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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00273


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Taking On The Spray -Photo by ET1 Frank NunamakerEnsign Kiley Provenzano, Electronic Warfare Officer on board USS Gettysburg (CG 64), walks to the next station during her final qualification of a Ships Readiness Force class by displaying her ability to perform self-defense skills after being sprayed with olorium capsaicin spray on Oct. 19. USS Gettysburg (CG 64) is returning home after completing the semi-annual exercise Joint Warrior off of the coast of the United Kingdom. Your Medical Team Only Click AwayBy Branch Health Clinic Mayport, Family Medicine Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport is offer ing a new way for patients and their care teams to connect. Patients with a Primary Care Manager (PCM) at BHC Mayport can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Homeport Online. Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for non-urgent issues, request lab results and medication refills, and access doctorreviewed health informa tion. Because its for nonurgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply. And the system is secure and confidential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Homeport Online, go to www.relayhealth. com, select register in the upper right corner, and select register as a patient. Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up, and it can take up to three business days for the team to finalize the registration. For technical help, call RelayHealth at 866-RELAY-ME (866-7352963). Patients can also fill out a registration form with staff at their Medical Homeport teams front desk. And, as always, BHC Mayport Medical Homeport teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and the Nurse Advice Line is available after-hours. To connect by tele phone anytime, call Central Appointments and After-Hours Nurse Advice Line at 800-JAXHOSP (800-529-4677). These communica tion options are just one aspect of Medical Homeportthe Navys approach to the nation wide medical home model of care, which emphasizes quality, coordinated care led by a primary care provider. Medical Homeport places the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doctors to nurses to case manag ersled by the PCM. The patient and the team work together for a coordinated, whole per son approach to health. To learn more about all services available at BHC Mayport and its parent command, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, check out the 2012 Patient Guide on the web at www.med. navy.mil/sites/navalhos pitaljax and like the command on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ navalhospitaljacksonville to keep up with current news. Trick-orTreating At MayportFrom BBCGet your fright on Oct. 26 with the fifth annual Balfour Beatty Communities Horrifying Haunted House from 6-9 p.m., on 1035 F Lexington Court in Ribault Bay Village. This free event is open for all residents. Halloween will be observed on Oct. 31. All should honor the hours from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. and house with out exterior lighting on should be avoided by trick-or-treaters.Evening In Pink With ClinicFrom NBHC MayportNaval Branch Health Clinic Mayport is going pink with its first Breast Cancer Awareness Symposium Oct. 26 in recognition of October as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. All military ID hold ers are invited put on their favorite pink attire and enjoy pink refresh ments at An Evening In Pink, from 5-7 p.m. at the Clinic. There will be pre sentations on top ics such as Breast Cancer In a Nut Shell, Mammograms 101. There will be breast self exam training and a Bra decorating con test. For more informa tion, call 270-4289 or 270-4284. Celebrate Harvest At ChapelFrom Mayport ChapelMayport Chapel would like to invite all Military families to our annual Harvest Festival. There will be a moonwalk, games, crafts, a cake walk, free hot dogs, nachos, pop corn, and many other fun fall actives. The fun starts Saturday, Oct. 27 from noon-3 p.m. at the Chapel. For more informa tion, call the Chapel at 270-5212. Sea & Sky SpectacularFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 314/12, released Oct. 19, announced the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) decision to terminate the Service Dress Khaki (SDK) initiative. The NAVADMIN also reemphasized the option al wear of the Service Dress Blue (SDB) uniform as an acceptable alterna tive during summer uni form wear periods when participating in events, ceremonies and meet ings where wearing a coat and tie is appropriate and when other uniforms are not prescribed. The Navy continu ously monitors Sailors uniform concerns and develops uniforms and design changes based on feedback received and research conduct ed, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. After May 2012 when the contempo rary design for SDK was approved for optional wear, the Navy continued to conduct research with product vendors and with the information gained and reviewed, the deci sion was made to cancel Service Dress Khaki. The Navy made the decision to terminate pur suing the SDK uniform as an optional uniform due to factors identified dur ing a comprehensive uni form assessment. These factors included the evaluation of quanti ties of SDK sets ordered/ sold, wear test of several models evaluating qual ity, durability, appearance and fit, and estimated cost per uniform set to the individual. The NAVADMIN 314/12 also reaffirmed E-7 to O-10 personnel may wear the SDB as a suitable alternative for wear in lieu of summer white and service dress white uni forms when a coat and tie is appropriate. SDB uni forms may be prescribed for wear year-round to all official functions (when formal dress, dinner dress, or full dress uniforms are not prescribed). Navy Nixes New Uniform -Photo by Paige GnannThousands of pedestrians crowd downtown Jacksonville Beach Saturday and Sunday for the 2012 Sea & Sky Spectacular featuring the Blue Angels. See story, photos, Pages 4-5.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.You probably remem ber some bullying which took place at some time during your school days. You may even have expe rienced some level of bul lying or maybe a friend did. Bullying is an all-toocommon human activity which has existed since the beginning of recorded history and is present in most cultures. It is enact ed by both boys and girls. Research suggests that somewhere between 30 percent and 60 percent of American schoolchildren report being bullied. Bullying is about power. One psychologist is quoted as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or had your interests and feelings unfairly damaged by someone more power ful than you. And this power can take different forms. Although girls are sometimes physi cally violent, it is boys who tend to be more physical. Florida law defines bul lying as systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psycho logical distress on one or more students and may involve teasing, social exclusion, threat, intimi dation, stalking, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious, or racial harass ment, public humiliation, or destruction of prop erty. Harassment is any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture; use of data or computer software; or written, ver bal or physical conduct directed against a student that places the student in reasonable fear of harm to his person or dam age to his property; has the effect of substantially interfering with a stu dents educational perfor mance, opportunities, or benefits; or has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of a school. All parents of schoolage children should know the law. Florida Statute 1006.147, The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act, prohibits bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a Florida public K 12 educational institu tion. This law requires that each school district in Florida adopt a policy prohibiting bullying and harassment of any stu dent or employee of a public K 12 school. The Duval County School Board has adopt ed an anti-bullying poli cy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bul lied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trust ed adult. This report can be done anonymously. An investigation will be conducted by the school principal or his/her des ignee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Now that you know the law, consider the fol lowing tips to deter and diminish bullying at your childs school: the schools designated administrator your con cerns about bullying, such as issues with supervision and monitoring of stu dents. build a social safety net work, and encourage them to travel via the buddy system. wide anti-bullying cam paign website at www. stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov to find ideas to prevent bullying to share with your children. What about your chil dren? Are they being bul lied? Possible warning signs include the follow ing: missing belongings, or bruises, excuses to avoid attending school, school, aches, stomachaches, loss of appetite, trouble sleep ing, or bad dreams, and/ or esteem. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the problem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school offi cials to find a solution. For More Information The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act is a memorial to Jeffrey Johnston, son of Debbie and Robert Johnston. Jeffreys story can now be found, with other bullycide stories, in the book, Bullycide in America: Moms speak out about the bullying/ suicide connection. The book can be ordered at www.bullycide.org. Stop Cyberbullying www.stopcyberbully ing.org Available in schools: Pay It Forward (HS Character Education Library) 2000 Pocket Catherine Ryan Hyde Sarah and the Naked Truth (MS Character Education Library) 2002 Yearling Patricia MacLachlan Stand Tall Molly Lou Mellon (ES Character Education Library) 2001 G.P. Putnam and Sons Patty Lovell Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Bullying Is On The Rise Among StudentsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingI am sure you have said this yourself or heard someone close by say, I am trying to juggle too many things! When we try to do too many things we can often feel like we are juggling too many balls in the air, afraid that we will soon see one drop! In a blog that I once read by John Maxwell, he mentions this very phe nomenon. He talks about the balls of life that we juggle being things such as work, family, health, friends, and spirit. He also mentions that one of these balls is made of rubber, able to bounce back, and that the rest are made of glass and will be damaged or shatter when dropped. Can you guess which of the following should be thought of as a rubber ball: Work, Family, Health, Friends, or Spirit? The rubber ball is indeedWork! Think about it with me for a moment. Your work and career can always bounce back if you need to drop it for a while. The oth ers are made of glass, and will sustain damage if dropped. For instance, when there is a death in the family, we are given emergency leave. If a Sailor asks for help with substance abuse, he is sent to treatment. Work can always be put on hold to give attention to the things that matter most! Unfortunately, too many people have sought to keep work well jug gled, and let everything else in life come crashing down! It can sometimes be a temptation to come to work every day and attempt to carefully man age how we think others view us, for the sake of ris ing in our career. All the while there may be a mar riage that is falling apart, financial hardships kept hidden, or a health issue kept quiet. As a Chaplain I can tell you that many times I have counseled people who strived to keep their career well balanced, and as a result they lost their marriage, family, and finances as a result. Often times the conse quences of a cracked glass ball will end up affecting the career as well, which ends up breaking that one ball that had the ability to bounce all along! I can also tell you many stories of people who have dropped the ball of Spirit for their career. They were once strong in their faith and attended weekly worship, but have let that slide for the sake of getting one more thing accomplished or simply sleeping in! The results of neglecting your spiritual ity and faith life often pro duce a negative outcome! So, let me encourage you to take a lifelong per spective. When life reach es its end which ball will you treasure the most? No one ever gets to the end of life and says, I wish I had worked more! So be courageous enough to inform your command when a glass ball needs atten tion, because work will be there when you return!Use Your Faith To Help Keep You GoingChap Stephen Cloer Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSThe Beaches Veterans wish to extend their grateful appreciation to the Home Depot Foundation who has provided our veteran community park with a $5000.00 Beatification Grant. Tami Swain, Atlantic Beach Home Depot Grant Coordinator, led six Team Depot employees, with their equipment, in donating their time and effort, to plant trees and over160 shrubs and bushes in our lovely Park. The Foundation money will also allow us to improve the playground and pro vide wheelchair accessi ble paths within the Park. In 2010, the city of Atlantic Beach asked the local Veterans organization to assist in the improvement of their 1-acre park to be used as a Community Veterans Park. Six Veterans orga nizations then formed the Beaches Veterans Memorial Park, Inc. and immediately began an improvement program by implementing an engraved brick donation program for the commu nity to honor their friends and family who have served their country in the Armed Forces on the United States. As a result through a City Grant, and help from the VFW and Rotary Club, an 80-foot flag pole now graces the approach to the City. Other donations created a 1,400-square-foot electri fied stage and the sodding of the entire park area where National Holidays are now observed by these Veterans groups. The next observance at the Park will be held on Veterans Day, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. featuring the Honorable Ander Crenshaw Fl 4, the Beaches Honor Guard, and Legion Riders along with many distinguished guests. Please bring chairs or blankets if you plan to attend and admire the beautiful landscaping program provided by the Home Depot Foundation and store employees. To learn more go to www.beachesveterans memorialpark.org Jack Berry BVMP TO THE Silver Star Added To Valor SiteFrom American Forces Press ServiceOfficials have added the names of those who have received Silver Star awards to a website listing recipients of the nations highest awards for valor. The site launched in July with the names of those who have received the Medal of Honor, the nations highest award for valor, since Sept. 11, 2001. On Aug. 1, officials added the names of those who have received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross or the Air Force Cross the nations second-highest valor awards. Now, the site also lists those who have received the Silver Star. The site at http://valor. defense.gov is designed to raise awareness of ser vice members heroism and to help in deterring those who falsely claim military honors, officials said. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 2012 Sea & Sky SpectacularBlue Angels Soar Over Jax Beaches -Photo by MC1 John ParkerExplosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Tim Fredrickson, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 6 Detachment Mayport, helps two blind chil dren learn about the F6-A EOD robot during 2012 Sea and Sky Spectacular. -Photo by MC1 John ParkerJason Newburg and Viper airshow flies close to the Jacksonville Beach Pier, as thousands of spectators crowd the beach to watch the 2012 Sea & Sky Spectacular hosted by Naval Station Mayport, the city of Jacksonville, and the Beaches cities on Oct. 20-21.-Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers from Naval Station Mayport patrol the streets on trash detail. From StaffThe 2012 Jacksonville Sea & Sky Spectacular flew into high gear with the performance of the U.S. Navys Blue Angels flight demonstration team on Oct. 20-21, hosted by Naval Station Mayport, the city of Jacksonville and the Beaches cit ies Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach and Atlantic Beach. The streets of down town Jacksonville Beach were packed, while the beaches were crammed over the weekend with thousands of spectators watching the multiple air performances. Performers included U.S. Special Operation Command Parachute Team, Corkey Fornof, Jason Newburg, Red Eagles, Julie Clark, Geico Skytypers, Black Diamond Jet Team, F4U-Corsair, F-18 Super Hornet, Legacy Flight, Mike Wiskus, Matt Chapman, Horsemen Fllight Team, F-22 Raptor, Heritage Flight, Michael Goulian, and the U.S. Coast Guard, who performed a search and rescue demonstra tion. Dozens of volun teers from Naval Station Mayport attended the two day event to help do everything from litter patrol, to Beverage sales and standing duty at the NS Mayport air terminal. The Blue Angels flew into NS Mayport on Thursday to prepape for the weekends event, which included a full day visiting with school groups and JROTC on Friday. Two members of the Blue Angels maintenance team were welcomed back by friendly faces from their former squad rons. Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Bo Tullis left HSM-46 for the Blue Angels a year ago after watching them per form at NS Mayport in 2009. Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class William Martin left Mayport two years ago for his place in the Blue Angels team.-Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers from HSL-48 sell drinks to help raise money for their MWR funds to host a command holiday party during the air show.-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport volunteers work a Beverage booth to raise money to pay for its annual holiday party by sell ing drinks at this years air show.-Photo by Paige GnannSandra Barrett of Naval Station Mayport MWR talks with spectators about opportunities available to the pub lic with the MWR guest pass.-Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers from the CPOA sell t-shirts, coins and beverages at the air show.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 5 -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyBlue Angels Sailors perform routine maintenance on a Blue Angels' F/A-18 Hornet at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyCapt. Douglas Cochrane, commanding officer Naval Station Mayport, greets Capt. Greg McWherter, com manding officer and flight leader of the U.S. Navy Blue Angels as he arrives at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC1 John ParkerF/A-18C Hornets assigned to the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, fly in formation over packed beaches in Jacksonville, Florida during the 2012 Sea & Sky Spectacular. This free event will feature a dynamic over-the-ocean sky show highlighted by the Blue Angels along with other military and civilian flight teams, live entertainment, a street festival featuring static displays of aircraft and military vehicles, simulators and recruitment booths. -Photo by MC1 John ParkerThe World Famous GEICO Skytypers Airshow Team is a flight squadron of six vintage WWII airplanes.-Photo by MC1 John ParkerAll eyes are focused up as Fat Albert performs maneuvers over Jacksonville Beach.-Photo by Paige GnannAviation Structional Mechanic 1st Class Bo Tullis joined the Blue Angels after leaving HSM-46 last year. Tullis said he wanted to join the team after seeing them perform at NS Mayport in 2009.-Photo by Paige GnannSpectators enjoy a bit of shade as they eat lunch in the plaza in Jacksonville Beach.-Photo by Paige GnannSpectators enjoy live music by the Southeast Navy band as they watch the air show from downtown Jacksonville Beach.

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Vicksburg Arrives In Lisbon, PortugalEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and guidedmissile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) arrived in Lisbon, Portugal, for a regularly-sched uled port visit Oct. 17. The visit serves to continue U.S. 6th Fleet efforts to build global maritime partnerships with European nations and improve maritime safety and security in the region. [U.S. Navy] ships go into Lisbon because of [Portugals] longstanding friendship with the U.S., said Capt. Logan Jones, commanding officer of Vicksburg. [Vicksburg and Porter] Sailors gain an oppor tunity to learn about, and see, someone elses homeland. [We also] have an opportunity to show the quality of our ships and our Sailors. While sightseeing will likely play a big role in Lisbon, it is not the sole purpose of the visit. While here, we want to make friends and strengthen the bonds between our two great nations and show our commit ment to maritime security, said Cmdr. Carl Brobst, executive officer of Vicksburg. I want our Sailors out there building rela tionships through community relations projects. Were here to absorb the culture, build com munity relations and contribute to the economy. Though U.S. Navy ships visit Lisbon, it is far from the most common European port. This will be my first time in Lisbon, said Command Master Chief Robert W. Bostic, command master chief of Vicksburg. It is a very unique port in that a lot of Sailors dont get a chance to come here. There will be an opportunity for [Vicksburg and Porter Sailors] to see a lot with minimum trav el. Vicksburg and Porter are conducting this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Vicksburg and Porter are deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater secu rity cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottU.S. Navy Sailors man the rails as guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) passes the 25th of April Bridge while pulling into Lisbon, Portugal. Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottQuartermaster 3rd Class Taverious Lee raises a flag as guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) pulls into Lisbon, Portugal. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Grandmasters Set To Complete DeploymentEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsThe Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46, Detachment Six, also known as the Big Irons, are nearing the end of their recent deployment aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) with record num bers. The Big Irons of Det. 6 have been on station with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ENTCSG) throughout the strike groups deployment. The detachments primary role has been to provide nighttime surface surveil lance and control as well as anti-terrorism force protection and logis tics support to the strike group. Ive been with {the Big Irons} for one year, and I have never seen a harder working detach ment, said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman (AW) Lionel Harris. I see a lot of hard work and a lot of team players even though we all come from different rates. I am the only {aviation ordnance man}, but I feel like part of the team and right at home. During the deployment and workup cycle, Det. 6 flew more than 1,500 hours during the course of 305 days, used more than 203,602 gallons of fuel, transported more than 15 tons of cargo, car ried more than 80 passen gers and flew 62 missions, making them one of the most efficient air detach ments in the Navy. We have flown more hours than any other detachment I know of, said Lt. Hunter Marner, a pilot with Det. 6. With seven pilots and three air crewman, we logged a lot of hours, but we were up to the challenge. With the large number of missions flown by the Big Irons, detachment Sailors were expected to be on top of their game. We always had to be flexible, said Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Helicopter) 2nd Class (NAC/AW/SW) Phillip M. Gullo. It was a constant challenge, but when you love your job, it makes it worth doing. Big Irons leadership also noticed the hard work of their crew. Our guys stepped up to the plate and they crushed it, said Lt. Benjamin Ross, the detachment maintenance officer. Everyone from the {mechanics} turning wrenches to the electri cians chasing wires and the aircrews managing the operations side of it all...they made it happen. I was very proud of all efforts that were put into making us one of the hardest working detach ments in the Navy, said Marner. It was a huge group effort; we couldnt have done it if we had been missing even one of our Sailors. Vicksburg is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of respon sibility. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT.Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT. Fight deadly childhood diseases. www.stjude.org Cole, Namesake Barracks Remembers Attack, Honors Fallen USS Cole Public Affairs Training and Support Center Great Lakes Public AffairsThe crew of guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) held a ceremony in memory of the 12th anniver sary of the al-Qaida suicide attack on the ship, Oct. 12., while staff and students from Training Support Center (TSC), Great Lakes, Ill., did the same at BEQ 6301, the USS Coles namesake barracks. Both ceremonies honored the 17 Sailors who lost their lives and the 37 Sailors who were injured during the attack in Aden, Yemen, Oct. 12, 2000. For our Navy, Cole, her Sailors and their families, our war on terror began on October 12, 2000, at 11:18 in the morning, said Cmdr. Peter K. Nilsen, Coles com manding officer. Our ship stands for American resolve. It is part of history and a memorial for our fallen ship mates. The crew of the Cole stood in formation as the names of the Sailors lost and injured that day were read aloud and bells struck in remembrance. The service conclud ed with a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps. As long as this building (USS Cole) is standing, I hope that the future Sailors will never forget what hap pened on the Cole on this day, said Chief Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical)(SW) Roman Sado. New Sailors were reminded of the ultimate sacri fice that was made by those who have gone before them. The ceremony was lead in prayer by Cmdr. Lynn Peterson, command chaplain TSC, Great Lakes. The event was colored by the memories of people, commented Peterson. I remember Sailors I met a few years after the attack who were still recovering from their injuries and felt that their sacrifices serve to con solidate our sense of purpose as a team. After sharing some stories of heroism on the USS Cole, Capt. Peter R. Lintner, commanding officer for TSC challenged the attendees to reflect on the meaning of shipmate in the Navy and asked, Will you be the one to dive in to the water for your shipmate? [The] ship had been completely repaired and though there were no longer visible remnants of the attack, the 17 brass stars on the deck where the hole once was served as a constant reminder to every Sailor that had the privilege to follow their USS Cole pre decessors, Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Bruce J. Pilgrim said of his first deployment on the USS Cole. Cole, homeported out of Norfolk, Va., is currently deployed in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility conducting theater security cooperation and maritime security operations. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 7

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4th Fleet Celebrates Hispanic Heritage MonthU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) celebrated National Hispanic Heritage Month with a potluck picnic aboard Naval Station Mayport Oct. 16, featuring a wide variety of Hispanic specialty dishes and music from many coun tries in 4th Fleets operat ing area. Recognizing Hispanic Heritage month and diversity is important to the Navy, especially for us here at 4th Fleet, as we continue to grow and develop our relation ships with our partner nations in Latin America, said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, COMUSNAVSO/C4F. In his remarks to the command, Harris high lighted the history and future of diversity. Hispanic culture has been a dominant facet of the United States since early in our history. The future of the U.S. will even more depend on the suc cess of further alignment with our fellow Americans of Latin American and Caribbean decent, Harris said. Diversity of the many characteristics and attributes of individu al Sailors and civilians enhance the overall mis sion readiness of 4th Fleet and the Navy. COMUSNAVSO was originally based in Puerto Rico and operated in South America, Central America, the Caribbean Sea and surrounding waters. In 2008, U.S. 4th Fleet was reestab lished and joined with COMUSNAVSO setting up headquarters aboard Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Since the beginning of COMNAVSOUTH at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, the command has had close ties to the Hispanic com munity. Over a decade later, the reestablishment of 4th Fleet and a home port shift to Florida, those bonds have only grown stronger and continue to flourish, said Chief Information Systems Technician Jason Hurley. We are fortunate to have amongst our staff, those dedicated to our Nation and Navy, those who picked up their roots from Puerto Rico to con tinue serving and con tributing to our success of mission in Latin America, he said. The observation first started in 1968, as National Hispanic Heritage week under President Lyndon B. Johnson and was expand ed by President Ronald Regan in 1988, to cover a 30-day period from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. The date of Sept. 15 is significant because it is the Independence Day for five Latin American countries: Costa Rica; El Salvador; Guatemala; Honduras; and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile cele brate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18 respectively. Hispanics have played a vital role in naval his tory, serving in virtu ally every at-sea conflict in American history. Hispanics can trace their tradition of naval service to men such as Lt. Jorge Farragut Mesquida, who served in the American Revolution. Seamen Phillip Bazar and Seamen John Ortgega, who distin guished themselves in combat and were award ed the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration of the United States, and Adm. David Farragut, who served during the civil war and was the first person to ever attain the rank of full admiral. Today nearly 70,000 Sailors and civilians of Hispanic heritage are serving in the Navy, mak ing up approximately 11 percent of the Navys active, Reserve and civil ian forces. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) support USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners in the the sea. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenChief Culinary Specialist Dwight Fennel and 4th Fleet Protocol Officer Ms. Maria Alvarez carve up a Puerto Rican-style roasted pig at a command picnic celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month Oct 16. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Underwood Celebrates Hispanic DiversityU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors assigned to the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) organized an event and dinner to recognize Hispanic Heritage Month, Oct. 19, while deployed to U.S. 4th Fleet and supporting Operation Martillo. Two naval officers representing Argentina and Peru, temporar ily assigned to U.S. Navy Destroyer Squadron Four Zero (DESRON 40), and an Underwood chief petty officer spoke to the crew about the Hispanic cul ture. When we say Hispanic, whom are we talking about? asked Chief Logistics Specialist Josue Negron. For sure, they are not one nation ality, nor one culture. Instead, Hispanics are a greatly diverse people. Their cultural and lin guistic origins are Spanish and Latin American, regardless of race and color. Negron went on to share some of the history of Spanish exploration and colonization in the Americas as well as some of the accomplishments of modern-day Hispanics including a Nobel Peace Prize winner, a surgeon general, and 10 astro nauts. After the speak ers addressed the crew about Hispanic heritage, Underwoods Diversity Team cooked a dinner of quesadillas, tacos, rice, and beans. I think its very impor tant to take time to rec ognize and celebrate, not only Hispanic heritage, but different cultures that make up the U.S. and the Navy, said Yeoman 1st Class Jose Carrion Rodriguez who helped cook the chicken quesa dillas. It shows our diver sity and our strength as the worlds great est Navy. The Diversity Team holds different cel ebrations throughout the year as a way to get the crew involved, bring up morale, and to inform the rest of the crew of the dif ferent cultures and diver sity we have here in our Navy, Rodriguez added. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America, and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsYeoman 1st Class (SW) Jose Carrion Rodriguez (left) and Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class (SW) Joshua Singleton cook quesadillas in the galley aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) for a dinner and event observ ing Hispanic Heritage Month. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Lt. Paolo Camogliano, a Peruvian naval officer assigned to U.S. Navy Destroyer Squadron Four Zero, addresses the crew on the mess deck of USS Underwood. Chief Logistics Specialist (SW/AW) Josue Negron addresses USS Underwoods crew on the mess deck during a dinner and event observing Hispanic Heritage Month. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 9

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Storytime in the Pumpkin Patch Caregivers and children from Child Development Center building 1960 listen to stories while visiting the CDC Pumpkin Patch.-Photos by Sarah BarthelemyOct. 26: Liberty Halloween Party. 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Be prepared to be scared to death. DJ, food, costume contest, prizes, games and more. 2707205 Oct. 30: Bingo Halloween Party. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on hard cards, Costume Contests, Treats from MWR and More! 270-7204 Nov. 1: Bingo Turkey Shoot. Every Bingo Session through Thanksgiving, Beachside Bingo is giving away a free Turkey. No valid at Lunchtime Bingo. 2707204 Nov. 2: Fall Fiesta 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Out of Hand, free food, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Nov. 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 4: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Nov. 7: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Nov. 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 13: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. MWR 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Oct. 26: Liberty Halloween Party 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. DJ, food, costume contest, game & prizes. All-hands event. Oct. 27: WasabiCon Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Transportation Only. Sign up deadline Oct. 24. Oct. 28: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Oct. 30: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 30: Bingo Halloween Party. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on hard cards, Costume Contests, Treats from MWR and More! 270-7204 Nov. 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at the Galley for Lunch. Nov. 2: Fall Fiesta 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Out of Hand, free food, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Nov. 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 3: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 7:30 a.m. Cost $10 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Signup deadline Oct. 16. Nov. 4: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Detroit Lions. Van departs 2 p.m. Cost $10. Nov. 4: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Nov. 5: East Coast Buffet Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. Nov. 7: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Nov. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts. Van departs 7 p.m. Cost $10. Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 10: UF Gators vs. Louisiana Tech. Van departs TBD. FREE. Nov. 11: Jacksonville Fair. Van departs 12 p.m. FREE. Transportation only. Nov. 12: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 13: College Workshop. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 14: Liberty Focus Group. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. We need your input and this is your chance to tell us what you think of your Liberty Program. Free refresh ments and all attendees will be entered to win. Nov. 14: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 11

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Classes Geared Towards Family StabilityFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Oct. 25, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 25, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1 Room 1124 Oct. 29, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Oct. 30, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Oct. 30, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Oct. 31, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 31, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of Fleet and Family Support Center line up with runners to recognize October as Domestic Violence Awareness month during the 5K run/3K walk sponsored by MWR the third Tuesday of every month.Military Wives Vendor Show Join us Nov. 3 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Mayport USO center. Come out and support your local military fami lies and their businesses as well as the USO. There will be food and raffle prizes. For more information, contact Heather or Leticia at milwivesbusi nessesandevents@gmail. com Free Admission To Jacksonville University Military Appreciation Football Game Active Duty personnel receive free admission to the JU vs. CAMPBELL football game at D. B. Milne Field on JUs campus. Game time is noon on Nov. 10. You must show current ID Card for free admission. JUs campus address is 2800 University Blvd N, Jacksonville, FL 32211. Boots On The Ground Walk or drive along 1.5miles of Boots on the Ground stretching from the corner of historic downtown Fernandina Beach to the Atlantic Ocean. The display is a memorial of more than 7,000 boots, pictures, and flags hon oring the brave firefight ers and police officers of 9-11 and fallen OIF-OEF U.S. service members. The event is free to the public. The Mothers of Americas Military Fallen is also accepting donations of worn combat boots. To do so, please contact Julie Bargeron at juliebargeron@mother sofamf.com or call (904) 468-0733. K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, and parties. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Professional Military Knowledge RedefinedNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsFollowing advancement exam construction chang es announced in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 197/11, a Test Plan Development Panel (TPDP) of force and command master chiefs redefined Professional Military Knowledge (PMK) the week of Oct. 19 at the Navy Advancement Center. The restructured advancement exams decrease the total num ber of questions from 200 to 175 and increase the emphasis on rating-specific technical questions. The September 2012 exams for active duty E4-E6, the upcoming January chief petty officer exam, and the Selected Reserve (SELRES) exams in February will be the first opportunities for candidates to take the new 175-question exams, which contain only 25 PMK questions. The previous exams were much more PMK heavy, ranging from 50 questions for the E4 exam to 100 PMK ques tions for candidates eligible for the chiefs exam, said Tom Updike, Navy advancement exe cution division head for the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center (NETPDTC). The reduced PMK section on the advancement exams presented the PMK-TPDP members with the tough task of prioritizing the massive PMK content area into a manageable and meaningful 25 ques tions on each exam. That process was focused on the critical information a Sailor needs to know beyond the core occu pational and job-specific knowledge requirements. Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Jeffrey Kirby from Patrol Squadron 16 was a PMK-TPDP member who trav eled to NETPDTC from Jacksonville, Fla. The new PMK test plan and content information will give future advancement exam review teams an excellent framework and structure to draw from as they develop test questions, said Kirby. We took fleet input as well as discussion with the PMK test panel to ensure our definition and topic areas were valid. The PMK sections of enlisted exams assess a Sailors knowledge of Navy general military training, professional development and the leadership continuum at the appropriate paygrade, regardless of rating. The primary reason for the exam structure change is to improve exam validity, added Updike. More job-spe cific technical questions improve the Navys ability to rank-order Sailors by rating. Advancement candidates who know the technical aspects of their rating better than their peers should like the change in exam struc ture. For Command Master Chief (AW/SS) James Barnes of the Navy Information Operations Command in San Antonio, participation in the PMK test plan panel was his first exposure to advancement exam con struction. Its extremely enlight ening to see how much effort and seriousness goes into advancement exam development, said Barnes. Our PMK team included members from the surface, subsurface, and aviation commu nities to ensure that the fleet was well-represented and gave an accurate and current definition of the required military knowl edge. To develop the PMK questions and rat ing-specific advance ment exams, NETPDTC brings fleet subject mat ter experts (FSMEs) for their respective ratings to review question banks and develop E4 E7 exams. The advance ment exam readiness reviews (AERRs) are one to two weeks in length, depending on exam bank work requirements and are held throughout the year. The reviews are held at NETPDTC at Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla. Participants receive tem porary additional duty (TAD) orders from their parent command, paid for by NETPDTC. We use SMEs from fleet and shore com mands throughout the Navy including school houses and learning cen ters to ensure exam-bank questions reflect the lat est technology and proce dures, said Master Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) (SW) Eddy Mejias, NETPDTC com mand master chief. The chiefs who participate know theyre helping to develop 21st-century leaders and have given us feedback that their par ticipation has been an invaluable experience. NETC Force Master Chief (AW/SW) April Beldo was part of the PMK test plan develop ment panel and will be coordinating approval of the new PMK definition through the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education chain of com mand. This has been a rewarding process for myself and the command master chiefs from the fleet and has rein forced the necessity for commands to send their best and brightest chiefs and senior chiefs to the AERRs, said Beldo. Chiefs who are close to the deck plates really know what their Sailors do on a daily basis and are crucial to the exam con struction process. For the current sched ule of Advancement Exam Readiness Reviews, see the AERR NAVADMIN 254/12: http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/reference/mes sages/Documents/ NAVADMINS/NAV2012/ NAV12254.txt. NavyNavy Christens Amphib Assault Ship AmericaFrom Department of Defense Public AffairsThe Navy christened the amphibious assault ship, USS America (LHA 6), on Oct. 20, during a ceremony in Pascagoula, Miss. The Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos delivered the ceremonys principal address. Mrs. Lynne Pace, wife of former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Peter Pace, served as the ships sponsor. From the American Revolution through the first Gulf War, three war ships have sailed with the name America. The first America was a 74-gun ship-of-the-line built for use by the Continental Navy and then presented to the king of France as a gift to show appreciation for his countrys service to the new nation. The sec ond America transported troops during World War I. The third ship to bear the name was a KittyHawk class aircraft carrier that supported operations from the Vietnam War through Operation Desert Storm. America is the fourth U.S. Navy ship to bear this name. The LHA 6 will inherit and continue the proud tradition of distinguished service that has long been associated with ships bearing the name America, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. For decades to come, the America Class will give Sailors and Marines high ly capable, flexible and advanced platforms for executing the complete spectrum of operations. USS America is the first ship of its class, replac ing the Tawara class of amphibious assault ships. As the next generation big-deck amphibious ship, LHA 6 is optimized for aviation, capable of supporting current and future aircraft such as the tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey and Joint Strike Fighter. LHA 6 uses the same gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution system, and electric auxiliary system built for USS Makin Island (LHD 8). This unique aux iliary propulsion system is designed for fuel efficien cy. LHA 6 provides a flex ible, multi-mission plat form with capabilities that span the range of military operations from forward deployed crisis response to forcible entry operations. The ship also will provide forward presence and power projection as an integral part of joint, interagency and multina tional maritime expedi tionary forces. America will operate for sustained periods in transit to, and operations, in an amphibious objective area to include: embark ing, transporting, control ling, inserting, sustaining and extracting elements of a marine air-ground task force, and support ing forces by helicopters and tilt rotors supported by Joint Strike Fighters F-35B. Although America will not include a well deck, the ship includes addi tional aviation spaces and has an increased aviation capacity: enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the avia tion maintenance facili ties, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. The ships keel was laid July 17, 2009, and the shipbuilder plans to deliver America in late 2013. USS America will be homeported in San Diego. Built by Ingalls Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries in Pascagoula, Miss., the ship will be 844 feet in length, with a 106foot beam, and have a displacement of approxi mately 44,971 long tons. -U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Ingalls ShipbuildingTugboats guide the amphibious assault ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) America (LHA 6) to her berthing place at Ingalls Shipbuilding. The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Arlington (LPD 24) can be seen in the background. America will be christened Oct. 20. Saturday, Oct. 27 Join a Park Ranger for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural communities. Participants are encour aged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Nov. 3 Why are we fascinated with monsters and the mysterious? They creep into our dreams and thoughts; we seek out souvenirs and keep our eyes on the horizon for a glimpse of them. Come learn about these mysterious creatures of the deep with a Park Ranger. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m for a discussion on the dif ferent types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Nov. 10 The University of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a holiday program at the Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue. The pro gram Herbal Holidays will be held from 10 a.m.1 p.m. The cost of the pro gram is $10 per person, $5 for children 11-16, under 10 free. Demonstrations, educational materi als and samples will be available for participants. Extension programs are open to all regardless of race, color, sex, age, hand icap, religion or national origin. Reservations are necessary and can be made by calling the Extension Office at 2557450 or registering online at: http://harvesthappen ings.eventbrite.com Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Sunday, Nov. 11 The First Annual Salute To Veterans 5K will start at 8 a.m., followed by a one-mile walk/run at 9 a.m. starting at the Jacksonville Landing. The 5K will benefit the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association. There is a discounted $15 entry for all military, seniors 65 and over and children 13 and under. Cost includes a t-shirt. Sign up online at http:// www.1stplacesports.com/ salute.html Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and home town favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music. Along with numerous local businesses, national organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project will be involved in the event. Tickets, which start at $29, are on sale now. Saturday, Nov. 17 To celebrate the fouryear anniversary of its grand opening, the Jacksonville Arboretum & Gardens will host Much Ado about Nature, a fam ily friendly event from 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information on the Arboretum, www.jacksonvillearboretum.org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Taking On The Spray -Photo by ET1 Frank NunamakerEnsign Kiley Provenzano, Electronic Warfare Officer on board USS Gettysburg (CG 64), walks to the next station during her final qualification of a Ships Readiness Force class by displaying her ability to perform self-defense skills after being sprayed with olorium capsaicin spray on Oct. 19. USS Gettysburg (CG 64) is returning home after completing the semi-annual exercise Joint Warrior off of the coast of the United Kingdom. Your Medical Team Only Click AwayBy Branch Health Clinic Mayport, Family Medicine Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport is offer ing a new way for patients and their care teams to connect. Patients with a Primary Care Manager (PCM) at BHC Mayport can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Homeport Online. Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for non-urgent issues, request lab results and medication refills, and access doctorreviewed health informa tion. Because its for nonurgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply. And the system is secure and confidential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Homeport Online, go to www.relayhealth. com, select register in the upper right corner, and select register as a patient. Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up, and it can take up to three business days for the team to finalize the registration. For technical help, call RelayHealth at 866-RELAY-ME (866-7352963). Patients can also fill out a registration form with staff at their Medical Homeport teams front desk. And, as always, BHC Mayport Medical Homeport teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and the Nurse Advice Line is available after-hours. To connect by tele phone anytime, call Central Appointments and After-Hours Nurse Advice Line at 800-JAXHOSP (800-529-4677). These communica tion options are just one aspect of Medical Homeportthe Navys approach to the nation wide medical home model of care, which emphasizes quality, coordinated care led by a primary care provider. Medical Homeport places the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doctors to nurses to case manag ersled by the PCM. The patient and the team work together for a coordinated, whole per son approach to health. To learn more about all services available at BHC Mayport and its parent command, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, check out the 2012 Patient Guide on the web at www.med. navy.mil/sites/navalhos pitaljax and like the command on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ navalhospitaljacksonville to keep up with current news. Trick-orTreating At MayportFrom BBCGet your fright on Oct. 26 with the fifth annual Balfour Beatty Communities Horrifying Haunted House from 6-9 p.m., on 1035 F Lexington Court in Ribault Bay Village. This free event is open for all residents. Halloween will be observed on Oct. 31. All should honor the hours from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. and house without exterior lighting on should be avoided by trick-or-treaters.Evening In Pink With ClinicFrom NBHC MayportNaval Branch Health Clinic Mayport is going pink with its first Breast Cancer Awareness Symposium Oct. 26 in recognition of October as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. All military ID hold ers are invited put on their favorite pink attire and enjoy pink refreshments at An Evening In Pink, from 5-7 p.m. at the Clinic. There will be pre sentations on top ics such as Breast Cancer In a Nut Shell, Mammograms 101. There will be breast self exam training and a Bra decorating con test. For more information, call 270-4289 or 270-4284. Celebrate Harvest At ChapelFrom Mayport ChapelMayport Chapel would like to invite all Military families to our annual Harvest Festival. There will be a moonwalk, games, crafts, a cake walk, free hot dogs, nachos, popcorn, and many other fun fall actives. The fun starts Saturday, Oct. 27 from noon-3 p.m. at the Chapel. For more informa tion, call the Chapel at 270-5212. Sea & Sky SpectacularFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 314/12, released Oct. 19, announced the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) decision to terminate the Service Dress Khaki (SDK) initiative. The NAVADMIN also reemphasized the optional wear of the Service Dress Blue (SDB) uniform as an acceptable alterna tive during summer uni form wear periods when participating in events, ceremonies and meet ings where wearing a coat and tie is appropriate and when other uniforms are not prescribed. The Navy continu ously monitors Sailors uniform concerns and develops uniforms and design changes based on feedback received and research conduct ed, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. After May 2012 when the contempo rary design for SDK was approved for optional wear, the Navy continued to conduct research with product vendors and with the information gained and reviewed, the deci sion was made to cancel Service Dress Khaki. The Navy made the decision to terminate pursuing the SDK uniform as an optional uniform due to factors identified dur ing a comprehensive uniform assessment. These factors included the evaluation of quanti ties of SDK sets ordered/ sold, wear test of several models evaluating qual ity, durability, appearance and fit, and estimated cost per uniform set to the individual. The NAVADMIN 314/12 also reaffirmed E-7 to O-10 personnel may wear the SDB as a suitable alternative for wear in lieu of summer white and service dress white uni forms when a coat and tie is appropriate. SDB uni forms may be prescribed for wear year-round to all official functions (when formal dress, dinner dress, or full dress uniforms are not prescribed). Navy Nixes New Uniform -Photo by Paige GnannThousands of pedestrians crowd downtown Jacksonville Beach Saturday and Sunday for the 2012 Sea & Sky Spectacular featuring the Blue Angels. See story, photos, Pages 4-5.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.You probably remem ber some bullying which took place at some time during your school days. You may even have expe rienced some level of bullying or maybe a friend did. Bullying is an all-toocommon human activity which has existed since the beginning of recorded history and is present in most cultures. It is enacted by both boys and girls. Research suggests that somewhere between 30 percent and 60 percent of American schoolchildren report being bullied. Bullying is about power. One psychologist is quoted as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or had your interests and feelings unfairly damaged by someone more power ful than you. And this power can take different forms. Although girls are sometimes physically violent, it is boys who tend to be more physical. Florida law defines bullying as systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psycho logical distress on one or more students and may involve teasing, social exclusion, threat, intimi dation, stalking, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious, or racial harassment, public humiliation, or destruction of prop erty. Harassment is any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture; use of data or computer software; or written, ver bal or physical conduct directed against a student that places the student in reasonable fear of harm to his person or dam age to his property; has the effect of substantially interfering with a stu dents educational performance, opportunities, or benefits; or has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of a school. All parents of schoolage children should know the law. Florida Statute 1006.147, The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act, prohibits bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a Florida public K 12 educational institu tion. This law requires that each school district in Florida adopt a policy prohibiting bullying and harassment of any stu dent or employee of a public K 12 school. The Duval County School Board has adopt ed an anti-bullying poli cy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bullied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trusted adult. This report can be done anonymously. An investigation will be conducted by the school principal or his/her des ignee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Now that you know the law, consider the fol lowing tips to deter and diminish bullying at your childs school: the schools designated administrator your con cerns about bullying, such as issues with supervision and monitoring of stu dents. build a social safety net work, and encourage them to travel via the buddy system. wide anti-bullying cam paign website at www. stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov to find ideas to prevent bullying to share with your children. What about your chil dren? Are they being bul lied? Possible warning signs include the follow ing: missing belongings, or bruises, excuses to avoid attending school, school, aches, stomachaches, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping, or bad dreams, and/ or esteem. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the problem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school officials to find a solution. For More Information The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act is a memorial to Jeffrey Johnston, son of Debbie and Robert Johnston. Jeffreys story can now be found, with other bullycide stories, in the book, Bullycide in America: Moms speak out about the bullying/ suicide connection. The book can be ordered at www.bullycide.org. Stop Cyberbullying www.stopcyberbully ing.org Available in schools: Pay It Forward (HS Character Education Library) 2000 Pocket Catherine Ryan Hyde Sarah and the Naked Truth (MS Character Education Library) 2002 Yearling Patricia MacLachlan Stand Tall Molly Lou Mellon (ES Character Education Library) 2001 G.P. Putnam and Sons Patty Lovell Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Bullying Is On The Rise Among StudentsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingI am sure you have said this yourself or heard someone close by say, I am trying to juggle too many things! When we try to do too many things we can often feel like we are juggling too many balls in the air, afraid that we will soon see one drop! In a blog that I once read by John Maxwell, he mentions this very phe nomenon. He talks about the balls of life that we juggle being things such as work, family, health, friends, and spirit. He also mentions that one of these balls is made of rubber, able to bounce back, and that the rest are made of glass and will be damaged or shatter when dropped. Can you guess which of the following should be thought of as a rubber ball: Work, Family, Health, Friends, or Spirit? The rubber ball is indeedWork! Think about it with me for a moment. Your work and career can always bounce back if you need to drop it for a while. The oth ers are made of glass, and will sustain damage if dropped. For instance, when there is a death in the family, we are given emergency leave. If a Sailor asks for help with substance abuse, he is sent to treatment. Work can always be put on hold to give attention to the things that matter most! Unfortunately, too many people have sought to keep work well jug gled, and let everything else in life come crashing down! It can sometimes be a temptation to come to work every day and attempt to carefully man age how we think others view us, for the sake of rising in our career. All the while there may be a marriage that is falling apart, financial hardships kept hidden, or a health issue kept quiet. As a Chaplain I can tell you that many times I have counseled people who strived to keep their career well balanced, and as a result they lost their marriage, family, and finances as a result. Often times the conse quences of a cracked glass ball will end up affecting the career as well, which ends up breaking that one ball that had the ability to bounce all along! I can also tell you many stories of people who have dropped the ball of Spirit for their career. They were once strong in their faith and attended weekly worship, but have let that slide for the sake of getting one more thing accomplished or simply sleeping in! The results of neglecting your spiritual ity and faith life often produce a negative outcome! So, let me encourage you to take a lifelong perspective. When life reaches its end which ball will you treasure the most? No one ever gets to the end of life and says, I wish I had worked more! So be courageous enough to inform your command when a glass ball needs atten tion, because work will be there when you return!Use Your Faith To Help Keep You GoingChap Stephen Cloer Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSThe Beaches Veterans wish to extend their grateful appreciation to the Home Depot Foundation who has provided our veteran community park with a $5000.00 Beatification Grant. Tami Swain, Atlantic Beach Home Depot Grant Coordinator, led six Team Depot employees, with their equipment, in donating their time and effort, to plant trees and over160 shrubs and bushes in our lovely Park. The Foundation money will also allow us to improve the playground and pro vide wheelchair accessi ble paths within the Park. In 2010, the city of Atlantic Beach asked the local Veterans organization to assist in the improvement of their 1-acre park to be used as a Community Veterans Park. Six Veterans orga nizations then formed the Beaches Veterans Memorial Park, Inc. and immediately began an improvement program by implementing an engraved brick donation program for the commu nity to honor their friends and family who have served their country in the Armed Forces on the United States. As a result through a City Grant, and help from the VFW and Rotary Club, an 80-foot flag pole now graces the approach to the City. Other donations created a 1,400-square-foot electri fied stage and the sodding of the entire park area where National Holidays are now observed by these Veterans groups. The next observance at the Park will be held on Veterans Day, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. featuring the Honorable Ander Crenshaw Fl 4, the Beaches Honor Guard, and Legion Riders along with many distinguished guests. Please bring chairs or blankets if you plan to attend and admire the beautiful landscaping program provided by the Home Depot Foundation and store employees. To learn more go to www.beachesveterans memorialpark.org Jack Berry BVMP TO THE Silver Star Added To Valor SiteFrom American Forces Press ServiceOfficials have added the names of those who have received Silver Star awards to a website listing recipients of the nations highest awards for valor. The site launched in July with the names of those who have received the Medal of Honor, the nations highest award for valor, since Sept. 11, 2001. On Aug. 1, officials added the names of those who have received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross or the Air Force Cross the nations second-highest valor awards. Now, the site also lists those who have received the Silver Star. The site at http://valor. defense.gov is designed to raise awareness of ser vice members heroism and to help in deterring those who falsely claim military honors, officials said. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 2012 Sea & Sky SpectacularBlue Angels Soar Over Jax Beaches -Photo by MC1 John ParkerExplosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Tim Fredrickson, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 6 Detachment Mayport, helps two blind chil dren learn about the F6-A EOD robot during 2012 Sea and Sky Spectacular. -Photo by MC1 John ParkerJason Newburg and Viper airshow flies close to the Jacksonville Beach Pier, as thousands of spectators crowd the beach to watch the 2012 Sea & Sky Spectacular hosted by Naval Station Mayport, the city of Jacksonville, and the Beaches cities on Oct. 20-21.-Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers from Naval Station Mayport patrol the streets on trash detail. From StaffThe 2012 Jacksonville Sea & Sky Spectacular flew into high gear with the performance of the U.S. Navys Blue Angels flight demonstration team on Oct. 20-21, hosted by Naval Station Mayport, the city of Jacksonville and the Beaches cit ies Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach and Atlantic Beach. The streets of down town Jacksonville Beach were packed, while the beaches were crammed over the weekend with thousands of spectators watching the multiple air performances. Performers included U.S. Special Operation Command Parachute Team, Corkey Fornof, Jason Newburg, Red Eagles, Julie Clark, Geico Skytypers, Black Diamond Jet Team, F4U-Corsair, F-18 Super Hornet, Legacy Flight, Mike Wiskus, Matt Chapman, Horsemen Fllight Team, F-22 Raptor, Heritage Flight, Michael Goulian, and the U.S. Coast Guard, who performed a search and rescue demonstra tion. Dozens of volun teers from Naval Station Mayport attended the two day event to help do everything from litter patrol, to Beverage sales and standing duty at the NS Mayport air terminal. The Blue Angels flew into NS Mayport on Thursday to prepape for the weekends event, which included a full day visiting with school groups and JROTC on Friday. Two members of the Blue Angels maintenance team were welcomed back by friendly faces from their former squad rons. Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Bo Tullis left HSM-46 for the Blue Angels a year ago after watching them per form at NS Mayport in 2009. Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class William Martin left Mayport two years ago for his place in the Blue Angels team.-Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers from HSL-48 sell drinks to help raise money for their MWR funds to host a command holiday party during the air show.-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport volunteers work a Beverage booth to raise money to pay for its annual holiday party by selling drinks at this years air show.-Photo by Paige GnannSandra Barrett of Naval Station Mayport MWR talks with spectators about opportunities available to the public with the MWR guest pass.-Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers from the CPOA sell t-shirts, coins and beverages at the air show.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 5 -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyBlue Angels Sailors perform routine maintenance on a Blue Angels' F/A-18 Hornet at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyCapt. Douglas Cochrane, commanding officer Naval Station Mayport, greets Capt. Greg McWherter, com manding officer and flight leader of the U.S. Navy Blue Angels as he arrives at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC1 John ParkerF/A-18C Hornets assigned to the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, fly in formation over packed beaches in Jacksonville, Florida during the 2012 Sea & Sky Spectacular. This free event will feature a dynamic over-the-ocean sky show highlighted by the Blue Angels along with other military and civilian flight teams, live entertainment, a street festival featuring static displays of aircraft and military vehicles, simulators and recruitment booths. -Photo by MC1 John ParkerThe World Famous GEICO Skytypers Airshow Team is a flight squadron of six vintage WWII airplanes.-Photo by MC1 John ParkerAll eyes are focused up as Fat Albert performs maneuvers over Jacksonville Beach.-Photo by Paige GnannAviation Structional Mechanic 1st Class Bo Tullis joined the Blue Angels after leaving HSM-46 last year. Tullis said he wanted to join the team after seeing them perform at NS Mayport in 2009.-Photo by Paige GnannSpectators enjoy a bit of shade as they eat lunch in the plaza in Jacksonville Beach.-Photo by Paige GnannSpectators enjoy live music by the Southeast Navy band as they watch the air show from downtown Jacksonville Beach.

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Vicksburg Arrives In Lisbon, PortugalEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and guidedmissile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) arrived in Lisbon, Portugal, for a regularly-sched uled port visit Oct. 17. The visit serves to continue U.S. 6th Fleet efforts to build global maritime partnerships with European nations and improve maritime safety and security in the region. [U.S. Navy] ships go into Lisbon because of [Portugals] longstanding friendship with the U.S., said Capt. Logan Jones, commanding officer of Vicksburg. [Vicksburg and Porter] Sailors gain an oppor tunity to learn about, and see, someone elses homeland. [We also] have an opportunity to show the quality of our ships and our Sailors. While sightseeing will likely play a big role in Lisbon, it is not the sole purpose of the visit. While here, we want to make friends and strengthen the bonds between our two great nations and show our commit ment to maritime security, said Cmdr. Carl Brobst, executive officer of Vicksburg. I want our Sailors out there building rela tionships through community relations projects. Were here to absorb the culture, build com munity relations and contribute to the economy. Though U.S. Navy ships visit Lisbon, it is far from the most common European port. This will be my first time in Lisbon, said Command Master Chief Robert W. Bostic, command master chief of Vicksburg. It is a very unique port in that a lot of Sailors dont get a chance to come here. There will be an opportunity for [Vicksburg and Porter Sailors] to see a lot with minimum travel. Vicksburg and Porter are conducting this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Vicksburg and Porter are deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater secu rity cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottU.S. Navy Sailors man the rails as guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) passes the 25th of April Bridge while pulling into Lisbon, Portugal. Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottQuartermaster 3rd Class Taverious Lee raises a flag as guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) pulls into Lisbon, Portugal. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Grandmasters Set To Complete DeploymentEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsThe Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46, Detachment Six, also known as the Big Irons, are nearing the end of their recent deployment aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) with record numbers. The Big Irons of Det. 6 have been on station with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ENTCSG) throughout the strike groups deployment. The detachments primary role has been to provide nighttime surface surveillance and control as well as anti-terrorism force protection and logis tics support to the strike group. Ive been with {the Big Irons} for one year, and I have never seen a harder working detach ment, said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman (AW) Lionel Harris. I see a lot of hard work and a lot of team players even though we all come from different rates. I am the only {aviation ordnance man}, but I feel like part of the team and right at home. During the deployment and workup cycle, Det. 6 flew more than 1,500 hours during the course of 305 days, used more than 203,602 gallons of fuel, transported more than 15 tons of cargo, carried more than 80 passengers and flew 62 missions, making them one of the most efficient air detach ments in the Navy. We have flown more hours than any other detachment I know of, said Lt. Hunter Marner, a pilot with Det. 6. With seven pilots and three air crewman, we logged a lot of hours, but we were up to the challenge. With the large number of missions flown by the Big Irons, detachment Sailors were expected to be on top of their game. We always had to be flexible, said Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Helicopter) 2nd Class (NAC/AW/SW) Phillip M. Gullo. It was a constant challenge, but when you love your job, it makes it worth doing. Big Irons leadership also noticed the hard work of their crew. Our guys stepped up to the plate and they crushed it, said Lt. Benjamin Ross, the detachment maintenance officer. Everyone from the {mechanics} turning wrenches to the electri cians chasing wires and the aircrews managing the operations side of it all...they made it happen. I was very proud of all efforts that were put into making us one of the hardest working detach ments in the Navy, said Marner. It was a huge group effort; we couldnt have done it if we had been missing even one of our Sailors. Vicksburg is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of respon sibility. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT.Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT. Fight deadly childhood diseases. www.stjude.org Cole, Namesake Barracks Remembers Attack, Honors Fallen USS Cole Public Affairs Training and Support Center Great Lakes Public AffairsThe crew of guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) held a ceremony in memory of the 12th anniver sary of the al-Qaida suicide attack on the ship, Oct. 12., while staff and students from Training Support Center (TSC), Great Lakes, Ill., did the same at BEQ 6301, the USS Coles namesake barracks. Both ceremonies honored the 17 Sailors who lost their lives and the 37 Sailors who were injured during the attack in Aden, Yemen, Oct. 12, 2000. For our Navy, Cole, her Sailors and their families, our war on terror began on October 12, 2000, at 11:18 in the morning, said Cmdr. Peter K. Nilsen, Coles commanding officer. Our ship stands for American resolve. It is part of history and a memorial for our fallen shipmates. The crew of the Cole stood in formation as the names of the Sailors lost and injured that day were read aloud and bells struck in remembrance. The service concluded with a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps. As long as this building (USS Cole) is standing, I hope that the future Sailors will never forget what happened on the Cole on this day, said Chief Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical)(SW) Roman Sado. New Sailors were reminded of the ultimate sacri fice that was made by those who have gone before them. The ceremony was lead in prayer by Cmdr. Lynn Peterson, command chaplain TSC, Great Lakes. The event was colored by the memories of people, commented Peterson. I remember Sailors I met a few years after the attack who were still recovering from their injuries and felt that their sacrifices serve to consolidate our sense of purpose as a team. After sharing some stories of heroism on the USS Cole, Capt. Peter R. Lintner, commanding officer for TSC challenged the attendees to reflect on the meaning of shipmate in the Navy and asked, Will you be the one to dive in to the water for your shipmate? [The] ship had been completely repaired and though there were no longer visible remnants of the attack, the 17 brass stars on the deck where the hole once was served as a constant reminder to every Sailor that had the privilege to follow their USS Cole pre decessors, Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Bruce J. Pilgrim said of his first deployment on the USS Cole. Cole, homeported out of Norfolk, Va., is currently deployed in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility conducting theater security cooperation and maritime security operations. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 7

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4th Fleet Celebrates Hispanic Heritage MonthU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) celebrated National Hispanic Heritage Month with a potluck picnic aboard Naval Station Mayport Oct. 16, featuring a wide variety of Hispanic specialty dishes and music from many coun tries in 4th Fleets operat ing area. Recognizing Hispanic Heritage month and diversity is important to the Navy, especially for us here at 4th Fleet, as we continue to grow and develop our relation ships with our partner nations in Latin America, said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, COMUSNAVSO/C4F. In his remarks to the command, Harris high lighted the history and future of diversity. Hispanic culture has been a dominant facet of the United States since early in our history. The future of the U.S. will even more depend on the suc cess of further alignment with our fellow Americans of Latin American and Caribbean decent, Harris said. Diversity of the many characteristics and attributes of individu al Sailors and civilians enhance the overall mis sion readiness of 4th Fleet and the Navy. COMUSNAVSO was originally based in Puerto Rico and operated in South America, Central America, the Caribbean Sea and surrounding waters. In 2008, U.S. 4th Fleet was reestab lished and joined with COMUSNAVSO setting up headquarters aboard Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Since the beginning of COMNAVSOUTH at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, the command has had close ties to the Hispanic com munity. Over a decade later, the reestablishment of 4th Fleet and a home port shift to Florida, those bonds have only grown stronger and continue to flourish, said Chief Information Systems Technician Jason Hurley. We are fortunate to have amongst our staff, those dedicated to our Nation and Navy, those who picked up their roots from Puerto Rico to con tinue serving and con tributing to our success of mission in Latin America, he said. The observation first started in 1968, as National Hispanic Heritage week under President Lyndon B. Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Regan in 1988, to cover a 30-day period from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. The date of Sept. 15 is significant because it is the Independence Day for five Latin American countries: Costa Rica; El Salvador; Guatemala; Honduras; and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile cele brate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18 respectively. Hispanics have played a vital role in naval his tory, serving in virtu ally every at-sea conflict in American history. Hispanics can trace their tradition of naval service to men such as Lt. Jorge Farragut Mesquida, who served in the American Revolution. Seamen Phillip Bazar and Seamen John Ortgega, who distin guished themselves in combat and were award ed the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration of the United States, and Adm. David Farragut, who served during the civil war and was the first person to ever attain the rank of full admiral. Today nearly 70,000 Sailors and civilians of Hispanic heritage are serving in the Navy, mak ing up approximately 11 percent of the Navys active, Reserve and civil ian forces. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) support USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners in the the sea. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenChief Culinary Specialist Dwight Fennel and 4th Fleet Protocol Officer Ms. Maria Alvarez carve up a Puerto Rican-style roasted pig at a command picnic celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month Oct 16. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Underwood Celebrates Hispanic DiversityU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors assigned to the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) organized an event and dinner to recognize Hispanic Heritage Month, Oct. 19, while deployed to U.S. 4th Fleet and supporting Operation Martillo. Two naval officers representing Argentina and Peru, temporar ily assigned to U.S. Navy Destroyer Squadron Four Zero (DESRON 40), and an Underwood chief petty officer spoke to the crew about the Hispanic cul ture. When we say Hispanic, whom are we talking about? asked Chief Logistics Specialist Josue Negron. For sure, they are not one nation ality, nor one culture. Instead, Hispanics are a greatly diverse people. Their cultural and lin guistic origins are Spanish and Latin American, regardless of race and color. Negron went on to share some of the history of Spanish exploration and colonization in the Americas as well as some of the accomplishments of modern-day Hispanics including a Nobel Peace Prize winner, a surgeon general, and 10 astro nauts. After the speak ers addressed the crew about Hispanic heritage, Underwoods Diversity Team cooked a dinner of quesadillas, tacos, rice, and beans. I think its very impor tant to take time to rec ognize and celebrate, not only Hispanic heritage, but different cultures that make up the U.S. and the Navy, said Yeoman 1st Class Jose Carrion Rodriguez who helped cook the chicken quesa dillas. It shows our diver sity and our strength as the worlds great est Navy. The Diversity Team holds different cel ebrations throughout the year as a way to get the crew involved, bring up morale, and to inform the rest of the crew of the different cultures and diver sity we have here in our Navy, Rodriguez added. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America, and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsYeoman 1st Class (SW) Jose Carrion Rodriguez (left) and Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class (SW) Joshua Singleton cook quesadillas in the galley aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) for a dinner and event observing Hispanic Heritage Month. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Lt. Paolo Camogliano, a Peruvian naval officer assigned to U.S. Navy Destroyer Squadron Four Zero, addresses the crew on the mess deck of USS Underwood. Chief Logistics Specialist (SW/AW) Josue Negron addresses USS Underwoods crew on the mess deck during a dinner and event observing Hispanic Heritage Month. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 9

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Storytime in the Pumpkin Patch Caregivers and children from Child Development Center building 1960 listen to stories while visiting the CDC Pumpkin Patch.-Photos by Sarah BarthelemyOct. 26: Liberty Halloween Party. 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Be prepared to be scared to death. DJ, food, costume contest, prizes, games and more. 2707205 Oct. 30: Bingo Halloween Party. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on hard cards, Costume Contests, Treats from MWR and More! 270-7204 Nov. 1: Bingo Turkey Shoot. Every Bingo Session through Thanksgiving, Beachside Bingo is giving away a free Turkey. No valid at Lunchtime Bingo. 2707204 Nov. 2: Fall Fiesta 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Out of Hand, free food, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Nov. 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 4: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Nov. 7: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Nov. 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 13: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. MWR 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Oct. 26: Liberty Halloween Party 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. DJ, food, costume contest, game & prizes. All-hands event. Oct. 27: WasabiCon Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Transportation Only. Sign up deadline Oct. 24. Oct. 28: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Oct. 30: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 30: Bingo Halloween Party. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on hard cards, Costume Contests, Treats from MWR and More! 270-7204 Nov. 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at the Galley for Lunch. Nov. 2: Fall Fiesta 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring live band Out of Hand, free food, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Nov. 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 3: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 7:30 a.m. Cost $10 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Signup deadline Oct. 16. Nov. 4: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Detroit Lions. Van departs 2 p.m. Cost $10. Nov. 4: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Nov. 5: East Coast Buffet Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. Nov. 7: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Nov. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts. Van departs 7 p.m. Cost $10. Nov. 9: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Nov. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Nov. 10: 4v4 Basketball Turkey Shoot. Sign up by Nov. 1. 270-5451 Nov. 10: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. 270-7205 Nov. 10: UF Gators vs. Louisiana Tech. Van departs TBD. FREE. Nov. 11: Jacksonville Fair. Van departs 12 p.m. FREE. Transportation only. Nov. 12: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 12: Veterans Day Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, and your choice of either a lb. hamburger or hot dog with fries and a fountain sod for only $10 (non-food option $8) Plus, Colored Headpin Bowling; bowl a strike with a colored headpin and win a free game pass. 270-5377 Nov. 13: Turkey Trot 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Nov. 13: College Workshop. 4:30 p.m. at Liberty Center. Nov. 14: Liberty Focus Group. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. We need your input and this is your chance to tell us what you think of your Liberty Program. Free refresh ments and all attendees will be entered to win. Nov. 14: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 11

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Classes Geared Towards Family StabilityFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Oct. 25, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 25, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1 Room 1124 Oct. 29, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Oct. 30, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Oct. 30, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Oct. 31, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 31, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of Fleet and Family Support Center line up with runners to recognize October as Domestic Violence Awareness month during the 5K run/3K walk sponsored by MWR the third Tuesday of every month.Military Wives Vendor Show Join us Nov. 3 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Mayport USO center. Come out and support your local military fami lies and their businesses as well as the USO. There will be food and raffle prizes. For more information, contact Heather or Leticia at milwivesbusi nessesandevents@gmail. com Free Admission To Jacksonville University Military Appreciation Football Game Active Duty personnel receive free admission to the JU vs. CAMPBELL football game at D. B. Milne Field on JUs campus. Game time is noon on Nov. 10. You must show current ID Card for free admission. JUs campus address is 2800 University Blvd N, Jacksonville, FL 32211. Boots On The Ground Walk or drive along 1.5miles of Boots on the Ground stretching from the corner of historic downtown Fernandina Beach to the Atlantic Ocean. The display is a memorial of more than 7,000 boots, pictures, and flags hon oring the brave firefight ers and police officers of 9-11 and fallen OIF-OEF U.S. service members. The event is free to the public. The Mothers of Americas Military Fallen is also accepting donations of worn combat boots. To do so, please contact Julie Bargeron at juliebargeron@mother sofamf.com or call (904) 468-0733. K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, and parties. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Professional Military Knowledge RedefinedNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsFollowing advancement exam construction changes announced in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 197/11, a Test Plan Development Panel (TPDP) of force and command master chiefs redefined Professional Military Knowledge (PMK) the week of Oct. 19 at the Navy Advancement Center. The restructured advancement exams decrease the total num ber of questions from 200 to 175 and increase the emphasis on rating-specific technical questions. The September 2012 exams for active duty E4-E6, the upcoming January chief petty officer exam, and the Selected Reserve (SELRES) exams in February will be the first opportunities for candidates to take the new 175-question exams, which contain only 25 PMK questions. The previous exams were much more PMK heavy, ranging from 50 questions for the E4 exam to 100 PMK ques tions for candidates eligible for the chiefs exam, said Tom Updike, Navy advancement exe cution division head for the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center (NETPDTC). The reduced PMK section on the advancement exams presented the PMK-TPDP members with the tough task of prioritizing the massive PMK content area into a manageable and meaningful 25 ques tions on each exam. That process was focused on the critical information a Sailor needs to know beyond the core occu pational and job-specific knowledge requirements. Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Jeffrey Kirby from Patrol Squadron 16 was a PMK-TPDP member who trav eled to NETPDTC from Jacksonville, Fla. The new PMK test plan and content information will give future advancement exam review teams an excellent framework and structure to draw from as they develop test questions, said Kirby. We took fleet input as well as discussion with the PMK test panel to ensure our definition and topic areas were valid. The PMK sections of enlisted exams assess a Sailors knowledge of Navy general military training, professional development and the leadership continuum at the appropriate paygrade, regardless of rating. The primary reason for the exam structure change is to improve exam validity, added Updike. More job-spe cific technical questions improve the Navys ability to rank-order Sailors by rating. Advancement candidates who know the technical aspects of their rating better than their peers should like the change in exam structure. For Command Master Chief (AW/SS) James Barnes of the Navy Information Operations Command in San Antonio, participation in the PMK test plan panel was his first exposure to advancement exam con struction. Its extremely enlight ening to see how much effort and seriousness goes into advancement exam development, said Barnes. Our PMK team included members from the surface, subsurface, and aviation commu nities to ensure that the fleet was well-represented and gave an accurate and current definition of the required military knowl edge. To develop the PMK questions and rat ing-specific advance ment exams, NETPDTC brings fleet subject mat ter experts (FSMEs) for their respective ratings to review question banks and develop E4 E7 exams. The advance ment exam readiness reviews (AERRs) are one to two weeks in length, depending on exam bank work requirements and are held throughout the year. The reviews are held at NETPDTC at Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla. Participants receive tem porary additional duty (TAD) orders from their parent command, paid for by NETPDTC. We use SMEs from fleet and shore com mands throughout the Navy including school houses and learning cen ters to ensure exam-bank questions reflect the lat est technology and procedures, said Master Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) (SW) Eddy Mejias, NETPDTC com mand master chief. The chiefs who participate know theyre helping to develop 21st-century leaders and have given us feedback that their par ticipation has been an invaluable experience. NETC Force Master Chief (AW/SW) April Beldo was part of the PMK test plan develop ment panel and will be coordinating approval of the new PMK definition through the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education chain of com mand. This has been a rewarding process for myself and the command master chiefs from the fleet and has rein forced the necessity for commands to send their best and brightest chiefs and senior chiefs to the AERRs, said Beldo. Chiefs who are close to the deck plates really know what their Sailors do on a daily basis and are crucial to the exam con struction process. For the current sched ule of Advancement Exam Readiness Reviews, see the AERR NAVADMIN 254/12: http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/reference/mes sages/Documents/ NAVADMINS/NAV2012/ NAV12254.txt. NavyNavy Christens Amphib Assault Ship AmericaFrom Department of Defense Public AffairsThe Navy christened the amphibious assault ship, USS America (LHA 6), on Oct. 20, during a ceremony in Pascagoula, Miss. The Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos delivered the ceremonys principal address. Mrs. Lynne Pace, wife of former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Peter Pace, served as the ships sponsor. From the American Revolution through the first Gulf War, three war ships have sailed with the name America. The first America was a 74-gun ship-of-the-line built for use by the Continental Navy and then presented to the king of France as a gift to show appreciation for his countrys service to the new nation. The sec ond America transported troops during World War I. The third ship to bear the name was a KittyHawk class aircraft carrier that supported operations from the Vietnam War through Operation Desert Storm. America is the fourth U.S. Navy ship to bear this name. The LHA 6 will inherit and continue the proud tradition of distinguished service that has long been associated with ships bearing the name America, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. For decades to come, the America Class will give Sailors and Marines highly capable, flexible and advanced platforms for executing the complete spectrum of operations. USS America is the first ship of its class, replac ing the Tawara class of amphibious assault ships. As the next generation big-deck amphibious ship, LHA 6 is optimized for aviation, capable of supporting current and future aircraft such as the tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey and Joint Strike Fighter. LHA 6 uses the same gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution system, and electric auxiliary system built for USS Makin Island (LHD 8). This unique auxiliary propulsion system is designed for fuel efficien cy. LHA 6 provides a flexible, multi-mission plat form with capabilities that span the range of military operations from forward deployed crisis response to forcible entry operations. The ship also will provide forward presence and power projection as an integral part of joint, interagency and multina tional maritime expedi tionary forces. America will operate for sustained periods in transit to, and operations, in an amphibious objective area to include: embark ing, transporting, controlling, inserting, sustaining and extracting elements of a marine air-ground task force, and support ing forces by helicopters and tilt rotors supported by Joint Strike Fighters F-35B. Although America will not include a well deck, the ship includes addi tional aviation spaces and has an increased aviation capacity: enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the avia tion maintenance facili ties, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. The ships keel was laid July 17, 2009, and the shipbuilder plans to deliver America in late 2013. USS America will be homeported in San Diego. Built by Ingalls Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries in Pascagoula, Miss., the ship will be 844 feet in length, with a 106foot beam, and have a displacement of approxi mately 44,971 long tons. -U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Ingalls ShipbuildingTugboats guide the amphibious assault ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) America (LHA 6) to her berthing place at Ingalls Shipbuilding. The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Arlington (LPD 24) can be seen in the background. America will be christened Oct. 20. Saturday, Oct. 27 Join a Park Ranger for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural communities. Participants are encour aged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Nov. 3 Why are we fascinated with monsters and the mysterious? They creep into our dreams and thoughts; we seek out souvenirs and keep our eyes on the horizon for a glimpse of them. Come learn about these mysterious creatures of the deep with a Park Ranger. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m for a discussion on the dif ferent types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Nov. 10 The University of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a holiday program at the Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue. The pro gram Herbal Holidays will be held from 10 a.m.1 p.m. The cost of the program is $10 per person, $5 for children 11-16, under 10 free. Demonstrations, educational materi als and samples will be available for participants. Extension programs are open to all regardless of race, color, sex, age, handicap, religion or national origin. Reservations are necessary and can be made by calling the Extension Office at 2557450 or registering online at: http://harvesthappen ings.eventbrite.com Go on a nature hike with a park ranger at 2 p.m through the forests of Fort George Island and learn about the history, people, and places that once called this island home. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Sunday, Nov. 11 The First Annual Salute To Veterans 5K will start at 8 a.m., followed by a one-mile walk/run at 9 a.m. starting at the Jacksonville Landing. The 5K will benefit the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association. There is a discounted $15 entry for all military, seniors 65 and over and children 13 and under. Cost includes a t-shirt. Sign up online at http:// www.1stplacesports.com/ salute.html Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and home town favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music. Along with numerous local businesses, national organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project will be involved in the event. Tickets, which start at $29, are on sale now. Saturday, Nov. 17 To celebrate the fouryear anniversary of its grand opening, the Jacksonville Arboretum & Gardens will host Much Ado about Nature, a family friendly event from 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information on the Arboretum, www.jacksonvillearboretum.org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 25, 2012 13

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