized crime (C-TOC) operation focused on monitoring See Underwood, Page 7 -Photo by MC1 John ParkerElectronic Technician 3rd Class Casey Colding and his wife talk with a local news sta tion during the homecoming of guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). This was the last deployment for Underwood before a scheduled decommissioning Spring 2013.-Photo by Paige GnannA Sailor searches for his family on the pier after returning to Naval Station Mayport from a deployment with USS Underwood.-Photo by Paige GnannSailors man the rails as a Tiger rider waves to the friends and families pierside at USS Underwoods home coming on Oct. 30. A Tiger is a friend or family member of the crew that joins the ship on its last leg of deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannFamilies hold signs welcoming home their Sailors and try and stay warm pierside during USS Underwoods home coming. -Photo by Paige GnannNew dad, Seaman Phil Christopher, meets his 6-week-old daughter Addilyn, for the first time.-Photo by Paige GnannChief Damage Controlman (SW) Thomas Hoffman is greeted pierside by his family at USS Underwoods homecoming celebration.-Photo by Paige GnannFriends and family of USS Underwood huddle close to keep warm as they watch the ship pull pierside at Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 30.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew of USS Underwood reunite with their friends and family pierside at Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 30. USS Underwood, with emarked HSL48 Detachment Three, completed its final deployment before decommissioning in March 2013.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 7 and detecting drug run ners in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific. With the help of U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachments 101 and 107, the ship is credited with recovering $27.5 million wholesale worth of cocaine. Underwood co-hosted receptions with ambas sadors and a deputy chief of mission. In Chile, Ambassador Wolff joined the crew in com memorating the Battle of Midway and the Battle of Iquique. In Jamaica, Ambassador Bridgewater and Underwood Sailors celebrated the 50th anniversary of Jamaicas independence and the establishment of the Jamaica Defense Force. In Trinidad and Tobago (TTO), Deputy Chief of Mission Wolfe helped observe the 50th anniver sary of TTOs indepen dence. Sailors participated in 12 community rela tion events in Peru, Chile, Jamaica, Curacao, Trinidad and Tobago and Key West. They also donated Project Handclasp materials in six countries. There was one rescue at sea, where Underwood saved the lives of six fishermen, including a child, who were stranded at sea for 10 days after their engine broke down. At sea, Underwood executed three live-fire exercises and two drone exercises. Gunners mates fired 173 rounds from the Mk 75 76mm gun and 1400 rounds from close-in weapon system (CIWS). Two foreign naval officers from Peru and Argentina and assigned to U.S. Navy Destroyer Squadron Four Zero (DESRON 40) embarked aboard Underwood for the final month of deployment to earn their surface warfare pins. Additionally, two ensigns from USS Simpson (FFG 56) were onboard for the last month and a half to work on officer of the deck qualifications while Simpson is in port. Sailors also had momentous personal achievements this deployment. Forty-eight Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification and seven Sailors earned their Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist qualification. Underwood promoted 29 Sailors to the next rank over the past six months as well. Southern Seas 2012 has been an outstand ing experience for Underwood Sailors, said Command Master Chief Michael P. Bates. This deployment has set Underwood Sailors up for future success and the majority of them will never have the opportunity to experience a deploy ment like this again. Additionally, the major ity of our Sailors were able to earn many tactical and technical qualifications which greatly enhanced Underwoods overall combat readiness and greatly impacted each Sailors career develop ment and progress. Underwood deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. Led by Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coordinated regional security strategy in sup port of White House strat egy to combat transitional organized crime and the U.S. and Central America Security Initiative. Fourteen countries are participating: Canada, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. JIATF South is a mul tiservice, multiagency, national task force which conducts counter-illicit trafficking operations and intelligence fusion to detect, monitor, and handoff suspected illicit trafficking targets to law enforcement activities; promotes security coop eration and coordinates country team and partner nation initiatives to defeat the flow of illicit traffic. From Page 6Underwood -Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Adan Gancerez hugs his children, Sebastian, 5, and Brianna, 4, after reuniting with them and his wife, Lorena, pierside.-Photo by Paige GnannSenior Chief Electronics Technician (SW/AW) Mark Kramer gets a welcome home kiss from his wife Penny.-Photo by Paige GnannGunners Mate 3rd Class Sean Bishop is welcomed home by family after disembarking USS Underwood.-Photo by Paige GnannQuartermaster 3rd Class (SW) David Collins reunites with his wife, Cameron, and children, Skylar, 5, and London, 2, before meeting his new son 2-month-old Aidyn.-Photo by Paige GnannFamily members hold signs welcoming home their Sailors aboard USS Underwood.-Photo by Paige GnannLt.j.g. Wilson Miles meets his 7-month-old daughter Abigail as his wife Leigh Anne watches the reunion.-Photo by Paige GnannInformation Systems Technician (SW) Phil Coburn reunites with his wife Maggie pierside.

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Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 13: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Nov. 14: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Nov. 14: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the 4th Fleet. For tickets, contact (904) 270-4551. Nov. 17: UFC 154: Pierre vs. Condit. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Nov. 21: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Nov. 23: Day After Thanksgiving Bowling Specials. 3 different spe cials, all day at Mayport Bowling Center. Daytime Special: 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus a lb. burger or hot dog with chips and a soda $10. Evening Special: 5-8 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus one item of Fast Lanes Grille Menu and a soda $13. Late Night Special: 8-11 p.m. 2 hours of Showtime Rock & Bowl, laser light show, and special drink specials $10. 270-5377 Nov. 23: Black Friday at Beachside Bingo. 6:30 p.m. Join us on Black Friday for specials, dou ble payouts and more. 270-7204 Nov. 16: No Shave November 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Upper Limit, free food, give aways and best/worst mustache contest. 2707205 Nov. 28: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. To purchase tickets in advance, please call (904) 270-5431. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Nov. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts. Van departs 7 p.m. Cost $10. Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 10: UF Gators vs. Louisiana Tech. Van departs TBD. FREE. Nov. 11: Jacksonville Fair. Van departs 12 p.m. FREE. Transportation only. Nov. 12: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. LIBERTYNov. 9: Family Game Night 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Child must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 270-5680 Nov. 16: Freedom FridayHarvest Festival 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 Nov. 30: Family Game Night 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Child must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 270-5680 KID 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWR Flag Football Tryouts -Photo by AC2 (AW) Curt MasonET3 Taylor Wells tries out for quarterback for the Naval Station Mayport Base Team. The team will be preparing for the Tri-Base Tournament at NAS JAX on Nov. 17. Games begin at 8:30 a.m. at their new Turf sports complex. Two teams from Kings Bay, NAS JAX and Naval Station Mayport will participate.Nov. 2 Final standings NS Mayports Fall Softball 2012Teams DESRON 14 Coast Guard Harbor Ops SERMC Phil Sea The Sullivans HSM-40 Airwolves Marines De Wert CSCS Wins 9 3 8 4 4 2 2 2 1 0 Losses 0 1 3 2 2 6 6 6 6 3 Percent 1 0.750 0.727 0.667 0.667 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.143 0.000 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Navy Provides Disaster Relief After SandyFrom Defense Media Activity NavyThe U.S. Navy con tinued to provide disas ter relief in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), national and local authorities in the New York and New Jersey areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. USS Wasp (LHA 1), USS San Antonio (LPD 17), and USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) are in position off the coast of New York and New Jersey supply ing military personnel and equipment to disaster areas. Wasp is supplying air craft to aid in the mission with a total of 18 helicopters aboard: -two SH-60s -four MH-53Es -six CH-53Es -six UH-1Ns and -one MH-53 Several of these helos have departed for Joint Base McGuire-DixLakehurst (JB MDL) for tasking. Wasp also sent a team of damage controlmen and hull technicians to help repair the damaged Hoboken Ferry Terminal. San Antonio has four MH-60S and a landing utility craft (LCU) capa ble of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. Carter Hall also has an LCU capable of transport ing cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. This LCU ferried supplies and personnel ashore to Sandy Hook, N.J., Nov. 4. Both San Antonio and Carter Hall are capable of providing command and control; underwater infrastructure repair capabili ties; riverine search and damage assessment; and underwater port survey. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, embarked aboard San Antonio and Carter Hall, is providing two 15 kilo watt generators and three 250 gallons per minute (gpm) pumps. Additionally, they are providing small boat and command and control support to the U.S. Coast Guard. Kanawha, a Henry J. Kaiser-class fleet replen ishment oiler, got under way Nov. 2 and will oper ate in the open waters east of recovery opera tions. This logistics ship will ensure that Navy and Marine Corps forces are self-sustained with food and fuel. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 is providing a convoy of 23 vehicles and 90 Seabees prepared to assist. Their equipment includes five 60 kilowatt, five 30 kilowatt and three 15 kilowatt generators and six 725 gpm pumps along with one 1,000 gpm pump. NMCB 5 is pro viding 110 Seabees to JB MDL for tasking. FEMA issued a mis sion assignment to the Department of Defense requesting high-volume water pumps (350 gpm and greater) with quali fied teams to support the operation and mainte nance of the equipment. In support of FEMA, the Secretary of Defense has authorized the Navy to provide 30 high-volume pumps, 125 Sailors and 30 civilian technicians to support dewatering efforts. So far, 18 Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Units have arrived, with an addi tional 110 Sailors and 30 pumps from NMCB 5 to arrive Nov. 5.Navy Reminds Officers To Update Official PhotoFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsAs hundreds of officers don new rank during promotion ceremonies across the fleet Nov. 1, officials remind officers to update their officer photo in their military records. Officer promotions typi cally occur on the first of each month. So, as a new group of officers pin on their new rank and update their ID cards, they must also remember to update their official photo, said Capt. Bruce Deshotel, assigned to Officer Career Transition Division, Navy Personnel Command (NPC), which coor dinates officer promotion lists, each month. New photographs are required for all officers within three months after accep tance of promotion. NAVADMIN 103/07, released in April 2007, re-instituted the requirement for officers to sub mit photographs for their per manent service records. The photo must also contain the following information. LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, MIDDLE INITIAL GRADE/ SSN LAST FOUR/ DESIGNATOR(S) DD/Month abbreviation/YY (for exam ple: 09 OCT 10) According to MILPERSMAN 1070-180, offi cers may write the required information on a piece of paper, poster board or white board in two-inch letters, which may be hand-written. Deshotel said the process is simple. Take the white board, poster or paper along with a digital camera and a shipmate into the passageway. Stand up against the bulkhead (left shoulder forward), while a shipmate takes the full-length photo. The photograph must be in color and display a full-length, three-quarter view of the member, left shoulder forward. A plain, flat background provides sufficient contrast to highlight details of the uniform. The photo must be four inches in width and six inches in height. Save the picture to a hard drive, then copy and paste it into the submission form (link below). Type in request ed information, print the form with the picture and sign the form. Mail the completed, signed form to: Navy Personnel Command Pers-312C 5720 Integrity Dr. Millington, TN 38055-3120 NAVPERS form 1070/884 is available at http://www.npc.navy.mil/ ReferenceLibrary/Forms/ NAVPERS/. Complete listings of active duty and Reserve offi cers authorized promotion Nov. 1 are contained in NAVADMINS 316/12 and 317/12. For more information, contact the NPC Customer Service Center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866-8275672). -Photo by Cpl. Bryan NygaardA U.S. Navy Seabee works to repair pier facilities in Hobobken, N.J. The U.S. Navy has positioned forces in the area to assist U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) in support of FEMA and local civil authorities following the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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CNO Greenert Uses Position Report To Check Course Of NavyAmerican Forces Press ServiceWhile generally satis fied with the progress of the service, the Navys top officer is using his latest position report to assess the effects of set and drift on the status of the U.S. Navy. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert spoke about his report during a roundtable with reporters in his Pentagon office today. Set and drift at sea is current, its wind, its things you didnt think about something that takes you a little bit off, he said. Then you deal with it, you adjust a bit, and you move on ahead. Position Report: 2012 addresses what the Navy needs to work on, the admiral said. The report is based on the three tenets of the service: Warfighting first, operate forward and be ready. Much of what the ser vice planned when Greenert came into his position last year, he said, is on track. The Navy has rein forced aid to warfighters by deploying new mine hunting and neutralizing equipment to the Arabian Gulf, and also has fielded improved torpedoes, advanced electromagnet ic sensors and up-gunned patrol craft in the region. And the USS Ponce (LPD 15) is deployed to the region as a forward stag ing base. The Navy and Marine Corps are working to reinvigorate amphibious warfare skills, Greenert said. In the past year, 25 ships and 14,000 Sailors and Marines honed those skills in Exercise Bold Alligator, he noted. Operating forward has meant an increasing number of ships and sail ors deploying, the admiral said. The Navy has made progress in rebalancing ships homeports to 60 percent in the Pacific and 40 percent in the Atlantic, rather than the 50-50 split that was the norm before a shift in strategic focus to the Asia-Pacific region. Being ready has meant filling billets on ships. The Navy has improved advancement and reenlistment opportuni ties across the board by reducing overmanned ratings and revising reenlistment processes to ensure fairness, the admiral said in his report. An enlisted retention board also affected the service. The impact of it, what we needed to do, the marketing of it, making sure its transparent, mak ing sure we give our folks every opportunity to do a deliberate transition for them are important and must be accomplished, the admiral said. The board was needed to get our fit right to get our people in billets at sea where they need to be, [with] the right skill set, with the right senior ity in the right rating, he explained. The admi ral said the Navy will not conduct another enlisted retention board during his watch. Greenert said he expects the Navy will fill the personnel gaps and will have the right mix for the fleet, and that the effort would be complete in September. But set and drift did affect the service over the past year, Greenert acknowledged. The thing that we didnt foresee a year ago was the level of [opera tional tempo] that the Navy has, he said. Mainly, it is the request for forces that extended past their deployments. The need for two carri ers in the Arabian Gulf, four extra minesweepers in the Arabian Gulf and more helicopters in the region was not anticipat ed to continue as long, he added. Looking ahead, Greenert said, he will reinstate tracking of indi vidual operational tempo. This is important for the overall health of the force, he said. Another area that needs more attention, the admiral said, is the crime of sexual assault. The number of events being reported has not declined, and Im not satisfied, he said. There will be a renewed emphasis. I like the strategy we have in place. I am satisfied that the track laid out by the Navy is good, but I per sonally am going to put more attention on that. The number of suicides in the Navy is creeping up, and we dont know why, Greenert said. We need to work on that work on the resil ience of our folks, make sure the programs we are putting in place are properly implanted and getting to the people who need them, he said. Greenert said he will issue more position reports as warranted. -Photo by MCC Joshua TreadwellChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert has released a report on the Navys ability to operate forward. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 13

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Reservists Build Operational Planning Skills Through COMUSNAVSO Urgent ProviderFrom Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/4th Fleet public affairsMore than 100 Navy Reservists from four East Coast units participated in the humanitarian assis tance and disaster relief exercise Urgent Provider on Nov. 2 and Nov. 3, building the skills they need to support the plan ning efforts of combatant commanders responding to real-world crises. Instructors with the Maritime Operations Center Training Team from the Naval War College and U.S. Fleet Forces Command devel oped and delivered the training, which required participants to work through problems caused by a Category 5 hurri cane in Central America, including an oil spill and the need to evacuate U.S. citizens. Members of the 4th Fleet, 5th Fleet Maritime Operations Center, U.S. Southern Command and Navy Information Operations CommandNorfolk reserve units used the Navy planning process to draft courses of action that were pre sented to Rear Admiral Jon G. Matheson, the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet deputy commander. Matheson emphasized the certainty that a com batant commander in any region will confront a cri sis and that reservists will be called upon to support the headquarters staff. When something goes down and these folks show up, theres not going to be time for them to figure out how to do mission analysis and course of action development, and how to fit into an opera tional planning team, Matheson said. This is a perfect opportunity for our folks to learn the planning process, so they can provide relevant and valuable support to the commander. Matheson said planning requires a diverse group and teamwork. Its not just unre stricted line officers in the operational planning teams, Matheson said. Its across all the fields, such as medical, logistics, public affairs and legal, so that when they work through the planning process and develop a course of action, and deliver it to the commander for a decision, it has been a collaborative effort. Along with officers, the group being trained included significant numbers of enlisted reservists. They brought an incred ibly diverse and broad set of skills from their military and civilian back grounds to the planning process, said Cmdr. David Polatty, the command ing officer of the 4th Fleet reserve unit. Over the past four years, the 13 members of the Maritime Operations Center Training Team have traveled to every fleet headquarters to teach the Navy planning process. They are the corporate knowledge of best practices across the fleet, Matheson said. Because of that, they are the per fect organization to work with reserve component units to help them to pre pare for this requirement to provide information to the commander in a time ly and accurate manner so the commander can make an informed deci sion. The Central American hurricane scenario, which had not been seen out side the war college, came to Mayport partly due to connections with Matheson, who once directed the training team, and Polatty, who teaches at the college as a civilian. Capt. Paul McKeon, the current director of the team, said the hurricane scenario was provided as an alternative to academ ic lectures. Giving people the opportunity to apply what theyve learned to a prac tical problem is a way for them to enrich and solid ify their knowledge, he said. And while hurricanes are frequent in the 4th Fleet area of operations, catastrophes occur all over the world, he said, so the fact that we have other fleets represented here is exactly what were looking for. Training team mem bers will take what they learned from their visit to improve the scenario, McKeon said. Meanwhile, many of the reservists may be seeing one anoth er again. Its not a question of if, said Capt. John Madril, the 5th Fleet units com manding officer. Its a question of when. We will all be together at some point on an operational planning team. -Photos by Lt. Cmdr. Corey Barker Above, Cmdr. Pete Dalve and Seaman Miles Erickson dis cuss an evacuation scenario during the Urgent Provider 2012 planning exercise conducted by the U.S. 4th Fleet reserve detachment. Right, U.S. 4th Fleet Deputy Commander, Rear Adm.Jon Matheson visits planners during the Urgent Provider 2012 planning exercise. While he works to protect the country,St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2, and his daughter Delilah 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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4th Fleet Sailors Help Local Charity Mission4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors from the White Hats Association with Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th fleet (COMUSNAVSO) par ticipated in a community relations (COMREL) proj ect Friday Nov. 2nd at the Clara White Mission in downtown Jacksonville. For over 100 years the Clara White Mission has helped Jacksonvilles lowincome, at-risk individu als, through job training, educational programs, and daily feedings. The sailors assisted the mission with daily food service by provid ing breakfast to the less fortunate and needy of Jacksonville. The mission serves breakfast every morning, serving on aver age 400 meals a day. Volunteers are essen tial to Clara White Mission, without them we would not be able to help the individuals that we do, we are grateful for the time these sailors have given us today. Said Shirley Edwards, volun teer coordinator at the mission. The mission also has a Veteran center, where individuals in need receive job training, and have access to computers and laundry facilities. The purpose of COMUSNAVO White Hats association is to bring the junior enlisted sail ors together personally and socially to promote friendship, mutual sup port and career development among the mem bers. Volunteering at the Clara White Mission is a great way for our asso ciation to introduce our selves to the command and the community. Said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Faith Goodwin, president of COMUSNAVO White Hats. I am very happy our Sailors are involved in the community. Our Navy and local communities all benefit from well-round ed Sailors who support both our mission at 4th Fleet as well as the needs of our community. Our White Hat Associations involvement with the Clara White Mission is a fine example of just that. Said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet. The experience the sail ors had being able to help others was a great experi ence, but for one sailor in particular, the experience was much more personal. I wanted to volunteer for this project, because I myself was homeless before I joined the Navy, said Information Systems Technician Seamen Chad Reed. Reed had been homeless as a teenager and that experience had a large impact on his deci sion to join the Navy. It was great to be able to help anyway that I could now that I am in a position to do so. For more information about COMUSNAVO White Hats association contact IT2 Goodwin at 904-270-5868. For more information regarding volunteer opportunities at the Clara White mission contact Shirley Edwards, volun teer coordinator at 904354-4162. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenLogistics Specialist 2nd Class Carlissia Johnson of COMUSNAVSO/C4F serves breakfast to an individual at the Clara White Mission in Jacksonville, Fla. Sullivan and other members were volunteering at the mission. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 15

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Mayport FFSC Schedule Set For NovemberFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Nov. 8, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 13, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 14, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 14, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing FFSC Room 719 Nov. 14, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 15, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 19, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Nov. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 20, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 26-29, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Nov. 27, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 27, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 29, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend.Helping Those Close At Home -Photos by Paige GnannMembers of Naval Station Mayports Family Advocacy Committee load boxes filled with supplies donated to Hubbard House, the local domestic violence shelter, in support of October as Domestic Awareness month. The drive was sponsored by NS Mayports Fleet and Family Support Center. CEO for Hubbard House, Ellen Siler, attended the meeting to talk with the committee and collect the items. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Saturday, Nov. 10 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a full day event to salute our Armed Forces from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Visitors will enjoy a day filled with military history and displays from the Revolutionary War to present day while inter acting with living his torians from each major U.S. military conflict. Period music and firing demonstrations will also highlight the experience. In addition, participants can visit the Fort Clinch Canteen for a variety of delightful refreshments. Park admission is $6 per vehicle for up to eight people. Admission into the fort is one canned food item per person, which will be donated to the Barnabas Food Pantry. Veterans and active duty military are invited to come dressed in uniform. The University of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a holiday program at the Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue. The pro gram will feature tips on baking and decorating with herbs of the season as well as preparing appe tizers, meats and vegeta bles with a savory twist. The program Herbal Holidays will be held from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The cost of the program is $10 per person, $5 for chil dren 11-16, under 10 free. Registrations are neces sary and can be made by calling the Extension Office at 255-7450 or reg istering online at: http://Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARFrom BVAPThe Beaches Veterans will present their 2012 Veterans Day program Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. honoring fellow Veterans, past and present. This years ceremony featurs Congressman Ander Crenshaw, and supported by the USN and Beaches Color Guard, the American Legion Riders. The 40 & 8 Locomotive will offer children rides and the SUBVETS will provide the Dive Klaxon. The Beaches Honor Guard will also be on hand to per form the Rifle Salute, Call to the Colors, and TAPS with an echo. Veteran Frank Kleese will sing the National Anthem and lead all participants in God Bless America. Remarks by Captain Douglas Cochrane, Commander, NS Mayport; Ms Arlene Griffin, North District Director for Senator Marco Rubio; and Atlantic Beach Mayor, Mike Borno, will honor the Veteran contribution to our community. Tami Swain, Home Depot Grant Coordinator, will be introduced as the supervisor of a $5,000 foundation grant provided wheelchair access, and more than 170 trees and shrubs to beatify this Community Veterans Park. The Park is located at the junction of Mayport Road and Atlantic Blvd, under the 80-foot flagpole. Please bring chairs or blankets for you listening comfort. In case of rain, the event will be the American Legion Pavilion, directly behind the Legion Lodge. Local boy scouts will assist in parking.Beaches Vets Hold Vet Day Programharvesthappenings.event brite.com Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Sunday, Nov. 11 The First Annual Salute To Veterans 5K will start at 8 a.m., followed by a one-mile walk/run at 9 a.m. starting at the Jacksonville Landing. The 5K will benefit the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association. There is a discounted $15 entry for all military, seniors 65 and over and children 13 and under. Cost includes a t-shirt. Sign up online at http:// www.1stplacesports.com/ salute.html Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and home town favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music. Along with numerous local businesses, national organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 17

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National Parks Free For Vets Day WeekendFrom American Forces Press ServiceAmericas 398 national parks will offer the pub lic free admission Nov. 10-12 during Veterans Day weekend in honor of those who serve and have served in the U.S. military, according to a National Park Service news release. National parks pre serve places that com memorate our countrys collective heritage our ideals, our majestic lands, our sacred sites, our patriotic icons which our military has defend ed through the years, National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said in the release. We are grateful for the service and sacrifice of military members, past and present, and honored to tell their story at many of our national parks, Jarvis added. From frontier forts to World War II battlefields, more than 70 national parks have direct con nections to the mili tary, the release said. These include the earli est national parks, where Army engineers designed park roads and buildings and the cavalry enforced regulations from 1886 until the National Park Service was established. National parks through out the country will hold special events to com memorate Veterans Day, according to the release. Highlights include: Evening candle light tours of Vicksburg National Cemetery, Miss., where visitors will encounter historical per sonalities; The 7th annual illu mination of 6,000 graves at Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Petersburg National Battlefield, Va.; A Continental sol dier encampment at Independence National Historical Park, Pa.; A talk on the AfricanAmerican Civil War experience at Natchez National Historical Park, Miss.; and, An exhibit and talks about the Roosevelts in the World Wars at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, N.Y. Additional benefits for veterans on Veterans Day include a free Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area cruise that will pass the USS Constitution on its way to Georges Island, home of Fort Warren, according to the release. The National Park Service is also, in partner ship with the Gettysburg Foundation, offering vets free entrance to the Gettysburg National Military Park museum in Pennsylvania, the release said. Finegan Honors Veterans Allyson King and Tahj Mareus say the Pledge of Allegiance after raising the American flag during a flag raising ceremony Nov. 2 at Finegan Elementary School. The school held also held a White Table cer emony presented by NS Mayport CMDCM Bob White in honor of Veterans Day Nov. 11.-Photos by Paige GnannNS Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Bob White explains the significance of the White Table ceremony to remember MIA/POW personnel during a ceremony at Finegan Elementary School. Service members, students, teachers and guests stand at attention during the Pledge of Allegiance at Finegan Elementary Schools Flag Raising ceremony on Nov. 2. 18 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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USS Enterprise Makes Last Mayport StopFrom Staff More than 5,500 Sailors and Marines serving on USS Enterprise (CVN 65) pulled into Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 31 for the last time before the ship returned to Norfolk, Va., on Nov. 4, fol lowing a seven month deployment sup porting operations in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Enterprises return to Norfolk was the 25th and final homecoming in her 51 years of distinguished service. The air craft carrier is scheduled to inactivate Dec. 1, 2012, in a ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station in Norfolk, Va. Enterprise is the Navys first nuclearpowered aircraft carrier and the oldest actively deployed warship in the U.S. Navys fleet. It is the only Enterpriseclass aircraft carrier ever to be commis sioned and will celebrate her 51st birth day Nov. 25, the first aircraft carrier in the world to do so. -Photo by MC3 Harry Andrew D. GordonAircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) arrives at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Enterprise is completing its final scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. -Photo by MC3 Scott PittmanLt. j.g. Trenton Daiuto, assigned to the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11, is greeted by his wife upon his return return to NS Mayport, Fla.-Photo by MC3 Scott PittmanSailors assigned to the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 return to NS Mayport, Fla.-Photo by MC3 Harry Andrew D. GordonAviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Cesar Thompson of HS-11 is greeted by his wife after USS Enterprise arrived at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 19

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20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Dont Wait To Mail Holiday GiftsFrom Naval Supply Systems Command Corporate CommunicationsDont wait to mail your holiday gifts. The Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25, delivery of holiday cards, letters, and pack ages are out. The dates are as follows: Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962-966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov 26 *Parcel Post: Nov. 13 Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 *Express mail Military Service: N/A *First-Class Letters/ Cards/Priority Mail: Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 1 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) *Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 *First-Class Mail (Letters/cards, priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is avail able from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-avail able basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth com bined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addi tion to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to par cels mailed to APO/ FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domesti cally by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space avail able basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth com bined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is also recommended that customers check with their local civilian or mili tary post office for infor mation on size restric tions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Additionally, cus tomers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items can not be mailed. Examples are: switch blade knives, pornog raphy, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, custom ers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alco hol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. The NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission--to deliver sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warfighter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfo lio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply opera tions, conventional ord nance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, secu rity assistance, and quality of life issues for the naval forces, including food service, postal ser vices, Navy Exchanges, and movement of house hold goods. The NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps team forms a vast network of pro fessionals who deliver unparalleled products and services to customers in the fleet and across the world.Budget For Holiday Gifts Can Make It CheeryFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNot interested in another desk fountain or lava lamp? Really dont want to participate in the office or club gift exchange? Its okay, but dont put off letting others know your preferences. Plan ahead and avoid feeling obligated to joinin or ungrateful for that unappreciated gift. With the holidays just around the corner, this is a good time to think about how you want to celebrate and plan your gift giving, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, personal financial man agement specialist at the Fleet and Family Support Center in Millington, Tenn. Generally there are two categories of shoppers the planners or the pro crastinators, according to Livingstone-Hoyte. Regardless of such labeling, one thing is cer tain; you will not survive the holidays financially without a well-thoughtout and realistic plan, she said. Everyone wants to have a great holiday season and include gifts, but to do that realistic planning and managing expectations goes with that. There are some simple steps Sailors and their families can take to pre pare for the holidays. Decide what your priori ties during the holidays are, what is important to you and why. Dont spend money out of guilt or a sense of obligation, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Knowing what your priorities are and shap ing the expectations of your family, friends and coworkers early in the season can relieve stress ors later. People will know what to expect. For more tips on man aging holiday spending along with a holiday bud get worksheet, visit www. navynavstress.com.Time For Flu Vaccine TRICAREIts that time of year again flu season. Time for you and your family to get flu shots. Not only will you signif icantly lower your chance of getting the flu this win ter, but you can make an important contribution to public health by limiting the spread of this danger ous disease. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states flu seasons are unpredictable and can be severe. All family mem bers, six months and older, should be immu nized every year, since the flu virus changes slightly season to season, requir ing yearly vaccinations. This is especially true for people at high risk of catching the flu or with a risk of flu-related com plications, such as chil dren, pregnant women, people 65 and older and those with chronic medi cal conditions such as asthma. A complete list of people at higher risk of complications is available at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website: www.cdc.gov/ flu/groups.htm Some people worry flu shots dont work. It is pos sible to get the flu, even after getting immunized. There are different strains of the flu virus in circu lation, meaning you can be exposed to a version of the virus youre not immunized against. Some even believe the flu vac cine causes the flu. This is incorrect. Flu shots con tain only pieces of killed flu virus that cannot infect the body. Some recipients report mild flu-like symptoms, which result from antibodies your body pro duces that help fight off the actual flu. Getting a flu shot is easy and inexpensive for TRICARE beneficiaries. You can get your flu vac cine from any military medical clinic or hospital at no cost to you, or from your pharmacist at one of 45,000 network pharma cies that administer vac cines to TRICARE benefi ciaries. Find a participating pharmacy near you at www.express-scripts. com/tricare/pharmacy, or by calling Express Scripts at 1-877-363-1303. You can also be vaccinated by your doctor, or at one of the retail health clinics found inside many phar macies. Keep in mind this is considered a medical visit, so you may have cost shares or copays. Generally, if the phar macist administers the vaccine, it is at no cost to you. If another healthcare professional administers the vaccine, it is a medical visit and you must pay the associated copays. Although getting vacci nated is the best way to prevent the flu, there are additional steps you can follow to avoid the flu. One of the most impor tant is to wash your hands regularly with soap and water, or use an alcoholbased hand sanitizer when those are not avail able. Here are some other tips from www.flu.gov : eyes, nose, or mouth. with sick people. habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food. mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw your used tissue in the trash. flu-like illness, stay home until at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (without the use of feverreducing medicine). Its important to get a flu shot every year your chances of staying healthy this winter increase dra matically if you do. For more information on this years flu season, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. To learn more about TRICARE coverage of flu shots, visit www.tricare.mil/flu.

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Gets Set For ClassicFrom StaffMayor Alvin Brown joined Capt. Doug Cochrane, Naval Station Mayport com manding officer, Rear Admiral John Scorby, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, and Mark S. Lee, Vice President of Brand Development & Marketing Communications for Florida Blue to welcome the arrival of the USS Bataan and Commanding Officer Capt. Erik Ross on Nov. 2. Mayor Brown presented Captain Ross and his crew with the key to the city. USS Bataan will serve as the platform for the 2012 Navy-Marine Corps Classic mens college basketball game presented by Florida Blue. The ship is part of the representa tional amphibious ready group ships that U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced will be homeported in the Jacksonville area. I am proud and hon ored at the arrival of the USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport, Mayor Brown said. Our community enjoys substantial ties to the active duty military members who drive our economy and our qual ity of life. Thats why I elevated military affairs to a cabinet-level office in my administration, and its why we work every day to ensure a great relationship with our current and retired service members. The ships arrival signaled the start of the Week of Valor on Monday, Nov. 5, a week of events highlighting the ser vice and sacrifice of Jacksonvilles military and veterans community with an emphasis on jobs and veteran services. The Navy is proud to be a part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor, said Rear Admiral Scorby. This is just the latest example of our long-standing friend ship that makes the Jacksonville area the most requested duty station in the Navy. The week will also feature two nationallytelevised events: the Thursday night matchup between the Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts at EverBank Field and Fridays Navy-Marine Corps Classic on the flight deck of the USS Bataan for ticket holders. Before the basketball game, the country music group, Little Big Town, will per form on the pier with Bataan as its backdrop. Tickets are available at the MWR ITT office for the free Little Big Town concert at Naval Station Mayport on Nov. 9. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. and the concert begins at 6 p.m. Tickets for this concert have been donated for the use of military per sonnel (active, reserve and retired) and DOD employees and their families. Must have base access (or be accompa nied by someone with base access). Active Duty personnel are required to wear uniforms to the concert (Navy Working Uniforms/ NWUs or Service Equivalent). Each service member or DOD employee is allowed a ticket for themselves and up to three more for their families and/or accompanied guests. Tickets are non-trans ferrable and shall not be resold on the open mar ket. Following the con cert, watch the University of Florida Gators take on the Georgetown Hoyas on the JUMBOTRONS. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. The city will host a Veterans Job Fair at the Prime Osborne Convention Center start ing at 8:30 a.m. The Week of Valor will conclude with the City of Jacksonvilles Veterans Recognition Breakfast on Nov. 12, followed immediately by the celebration of the Veterans Day Parade in Downtown. For more information please go to: www.coj.net/ MilitaryAffairs or http:// www.facebook.com/ WeekOfValor Vicksburg Returns -Photo by MCSN Damian BergChief Operations Specialist Robert Laird Jr., assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), kisses his son as his son hi-fives a Sailor walking by during the ships homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. Vicksburg com pleted a successful and final deployment after operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. See the complete story and photos in the Nov. 15 edition of The Mirror. -Photo by MCSN Rob AylwardConstruction continues on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) for the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game scheduled for Nov. 9 between University of Florida and Georgetown University at Naval Station Mayport. The Navy-Marine Corps Classic is hosted by the city of Jacksonville which, along with its surrounding communities, has a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. The game honors veterans, active and reserve service members, and military families. America's away team, the Navy and Marine Corps are reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, above and below the sea as well as ashore. Join the conversation in social media using #BBallOnDeck. November Opens For PCS OrdersFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) application phase is scheduled to begin Nov. 8, and remain open until 5 a.m. Nov. 20 for Sailors in their per manent change of station (PCS) orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the webbased program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when its time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at https:// www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. Sailors are in their orders negotiation win dow when they are with in nine through seven months from their pro jected rotation date (PRD). This is the first application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a July 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a June 2013 PRD. These Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS/ ID or through a command career counselor (CCC). The application phase is typically 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their fam ily and chain of command before making applica tions before the applica tion phase closes. Updated detailing busi ness rules announced earlier this year in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers fill all advertised active-duty billets each month using the avail able Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be See PCS, Page 4

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Cyber bullying is an pervasive and invasive form of bullying which uses the internet. A new study by cyber bully ing experts, authors, and Profs. Sameer Hinduja and Justin Patchin has created new awareness and accompanying help for the only age group (1019) showing an upward trend in suicide (com pared to the 28.5% decline in suicide for youth over all), and despite a down ward trend in traditional bullying. Other studies suggest that cyber bul lying alone is affecting a significant number of school-age children, with nearly 25 percent to 35 percent of respondents claiming to have been bullied in chat rooms, through email, and via text messages. Cyber bullying is a complex problem. These are examples of how students bully each other in the high-tech world. Email: A student will send a threatening email to another, then forward it to other people. Harassment : Sending severe or persistent hurt ful text or email messages to someone. Impersonation: A student may impersonate another student to make unpopular online com ments. These comments can lead to the impersonated student being ostra cized or further bullied in a more traditional way. Outing: This is the public display, posting, or forwarding of personal communication or images which contain sensitive personal information or images which are sexual in nature. Cell phone or laptop cameras are used as part of outing bullying. Exclusion: This is the process of designat ing who is in and who is out of a particular group at school. Frequently girls will exclude certain other girls from email lists or chat room conversations. As a result of their study, Patchin and Hinduja believe that [e] xperience with peer harassment (most often as a target but also as a perpetrator) contributes to depression, decreased selfworth, hopeless ness, and loneliness all of which are precursors to suicidal thoughts and behavior. So preven tion and intervention must focus on the stu dent much more than the technology. For they have found in a survey of 2,00 randomly selected middle-schoolers in one of the USs largest school districts that Traditional bullying victims were 1.7 times more likely and tradi tional bullying offenders were 2.1 times more likely to have attempted sui cide than those who were not traditional victims or offenders. Cybe rbullying vic tims were 1.9 times more likely and cyber bully ing offenders were 1.5 times more likely to have attempted suicide than those who were not cyber bullying victims or offenders (note the vulnerability of bullies as well as targets, school counselors, and the need to care for both). While the authors of the study concluded that suicide prevention and intervention should be included in schools bul lying and cyber bullying response programs, par ents can also assist with prevention and interven tion. Parents who notice changes in their childs behavior should pay par ticular attention to the following: The child appears upset after internet use. The child is using his computer late at night more than usual. There is some evidence that the child is covering his online tracks. The childs school life is suffering (declining grades, poor attendance, reported misbehavior). Here are some tips to help parents if they sus pect their child is being cyber bullied. Maintain calm and open communication. Let them know that you trust them and that you are willing to help with whatever problem they are dealing with. Explain that revenge will not solve the problem and could make it worse. Help your child keep records of chat tran scripts, photos, or emails for evidence. Report the abuse to the perpetrators internet service provider or cell phone service provider. Communicate the abuse to the schools designated administrator. If the child will not share the problem with you, call the childs school counselor and ask if she will talk to your child about your concerns. It is important to stop the bullying and the suicides. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. For More Information: www.netfamilynews. org articles: Parenting & the digital drama overload Cyber bullying & bullying-related sui cides: 1 way to help our digital-age kids com munity.norton.com/t5/ Ask-Marian/Increased Media Consumption and Impact on Youth: 7 Steps for Controlling Runaway Media Use www.connectsafety.org articles: Tips to Prevent Sexting Online Safety 3.0: Empowering and Protecting YouthCyber Bullying And Suicide: Watch For SignsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThe Bible has a lot to say to us on a variety of issues and subjects. One of the things it asks us to do is treat others with love and respect. It asks us to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. On this note, I read an internet blog the other day written by Tony Kriz (10/15/12) who penned the article title that you see above. Intrigued, I read the arti cle. It made me stop and think. I thought I would share some excepts with you and perhaps it may do the same for you. I was brought up in a very nice world. We lived in nice houses in nice neighborhoods. My parents always drove appro priately nice cars and we went to a nice church. When we traveled across town they were careful to drive around and or up and over any neighbor hoods that were not nice like ours. There is this capacity within me, maybe it is an addiction or maybe just an ignorance, but it allows me to dismiss people who are sitting right in front of me. Some people I simply dismiss their words, others I look right through. There is a homeless couple that lives in my neighborhood. Their names are Richard and Rosemary. Everyday Richard pushes Rosemary in her war-machine wheelchair through the crosswalks before the glazed eyes of Sedans and SUVs. Then he ramps her onto the sidewalks on the other side. Like every body else, I never saw them. If I dare to be honest, I fear that I cant see them. It seems I relegate the humans around me into two categories. Some people are characters in my play, a play about me. Others are simply props, no more significant than a vase or a lamp stand or a figure on the backdrop. This middle aged cou ple, these neighbors, they live in a metal shed behind a dilapidated house. No water. No electricity. Just four rusted walls holding up the most minimal definition of a roof. They traveled to Portland from Florida on the promise of a job. They spent every last penny. When they arrived the job was a lie. Richard works hard. He will give an afternoons labor to anyone for $20. Rosemary is always with him. How did I come to see them? It was my wife. She saw them. She met them. She listened to them and invited them over. Richard and Rosemary come by our house most every week. Two weeks ago, Rosemary was in the hospital. She was slowly dying. We drove Richard to visit her and at the end of our visit we prayed togeth er. Richard turned to Rosemary and said, I cant remember the last time we prayed with somebody else. I want ed to cry. I wanted to tell him they had given more to us than we could ever give them. How does one heal from selective sight? Truly, something to think about.We Were Blind: How A Homeless Couple Taught Us To SeeChap Stephen Souders Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSPresident Proclaims November As Military Family MonthFrom American Forces Press ServiceIn our military fami lies, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come, President Barack Obama said in his proc lamation issued today declaring the month of November as Military Family Month. The proclamation reads: Since our Nations earliest days, courageous men and women of all backgrounds and beliefs have banded together to fight for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each of them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse proud family members who share the weight of deployment and make profound sacrifices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recom mit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation. In our military fami lies, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the val ues that will preserve our greatness for centu ries to come. With loved ones serving far from home, military spouses take on the work of two. Their children show courage and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each community they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patriotism. We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their fami lies as well as they serve us. Through First Lady Michelle Obamas and Dr. Jill Bidens Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to fulfill this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and sup port they have earned. Last year, we challenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 vet erans and military spous es by the end of 2013. To date, they have already exceeded that challenge, hiring over 125,000 veter ans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep fighting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their families. When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a com bat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their fami lies feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patri ots who keep our coun try safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have per ished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up our military families not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by vir tue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby pro claim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation. Mayport Federal Health Fair SetFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will host a 2013 Federal Employee Health Fair on Nov. 13 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Base Chapel, Building 350. Federal Employees will have the opportunity to choose health, dental and vision insurance coverage for 2013 and determine whether to contribute to a health and/or dependent care flexible spending account.

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USS Robert G. Bradley Deploys To Sixth Fleet USS Robert G. Bradley PAOUSS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), home ported in Mayport, Florida, depart ed on Oct. 31 for deployment to the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. USS Robert G. Bradley will return to Africa for a third time after complet ing a six month Africom Deployment in 2011. While off the coast of Africa, USS Robert G. Bradley will be supporting Sixth Fleet. Sixth Fleet, headquar tered at Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy conducts the full range of Maritime Operations and Theater Security Cooperation missions in concert with coali tion, joint, interagency and other parties in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa. Since USS Robert G. Bradleys last deploy ment, RGB completed a highly successful train ing cycle including a Supply Management Certification and 3M Assessment. Additionally, RGB excelled at a congressionally mandat ed underway material inspection (INSURV) and participated in UNITAS, a multinational exercise. The crew is looking forward to getting back on the open ocean. Many of the new sailors have not had the opportunity to travel abroad. Ensign Patrick Hearn, who reported onboard USS Robert G. Bradley a few weeks before deploy ment says, It will be my first deployment and I look forward to and am excited for missions in Africa. This will be USS Robert G. Bradleys last deploy ment; decommissioning is scheduled for December 2013. RGB was commissioned Aug. 11, 1984 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire as the 41st Oliver Hazard Perry Class Guided Missile Frigate. -Photo courtesy of USS Robert G. BradleyShips Serviceman 1st Class(SW) Anthony L. Wright prepares to shift colors as USS Robert G. Bradley gets underway for its last deployment. more proactive in get ting an assignment of their choice by maximiz ing their choices. Data shows that Sailors rarely apply for more than two advertised jobs. Officials recommend using all five choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference sec tion under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill billets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, Fleet readiness require ments are the guid ing factor in filling bil lets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay (SDIP) or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP) to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea bil lets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when match ing Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, quali fications, career pro gression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to adver tised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Sailors can learn more about CMS/ID from their CCC or access CMS/ID by selecting the CMS/ID link on the Navy Personnel Command website at www.npc.navy.mil.> For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/ npc/.From Page 1PCS 4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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EOD Personnel Assist GTMO With Removal Of Potentially Hazardous Device Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Public AffairsNavy divers at Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, discovered an object that appeared to be unexploded ord nance, Oct. 30. Located approximately 20 feet offshore of the installa tions Windward Ferry Landing beach, the object was spotted as NS Guantanamo Bays dive team inspected the sur rounding waters for safe public use. All beaches at NS Guantanamo Bay remain closed for debris remov al left in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Initially there was a 1,250 square foot cor don established, said NS Guantanamo Bay Emergency Manager Mark Kennedy. Facilities inside the cordon were evacuated. An incident command was set up and the installations Weapons officer served as the inci dent commander (IC). The IC requested sup port of the Emergency Operation Center (EOC). As emergency response representatives from the installations Security, Fire, Port Operations, and other respective depart ments manned the EOC, base officials shifted Ferry transportation services to an alternate location near the Bayview restaurant. The entire proce dure was in line with the Incident Command System and the National Incident Management System, said Kennedy. We treated this event as an actual emergency and took every precaution necessary to ensure the community was protect ed. Technicians attached to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 6, Mayport, Fla., were contacted and departed for NS Guantanamo Bay to assist with the identification and removal of the object in question. Our lead EOD techni cian did close reconnais sance on the object and based on internal and external features, he was able to determine that it was, in fact, a practice device and that it did not pose a hazard, said EODMU 6 Officer-inCharge Lt. j.g. Matthew Grove. It was certified as inert and the non-haz ardous device was turned over to Weapons depart ment for proper disposal in accordance with base regulations and direc tives. According to Chief Navy Diver Michael Linzy, command diving officer, the practice device weighed approximately 100 pounds. At approxi mately 9:30 p.m. that evening, the all clear was passed base wide via the installations Facebook page, base information television channel, and through a command-wide press release, informing residents that normal Ferry transportation operations had been restored. In a case like this, we absolutely have to do due-diligence to make sure everyone is protect ed, said Grove. Based on the initial findings, we built a worse case scenario and did a thor ough threat assessment to make sure everyone would be protected in the case of an accidental detonation. We were able to get here quickly, determine there were no haz ards, and get traffic mov ing again. My brother grabbed the chrome knob of our Buicks radio and cranked it up, hoping Mom wouldnt complain. From the back seat, I could hear the grinding voice of Ted Nugent and see my brothers elbow jerk to the rhythm of his air guitar. I just dont get it, Mom piped up over the screeching sounds, Why on Earth would a cat scratch a beaver? That just doesnt make sense ecologically. My brother and I were mortal enemies, but he grinned at me to share our mutual opinion that Mom was totally uncool. She was notorious for embarrassing us by botching lyrics and doing cheesy mom dances to our favorite songs. My brother and I shriveled in humiliation when Mom pointed her thumbs alternately into the air to the beat, or did the Mashed Potato to Rod Stewarts Da Ya Think Im Sexy or KC & The Sunshine Bands Shake, Shake, Shake Your Booty. She mustve been born uncool, we thought, and were thankful that we would never suffer the same fate. But then, life played its cruel joke, and I became a middle-aged mom. Although fully entrenched in denial, I sometimes get the feeling that, much like my moth er before me, I have no idea whats cool anymore. I reluctantly allow my kids to control the radio on our way to school, and am forced to listen to the repertoire of new rock alternative and pop tunes that only serve to keep me from hearing the news and weather. As cool as I think I am, Im just realizing who Foo Fighters and Train are. Itll take me another five years before I can wrap my mind around Mumford & Sons, Fun and Young the Giant. Recently, our kids wanted to go to a base concert featuring a band named Switchfoot. All our friends were going, so despite the fact that we couldnt identify the music off the top of our heads, we jumped on the bandwagon like groupies. The morning of the concert, my husband and I figured wed better do our research. With the assistance of our teenage daughter, we played snippets of Switchfoots songs on iTunes. Hey, Ive heard this one before! I said, and my husband and I gyrat ed to the beat while our kids rolled their eyes. Oooo, this ones actually pretty good, my husband exclaimed upon hearing another familiar song. Yea, hmmm, uhuh, da, da -HEY, we are the Dark Horses!! he belted at the top of his lungs. Later at the concert, my husband and I were ready to prove that we hadnt lost our cool. Pairing middle-aged dance moves with inaccurate lyrics, we appeared to be hav ing a blast. An hour later, my husband asked me to search my purse for ibu prophen for a pain in his lower back. Another hour later, we began to yawn and complain about the noise. Finally, in the last hour of the concert, we just wanted to go home, take our fiber tablets, and go to bed. No matter how obvious it is that were not cool anymore, we middle-aged parents never want to face reality. Sounds like a xylo phone. Whats the name of this band, Honey? I asked my teenage daugh ter last week while driving our minivan to school. Gotye, she answered with a slight eye roll. Sheesh. Kids these days just dont know good music. Why would any one name a band Goiter anyway? I thought to myself, secure in the knowledge that Id always be cool. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&Potatoes a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 5

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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Underwood Returns From Final Deployment Southern Seas 2012 Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class guidedmissile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) returned to Naval Station Mayport from its final deployment, Southern Seas 2012 to Central and South America and the Caribbean, Oct. 30. Underwood, with embarked Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Four Eight Detachment Three (HSL-48 Det. 3), com pleted a 190-day deploy ment in the 4th Fleet area of responsibility. The ship will be decommissioned in March 2013. Underwood announced its arrival in the Mayport harbor with a 36-gun salute. Family and friends waited on the pier. It is a wonderful feel ing to return home after Underwoods final deployment, said Cmdr. Peter T. Mirisola, the commanding officer of the ship. The crew per formed admirably and I could not be more proud of them. They justifiably earned the accolades and admiration of our part ners in South America and the Caribbean and represented the United States of America, our Navy and the thousands of Sailors who served on Underwood for three decades exceptionally well. The ship departed Mayport April 23 to par ticipate in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) before pro ceeding to Peru for its first international exercise in May. Throughout the cruise, Underwood made 23 port visits, to include Peru, Chile, Panama, Colombia, Jamaica, Curacao, Trinidad and Tobago, Guantanamo Bay, Honduras, and Key West. Twice they tran sited the Panama Canal. The deployment involved theater security coopera tion and counter-narcotic operations. They participated in the multinational exercises UNITAS Atlantic, UNITAS Pacific, and Silent Forces Exercise (SIFOREX). Bilateral exercises with Chile and Colombia and a group sail with Brazil were part of the the ater security operations in which Underwood participated. During August and October, Underwood directly supported Operation Martillo, a countertransnational organized crime (C-TOC) operation focused on monitoring See Underwood, Page 7 -Photo by MC1 John ParkerElectronic Technician 3rd Class Casey Colding and his wife talk with a local news station during the homecoming of guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). This was the last deployment for Underwood before a scheduled decommissioning Spring 2013.-Photo by Paige GnannA Sailor searches for his family on the pier after returning to Naval Station Mayport from a deployment with USS Underwood.-Photo by Paige GnannSailors man the rails as a Tiger rider waves to the friends and families pierside at USS Underwoods home coming on Oct. 30. A Tiger is a friend or family member of the crew that joins the ship on its last leg of deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannFamilies hold signs welcoming home their Sailors and try and stay warm pierside during USS Underwoods home coming. -Photo by Paige GnannNew dad, Seaman Phil Christopher, meets his 6-week-old daughter Addilyn, for the first time.-Photo by Paige GnannChief Damage Controlman (SW) Thomas Hoffman is greeted pierside by his family at USS Underwoods homecoming celebration.-Photo by Paige GnannFriends and family of USS Underwood huddle close to keep warm as they watch the ship pull pierside at Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 30.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew of USS Underwood reunite with their friends and family pierside at Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 30. USS Underwood, with emarked HSL48 Detachment Three, completed its final deployment before decommissioning in March 2013.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 7 and detecting drug run ners in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific. With the help of U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachments 101 and 107, the ship is credited with recovering $27.5 million wholesale worth of cocaine. Underwood co-hosted receptions with ambas sadors and a deputy chief of mission. In Chile, Ambassador Wolff joined the crew in com memorating the Battle of Midway and the Battle of Iquique. In Jamaica, Ambassador Bridgewater and Underwood Sailors celebrated the 50th anniversary of Jamaicas independence and the establishment of the Jamaica Defense Force. In Trinidad and Tobago (TTO), Deputy Chief of Mission Wolfe helped observe the 50th anniver sary of TTOs indepen dence. Sailors participated in 12 community rela tion events in Peru, Chile, Jamaica, Curacao, Trinidad and Tobago and Key West. They also donated Project Handclasp materials in six countries. There was one rescue at sea, where Underwood saved the lives of six fishermen, including a child, who were stranded at sea for 10 days after their engine broke down. At sea, Underwood executed three live-fire exercises and two drone exercises. Gunners mates fired 173 rounds from the Mk 75 76mm gun and 1400 rounds from close-in weapon system (CIWS). Two foreign naval officers from Peru and Argentina and assigned to U.S. Navy Destroyer Squadron Four Zero (DESRON 40) embarked aboard Underwood for the final month of deployment to earn their surface warfare pins. Additionally, two ensigns from USS Simpson (FFG 56) were onboard for the last month and a half to work on officer of the deck qualifications while Simpson is in port. Sailors also had momentous personal achievements this deployment. Forty-eight Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification and seven Sailors earned their Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist qualification. Underwood promoted 29 Sailors to the next rank over the past six months as well. Southern Seas 2012 has been an outstand ing experience for Underwood Sailors, said Command Master Chief Michael P. Bates. This deployment has set Underwood Sailors up for future success and the majority of them will never have the opportunity to experience a deployment like this again. Additionally, the major ity of our Sailors were able to earn many tactical and technical qualifications which greatly enhanced Underwoods overall combat readiness and greatly impacted each Sailors career develop ment and progress. Underwood deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. Led by Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coordinated regional security strategy in sup port of White House strategy to combat transitional organized crime and the U.S. and Central America Security Initiative. Fourteen countries are participating: Canada, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. JIATF South is a mul tiservice, multiagency, national task force which conducts counter-illicit trafficking operations and intelligence fusion to detect, monitor, and handoff suspected illicit trafficking targets to law enforcement activities; promotes security coop eration and coordinates country team and partner nation initiatives to defeat the flow of illicit traffic. From Page 6Underwood -Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Adan Gancerez hugs his children, Sebastian, 5, and Brianna, 4, after reuniting with them and his wife, Lorena, pierside.-Photo by Paige GnannSenior Chief Electronics Technician (SW/AW) Mark Kramer gets a welcome home kiss from his wife Penny.-Photo by Paige GnannGunners Mate 3rd Class Sean Bishop is welcomed home by family after disembarking USS Underwood.-Photo by Paige GnannQuartermaster 3rd Class (SW) David Collins reunites with his wife, Cameron, and children, Skylar, 5, and London, 2, before meeting his new son 2-month-old Aidyn.-Photo by Paige GnannFamily members hold signs welcoming home their Sailors aboard USS Underwood.-Photo by Paige GnannLt.j.g. Wilson Miles meets his 7-month-old daughter Abigail as his wife Leigh Anne watches the reunion.-Photo by Paige GnannInformation Systems Technician (SW) Phil Coburn reunites with his wife Maggie pierside.

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Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 13: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Nov. 14: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Nov. 14: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the 4th Fleet. For tickets, contact (904) 270-4551. Nov. 17: UFC 154: Pierre vs. Condit. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Nov. 21: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Nov. 23: Day After Thanksgiving Bowling Specials. 3 different spe cials, all day at Mayport Bowling Center. Daytime Special: 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus a lb. burger or hot dog with chips and a soda $10. Evening Special: 5-8 p.m. 2 hours of Red Pin Bowling, plus one item of Fast Lanes Grille Menu and a soda $13. Late Night Special: 8-11 p.m. 2 hours of Showtime Rock & Bowl, laser light show, and special drink specials $10. 270-5377 Nov. 23: Black Friday at Beachside Bingo. 6:30 p.m. Join us on Black Friday for specials, dou ble payouts and more. 270-7204 Nov. 16: No Shave November 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Upper Limit, free food, give aways and best/worst mustache contest. 2707205 Nov. 28: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. To purchase tickets in advance, please call (904) 270-5431. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Nov. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts. Van departs 7 p.m. Cost $10. Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 10: UF Gators vs. Louisiana Tech. Van departs TBD. FREE. Nov. 11: Jacksonville Fair. Van departs 12 p.m. FREE. Transportation only. Nov. 12: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. LIBERTYNov. 9: Family Game Night 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Child must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 270-5680 Nov. 16: Freedom FridayHarvest Festival 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Nov. 30: Family Game Night 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Child must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 270-5680 KID 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWR Flag Football Tryouts -Photo by AC2 (AW) Curt MasonET3 Taylor Wells tries out for quarterback for the Naval Station Mayport Base Team. The team will be preparing for the Tri-Base Tournament at NAS JAX on Nov. 17. Games begin at 8:30 a.m. at their new Turf sports complex. Two teams from Kings Bay, NAS JAX and Naval Station Mayport will participate.Nov. 2 Final standings NS Mayports Fall Softball 2012Teams DESRON 14 Coast Guard Harbor Ops SERMC Phil Sea The Sullivans HSM-40 Airwolves Marines De Wert CSCS Wins 9 3 8 4 4 2 2 2 1 0 Losses 0 1 3 2 2 6 6 6 6 3 Percent 1 0.750 0.727 0.667 0.667 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.143 0.000 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 11

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Navy Provides Disaster Relief After SandyFrom Defense Media Activity NavyThe U.S. Navy con tinued to provide disas ter relief in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), national and local authorities in the New York and New Jersey areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. USS Wasp (LHA 1), USS San Antonio (LPD 17), and USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) are in position off the coast of New York and New Jersey supply ing military personnel and equipment to disaster areas. Wasp is supplying air craft to aid in the mission with a total of 18 helicopters aboard: -two SH-60s -four MH-53Es -six CH-53Es -six UH-1Ns and -one MH-53 Several of these helos have departed for Joint Base McGuire-DixLakehurst (JB MDL) for tasking. Wasp also sent a team of damage controlmen and hull technicians to help repair the damaged Hoboken Ferry Terminal. San Antonio has four MH-60S and a landing utility craft (LCU) capa ble of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. Carter Hall also has an LCU capable of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. This LCU ferried supplies and personnel ashore to Sandy Hook, N.J., Nov. 4. Both San Antonio and Carter Hall are capable of providing command and control; underwater infrastructure repair capabili ties; riverine search and damage assessment; and underwater port survey. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, embarked aboard San Antonio and Carter Hall, is providing two 15 kilo watt generators and three 250 gallons per minute (gpm) pumps. Additionally, they are providing small boat and command and control support to the U.S. Coast Guard. Kanawha, a Henry J. Kaiser-class fleet replen ishment oiler, got under way Nov. 2 and will oper ate in the open waters east of recovery opera tions. This logistics ship will ensure that Navy and Marine Corps forces are self-sustained with food and fuel. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 is providing a convoy of 23 vehicles and 90 Seabees prepared to assist. Their equipment includes five 60 kilowatt, five 30 kilowatt and three 15 kilowatt generators and six 725 gpm pumps along with one 1,000 gpm pump. NMCB 5 is pro viding 110 Seabees to JB MDL for tasking. FEMA issued a mis sion assignment to the Department of Defense requesting high-volume water pumps (350 gpm and greater) with quali fied teams to support the operation and mainte nance of the equipment. In support of FEMA, the Secretary of Defense has authorized the Navy to provide 30 high-volume pumps, 125 Sailors and 30 civilian technicians to support dewatering efforts. So far, 18 Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Units have arrived, with an addi tional 110 Sailors and 30 pumps from NMCB 5 to arrive Nov. 5.Navy Reminds Officers To Update Official PhotoFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsAs hundreds of officers don new rank during promotion ceremonies across the fleet Nov. 1, officials remind officers to update their officer photo in their military records. Officer promotions typi cally occur on the first of each month. So, as a new group of officers pin on their new rank and update their ID cards, they must also remember to update their official photo, said Capt. Bruce Deshotel, assigned to Officer Career Transition Division, Navy Personnel Command (NPC), which coor dinates officer promotion lists, each month. New photographs are required for all officers within three months after accep tance of promotion. NAVADMIN 103/07, released in April 2007, re-instituted the requirement for officers to submit photographs for their per manent service records. The photo must also contain the following information. LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, MIDDLE INITIAL GRADE/ SSN LAST FOUR/ DESIGNATOR(S) DD/Month abbreviation/YY (for exam ple: 09 OCT 10) According to MILPERSMAN 1070-180, offi cers may write the required information on a piece of paper, poster board or white board in two-inch letters, which may be hand-written. Deshotel said the process is simple. Take the white board, poster or paper along with a digital camera and a shipmate into the passageway. Stand up against the bulkhead (left shoulder forward), while a shipmate takes the full-length photo. The photograph must be in color and display a full-length, three-quarter view of the member, left shoulder forward. A plain, flat background provides sufficient contrast to highlight details of the uniform. The photo must be four inches in width and six inches in height. Save the picture to a hard drive, then copy and paste it into the submission form (link below). Type in request ed information, print the form with the picture and sign the form. Mail the completed, signed form to: Navy Personnel Command Pers-312C 5720 Integrity Dr. Millington, TN 38055-3120 NAVPERS form 1070/884 is available at http://www.npc.navy.mil/ ReferenceLibrary/Forms/ NAVPERS/. Complete listings of active duty and Reserve officers authorized promotion Nov. 1 are contained in NAVADMINS 316/12 and 317/12. For more information, contact the NPC Customer Service Center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866-8275672). -Photo by Cpl. Bryan NygaardA U.S. Navy Seabee works to repair pier facilities in Hobobken, N.J. The U.S. Navy has positioned forces in the area to assist U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) in support of FEMA and local civil authorities following the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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CNO Greenert Uses Position Report To Check Course Of NavyAmerican Forces Press ServiceWhile generally satis fied with the progress of the service, the Navys top officer is using his latest position report to assess the effects of set and drift on the status of the U.S. Navy. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert spoke about his report during a roundtable with reporters in his Pentagon office today. Set and drift at sea is current, its wind, its things you didnt think about something that takes you a little bit off, he said. Then you deal with it, you adjust a bit, and you move on ahead. Position Report: 2012 addresses what the Navy needs to work on, the admiral said. The report is based on the three tenets of the service: Warfighting first, operate forward and be ready. Much of what the ser vice planned when Greenert came into his position last year, he said, is on track. The Navy has rein forced aid to warfighters by deploying new mine hunting and neutralizing equipment to the Arabian Gulf, and also has fielded improved torpedoes, advanced electromagnet ic sensors and up-gunned patrol craft in the region. And the USS Ponce (LPD 15) is deployed to the region as a forward stag ing base. The Navy and Marine Corps are working to reinvigorate amphibious warfare skills, Greenert said. In the past year, 25 ships and 14,000 Sailors and Marines honed those skills in Exercise Bold Alligator, he noted. Operating forward has meant an increasing number of ships and sailors deploying, the admiral said. The Navy has made progress in rebalancing ships homeports to 60 percent in the Pacific and 40 percent in the Atlantic, rather than the 50-50 split that was the norm before a shift in strategic focus to the Asia-Pacific region. Being ready has meant filling billets on ships. The Navy has improved advancement and reenlistment opportuni ties across the board by reducing overmanned ratings and revising reenlistment processes to ensure fairness, the admiral said in his report. An enlisted retention board also affected the service. The impact of it, what we needed to do, the marketing of it, making sure its transparent, making sure we give our folks every opportunity to do a deliberate transition for them are important and must be accomplished, the admiral said. The board was needed to get our fit right to get our people in billets at sea where they need to be, [with] the right skill set, with the right senior ity in the right rating, he explained. The admi ral said the Navy will not conduct another enlisted retention board during his watch. Greenert said he expects the Navy will fill the personnel gaps and will have the right mix for the fleet, and that the effort would be complete in September. But set and drift did affect the service over the past year, Greenert acknowledged. The thing that we didnt foresee a year ago was the level of [opera tional tempo] that the Navy has, he said. Mainly, it is the request for forces that extended past their deployments. The need for two carri ers in the Arabian Gulf, four extra minesweepers in the Arabian Gulf and more helicopters in the region was not anticipated to continue as long, he added. Looking ahead, Greenert said, he will reinstate tracking of indi vidual operational tempo. This is important for the overall health of the force, he said. Another area that needs more attention, the admiral said, is the crime of sexual assault. The number of events being reported has not declined, and Im not satisfied, he said. There will be a renewed emphasis. I like the strategy we have in place. I am satisfied that the track laid out by the Navy is good, but I per sonally am going to put more attention on that. The number of suicides in the Navy is creeping up, and we dont know why, Greenert said. We need to work on that work on the resil ience of our folks, make sure the programs we are putting in place are properly implanted and getting to the people who need them, he said. Greenert said he will issue more position reports as warranted. -Photo by MCC Joshua TreadwellChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert has released a report on the Navys ability to operate forward. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 13

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Reservists Build Operational Planning Skills Through COMUSNAVSO Urgent ProviderFrom Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/4th Fleet public affairsMore than 100 Navy Reservists from four East Coast units participated in the humanitarian assistance and disaster relief exercise Urgent Provider on Nov. 2 and Nov. 3, building the skills they need to support the planning efforts of combatant commanders responding to real-world crises. Instructors with the Maritime Operations Center Training Team from the Naval War College and U.S. Fleet Forces Command devel oped and delivered the training, which required participants to work through problems caused by a Category 5 hurri cane in Central America, including an oil spill and the need to evacuate U.S. citizens. Members of the 4th Fleet, 5th Fleet Maritime Operations Center, U.S. Southern Command and Navy Information Operations CommandNorfolk reserve units used the Navy planning process to draft courses of action that were pre sented to Rear Admiral Jon G. Matheson, the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet deputy commander. Matheson emphasized the certainty that a com batant commander in any region will confront a cri sis and that reservists will be called upon to support the headquarters staff. When something goes down and these folks show up, theres not going to be time for them to figure out how to do mission analysis and course of action development, and how to fit into an opera tional planning team, Matheson said. This is a perfect opportunity for our folks to learn the planning process, so they can provide relevant and valuable support to the commander. Matheson said planning requires a diverse group and teamwork. Its not just unre stricted line officers in the operational planning teams, Matheson said. Its across all the fields, such as medical, logistics, public affairs and legal, so that when they work through the planning process and develop a course of action, and deliver it to the commander for a decision, it has been a collaborative effort. Along with officers, the group being trained included significant numbers of enlisted reservists. They brought an incred ibly diverse and broad set of skills from their military and civilian backgrounds to the planning process, said Cmdr. David Polatty, the command ing officer of the 4th Fleet reserve unit. Over the past four years, the 13 members of the Maritime Operations Center Training Team have traveled to every fleet headquarters to teach the Navy planning process. They are the corporate knowledge of best practices across the fleet, Matheson said. Because of that, they are the per fect organization to work with reserve component units to help them to prepare for this requirement to provide information to the commander in a timely and accurate manner so the commander can make an informed deci sion. The Central American hurricane scenario, which had not been seen out side the war college, came to Mayport partly due to connections with Matheson, who once directed the training team, and Polatty, who teaches at the college as a civilian. Capt. Paul McKeon, the current director of the team, said the hurricane scenario was provided as an alternative to academ ic lectures. Giving people the opportunity to apply what theyve learned to a prac tical problem is a way for them to enrich and solidify their knowledge, he said. And while hurricanes are frequent in the 4th Fleet area of operations, catastrophes occur all over the world, he said, so the fact that we have other fleets represented here is exactly what were looking for. Training team mem bers will take what they learned from their visit to improve the scenario, McKeon said. Meanwhile, many of the reservists may be seeing one another again. Its not a question of if, said Capt. John Madril, the 5th Fleet units com manding officer. Its a question of when. We will all be together at some point on an operational planning team. -Photos by Lt. Cmdr. Corey Barker Above, Cmdr. Pete Dalve and Seaman Miles Erickson discuss an evacuation scenario during the Urgent Provider 2012 planning exercise conducted by the U.S. 4th Fleet reserve detachment. Right, U.S. 4th Fleet Deputy Commander, Rear Adm.Jon Matheson visits planners during the Urgent Provider 2012 planning exercise. While he works to protect the country,St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2, and his daughter Delilah 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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4th Fleet Sailors Help Local Charity Mission4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors from the White Hats Association with Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th fleet (COMUSNAVSO) par ticipated in a community relations (COMREL) project Friday Nov. 2nd at the Clara White Mission in downtown Jacksonville. For over 100 years the Clara White Mission has helped Jacksonvilles lowincome, at-risk individu als, through job training, educational programs, and daily feedings. The sailors assisted the mission with daily food service by provid ing breakfast to the less fortunate and needy of Jacksonville. The mission serves breakfast every morning, serving on average 400 meals a day. Volunteers are essen tial to Clara White Mission, without them we would not be able to help the individuals that we do, we are grateful for the time these sailors have given us today. Said Shirley Edwards, volun teer coordinator at the mission. The mission also has a Veteran center, where individuals in need receive job training, and have access to computers and laundry facilities. The purpose of COMUSNAVO White Hats association is to bring the junior enlisted sail ors together personally and socially to promote friendship, mutual sup port and career development among the mem bers. Volunteering at the Clara White Mission is a great way for our asso ciation to introduce our selves to the command and the community. Said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Faith Goodwin, president of COMUSNAVO White Hats. I am very happy our Sailors are involved in the community. Our Navy and local communities all benefit from well-round ed Sailors who support both our mission at 4th Fleet as well as the needs of our community. Our White Hat Associations involvement with the Clara White Mission is a fine example of just that. Said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet. The experience the sailors had being able to help others was a great experience, but for one sailor in particular, the experience was much more personal. I wanted to volunteer for this project, because I myself was homeless before I joined the Navy, said Information Systems Technician Seamen Chad Reed. Reed had been homeless as a teenager and that experience had a large impact on his decision to join the Navy. It was great to be able to help anyway that I could now that I am in a position to do so. For more information about COMUSNAVO White Hats association contact IT2 Goodwin at 904-270-5868. For more information regarding volunteer opportunities at the Clara White mission contact Shirley Edwards, volun teer coordinator at 904354-4162. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenLogistics Specialist 2nd Class Carlissia Johnson of COMUSNAVSO/C4F serves breakfast to an individual at the Clara White Mission in Jacksonville, Fla. Sullivan and other members were volunteering at the mission. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 15

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Mayport FFSC Schedule Set For NovemberFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Nov. 8, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 13, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 14, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 14, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing FFSC Room 719 Nov. 14, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 15, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 19, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Nov. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 20, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Nov. 26-29, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 Designed for Military personnel within 90-180 days of leaving the mili tary. The seminar focus es on benefits for service members and their fam ily members. Participants receive help in translat ing their military acquired skills into civilian lan guage and are exposed to the civilian job mar ket and how to success fully compete in the civilian employment arena; learning about resumes, employment interviews and marketing them selves. If you are within a minimum of 180 days of leaving the military see your career counselor for a quota for this highly successful program. Nov. 27, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Nov. 27, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Nov. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Nov. 29, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend.Helping Those Close At Home -Photos by Paige GnannMembers of Naval Station Mayports Family Advocacy Committee load boxes filled with supplies donated to Hubbard House, the local domestic violence shelter, in support of October as Domestic Awareness month. The drive was sponsored by NS Mayports Fleet and Family Support Center. CEO for Hubbard House, Ellen Siler, attended the meeting to talk with the committee and collect the items. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Saturday, Nov. 10 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a full day event to salute our Armed Forces from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Visitors will enjoy a day filled with military history and displays from the Revolutionary War to present day while inter acting with living his torians from each major U.S. military conflict. Period music and firing demonstrations will also highlight the experience. In addition, participants can visit the Fort Clinch Canteen for a variety of delightful refreshments. Park admission is $6 per vehicle for up to eight people. Admission into the fort is one canned food item per person, which will be donated to the Barnabas Food Pantry. Veterans and active duty military are invited to come dressed in uniform. The University of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a holiday program at the Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue. The pro gram will feature tips on baking and decorating with herbs of the season as well as preparing appetizers, meats and vegetables with a savory twist. The program Herbal Holidays will be held from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The cost of the program is $10 per person, $5 for chil dren 11-16, under 10 free. Registrations are neces sary and can be made by calling the Extension Office at 255-7450 or reg istering online at: http://Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARFrom BVAPThe Beaches Veterans will present their 2012 Veterans Day program Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. honoring fellow Veterans, past and present. This years ceremony featurs Congressman Ander Crenshaw, and supported by the USN and Beaches Color Guard, the American Legion Riders. The 40 & 8 Locomotive will offer children rides and the SUBVETS will provide the Dive Klaxon. The Beaches Honor Guard will also be on hand to per form the Rifle Salute, Call to the Colors, and TAPS with an echo. Veteran Frank Kleese will sing the National Anthem and lead all participants in God Bless America. Remarks by Captain Douglas Cochrane, Commander, NS Mayport; Ms Arlene Griffin, North District Director for Senator Marco Rubio; and Atlantic Beach Mayor, Mike Borno, will honor the Veteran contribution to our community. Tami Swain, Home Depot Grant Coordinator, will be introduced as the supervisor of a $5,000 foundation grant provided wheelchair access, and more than 170 trees and shrubs to beatify this Community Veterans Park. The Park is located at the junction of Mayport Road and Atlantic Blvd, under the 80-foot flagpole. Please bring chairs or blankets for you listening comfort. In case of rain, the event will be the American Legion Pavilion, directly behind the Legion Lodge. Local boy scouts will assist in parking.Beaches Vets Hold Vet Day Programharvesthappenings.event brite.com Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Sunday, Nov. 11 The First Annual Salute To Veterans 5K will start at 8 a.m., followed by a one-mile walk/run at 9 a.m. starting at the Jacksonville Landing. The 5K will benefit the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association. There is a discounted $15 entry for all military, seniors 65 and over and children 13 and under. Cost includes a t-shirt. Sign up online at http:// www.1stplacesports.com/ salute.html Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and home town favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music. Along with numerous local businesses, national organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 17

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National Parks Free For Vets Day WeekendFrom American Forces Press ServiceAmericas 398 national parks will offer the pub lic free admission Nov. 10-12 during Veterans Day weekend in honor of those who serve and have served in the U.S. military, according to a National Park Service news release. National parks pre serve places that com memorate our countrys collective heritage our ideals, our majestic lands, our sacred sites, our patriotic icons which our military has defend ed through the years, National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said in the release. We are grateful for the service and sacrifice of military members, past and present, and honored to tell their story at many of our national parks, Jarvis added. From frontier forts to World War II battlefields, more than 70 national parks have direct con nections to the mili tary, the release said. These include the earli est national parks, where Army engineers designed park roads and buildings and the cavalry enforced regulations from 1886 until the National Park Service was established. National parks throughout the country will hold special events to com memorate Veterans Day, according to the release. Highlights include: Evening candle light tours of Vicksburg National Cemetery, Miss., where visitors will encounter historical per sonalities; The 7th annual illu mination of 6,000 graves at Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Petersburg National Battlefield, Va.; A Continental sol dier encampment at Independence National Historical Park, Pa.; A talk on the AfricanAmerican Civil War experience at Natchez National Historical Park, Miss.; and, An exhibit and talks about the Roosevelts in the World Wars at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, N.Y. Additional benefits for veterans on Veterans Day include a free Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area cruise that will pass the USS Constitution on its way to Georges Island, home of Fort Warren, according to the release. The National Park Service is also, in partnership with the Gettysburg Foundation, offering vets free entrance to the Gettysburg National Military Park museum in Pennsylvania, the release said. Finegan Honors Veterans Allyson King and Tahj Mareus say the Pledge of Allegiance after raising the American flag during a flag raising ceremony Nov. 2 at Finegan Elementary School. The school held also held a White Table cer emony presented by NS Mayport CMDCM Bob White in honor of Veterans Day Nov. 11.-Photos by Paige GnannNS Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Bob White explains the significance of the White Table ceremony to remember MIA/POW personnel during a ceremony at Finegan Elementary School. Service members, students, teachers and guests stand at attention during the Pledge of Allegiance at Finegan Elementary Schools Flag Raising ceremony on Nov. 2. 18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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USS Enterprise Makes Last Mayport StopFrom Staff More than 5,500 Sailors and Marines serving on USS Enterprise (CVN 65) pulled into Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 31 for the last time before the ship returned to Norfolk, Va., on Nov. 4, fol lowing a seven month deployment supporting operations in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Enterprises return to Norfolk was the 25th and final homecoming in her 51 years of distinguished service. The air craft carrier is scheduled to inactivate Dec. 1, 2012, in a ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station in Norfolk, Va. Enterprise is the Navys first nuclearpowered aircraft carrier and the oldest actively deployed warship in the U.S. Navys fleet. It is the only Enterpriseclass aircraft carrier ever to be commissioned and will celebrate her 51st birthday Nov. 25, the first aircraft carrier in the world to do so. -Photo by MC3 Harry Andrew D. GordonAircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) arrives at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Enterprise is completing its final scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. -Photo by MC3 Scott PittmanLt. j.g. Trenton Daiuto, assigned to the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11, is greeted by his wife upon his return return to NS Mayport, Fla.-Photo by MC3 Scott PittmanSailors assigned to the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 return to NS Mayport, Fla.-Photo by MC3 Harry Andrew D. GordonAviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Cesar Thompson of HS-11 is greeted by his wife after USS Enterprise arrived at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 19

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20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Dont Wait To Mail Holiday GiftsFrom Naval Supply Systems Command Corporate CommunicationsDont wait to mail your holiday gifts. The Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25, delivery of holiday cards, letters, and pack ages are out. The dates are as follows: Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962-966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov 26 *Parcel Post: Nov. 13 Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 *Express mail Military Service: N/A *First-Class Letters/ Cards/Priority Mail: Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 1 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) *Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 *First-Class Mail (Letters/cards, priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is avail able from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-avail able basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth com bined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addi tion to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to par cels mailed to APO/ FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domesti cally by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space avail able basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth com bined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is also recommended that customers check with their local civilian or military post office for infor mation on size restric tions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Additionally, cus tomers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items can not be mailed. Examples are: switch blade knives, pornog raphy, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, customers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alco hol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. The NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission--to deliver sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warfighter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfo lio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply opera tions, conventional ord nance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, security assistance, and quality of life issues for the naval forces, including food service, postal ser vices, Navy Exchanges, and movement of house hold goods. The NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps team forms a vast network of pro fessionals who deliver unparalleled products and services to customers in the fleet and across the world.Budget For Holiday Gifts Can Make It CheeryFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNot interested in another desk fountain or lava lamp? Really dont want to participate in the office or club gift exchange? Its okay, but dont put off letting others know your preferences. Plan ahead and avoid feeling obligated to joinin or ungrateful for that unappreciated gift. With the holidays just around the corner, this is a good time to think about how you want to celebrate and plan your gift giving, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, personal financial man agement specialist at the Fleet and Family Support Center in Millington, Tenn. Generally there are two categories of shoppers the planners or the pro crastinators, according to Livingstone-Hoyte. Regardless of such labeling, one thing is cer tain; you will not survive the holidays financially without a well-thoughtout and realistic plan, she said. Everyone wants to have a great holiday season and include gifts, but to do that realistic planning and managing expectations goes with that. There are some simple steps Sailors and their families can take to pre pare for the holidays. Decide what your priori ties during the holidays are, what is important to you and why. Dont spend money out of guilt or a sense of obligation, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Knowing what your priorities are and shap ing the expectations of your family, friends and coworkers early in the season can relieve stress ors later. People will know what to expect. For more tips on man aging holiday spending along with a holiday budget worksheet, visit www. navynavstress.com.Time For Flu Vaccine TRICAREIts that time of year again flu season. Time for you and your family to get flu shots. Not only will you significantly lower your chance of getting the flu this winter, but you can make an important contribution to public health by limiting the spread of this dangerous disease. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states flu seasons are unpredictable and can be severe. All family mem bers, six months and older, should be immu nized every year, since the flu virus changes slightly season to season, requir ing yearly vaccinations. This is especially true for people at high risk of catching the flu or with a risk of flu-related com plications, such as chil dren, pregnant women, people 65 and older and those with chronic medi cal conditions such as asthma. A complete list of people at higher risk of complications is available at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website: www.cdc.gov/ flu/groups.htm. Some people worry flu shots dont work. It is possible to get the flu, even after getting immunized. There are different strains of the flu virus in circu lation, meaning you can be exposed to a version of the virus youre not immunized against. Some even believe the flu vac cine causes the flu. This is incorrect. Flu shots con tain only pieces of killed flu virus that cannot infect the body. Some recipients report mild flu-like symptoms, which result from antibodies your body produces that help fight off the actual flu. Getting a flu shot is easy and inexpensive for TRICARE beneficiaries. You can get your flu vac cine from any military medical clinic or hospital at no cost to you, or from your pharmacist at one of 45,000 network pharma cies that administer vac cines to TRICARE benefi ciaries. Find a participating pharmacy near you at www.express-scripts. com/tricare/pharmacy, or by calling Express Scripts at 1-877-363-1303. You can also be vaccinated by your doctor, or at one of the retail health clinics found inside many phar macies. Keep in mind this is considered a medical visit, so you may have cost shares or copays. Generally, if the phar macist administers the vaccine, it is at no cost to you. If another healthcare professional administers the vaccine, it is a medical visit and you must pay the associated copays. Although getting vacci nated is the best way to prevent the flu, there are additional steps you can follow to avoid the flu. One of the most impor tant is to wash your hands regularly with soap and water, or use an alcoholbased hand sanitizer when those are not available. Here are some other tips from www.flu.gov: eyes, nose, or mouth. with sick people. habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food. mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw your used tissue in the trash. flu-like illness, stay home until at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (without the use of feverreducing medicine). Its important to get a flu shot every year your chances of staying healthy this winter increase dra matically if you do. For more information on this years flu season, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. To learn more about TRICARE coverage of flu shots, visit www.tricare.mil/flu.

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