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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00271


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Commands Go Head-to-Head In Fall Sports Challenge -Photo by Paige GnannEnsign Paul Moe of USS The Sullivans goes in short for an out on first base as a batter from USS Simpson runs past during the Chicago 16 Softball competition, part of the annual MWR Fall Sports Challenge held Oct. 2-5. Find out which command came out on top, pages 4-5. Make sure to check out www.mayportmirror.com photo gallery to see all of the Sports Challenge photos that didnt make this edition. Jax Hosts Week of Valor To Say Thanks To MilitaryContributorJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. held a press conference Oct. 4 to announce the City of Jacksonvilles plans to host a Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their fami lies. Numerous events will be held throughout the city Nov. 5-12 to recognize the contributions and sac rifices of those serving or have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Today, Im proud to announce the City of Jacksonvilles 2012 Week of Valor a celebration of service and sacrifice by all those who have served and those currently serv ing, said Brown, dur ing the press conference at Jacksonville City Hall. It is so important for us to take these opportuni ties to say thank you. We must never forget just how much these brave men and women give. Valor is a powerful con cept. It represents unpar alleled courage, selfless service and commitment to our nation. The mayor then intro duced Scorby to the podium. Blue Angels ComingFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport, the city of Jacksonville and the Beaches cities are gearing up for this years Sea & Sky Spectacular scheduled for Oct. 20-21at Jacksonville Beach oceanfront. This free event will be held from 9:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. and feature a dynamic over-the-ocean sky show highlighted by the world-famous United States Navy Blue Angels along with other military and civil ian flight teams, live entertainment, a street festival featuring static displays of aircraft and military vehicles, simulators, recruitment booths, a kids area and Meet The Performers Autograph Sessions. Show center will be located between 1st Ave. N and 6th Ave. N Performers this year include: U.S. Navy Blue Angels U.S. Special Operations Command Parachute Team Corkey Fornoff LoPresti Fury Jason Newburg Viper Air Shows The Red Eagles Julie Clark Black Diamonds F4U-Corsair F-18 Super Hornet Legacy Flight Matt Chapman Horsemen Flight Team F-22 Raptor Heritage Flight Michael Goulian USCG Search and Rescue Demo Narrated by: Danny Clisham Air Boss: Wayne Boggs Plan now for parking. Festival-goers are encour aged to park at the TPC parking lots, located west of A1A on Palm Valley Road/County Road 210. Cost is $20 and includes a free shuttle from the lot. Parking will extremely limited during the event. Event attendees are strongly encouraged to take the con venient, free shuttles. Shuttles will start running at 8 a.m. and will run continuously to and from the event site until 6 p.m. For more information about the 2012 Sea and Sky Spectacular, call (904) 630-3690. -Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown announces a series of events to honor military mem bers, veterans and their families during the City of Jacksonville's "Week of Valor" dur ing a press conference Oct. 4. From left, Aaron Bowman of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, Jacksonville Jaguars Senior Vice President of Sales Mackey Weaver, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., Brown, Jacksonville Director of Military Affairs Victor Guillory and Jacksonville Director, Sports and Entertainment Alan Verlander. Be A Ball Kid Contest For Navy Marine Corps Classic Basketball GameFrom MWREight lucky active duty Navy, Marine Corps and/or Coast Guard dependents will get the chance to be a Ball Kid at the Navy Marine Corps Classic on Nov. 9, with the Georgetown Hoyas facing off against the University of FL Gators. Children must be between the ages 12-17 (18 if still in high school). To enter, please submit childs name, age, contact phone number, email address and Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard base affiliation to mwrmay port@navy.mil by Oct. 26. All entrants must be attached to a Tri-Site base and must be able to provide proof of age and active duty depen dent ID if selected. Names will be drawn by the city of Jacksonville. For more information, call (904) 270-5228. See Valor, Page 6

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.It is that time in the senior year when students need to make some final decisions about what they are going to do after high school. To achieve post secondary training suc cess, the student will need to ests, abilities, and pref erences to help choose a career, career goal can be achieved at a university, community college, tech nical school, or through the military either mili tary service or a military academy, ing which one of those choices will help him to achieve his career goal, and leads to postsecondary training success. But why continue an education after high school? With todays economy, it is almost impossible to support oneself with just a high school diploma. Further education means more money! Here are a few reasons to go to college from the website www.ACT.org: Every bit of education you get after high school increases the chances youll earn good pay. Most college graduates earn more money during their working years than people who stop their education at high school earn. The more education you get the more likely it is you will always have a job. According to one estimate, by the year 2028 there will be 19 million more jobs for educated workers than there are qualified people to fill them. Continuing education after high school is much more important for your generation than it was for your parents gen eration. Today most good jobs require more than a high school diploma. Businesses want to hire people who know how to think and solve problems. Education beyond high school gives you a lot of other benefits, including meeting new people, tak ing part in new oppor tunities to explore your interests, and experienc ing success. The next question you may ask yourself is, Now that my child has decided he wants to attend col lege, how do we decide which college he will attend? Researching and then finding an answer to that question forms the foundation of a college search. An integral part of this search will be to determine the following: offered at that institution? If your child is interested in marine biology, and that is not offered at that institution, you need to look further. universitys GPA admis sion requirements? Are they the same for every program? While most schools calculate the admission GPA on the 18 core academic credits with additional weight given to grades of C or higher, they carefully examine those 18 core academic credits to make sure they are in the most rigorous courses offered at your childs high school. leges/universitys SAT/ ACT score requirements? Floridas college advising website www.FLVC.org will provide not only an SAT/ACT score for college admission, but other eli gibility requirements as well. You need to look at the university your child is interested in to deter mine last years average SAT and ACT scores for incoming freshman. applied and how many were actually admitted? All of this information can be found on www.FLVC. org for Florida public and private schools and on the individual schools website. These websites will also list the average incoming GPA, average class size, student-to-fac ulty ratio, and many other facts which may help your child select the very best school for him. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or con cerns about an education al issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Let The College Selection Process BeginJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAbout a year ago, my phone rang, and for once, it wasnt my kids or my husband or my mother or my carpool partner or my in laws or one of those pre-recorded doctors appointment confirma tion messages. Hey Lisa, what have you been up to? she asked. I was dumbfound ed. I had not received a purely social call in months it was as if I had forgotten what to do. My mind raced as I tried to remember how to engage in idle chit chat. Why on earth is she calling me? I thought. I mean, we only know each other because our hus bands work together, and besides, Im new here, but she has plenty of other friends to call . there must be some problem. Oh, you know, the usual . busy, busy, busy! I lied, waiting for her to ask to borrow money, or give her a ride to the airport, or buy over priced candles for her sons baseball team fundraiser. Well, listen, would you like to go on a power walk or something? Really?! Yes! Id love to! What time?! Where do you want me to meet you?! Ill go anywhere! I already have work out clothes on, so Im ready to go when ever you are, so just say the word and Nine-fifteen at the Park and Ride lot on Wonderwood Drive, she interrupted my pathetic ramble. You got it! I arrived twenty min utes early, and sat des perately waiting to spot her mini van. When she arrived, I bolted from my car as if it had burst into flames. Hi! I yelled and waved across the park ing lot, startling her out of her morning haze. For the next hour, we did what military spouses do so well analyzed, pondered, proclaimed, opined, pontificated, empathized, chastised, gossiped and even lis tened a little bit, all under the guise of exer cise. I thoroughly enjoyed myself. Back in the parking lot, my new friend suggested that we make the outing our new Thursday rou tine. I eagerly agreed, and nearly skipped back to my car with a goofy grin. On the drive home, I thought, Finally, a real friend. I cant wait for next Thursday. I wonder if shed want to meet Tuesday, too maybe thats too much. Ill scare her away. Hmmm. Come to think of it, maybe I came on too strong. I think I did most of the talk ing. Why do I always do that? She was probably wondering if Id ever shut up. Ill bet shell call and cancel because she thinks Im an annoying blabber mouth. I pulled into my driveway and looked at myself in the rear view mirror. Not only did I realize that my bangs had fallen into that unflattering middle part that made my face look like a full moon, it also occurred to me that this had all happened before. Suddenly overwhelmed with that bizarre dj vu sensation, I tried to rec ollect the past. I soon realized that Id had the same internal conversa tion with myself in 2008, 1998, 1996, 1994 and 1993 basically, every time the military has ordered us to move. After every move, you busy yourself with setting up your new life new house, new schools, new doctors, new dentists, new music teachers, new church, new pizza place. But once new routines are in place, theres nothing left to do except live. I dont care whether you live in Poughkeepsie or Prague, boredom eventually sets in. You find yourself dawdling on the internet, ignor ing housework, and eat ing too much. You put on work out clothes, but never make it to the gym. You call your husband even though you know he cant chat. You write long e-mails to old friends who are too preoccupied to write back. Even the fam ily dog, has no good gos sip to share. You are bored out of your mind. As I fixed my bangs in the rear view mirror, I remembered the story of Christopher McCandless, a young man who disap peared Into the Wild (the name of the book by Jon Krakauer) to live free from obligations and rela tionships. After spend ing over three months utterly alone, he realized that he had been wrong about life all along. Days before he died of starva tion trying to make it back out of the wild, he wrote, Happiness is only real if shared. Remembering the quote helped me under stand why I always get a little pathetic every time we move, and although Im in no danger of starv ing anytime soon (quite the contrary in fact,) I realized that everyone needs a good friend or two to nourish the soul. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comA Little Pathetic Leads To Sharing HappinessLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesIt has become common in our society to identify certain months through out the year to highlight particular causes and issues that need our awareness or attention. In the month of October alone we are observ ing: National Disability Employment Awareness Month, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, National Cyber Security Awareness Month, National Hispanic Heritage Month, National Work and Family Month to name a few. These causes are noteworthy and noble pursuits, and we should continue to draw attention to things that strengthen society. However, we live in an age where we are inundated with information, and the amount of data placed before us easily becomes white noise. Unfortunately, as one multi-themed month rolls into another, the various causes and observances designed to promote pub licity, lose their luster and meaning. All that said, I want to draw your atten tion to something that should be significant to all Sailors and their families this month Navy Birthday. Just like the white noise of too much information, we often find ourselves so numb to the day-to-day grind that we think we can gloss over our Navys history. Please dont let that happen this year. On Oct. 13, our Navy will turn 237 years old and it is important that we all take moment to pause, reflect, and celebrate the rich heritage of American naval history and tradi tion that has been passed on to us throughout the generations. This year marks the bicentennial of the War of 1812. While we commemorate this event, we should remember our shipmates underway at sea, flying missions in the air, and those serving boots on the ground in Afghanistan. We should also remember that mis sion readiness is never accomplished without the support of the wives, husbands, and children who form the Navy fam ily. Furthermore, we must also remember all those who have gone before. Whether they served one enlistment or retired after thirty years, they are Sailors. One of the greatest honors I have as a Navy chap lain is officiating the funerals of Navy veter ans and learning about their lives. I am always amazed at the contribu tions these Americans made to make our coun try strong and how so many of them continued to live out their daily lives Celebrate Navys 237th Birthday By Remembering Shipmates Of Past, PresentChap. Jerome Cayangyang NS Mayport Chaplain CHAPLAINSSee Chaplain, Page 3 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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at home, at work, at play with Honor, Courage, and Commitment. With all this this reflec tion comes the important task of reaffirming our duty and responsibility to uphold our Navys Core Values: Honor, Courage and Commitment. We have to go beyond an occasional GMT on Core Values or an annual observance. We must not allow them to be reduced into slogans on a ships crest or a t-shirt. These should be words not only on our lips, but words lived out DAILY in our lives. 24/7. I am not a blind idealist. The Bible teaches None is righteous, no, not one. (Romans 3:11) Simply put, we are not perfect people and the Navy is not perfect either just read the Navy Times. If we are honest with our selves, we all make mis takes and fall short of expectations. So how do we do this in an imperfect world made up of imper fect people? As a person of the Christian faith I realize that Honor, Courage, and Commitment are ideals I cannot arrive at on my own. Thus I turn to God, and through the grace of His son Jesus Christ, I can do all things through him who strengthens me. (Philippians 4:13) Just before this verse the apos tle Paul writes, Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honor able, whatever is just, whatever is pure, what ever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you. (Philippians 4:8-9) The perfection of Honor, Courage, and Commitment in our lives is found by seeking God first. But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. (Matthew 6:33) As we approach the Navys Birthday, we must remain un-swerved in our devotion to those values that strengthen our char acter, and our thoughts. Through this we discov er that it is Gods grace received through faith that truly enables us to be Honorable, Courageous, and Committed. Realizing the impor tance of God in our lives I invite you to join me in a prayer from the Book of Common Prayer that I have said often on behalf of our Sailors: ETERNAL Lord God, who alone spreadest out the heavens, and rul est the raging of the sea; Vouchsafe to take into thy almighty and most gracious protection our countrys Navy, and all who serve therein. Preserve them from the dangers of the sea, and from the violence of the enemy; that they may be a safeguard unto the United States of America, and a security for such as pass on the seas upon their lawful occasions; that the inhabitants of our land may in peace and quiet ness serve thee our God, to the glory of thy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Happy Navy Birthday and God bless you!From Page 2ChaplainDefense Expo Slated For Oct. 17From the office of Congressman Ander CrenshawThe Florida League of Defense Contractors and the Jacksonville Aviation Authority in conjunc tion with Congressman Ander Crenshaw will launch the first-ever First Coast Defense Expo at Jacksonville Jetport at Cecil Airport on Wednesday, Oct. 17. The day-long event will allow the First Coast community, including service members from regional military installations such as Naval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the oppor tunity to see how the regional defense industry contributes to our national security and creates jobs for the First Coast. The United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, and the Florida Air National Guard will have displays at the event, where local, regional, and national defense contrac tors will exhibit materials at booths across 15,000 square feet of floor space from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the afternoon, Congressman Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, Florida Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Carroll, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, and key defenseindustry leaders will par ticipate in a Town Hallstyle discussion on the role and importance of the defense industry to our national security and economy. The First Coast is an anchor to our national security a standing not possible without the dedication of our men and women in uniform and the support and expertise of the compa nies that make up our defense industrial base, said Crenshaw. The First Coast Defense Expo is a fabulous opportunity to learn about Northeast Floridas contributions to our military. Ill be shar ing the Capitol Hill per spective on how defense policy impacts Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the local industrial base, and our economy. Folks will be able to view exhib its, network, participate in workshops, and meet the people who play a central role in support ing our men and women in uniform in Florida and around the globe. Further informa tion on the program and admission tickets can be obtained on the Florida League of Defense Contractors web site at www.fl-dc.org. The Jacksonville Jetport is located at Cecil Airport, 13446 Aerospace Way, in Jacksonville, Fla.SECDEF Releases Voting Guidance For DoDFrom Department of Defense Public AffairsSecretary of Defense Leon M. Panetta released the following message Oct. 5. On November 6th, Americans will have the opportunity to exer cise the most important responsibility we have in a democracy the right to vote. Voters will choose from candidates at every level from the Commander-in-Chief, to legislative representatives, to county commission ers, city council members and others. I dont have to tell you that your vote can determine the future. It really counts. And thats why its so important to participate in this process no matter where you are in the world, no matter who you plan to vote for. Please exercise the very privilege that youre will ing to fight and die for in order to protect. But there isnt much time. If youre overseas or away from home, request your absentee ballot immediately, and mail it back in time so that your vote will count. And if you need help, visit your Installation Voter Assistance Office, or see your units voting assis tance officer, or visit the website www.fvap.gov
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HSL-48 Vipers Strike Out Competition From StaffHSL-48 started out this years MWR Fall Sports Challenge with a win and went on to win it all. The team ruled the challenge with 7 first places and defeating a record-par ticipating 18 other com mands. Stepping up a notch from their second place overall at the Spring Challenge, HSL-48 scored 1000 points, followed by 725 points for HSL-60 in second place and USS The Sullivans placing third with 700 points. Competing over four days, Oct. 2-5, this sea sons Sports Challenge included the new events Water Balloon Launch and Chicago 16 softball. The first day opened with a win for HSL-48 in the CO/CMC Canoe Race. SERMC won the Experienced Canoe Race and HSL-60 brought home the win in Kickball. Bowling went to FRCSE. On day two, Naval Station Mayport brought See Challenge, Page 5 -Photos by Paige GnannThe Vipers of HSL-48 receive the First Place trophy as the winners of the 2012 MWR Fall Sports Challenge, beating out 18 other commands. COs and CMCs paddle hard for placement during the CO/CMC Canoe Challenge. This year included black-out goggles for a crewmember as a twist to the competition. Experienced Canoers from USS De Wert lose their canoe during the start of the race, but were able to get back in a finish. SERMC won the event. HSL-48 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Tye Simpson, and HSL-48 CMC, CMDCM Jim Key, win the rights to the coveted trophy after winning this years CO/CMC Canoe race. Coasties from ANT Jax, off Penman Road, try to take down other commands in the 8-Ball competition. Chief Master-at-Arms Paul Parris lines up his shot during the 8-Ball competition. HSL-60 won the Thursday event. HSL-60 and Harbor Ops toss up some competition at Corn Hole, but USS Simpson eventually wins the event. Runners are off during the Relay Race event on Oct. 3. A Sailor sets his shot during the Table Tennis competition. NS Mayport won the event. Sailors aim for the bulls eye during the Cricket Darts competition. Winners were HSL48. 4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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home a win with Chicago 16 Softball. HSL-48 got its second win in the Relay Race and HSM-40 took the win in the Swim Relay. On Day 3, HSL-48 took the day in Golf and Cricket Darts. NS Mayport ruled Table Tennis and the 8-Ball Pool win went to HSL-60. The last day of competition, USS Simpson spiked a win in Volleyball and Cornhole. But, HSL-48 launched its command into a win with Water Balloon Launch, Auto Racing and TugoWar and pulled into first place overall. Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Heliocpter) 2nd Class Nick Hildago of HSL-48 was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Heliocpter) 2nd Class Nick Hildago of HSL-48 was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. Sailors from HSL-60 yell at a shipmate to swim harder as the command takes first place in the Swim Relay. Sailor from Naval Station Mayport Security aim and fire a water balloon during the newest event, Water Balloon Launch. SERMC goes up against USS Simpson during Beach Volleyball. Sailors pedal hard and head for the finish line during the Auto Racing competition. HSL-48 took first place in the pedal car event. A Sailor takes off on the next leg of the Swim Relay com petition. HSL-60 holds its own during the TugoWar competition, but was eventually beat out by event winners, HSL-48. A Sailor from HSL-48 serves the volley during the last round of competition against USS Simpson.From Page 4Challenge HSL-60 and SERMC kick it off during the Kickball com petition. HSL-60 won the event. A Coastie tries to recover the ball as a Sailor from USS Simpson takes off for first base in Chicago 16 Softball. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 5

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For the past year, Ive had the privilege of leading the Navys Southeast Region, which includes Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, and Navy Submarine Base Kings Bay. Every day, I see our young men and women who have made the com mitment to serve our country in a way that most people cannot imagine, said Scorby. The men and women in uniform today are but the latest in a long line of heroes who have served their nation in times of conflict and in times of peace, he continued. To each of these heroes, both past and present, we owe a debt that we may never be able to fully repay. And for that reason, I am pleased to be here for the launching the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor initiative. This trib ute is a true expression of the long-standing friend ship we share between the Armed Forces of the United States and the City of Jacksonville. During the Week of Valor, the following events will be held to pay tribute to the military: Nov. 5, 11:30 a.m. Military Appreciation Luncheon at the Prime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 5-12 Active duty military and veteran school visits Nov. 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans Summit University of North Florida University Center Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts Military Appreciation Game Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. Veterans Job Fair Prime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m. Mayport Music Concert NS Mayport Nov. 9, 9 p.m. NavyMarine Corps Classic, Florida vs. Georgetown NS Mayport Nov. 12, 9 a.m. Veterans Recognition Breakfast Times Union Center Nov. 12, 11:01 a.m. Veterans Day Parade Downtown Jacksonville The Department of the Navy is particularly excit ed to be part of the NavyMarine Corps Basketball Classic, which will be played on board USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport. Ships such as the Bataan are part of Americas Away Team, ready to deploy around the world to defend our nations interests, giv ing the United States a home-court advantage that cannot be duplicat ed, said Scorby. Bataan will be com ing to Mayport along with USS Mesa Verde and USS Carter Hall, two other amphibious warships that constitute a representa tional amphibious ready group that will match the ships that Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced would be homeported in Mayport beginning in 2013, he added. These ships not only reinforce the impor tance of Northeast Florida in the Navys strategic dis persal, but demonstrate the value of the NavyMarine Corps team. Scorby concluded by praising the City of Jacksonville for their con tinual support of the military. The City of Jacksonville has pub licly declared itself as the most military-friendly city in the nation. While the Week of Valor is more of a public demonstra tion of support; the city has put in place numerous programs and initiatives that provide tangible ben efits to our veterans and active duty service mem bers. This can be seen by the fact that many of our Sailors and Marines who come to Jacksonville often stay in Jacksonville, even after they leave the mili tary service. For more information on the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor events, go to: www. coj.net/MilitaryAffairs. From Page 1ValorFFSC Schedule Set For OctoberFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Oct. 11, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 15, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class FFSC Room 702 Oct. 15-17, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training Building 1 Room 1615 Oct. 15-19, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training Building 1 Room 1616 Oct. 16, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 16, 1-3 p.m., What About The Kids?, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 16, 7:30 a.m., Domestic Violence Awareness 5K/3K Run, Base Gym Oct. 17, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 17, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Home Buying, Building 1 Room 1616 Oct. 17, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Oct. 17-18, 5-9 p.m., FRG Leadership Training Building 1 Room 1615 Oct. 18, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 20, 5:30-8:30 p.m., IA Family Outing, Bowling Alley Oct. 22-25, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Oct. 23, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 24, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 24, 9-11 a.m., Credit Management, FFSC Room 719 Oct. 24, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Oct. 25, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 25, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1 Room 1124 Oct. 29, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 30, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Oct. 30, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 31, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 31, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 EOQ Lunch On Oct. 23From StaffNaval Station Civilian Employee of the Quarter presentation/luncheon will be held on Oct. 23 at 11:30 a.m., Ocean Breeze Conference Center. All are welcome to attend and support the nominees. Lunch is $8. Pay at the door. RSVP to Sandra Barrett by Oct. 19. Nominees for Employee of the Quarter (3rd Quarter): Kevin Moyer, Fire/ Emergency Services Marden Le Bouton, MWR Gregory Schmitt, PWD Lawrence Ossi, PWD Karen Downey, Chapel Todd Wright, FFSC Robert Nelson, Housing Robert Garis, Air Ops Diane Williams, NGIS Larry Delong, Safety Theodis Simmons, Security 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Give Blood, Save LivesFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will host a blood drive in partnership with American Red Cross on Oct. 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1, Room 104. The blood drive is open to all military and civil ian personnel, including dependents. The American Red Cross has an emergency need for blood donors of all types. This will the last oppor tunity to give blood on board the installation until after the holiday season.Loading The Seahawk -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottAviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Phillip Craven, left, and Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Lionel Harris, both assigned to the Grandmasters of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 46, load AGM-114 Hellfire missiles onto an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. Picking Up Supplies -Photo by MC2 Scott RaegenLogistics Specialist Seaman William Bagwell monitors sea activity aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) before a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204).Get Coupons, Special Offers With Commissary Rewards CardFrom DeCAIts here! The Commissary Rewards Card is available now in the Mayport Commissary. The card is free and designed to reduce the number of paper coupons commissary customers clip and carry saving them time and money. As an introductory offer, customers who pick up their cards by Oct. 24 receive preloaded digital coupons on their cards that can be used immedi ately. Adding digital coupons is easy and is done online after registering the card through the commis sary website at http:// www.commissaries.com/ rewards/index.cfm. New digital coupons will typically be available every two or three weeks. Visit the website for more information or ask in the commissary. -DeCA ImageThe Mayport Commissary is issuing new Commissary Rewards Cards with preloaded digital coupons for cus tomers who sign up by Oct. 24. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Finegan Thanks Service Members For Volunteer Work Maria Bray Illustrates Multi-Mission CapabilitiesFrom U.S. Coast Guard Public AffairsThe Coast Guard Cutter Maria Bray and crew returned to their home port at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Thursday morning fol lowing a 30-day deploy ment during which crew members were directly engaged in operations involving 75 Cuban migrants. The Maria Bray headed to Miami and Key West, Fla., on Oct. 5 in support of the cutters primary mission of aids to naviga tion, but the crew dem onstrated their multimission capabilities when they were called upon during their deploy ment to assist other Coast Guard cutters with migrant operations. The crew of the Maria Bray partnered with the Coast Guard Cutter Sawfish, an 87-foot patrol boat homeported in Key West, and Coast Guard Cutter Kodiak Island, a 110-foot patrol boat homeported in Key West, to repatriate several of the Cuban migrants to Bahia de Cabatas, Cuba Sept. 21, 2012. A press release with more details is available HERE. In total during the 30-day deployment, 75 Cuban migrants went aboard the Maria Bray. The cutter housed many of the migrants for 20 days before repatriating them. Though not common, Alien Migrant Interdiction Operations is one of the many missions performed by the 175-foot buoy ten der. We took part in this operation to relieve pressure on other Coast Guard afloat assets so they could complete missions in other areas of the Caribbean, said Chief Warrant Officer Christopher Cartwright, the commanding officer of the Maria Bray. The crew has done an amaz ing job switching their focus from aids to navigation servicing to migrant interdiction and back to ATON. The Coast Guard Cutter Maria Bray is a 175-foot buoy tender, and the crews primary mission is maintaining more than 300 aids to navigation from Georgetown, S.C., to Ft. Pierce, Fla., and near Andros Island, Bahamas. -Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jessica PotterA crewmember aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Maria Bray puts equipment away after the cutter returned to homeport at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach Oct. 4, 2012. The primary mission of crewmem bers aboard the 175-foot buoy tender is servicing aids to navigation, but during a 30-day deployment to Miami and Key West, Fla., the crew assisted with an Alien Migrant Interdiction Operation. -Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jessica PotterService members from Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., participate in a flag raising ceremony performed by students at Finegan Elementary School on Friday, Oct. 5, 2012. Over a six-month period more than 20 Coast Guardsmen and more than 20 Sailors dedicated time assisting in a grounds beauti fication project for the elementary school. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 9

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USS Gettysburg VBSS Team Conducts Training During Exercise Joint WarriorDestroyer Squadron 26 Public AffairsUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Sailors participated in visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team training as part of Exercise Joint Warrior off the coast of Scotland, Oct. 2. As part of the training, a small vessel approached the area where Gettysburg was patrolling and acted as a suspected pirate ves sel. Gettysburg queried the vessel according to exercise instructions. When the small vessel did not reply properly, the VBSS team prepared to board it. The VBSS team offi cers reported to the Gettysburg bridge to get amplifying information about the vessel, and how it was behaving while the other members of the VBSS team dressed out for the boarding. The VBSS team then reported to the fantail to launch a rigid hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) to transport them to the suspected vessel. I look at it kind of like a football game, when we are in the locker room just prepping, thinking about the plays you are going to make, what the other team is going to do, how you are going to counter that to bring your team back home safe. said Lt.j.g. Christian Mack, a member of the VBSS team on board Gettysburg. Once on board the small vessel, the VBSS teams job is to conduct a search and determine if it is operating within inter national law. If they find the vessel is a suspected pirate ship or participat ing in illegal operations, the team will move to take control of the ship. Team members are trained in engineering and bridge standing procedures so they can maneuver the vessel if needed. VBSS teams participate in similar training at least once a quarter, either at sea or ashore. Being at sea, doing it underway is the best training, said VBSS team member Lt. j.g. Michael Burris. -Photo by Lt. Amber LewisMembers of the visit, board, search and seizure team and Sailors from the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) move toward a small vessel during a Joint Warrior 12-2 training exercise. Joint Warrior is designed and led by the joint tactical exercise plan ning staff in the United Kingdom and is intended to improve interoperability between allied navies and prepare participants for a role in a joint maritime environment during deployments. Navy Ball Tix On SaleFrom MWRTickets are on sale for the 2012 Naval Station Mayport Navy Ball at Mayport ITT (270-5145 x5). The Navy Ball will be held on Oct. 25 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center starting with the cocktail hour at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. Ticket prices are O-6 and above, Retiree/ DoD Civilians $50; 04-05 $45; 01-03/CWO/E7-E9 $40; E-5 and below $30. Command tables can be purchased $450 per table of 10 people. Guest speak er is Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, COMUSNAVSO/C4F. This is a Black Tie event; mili tary: mess dress 0-4 and above; service dress uni form w/miniature medals 0-3 and below; civilian: formal attire. Working together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com a CFC participant Provided as a public service 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Farragut DC Training Makes Olympic Effort USS Farragut (DDG 99) Public AffairsSailors aboard guid ed-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) competed in the ships Damage Control (DC) Olympics, Oct. 2. DC Olympics pro vide Sailors a chance to have fun, while testing and improving the dam age control skills theyve learned through normal training. The DC Olympics is an opportunity for person nel on the ship to com pete with one another in doing basic damage control skills, said Cmdr. William G. Musser, exec utive officer of Farragut. Its a great opportunity to improve the readiness of the ship. Farraguts DC Olympics consisted of six events including a fire fighting ensemble relay, message relay, pipe patching sce nario, de-smoking race, stretcher bearer race and a competition to see who could aim a fire hose the best by filling a trash can with the water stream. Its a great training tool because it breaks up the monotony of every day training, said Chief Damage Controlman (SW) Brandon Coates, Farraguts damage con trol leading chief petty officer. The Sailors get the chance to really get hands-on and use the equipment. Sailors typically simu late some aspects of dam age control procedures during conventional training scenarios such as charging hoses or electri cally isolating a compart ment. The DC Olympics give the Sailors the chance to use a live hose, or attempt to patch a pipe that has water actually leaking. Six teams participated in the DC Olympics. Each team was comprised of members from the differ ent repair lockers aboard the ship. Repair locker 2 took first place. I had a blast, said Hull Technician 2nd Class (SW) John Overwise. Its a fun way to see what weve actually learned during our training. Farragut is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photos by MC3(SW) A.J. JonesHull Technician 2nd Class John Overwise, from Philadelphia, Pa., front, and Damage Controlman 1st Class Justin Christensen, from Ogden, Utah, simulate fighting a fire during a general quarters drill aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Hull Technician 2nd Class John Overwise, from Philadelphia, Pa., simulates using a fire hose to cool a space during a general quarters drill aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 11

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Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWRNew Fitness Classes Includes Saturday PT OpportunityFrom MWRThe new fitness sched ule includes not only eight new class types, but a weekend PT opportu nity. On Saturdays at 9:30 a.m., the WOD Squad gathers to undertake a carefully planned W.O.D. (Workout of the Day) in the Mayport Sandbox located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The WOD Squad is a continuously grow ing group of active duty, spouses, dependants, retirees and civilians all attached to NAVSTA Mayport who have com pleted the six-part Intro to HIT (High Intensity Training) program or who can demonstrate to Fitness Specialist Russell Krenz that they possess previous high intensity training experience. The WOD Squad is approximately 50 persons strong and 30 persons are currently moving up the ranks program. Intro to HIT meets at 10:30 a.m. on Saturdays and varies between Sessions 1-6. Intro to HIT is a progressive 6-part program that must be completed in sequen tial order. Other sand box classes include HIT for Women and HIT Skill Review. For more information on HIT programs and all the new classes offered on the fitness schedule email emily.deason@navy.mil. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Oct. 12: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Oct. 12: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Oct. 13: Fall Fest 2012. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pictures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. A variety of vendors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked good ies, and more. Oct. 13: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Oct. 13: UFC 153: Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Oct. 16: Knock Out Domestic Violence 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Oct. 16: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Oct. 17: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Oct. 19: Toga Party 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Rock out with your togas out. Featuring live band Southern Magic, free food, giveaways and more. Before the band, we will be screening the movie Animal House. Oct. 20: All Khaki Oktoberfest. 6-10 p.m. at Focsle CPO Lounge. Don yer lederhosen & grab ye maiden for Focsle Lounges very first Oktoberfest Celebration! Festivities include live band One-Eyed Jakes, free German-inspired food, barrel roll obstacle course, bratwurst-eating contest, barrel toss, Oct. 24: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by HSL-48. To purchase tick ets in advance, please call CMDCM Jim Key at (904) 270-6810 x119. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Oct. 11: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 12: Halloween Horror Nights Trip. Van departs 4:30 p.m. Cost $35. Sign up deadline Oct. 8. Oct. 12: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Oct. 12: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rent al, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Oct. 13: Fall Fest 2012. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pictures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. A variety of vendors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked goodies, and more. Purchase your sea sonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Oct. 13: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials through out the day. 270-7205 Oct. 13: UFC 153: Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Oct. 14: Ghosts & Gravestones Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $10. Sign up deadline Oct. 8. Oct. 15: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 16: Knock Out Domestic Violence 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Oct. 17: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Oct. 17: Candy/ Caramel Apple Making. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 18: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 19: Toga Party 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Rock out with your togas out. Featuring live band Southern Magic, free food, giveaways and more. Before the band, we will be screening the movie Animal House. 270-7205 LIBERTY Oct. 13: Fall Fest 2012. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pictures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. A variety of vendors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked good ies, and more. Purchase your seasonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Oct. 19: Freedom Friday Monster Mash Movie Bash. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 Oct. 25: Drama Club Presents Casper. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. KID THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 13

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TA Eligibility Restored For Clock Hour ProgramsNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsThe Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) announced Oct. 4 the restoration of Tuition Assistance (TA) eligibil ity for clock hour-based vocational and technical programs. Announced in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 305-12, individuals may receive funds for clock hour pro grams provided the ser vice member meets all TA eligibility requirements, establishes an approved education plan with their local Navy College Office (NCO) and has received an electronic TA voucher. Clock hour programs provide vocational education opportunities that often enhance Sailors skills in technical career fields on active duty and can benefit them when they eventually return to the private sector, said Dr. Jonathan Woods, Voluntary Education spe cialist on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Manpower, Training and Education). Proper planning, includ ing determining TA eli gibility, is the key to suc cessful execution of these education programs. Many schools offer non-college degree pro grams in a variety of cer tificate and diploma pro grams on a clock hour basis rather than through award of semester or quarter hour credits. The Navy uses objec tive criteria established by the Department of Veterans Affairs for approving programs offered by non-college degree schools for deter mining TA funding eligi bility, said Tom Smith, enlisted education coor dinator for NETC. Navy approval also offers Sailors the option to use the GI Bill top-up pro gram to cover costs that exceed the TA cap for a given fiscal year. A list of VA-approved clock hour programs can be found online at http:// inquiry.vba.va.gov/. In the center of the screen, click on Click here to search for approved programs and then click on the appro priate state to find local programs. VA-approved clock hour programs are instructor-led, face-toface programs in order to meet strict attendance and performance require ments. Sailors are strongly encouraged to pursue clock hour programs that prepare them for Navy Credentialing Opportunities Online (COOL) funded certifica tion or licensing exami nations, added Woods. Certification and license eligibility for clock hour programs can be researched at www.cool. navy.mil. Each Sailor may use TA to fund only one voca tional/technical program that uses clock hours dur ing a career. Sailors are required to discuss their educational goals with a Navy College counselor prior to enrolling in any program that is funded by TA. TA funds 100 percent of tuition and autho rized fees, up to $250 per semester hour, or $166.67 per quarter hour, or $16.67 per clock hour. TA is limited to 16 semester hours, 24-quarter hours, or 240 clock hours per fis cal year. Both credit and clock hours can be fund ed by TA, however the combined total cost for an individual Sailor can not exceed the maximum allowable annual TA cap of $4,500. Completion require ments for clock hour pro grams funded by TA are the same as other edu cational programs and require Sailors to reim burse the full cost of the TA voucher for dropping or failing a course. Credit for military training through the American Council on Military Education, credit by examination and the Navy College Program for Afloat College Education, all afford eligible Sailors the opportunity to earn a college degree. Its crucial that Sailors work closely with their Navy College Office or the Virtual Education Center to ensure they know how clock hour programs dovetail into their edu cational goals, added Smith. Bridging techni cal or vocational training with academic degree tracks can be challeng ing, so let the experts help you. Historically, nearly half of Sailors pursuing clock hour training have sought academic degrees. Additional information on educational programs, including clock hour programs is available on the Navy College web site: www.navycollege. navy.mil or the Virtual Education Center at: 877838-1659 (DSN) 492-4584.Navy Commissions USS Michael Murphy In Big AppleNaval Surfaces Forces Public AffairsUSS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), the Navys newest guided-missile destroyer, was commis sioned during a formal ceremony at pier 88 in Manhattan, Oct. 6. The newest destroy er honors Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy, a New York native who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions dur ing Operation Red Wings in Afghanistan, June 28, 2005. Thousands of spec tators, veterans and invited guests gathered in front of the ship to witness the ceremony, which included distin guished guests such as the Mayor of New York, the Honorable Michael Bloomberg, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Adm. William McRaven, commander, U.S. Special Operations Command. The Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, delivered the principal address and spoke of the ship, her crew and her namesakes heroic actions. This ship honors the courage, service and sacrifice of Lt. Michael Murphy, his Red Wings brothers, fellow SEALs, special operators and service members around the world who answer the call of duty every day, said Mabus. It is abso lutely fitting that the USS Michael Murphy bears a SEAL trident on her crest because, much like Michael and every Navy SEAL who has earned the honor of wearing the tri dent, this ship is designed to counter threats from above and below the sur face of the oceans, in the air and on land. Greenert reflected on the ships massive power and ability to protect our nations freedom. USS Michael Murphy, the most flexible, lethal and multi-mission capa ble ship of its kind, repre sents the backbone of our surface combatant fleet, Greenert said. It is one of the best destroyers in the world. This ship will operate forward around the globe, assuring allies, projecting power and defending our nation. And, like its namesake, Lt. Michael Murphy, this ship will serve to protect, influ ence and win in an era of uncertainty. At the conclusion of the remarks, Murphys moth er and ships sponsor Maureen Murphy gave the order to, man our ship and bring her to life! The crew responded by saying Aye, Aye, Maam and began to double time up the brows to man the ship as the Navy band played Anchors Aweigh. Crewmembers stood side by side, manning the rails as the ships systems came online. Radars, weapon systems, and other parts of the ship began moving to symbolize her coming to life. Cmdr. Thomas E. Shultz, a native of El Cajon, Calif., is the com manding officer of the ship and will lead the crew of 279 officers and enlisted personnel. The 9,200-ton Michael Murphy was built by General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. The ship is the 62nd ship in the Arleigh Burke class of Navy destroyers and the last of its class. It is 509 feet in length, has a waterline beam of 59 feet, and has a navigational draft of 31 feet. The commissioning was the culmination of a week-long celebration in New York City honor ing the ship, her crew and the legacy of Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy. The ship will be home ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. You can also follow the ship on Facebook: https://www.facebook. com/USSMichaelMurphy. -Photo by MC1 Peter D. LawlorThe ship's officers and crew man the ship during the commissioning ceremony of the Arleigh-Burke class destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112). Murphy is named after Lt. Michael Murphy, a Navy SEAL and Medal of Honor recipient who posthumously received the nation's highest military honor for bravery during combat in Afghanistan in 2005. Operation Homefront Acceptimg Military Child of the Year NominationsFrom Operation HomefrontOperation Homefront, the national nonprofit dedicated to provid ing emergency finan cial and other assis tance to military fami lies, has announced that nominations for the Military Child of the Year Awards are being accepted online at MilitaryChildOfTheYear. org through December 15, 2012. Winners will be rec ognized in April 2013. The Military Child of the Year Award recognizes children who stand out among their peers. Ideal candidates for the award demonstrate resil ience, strength of charac ter, and thrive in the face of the challenges of mili tary life. These young heroes embody leadership within their families and com munities. This award is presented to an outstanding child from each branch of ser vice Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The winners each receive $5,000 and a lap top, and are flown with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for a special recognition cer emony on April 11. In previous years, recipi ents have had the honor of meeting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey, and First Lady Michelle Obama, who were guest speakers for the event awards ceremonies. For more information on how to nominate a child in your community, to become a sponsor, or to see photos from past events, please log on to MilitaryChildOfTheYear. org. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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GTMO Hosts USS Underwood, U.S. 4th Fleet Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Public AffairsUSS Underwood (FFG 36) and USS Anzio (CG 68) visited Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, from, Sept. 29-30 during their deployments in support of multina tional maritime exercise Southern Seas 2012 and UNITAS Atlantic 53. Underwood received logistic support from the installation including fuel, water and supplies, while UNITAS flagship USS Anzio disembarked attached staff members from Destroyer Squadron 40 including U.S 4th Fleet Commander, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris. UNITAS Atlantic 53 is a U.S. and South Americasponsored international naval exercise. This is the 53rd year partner nations have participated in UNITAS, which stands for unity, making it the longest ongoing maritime exercise in the region. Thirteen multinational ships from seven part ner nations participated in the exercise that origi nated in Key West, Fla. and officially ended in the Western Caribbean Sept. 29. Warships from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United States and the United Kingdom and observers from France, Jamaica, Panama and Peru participated in the exercise. UNITAS is designed to train each naval force in a variety of maritime sce narios, with each operat ing as a component of a multi-national force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. The exer cise develops and sustains relationships that improve the capacity of emerg ing and enduring part ners maritime forces to achieve common desired effects. The annual exer cise fosters friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating navies. Southern Seas 2012 is a six-month U.S. Navy engagement and train ing operation to the Caribbean and Central and South America. During the deployment, USS Underwood and embarked units partici pated in a variety of exer cises and multi-national exchanges to improve operational readiness and enhance relationships in the region. During the operation, assigned units focused on operating in the multi-national envi ronment, preparing to deal with unconventional threats such as illicit traf ficking, and improved training levels in a variety of mission areas. Participating forces took part in major regional exercises including UNITAS Atlantic, UNITAS Pacific, and Silent Force Exercise. Forces also partici pated in a series of the ater security cooperation events, including militaryto-military cooperation, humanitarian assistance, disaster response, com bined training, and mari time security. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, serves as a logisti cal hub in the U.S. 4th Fleet Caribbean theatre. The installations Port Operations department provides operational sup port for more than 150 vessels a year. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulAviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class (AW) Randolph Vasquez removes the air intake covers from an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to HSL-48 on the flight deck of USS Underwood (FFG 36). -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulVasquez transits through the portside helicopter hangar hatch to the flight deck of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) for the recovery of an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Four Eight (HSL-48). Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mis sion, Southern Seas 2012. Logistics Specialist Seaman Michael Spears removes the power cable from an SH-60B Sea Hawk heli copter assigned to HSL-48 during a functional flight check on the flight deck of the Oliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frigate USS Underwood. -Photo by MC2 Stuart Phillips THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 15

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville Conducts Baby Boot Camp Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastExpecting parents were able to receive a crash course on infant care during a Baby Boot Camp class at Naval Hospital Jacksonville (NH Jacksonville) Oct. 3. Baby Boot Camp focus es on the newborn and what to expect the first few days and weeks at home as well as prepare them for a positive par enting experience. There is a lot of infor mation that parents dont know they need until they need it. Parents are on a very steep learning curve, especially with a first child, so its important to give them as much infor mation ahead of time, said Alisa Davis R.N., perinatal nurse educa tor at NH Jacksonville where two to three babies are born each day. It makes a little less over whelming when they do bring their newborn home. Father-to-be, Aviation Electricians Mate 2nd Class Jonathan Musick, assigned to Fleet Readiness Reserve Southeast, found the class to be very informative. He particularly enjoyed the Happiest Baby on the Block section teaching a five-step method used for soothing infants to greatly reduce crying time. I had no idea what swaddling was, let alone how to swaddle a baby. Its giving me the con fidence to feel at ease, and comforting to know I can care for my child. I feel better prepared, said Musick. Participants were able to receive information from trained nurses on basic baby care, pediat ric dental health, tobacco cessation, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society visit ing nurse, Happiest Baby on the Block, injury pre vention, car seat safety and a demonstration on infant CPR. A pediatric provider was also on hand to dis cuss the importance of immunizations and answer any questions the expecting parents had. Sonar Technician (sur face) 3rd Class Kimberly Campbell, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, and her husband Brandon attended a few other classes at NH Jacksonville before Baby Boot Camp and feel all parents should participate in the prenatal classes. I feel the classes helped us to be more pos itive about the pregnancy and work better togeth er, said Campbell. We received a lot of informa tion that helped us really understand and prepare for the delivery. NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of free-ofcharge classes to patients giving birth at the hospi tal to include Baby Boot Camp, Prenatal Exercise, Hypnobirthing, Infant Massage, Breastfeeding, Prepared Childbirth and an orientation program. NH Jacksonville is the first hospital on Floridas First Coastmilitary or civilianto earn Baby Friendly des ignation from United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and World Health Organization. Its the 3rd hospital in DoD and 4th in Florida with the certification. Baby Friendly hospitals seek to improve the health of babies and moms by promoting breastfeeding. That means healthi er active duty moms and healthier families. Anyone wishing to develop a prenatal edu cation plan can call (904) 542BABY (542-2229) to register for classes or talk to a nurse. -Photo by MC1 Toiete JacksonAlisa Davis, lactation specialist at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, demonstrates proper procedures when giving infant CPR to expecting parents during a baby boot camp class at NH Jacksonville. -Photo by MC1 Toiete JacksonFirst time dad Aviation Electronic's Mate 2nd Class Jonathan Musick, assigned to Fleet Readiness Reserve Southeast, learns how to swaddle a baby with help from his wife Amber during a baby boot camp class at Naval Hospital (NH)Jacksonville. Baby boot camp is one of many free-of-charge classes offered by NH Jacksonville to help patients giving birth at its hospital, education on what to expect before, during and after giving birth.Get Into ShipShape With Health PromoFrom Health Promotion by the OceanDo you want to make some permanent healthy lifestyle changes before the holidays? Mayport Health Promotion will be start ing a free eight-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class on Oct. 30. Class will take place once a week on Tuesday mornings from 9-11 a.m. through Dec. 18. We cover topics such as calorie counting, the basic food groups, gro cery shopping, reading food labels, and much more. Class is open to active duty, adult dependents, and retir ees. The class location is Building 2050, Marshal Couch Drive. Call 2705251 for more informa tion. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.While he works to defend the country, St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease. Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Of cer 2 and his daughter Delilah, a St. Jude patient. Fruits, Veggies: More MattersNaval Hospital Jacksonville Well ness CenterIts Fruits & VeggiesMore Matters Month, raising awareness about fruits and vegetables in ones daily diet. Although people know that fruits and vegetables are associated with good nutrition, many still dont consume the recommended daily amount. The U.S. Department of Agricultures food guide, My Plate, recommends filling half of ones plateat each meal-with fruits and vegetables. Eating more fruits and veggies does mat ter. Theyre high in many vitamins and minerals, contain fiber that helps with digestion, are usu ally low in calories (which can help with a healthy weight), and can reduce the risk of many diseases (such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and some cancers). Plan ahead to add fruits and vegetables to each meal, and heres a few tips. Add fruit to cereal, or vegetables to an omelet. fruit and veggies, instead of chips and sweets. Include veggies as part of the main meal, and fruits as sides or desserts. gies instead of fries at res taurants. There are many fruits and vegetables to choose from, so dont be afraid to try new types. For more ideas and recipes, contact Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayports Wellness Center at 270-5251 or visit www.fruitsandveggiesmo rematters.org. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Saturday, Oct. 13 Join a park ranger to learn about the many common spe cies that inhabit the natural communities of the undevel oped barrier islands of north east Florida. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Friday, Oct. 19 The Marriage Ministry of Neptune Baptist Church will host The Art of Marriage videoconference series. This six-part event will present the principles of a strong, healthy, marriage relationship using a variety of speakers, engaging stories, humorous scenarios and inter views from real couples struggling to find solutions to improve their marriage. The conference was produced by Family Life and is receiving rave reviews nationwide. The conference will begin on Friday, Oct. 19 from 6-9 p.m. and continue on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Refreshments will be provided on Friday evening and lunch will be provided on Saturday. Dress is casual. Each couple will be provided with a workbook with useful tips, articles, and exercises to help reinforce conference topics. Childcare is available by appointment and donation. The cost to attend is $40 per couple ($20 for marriage-minded singles). Tickets may be purchased at LifeWay Christian Bookstore-Town Center, at www.neptunebaptist.org/ministries/marriage or by calling (904) 249-2307. Saturday, Oct. 20 Crafters Wanted! Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach will host its annual Craft Fair and Fall Festival on from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. To reserve your booth, please contact the church office today at 249-5370. The City of Atlantic Beach Family Fun Day and Campout under the Stars returns to Jack Russell Park, 1:30-10 p.m. Our 19th Annual Campout is one of the Citys most popular events. Reserve your campsite early before they sell out! Campers can reserve a 10 x 10 campsite for a $10 fee before Oct. 1, and $15 after Sept. 30. This year continues the Saturday Family Fun Day activities and performances for kids of all ages! Afternoon and evening events, including our Twilight Movie are free and open to the public. Russell Park field is located on Plaza St., north of Atlantic Beach City Hall on Seminole Rd. Registration forms are on the City website and campers can register by mail, or choose your campsite at the Recreation Office, 716 Ocean Blvd., weekdays 8-noon and 1-4:30 p.m. Call 247-5828 for more information or visit www.coab.us/events Girls Inc of Jacksonville is sponsoring Fall into the Daddy Daughter Dance! 5:30-9:30 p.m. at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village. All proceeds benefit Girls Inc. of Jacksonville, a nonprofit organization that inspires all girls to be Strong, Smart & Bold. Cost is $80 per couple (Dad or significant adult male) and $30 per additional daughter. Find out more at www. DaddyDaughterDanceGIJ.com or call 904-731-9933 The Friends of Talbot Islands State Parks will host the annu al A Day for Hope and Friends benefit event at Amelia Island State Park from 3-6 p.m. at Kelly Seahorse Ranch, Amelia Island State Park, State Road A1A North, Jacksonville. Each year the Friends of Talbot Islands State Parks coordinate an equestrian event to increase membership and raise funds for Amelia Island, George Crady Bridge Fishing Pier, Big Talbot Island, Little Talbot Island, Fort George Island, Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve and Yellow Bluff Fort State Parks. All proceeds from the event will benefit these organizations. Participants will enjoy an afternoon of horse back riding on the beach, edu cational opportunities, a low country boil, barbeque and beverages. The cost is $10 per plate. While you are there, sign up to become a member of the Friends of Talbot Islands State Parks. Donations are also welcomed and are 100% tax deductible. For directions and additional information, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org Monday, Oct. 22 A Beauty Berry Jelly Class at the Duval County Canning Center will be held at 9 a.m.Noon and 1-4 p.m. at Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue. Cost is $20 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 2557450. Saturday, Oct. 27 Join a Park Ranger for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural communities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the pro gram is free. Sunday, Nov. 11 Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and hometown favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music.Along with numerous local businesses, national organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project will be involved in the event. Tickets, which start at $29, are on sale now. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Southern Womens Show Your Greater Jacksonville USO Mayport and NAS Centers have discounted tickets avail able for this years Southern Womens Show Oct. 19-21. Tickets are $5 each and cash only. Enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health, beauty, and lifestyle ven dors at the Prime Osborn Convention Center October 18th-21st. For more information on this event, visit www. SouthernWomensShow. com. Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an indi vidual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or emailing me at herb@jaxsignarama. com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned fran chise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. For information on quali fications and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 17

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Commands Go Head-to-Head In Fall Sports Challenge -Photo by Paige GnannEnsign Paul Moe of USS The Sullivans goes in short for an out on first base as a batter from USS Simpson runs past during the Chicago 16 Softball competition, part of the annual MWR Fall Sports Challenge held Oct. 2-5. Find out which command came out on top, pages 4-5. Make sure to check out www.mayportmirror.com photo gallery to see all of the Sports Challenge photos that didnt make this edition. Jax Hosts Week of Valor To Say Thanks To MilitaryContributorJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. held a press conference Oct. 4 to announce the City of Jacksonvilles plans to host a Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their fami lies. Numerous events will be held throughout the city Nov. 5-12 to recognize the contributions and sacrifices of those serving or have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Today, Im proud to announce the City of Jacksonvilles 2012 Week of Valor a celebration of service and sacrifice by all those who have served and those currently serv ing, said Brown, dur ing the press conference at Jacksonville City Hall. It is so important for us to take these opportuni ties to say thank you. We must never forget just how much these brave men and women give. Valor is a powerful con cept. It represents unpar alleled courage, selfless service and commitment to our nation. The mayor then intro duced Scorby to the podium. Blue Angels ComingFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport, the city of Jacksonville and the Beaches cities are gearing up for this years Sea & Sky Spectacular scheduled for Oct. 20-21at Jacksonville Beach oceanfront. This free event will be held from 9:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. and feature a dynamic over-the-ocean sky show highlighted by the world-famous United States Navy Blue Angels along with other military and civilian flight teams, live entertainment, a street festival featuring static displays of aircraft and military vehicles, simulators, recruitment booths, a kids area and Meet The Performers Autograph Sessions. Show center will be located between 1st Ave. N and 6th Ave. N Performers this year include: U.S. Navy Blue Angels U.S. Special Operations Command Parachute Team Corkey Fornoff LoPresti Fury Jason Newburg Viper Air Shows The Red Eagles Julie Clark Black Diamonds F4U-Corsair F-18 Super Hornet Legacy Flight Matt Chapman Horsemen Flight Team F-22 Raptor Heritage Flight Michael Goulian USCG Search and Rescue Demo Narrated by: Danny Clisham Air Boss: Wayne Boggs Plan now for parking. Festival-goers are encour aged to park at the TPC parking lots, located west of A1A on Palm Valley Road/County Road 210. Cost is $20 and includes a free shuttle from the lot. Parking will extremely limited during the event. Event attendees are strongly encouraged to take the con venient, free shuttles. Shuttles will start running at 8 a.m. and will run continuously to and from the event site until 6 p.m. For more information about the 2012 Sea and Sky Spectacular, call (904) 630-3690. -Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown announces a series of events to honor military mem bers, veterans and their families during the City of Jacksonville's "Week of Valor" dur ing a press conference Oct. 4. From left, Aaron Bowman of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, Jacksonville Jaguars Senior Vice President of Sales Mackey Weaver, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., Brown, Jacksonville Director of Military Affairs Victor Guillory and Jacksonville Director, Sports and Entertainment Alan Verlander. Be A Ball Kid Contest For Navy Marine Corps Classic Basketball GameFrom MWREight lucky active duty Navy, Marine Corps and/or Coast Guard dependents will get the chance to be a Ball Kid at the Navy Marine Corps Classic on Nov. 9, with the Georgetown Hoyas facing off against the University of FL Gators. Children must be between the ages 12-17 (18 if still in high school). To enter, please submit childs name, age, contact phone number, email address and Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard base affiliation to mwrmay port@navy.mil by Oct. 26. All entrants must be attached to a Tri-Site base and must be able to provide proof of age and active duty depen dent ID if selected. Names will be drawn by the city of Jacksonville. For more information, call (904) 270-5228. See Valor, Page 6

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.It is that time in the senior year when students need to make some final decisions about what they are going to do after high school. To achieve post secondary training suc cess, the student will need to ests, abilities, and pref erences to help choose a career, career goal can be achieved at a university, community college, tech nical school, or through the military either mili tary service or a military academy, ing which one of those choices will help him to achieve his career goal, and leads to postsecondary training success. But why continue an education after high school? With todays economy, it is almost impossible to support oneself with just a high school diploma. Further education means more money! Here are a few reasons to go to college from the website www.ACT.org: Every bit of education you get after high school increases the chances youll earn good pay. Most college graduates earn more money during their working years than people who stop their education at high school earn. The more education you get the more likely it is you will always have a job. According to one estimate, by the year 2028 there will be 19 million more jobs for educated workers than there are qualified people to fill them. Continuing education after high school is much more important for your generation than it was for your parents gen eration. Today most good jobs require more than a high school diploma. Businesses want to hire people who know how to think and solve problems. Education beyond high school gives you a lot of other benefits, including meeting new people, tak ing part in new oppor tunities to explore your interests, and experienc ing success. The next question you may ask yourself is, Now that my child has decided he wants to attend col lege, how do we decide which college he will attend? Researching and then finding an answer to that question forms the foundation of a college search. An integral part of this search will be to determine the following: offered at that institution? If your child is interested in marine biology, and that is not offered at that institution, you need to look further. universitys GPA admis sion requirements? Are they the same for every program? While most schools calculate the admission GPA on the 18 core academic credits with additional weight given to grades of C or higher, they carefully examine those 18 core academic credits to make sure they are in the most rigorous courses offered at your childs high school. leges/universitys SAT/ ACT score requirements? Floridas college advising website www.FLVC.org will provide not only an SAT/ACT score for college admission, but other eli gibility requirements as well. You need to look at the university your child is interested in to deter mine last years average SAT and ACT scores for incoming freshman. applied and how many were actually admitted? All of this information can be found on www.FLVC. org for Florida public and private schools and on the individual schools website. These websites will also list the average incoming GPA, average class size, student-to-fac ulty ratio, and many other facts which may help your child select the very best school for him. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or con cerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Let The College Selection Process BeginJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAbout a year ago, my phone rang, and for once, it wasnt my kids or my husband or my mother or my carpool partner or my in laws or one of those pre-recorded doctors appointment confirma tion messages. Hey Lisa, what have you been up to? she asked. I was dumbfounded. I had not received a purely social call in months it was as if I had forgotten what to do. My mind raced as I tried to remember how to engage in idle chit chat. Why on earth is she calling me? I thought. I mean, we only know each other because our hus bands work together, and besides, Im new here, but she has plenty of other friends to call . there must be some problem. Oh, you know, the usual . busy, busy, busy! I lied, waiting for her to ask to borrow money, or give her a ride to the airport, or buy overpriced candles for her sons baseball team fundraiser. Well, listen, would you like to go on a power walk or something? Really?! Yes! Id love to! What time?! Where do you want me to meet you?! Ill go anywhere! I already have work out clothes on, so Im ready to go whenever you are, so just say the word and Nine-fifteen at the Park and Ride lot on Wonderwood Drive, she interrupted my pathetic ramble. You got it! I arrived twenty min utes early, and sat des perately waiting to spot her mini van. When she arrived, I bolted from my car as if it had burst into flames. Hi! I yelled and waved across the park ing lot, startling her out of her morning haze. For the next hour, we did what military spouses do so well analyzed, pondered, proclaimed, opined, pontificated, empathized, chastised, gossiped and even lis tened a little bit, all under the guise of exer cise. I thoroughly enjoyed myself. Back in the parking lot, my new friend suggested that we make the outing our new Thursday rou tine. I eagerly agreed, and nearly skipped back to my car with a goofy grin. On the drive home, I thought, Finally, a real friend. I cant wait for next Thursday. I wonder if shed want to meet Tuesday, too maybe thats too much. Ill scare her away. Hmmm. Come to think of it, maybe I came on too strong. I think I did most of the talk ing. Why do I always do that? She was probably wondering if Id ever shut up. Ill bet shell call and cancel because she thinks Im an annoying blabber mouth. I pulled into my driveway and looked at myself in the rear view mirror. Not only did I realize that my bangs had fallen into that unflattering middle part that made my face look like a full moon, it also occurred to me that this had all happened before. Suddenly overwhelmed with that bizarre dj vu sensation, I tried to rec ollect the past. I soon realized that Id had the same internal conversa tion with myself in 2008, 1998, 1996, 1994 and 1993 basically, every time the military has ordered us to move. After every move, you busy yourself with setting up your new life new house, new schools, new doctors, new dentists, new music teachers, new church, new pizza place. But once new routines are in place, theres nothing left to do except live. I dont care whether you live in Poughkeepsie or Prague, boredom eventually sets in. You find yourself dawdling on the internet, ignor ing housework, and eat ing too much. You put on work out clothes, but never make it to the gym. You call your husband even though you know he cant chat. You write long e-mails to old friends who are too preoccupied to write back. Even the family dog, has no good gos sip to share. You are bored out of your mind. As I fixed my bangs in the rear view mirror, I remembered the story of Christopher McCandless, a young man who disap peared Into the Wild (the name of the book by Jon Krakauer) to live free from obligations and relationships. After spend ing over three months utterly alone, he realized that he had been wrong about life all along. Days before he died of starva tion trying to make it back out of the wild, he wrote, Happiness is only real if shared. Remembering the quote helped me under stand why I always get a little pathetic every time we move, and although Im in no danger of starving anytime soon (quite the contrary in fact,) I realized that everyone needs a good friend or two to nourish the soul. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comA Little Pathetic Leads To Sharing HappinessLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesIt has become common in our society to identify certain months through out the year to highlight particular causes and issues that need our awareness or attention. In the month of October alone we are observ ing: National Disability Employment Awareness Month, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, National Cyber Security Awareness Month, National Hispanic Heritage Month, National Work and Family Month to name a few. These causes are noteworthy and noble pursuits, and we should continue to draw attention to things that strengthen society. However, we live in an age where we are inundated with information, and the amount of data placed before us easily becomes white noise. Unfortunately, as one multi-themed month rolls into another, the various causes and observances designed to promote publicity, lose their luster and meaning. All that said, I want to draw your atten tion to something that should be significant to all Sailors and their families this month Navy Birthday. Just like the white noise of too much information, we often find ourselves so numb to the day-to-day grind that we think we can gloss over our Navys history. Please dont let that happen this year. On Oct. 13, our Navy will turn 237 years old and it is important that we all take moment to pause, reflect, and celebrate the rich heritage of American naval history and tradi tion that has been passed on to us throughout the generations. This year marks the bicentennial of the War of 1812. While we commemorate this event, we should remember our shipmates underway at sea, flying missions in the air, and those serving boots on the ground in Afghanistan. We should also remember that mis sion readiness is never accomplished without the support of the wives, husbands, and children who form the Navy fam ily. Furthermore, we must also remember all those who have gone before. Whether they served one enlistment or retired after thirty years, they are Sailors. One of the greatest honors I have as a Navy chap lain is officiating the funerals of Navy veter ans and learning about their lives. I am always amazed at the contribu tions these Americans made to make our coun try strong and how so many of them continued to live out their daily lives Celebrate Navys 237th Birthday By Remembering Shipmates Of Past, PresentChap. Jerome Cayangyang NS Mayport Chaplain CHAPLAINSSee Chaplain, Page 3 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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at home, at work, at play with Honor, Courage, and Commitment. With all this this reflec tion comes the important task of reaffirming our duty and responsibility to uphold our Navys Core Values: Honor, Courage and Commitment. We have to go beyond an occasional GMT on Core Values or an annual observance. We must not allow them to be reduced into slogans on a ships crest or a t-shirt. These should be words not only on our lips, but words lived out DAILY in our lives. 24/7. I am not a blind idealist. The Bible teaches None is righteous, no, not one. (Romans 3:11) Simply put, we are not perfect people and the Navy is not perfect either just read the Navy Times. If we are honest with our selves, we all make mis takes and fall short of expectations. So how do we do this in an imperfect world made up of imper fect people? As a person of the Christian faith I realize that Honor, Courage, and Commitment are ideals I cannot arrive at on my own. Thus I turn to God, and through the grace of His son Jesus Christ, I can do all things through him who strengthens me. (Philippians 4:13) Just before this verse the apostle Paul writes, Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honor able, whatever is just, whatever is pure, what ever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you. (Philippians 4:8-9) The perfection of Honor, Courage, and Commitment in our lives is found by seeking God first. But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. (Matthew 6:33) As we approach the Navys Birthday, we must remain un-swerved in our devotion to those values that strengthen our char acter, and our thoughts. Through this we discov er that it is Gods grace received through faith that truly enables us to be Honorable, Courageous, and Committed. Realizing the impor tance of God in our lives I invite you to join me in a prayer from the Book of Common Prayer that I have said often on behalf of our Sailors: ETERNAL Lord God, who alone spreadest out the heavens, and rul est the raging of the sea; Vouchsafe to take into thy almighty and most gracious protection our countrys Navy, and all who serve therein. Preserve them from the dangers of the sea, and from the violence of the enemy; that they may be a safeguard unto the United States of America, and a security for such as pass on the seas upon their lawful occasions; that the inhabitants of our land may in peace and quiet ness serve thee our God, to the glory of thy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Happy Navy Birthday and God bless you!From Page 2ChaplainDefense Expo Slated For Oct. 17From the office of Congressman Ander CrenshawThe Florida League of Defense Contractors and the Jacksonville Aviation Authority in conjunc tion with Congressman Ander Crenshaw will launch the first-ever First Coast Defense Expo at Jacksonville Jetport at Cecil Airport on Wednesday, Oct. 17. The day-long event will allow the First Coast community, including service members from regional military installations such as Naval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the oppor tunity to see how the regional defense industry contributes to our national security and creates jobs for the First Coast. The United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, and the Florida Air National Guard will have displays at the event, where local, regional, and national defense contrac tors will exhibit materials at booths across 15,000 square feet of floor space from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the afternoon, Congressman Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, Florida Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Carroll, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, and key defenseindustry leaders will par ticipate in a Town Hallstyle discussion on the role and importance of the defense industry to our national security and economy. The First Coast is an anchor to our national security a standing not possible without the dedication of our men and women in uniform and the support and expertise of the compa nies that make up our defense industrial base, said Crenshaw. The First Coast Defense Expo is a fabulous opportunity to learn about Northeast Floridas contributions to our military. Ill be shar ing the Capitol Hill per spective on how defense policy impacts Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the local industrial base, and our economy. Folks will be able to view exhibits, network, participate in workshops, and meet the people who play a central role in support ing our men and women in uniform in Florida and around the globe. Further informa tion on the program and admission tickets can be obtained on the Florida League of Defense Contractors web site at www.fl-dc.org. The Jacksonville Jetport is located at Cecil Airport, 13446 Aerospace Way, in Jacksonville, Fla.SECDEF Releases Voting Guidance For DoDFrom Department of Defense Public AffairsSecretary of Defense Leon M. Panetta released the following message Oct. 5. On November 6th, Americans will have the opportunity to exer cise the most important responsibility we have in a democracy the right to vote. Voters will choose from candidates at every level from the Commander-in-Chief, to legislative representatives, to county commission ers, city council members and others. I dont have to tell you that your vote can determine the future. It really counts. And thats why its so important to participate in this process no matter where you are in the world, no matter who you plan to vote for. Please exercise the very privilege that youre will ing to fight and die for in order to protect. But there isnt much time. If youre overseas or away from home, request your absentee ballot immediately, and mail it back in time so that your vote will count. And if you need help, visit your Installation Voter Assistance Office, or see your units voting assis tance officer, or visit the website www.fvap.gov
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HSL-48 Vipers Strike Out Competition From StaffHSL-48 started out this years MWR Fall Sports Challenge with a win and went on to win it all. The team ruled the challenge with 7 first places and defeating a record-par ticipating 18 other com mands. Stepping up a notch from their second place overall at the Spring Challenge, HSL-48 scored 1000 points, followed by 725 points for HSL-60 in second place and USS The Sullivans placing third with 700 points. Competing over four days, Oct. 2-5, this sea sons Sports Challenge included the new events Water Balloon Launch and Chicago 16 softball. The first day opened with a win for HSL-48 in the CO/CMC Canoe Race. SERMC won the Experienced Canoe Race and HSL-60 brought home the win in Kickball. Bowling went to FRCSE. On day two, Naval Station Mayport brought See Challenge, Page 5 -Photos by Paige GnannThe Vipers of HSL-48 receive the First Place trophy as the winners of the 2012 MWR Fall Sports Challenge, beating out 18 other commands. COs and CMCs paddle hard for placement during the CO/CMC Canoe Challenge. This year included black-out goggles for a crewmember as a twist to the competition. Experienced Canoers from USS De Wert lose their canoe during the start of the race, but were able to get back in a finish. SERMC won the event. HSL-48 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Tye Simpson, and HSL-48 CMC, CMDCM Jim Key, win the rights to the coveted trophy after winning this years CO/CMC Canoe race. Coasties from ANT Jax, off Penman Road, try to take down other commands in the 8-Ball competition. Chief Master-at-Arms Paul Parris lines up his shot during the 8-Ball competition. HSL-60 won the Thursday event. HSL-60 and Harbor Ops toss up some competition at Corn Hole, but USS Simpson eventually wins the event.Runners are off during the Relay Race event on Oct. 3. A Sailor sets his shot during the Table Tennis competition. NS Mayport won the event. Sailors aim for the bulls eye during the Cricket Darts competition. Winners were HSL48. 4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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home a win with Chicago 16 Softball. HSL-48 got its second win in the Relay Race and HSM-40 took the win in the Swim Relay. On Day 3, HSL-48 took the day in Golf and Cricket Darts. NS Mayport ruled Table Tennis and the 8-Ball Pool win went to HSL-60. The last day of competition, USS Simpson spiked a win in Volleyball and Cornhole. But, HSL-48 launched its command into a win with Water Balloon Launch, Auto Racing and TugoWar and pulled into first place overall. Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Heliocpter) 2nd Class Nick Hildago of HSL-48 was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Heliocpter) 2nd Class Nick Hildago of HSL-48 was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. Sailors from HSL-60 yell at a shipmate to swim harder as the command takes first place in the Swim Relay. Sailor from Naval Station Mayport Security aim and fire a water balloon during the newest event, Water Balloon Launch. SERMC goes up against USS Simpson during Beach Volleyball. Sailors pedal hard and head for the finish line during the Auto Racing competition. HSL-48 took first place in the pedal car event. A Sailor takes off on the next leg of the Swim Relay competition. HSL-60 holds its own during the TugoWar competition, but was eventually beat out by event winners, HSL-48. A Sailor from HSL-48 serves the volley during the last round of competition against USS Simpson.From Page 4Challenge HSL-60 and SERMC kick it off during the Kickball competition. HSL-60 won the event. A Coastie tries to recover the ball as a Sailor from USS Simpson takes off for first base in Chicago 16 Softball. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 5

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For the past year, Ive had the privilege of leading the Navys Southeast Region, which includes Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, and Navy Submarine Base Kings Bay. Every day, I see our young men and women who have made the commitment to serve our country in a way that most people cannot imagine, said Scorby. The men and women in uniform today are but the latest in a long line of heroes who have served their nation in times of conflict and in times of peace, he continued. To each of these heroes, both past and present, we owe a debt that we may never be able to fully repay. And for that reason, I am pleased to be here for the launching the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor initiative. This tribute is a true expression of the long-standing friend ship we share between the Armed Forces of the United States and the City of Jacksonville. During the Week of Valor, the following events will be held to pay tribute to the military: Nov. 5, 11:30 a.m. Military Appreciation Luncheon at the Prime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 5-12 Active duty military and veteran school visits Nov. 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans Summit University of North Florida University Center Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts Military Appreciation Game Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. Veterans Job Fair Prime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m. Mayport Music Concert NS Mayport Nov. 9, 9 p.m. NavyMarine Corps Classic, Florida vs. Georgetown NS Mayport Nov. 12, 9 a.m. Veterans Recognition Breakfast Times Union Center Nov. 12, 11:01 a.m. Veterans Day Parade Downtown Jacksonville The Department of the Navy is particularly excit ed to be part of the NavyMarine Corps Basketball Classic, which will be played on board USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport. Ships such as the Bataan are part of Americas Away Team, ready to deploy around the world to defend our nations interests, giv ing the United States a home-court advantage that cannot be duplicat ed, said Scorby. Bataan will be com ing to Mayport along with USS Mesa Verde and USS Carter Hall, two other amphibious warships that constitute a representa tional amphibious ready group that will match the ships that Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced would be homeported in Mayport beginning in 2013, he added. These ships not only reinforce the impor tance of Northeast Florida in the Navys strategic dispersal, but demonstrate the value of the NavyMarine Corps team. Scorby concluded by praising the City of Jacksonville for their con tinual support of the military. The City of Jacksonville has pub licly declared itself as the most military-friendly city in the nation. While the Week of Valor is more of a public demonstra tion of support; the city has put in place numerous programs and initiatives that provide tangible benefits to our veterans and active duty service mem bers. This can be seen by the fact that many of our Sailors and Marines who come to Jacksonville often stay in Jacksonville, even after they leave the mili tary service. For more information on the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor events, go to: www. coj.net/MilitaryAffairs. From Page 1ValorFFSC Schedule Set For OctoberFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Oct. 11, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 15, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class FFSC Room 702 Oct. 15-17, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training Building 1 Room 1615 Oct. 15-19, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training Building 1 Room 1616 Oct. 16, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 16, 1-3 p.m., What About The Kids?, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 16, 7:30 a.m., Domestic Violence Awareness 5K/3K Run, Base Gym Oct. 17, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 17, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Home Buying, Building 1 Room 1616 Oct. 17, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Oct. 17-18, 5-9 p.m., FRG Leadership Training Building 1 Room 1615 Oct. 18, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 20, 5:30-8:30 p.m., IA Family Outing, Bowling Alley Oct. 22-25, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Oct. 23, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 24, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 24, 9-11 a.m., Credit Management, FFSC Room 719 Oct. 24, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Oct. 25, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 25, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1 Room 1124 Oct. 29, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 30, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 Oct. 30, 9-11 a .m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Oct. 31, 9 a..m.-noon, Employment Seminar FFSC Room 607 Oct. 31, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 EOQ Lunch On Oct. 23From StaffNaval Station Civilian Employee of the Quarter presentation/luncheon will be held on Oct. 23 at 11:30 a.m., Ocean Breeze Conference Center. All are welcome to attend and support the nominees. Lunch is $8. Pay at the door. RSVP to Sandra Barrett by Oct. 19. Nominees for Employee of the Quarter (3rd Quarter): Kevin Moyer, Fire/ Emergency Services Marden Le Bouton, MWR Gregory Schmitt, PWD Lawrence Ossi, PWD Karen Downey, Chapel Todd Wright, FFSC Robert Nelson, Housing Robert Garis, Air Ops Diane Williams, NGIS Larry Delong, Safety Theodis Simmons, Security 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Give Blood, Save LivesFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will host a blood drive in partnership with American Red Cross on Oct. 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1, Room 104. The blood drive is open to all military and civil ian personnel, including dependents. The American Red Cross has an emergency need for blood donors of all types. This will the last opportunity to give blood on board the installation until after the holiday season.Loading The Seahawk -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottAviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Phillip Craven, left, and Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Lionel Harris, both assigned to the Grandmasters of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 46, load AGM-114 Hellfire missiles onto an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. Picking Up Supplies -Photo by MC2 Scott RaegenLogistics Specialist Seaman William Bagwell monitors sea activity aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) before a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204).Get Coupons, Special Offers With Commissary Rewards CardFrom DeCAIts here! The Commissary Rewards Card is available now in the Mayport Commissary. The card is free and designed to reduce the number of paper coupons commissary customers clip and carry saving them time and money. As an introductory offer, customers who pick up their cards by Oct. 24 receive preloaded digital coupons on their cards that can be used immediately. Adding digital coupons is easy and is done online after registering the card through the commis sary website at http:// www.commissaries.com/ rewards/index.cfm. New digital coupons will typically be available every two or three weeks. Visit the website for more information or ask in the commissary. -DeCA ImageThe Mayport Commissary is issuing new Commissary Rewards Cards with preloaded digital coupons for cus tomers who sign up by Oct. 24. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Finegan Thanks Service Members For Volunteer Work Maria Bray Illustrates Multi-Mission CapabilitiesFrom U.S. Coast Guard Public AffairsThe Coast Guard Cutter Maria Bray and crew returned to their home port at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach, Fla., Thursday morning fol lowing a 30-day deploy ment during which crewmembers were directly engaged in operations involving 75 Cuban migrants. The Maria Bray headed to Miami and Key West, Fla., on Oct. 5 in support of the cutters primary mission of aids to navigation, but the crew dem onstrated their multimission capabilities when they were called upon during their deploy ment to assist other Coast Guard cutters with migrant operations. The crew of the Maria Bray partnered with the Coast Guard Cutter Sawfish, an 87-foot patrol boat homeported in Key West, and Coast Guard Cutter Kodiak Island, a 110-foot patrol boat homeported in Key West, to repatriate several of the Cuban migrants to Bahia de Cabatas, Cuba Sept. 21, 2012. A press release with more details is available HERE. In total during the 30-day deployment, 75 Cuban migrants went aboard the Maria Bray. The cutter housed many of the migrants for 20 days before repatriating them. Though not common, Alien Migrant Interdiction Operations is one of the many missions performed by the 175-foot buoy ten der. We took part in this operation to relieve pressure on other Coast Guard afloat assets so they could complete missions in other areas of the Caribbean, said Chief Warrant Officer Christopher Cartwright, the commanding officer of the Maria Bray. The crew has done an amaz ing job switching their focus from aids to navigation servicing to migrant interdiction and back to ATON. The Coast Guard Cutter Maria Bray is a 175-foot buoy tender, and the crews primary mission is maintaining more than 300 aids to navigation from Georgetown, S.C., to Ft. Pierce, Fla., and near Andros Island, Bahamas. -Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jessica PotterA crewmember aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Maria Bray puts equipment away after the cutter returned to homeport at Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville in Atlantic Beach Oct. 4, 2012. The primary mission of crewmem bers aboard the 175-foot buoy tender is servicing aids to navigation, but during a 30-day deployment to Miami and Key West, Fla., the crew assisted with an Alien Migrant Interdiction Operation. -Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jessica PotterService members from Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., participate in a flag raising ceremony performed by students at Finegan Elementary School on Friday, Oct. 5, 2012. Over a six-month period more than 20 Coast Guardsmen and more than 20 Sailors dedicated time assisting in a grounds beautification project for the elementary school. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 9

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USS Gettysburg VBSS Team Conducts Training During Exercise Joint WarriorDestroyer Squadron 26 Public AffairsUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Sailors participated in visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team training as part of Exercise Joint Warrior off the coast of Scotland, Oct. 2. As part of the training, a small vessel approached the area where Gettysburg was patrolling and acted as a suspected pirate vessel. Gettysburg queried the vessel according to exercise instructions. When the small vessel did not reply properly, the VBSS team prepared to board it. The VBSS team offi cers reported to the Gettysburg bridge to get amplifying information about the vessel, and how it was behaving while the other members of the VBSS team dressed out for the boarding. The VBSS team then reported to the fantail to launch a rigid hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) to transport them to the suspected vessel. I look at it kind of like a football game, when we are in the locker room just prepping, thinking about the plays you are going to make, what the other team is going to do, how you are going to counter that to bring your team back home safe. said Lt.j.g. Christian Mack, a member of the VBSS team on board Gettysburg. Once on board the small vessel, the VBSS teams job is to conduct a search and determine if it is operating within inter national law. If they find the vessel is a suspected pirate ship or participat ing in illegal operations, the team will move to take control of the ship. Team members are trained in engineering and bridge standing procedures so they can maneuver the vessel if needed. VBSS teams participate in similar training at least once a quarter, either at sea or ashore. Being at sea, doing it underway is the best training, said VBSS team member Lt. j.g. Michael Burris. -Photo by Lt. Amber LewisMembers of the visit, board, search and seizure team and Sailors from the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) move toward a small vessel during a Joint Warrior 12-2 training exercise. Joint Warrior is designed and led by the joint tactical exercise plan ning staff in the United Kingdom and is intended to improve interoperability between allied navies and prepare participants for a role in a joint maritime environment during deployments. Navy Ball Tix On SaleFrom MWRTickets are on sale for the 2012 Naval Station Mayport Navy Ball at Mayport ITT (270-5145 x5). The Navy Ball will be held on Oct. 25 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center starting with the cocktail hour at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. Ticket prices are O-6 and above, Retiree/ DoD Civilians $50; 04-05 $45; 01-03/CWO/E7-E9 $40; E-5 and below $30. Command tables can be purchased $450 per table of 10 people. Guest speaker is Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, COMUSNAVSO/C4F. This is a Black Tie event; mili tary: mess dress 0-4 and above; service dress uni form w/miniature medals 0-3 and below; civilian: formal attire. Working together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com a CFC participant Provided as a public service 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Farragut DC Training Makes Olympic Effort USS Farragut (DDG 99) Public AffairsSailors aboard guid ed-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) competed in the ships Damage Control (DC) Olympics, Oct. 2. DC Olympics pro vide Sailors a chance to have fun, while testing and improving the dam age control skills theyve learned through normal training. The DC Olympics is an opportunity for person nel on the ship to com pete with one another in doing basic damage control skills, said Cmdr. William G. Musser, exec utive officer of Farragut. Its a great opportunity to improve the readiness of the ship. Farraguts DC Olympics consisted of six events including a fire fighting ensemble relay, message relay, pipe patching sce nario, de-smoking race, stretcher bearer race and a competition to see who could aim a fire hose the best by filling a trash can with the water stream. Its a great training tool because it breaks up the monotony of every day training, said Chief Damage Controlman (SW) Brandon Coates, Farraguts damage con trol leading chief petty officer. The Sailors get the chance to really get hands-on and use the equipment. Sailors typically simu late some aspects of damage control procedures during conventional training scenarios such as charging hoses or electri cally isolating a compart ment. The DC Olympics give the Sailors the chance to use a live hose, or attempt to patch a pipe that has water actually leaking. Six teams participated in the DC Olympics. Each team was comprised of members from the differ ent repair lockers aboard the ship. Repair locker 2 took first place. I had a blast, said Hull Technician 2nd Class (SW) John Overwise. Its a fun way to see what weve actually learned during our training. Farragut is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photos by MC3(SW) A.J. JonesHull Technician 2nd Class John Overwise, from Philadelphia, Pa., front, and Damage Controlman 1st Class Justin Christensen, from Ogden, Utah, simulate fighting a fire during a general quarters drill aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Hull Technician 2nd Class John Overwise, from Philadelphia, Pa., simulates using a fire hose to cool a space during a general quarters drill aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 11

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Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Pilates 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core 5:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch Tuesday 10:30 a.m., Intro to Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 12:30 p.m., Flex N Stretch 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equipment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. Monday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11 a.m., HIT Noon, HIT Skill Review Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT 2 p.m., HIT 3 p.m., Intro to HIT Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 9:30 a.m., Intro to TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7 a.m., HIT 8 a.m., Intro to HIT 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 3 p.m., HIT 4 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 7 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 8 a.m., HIT Skill Review 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 MWRNew Fitness Classes Includes Saturday PT OpportunityFrom MWRThe new fitness sched ule includes not only eight new class types, but a weekend PT opportu nity. On Saturdays at 9:30 a.m., the WOD Squad gathers to undertake a carefully planned W.O.D. (Workout of the Day) in the Mayport Sandbox located oceanfront behind Surfside Fitness Center. The WOD Squad is a continuously grow ing group of active duty, spouses, dependants, retirees and civilians all attached to NAVSTA Mayport who have com pleted the six-part Intro to HIT (High Intensity Training) program or who can demonstrate to Fitness Specialist Russell Krenz that they possess previous high intensity training experience. The WOD Squad is approximately 50 persons strong and 30 persons are currently moving up the ranks program. Intro to HIT meets at 10:30 a.m. on Saturdays and varies between Sessions 1-6. Intro to HIT is a progressive 6-part program that must be completed in sequen tial order. Other sand box classes include HIT for Women and HIT Skill Review. For more information on HIT programs and all the new classes offered on the fitness schedule email emily.deason@navy.mil. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Oct. 12: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Oct. 12: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Oct. 13: Fall Fest 2012. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pictures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. A variety of vendors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked good ies, and more. Oct. 13: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Oct. 13: UFC 153: Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Oct. 16: Knock Out Domestic Violence 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Oct. 16: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Oct. 17: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Oct. 19: Toga Party 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Rock out with your togas out. Featuring live band Southern Magic, free food, giveaways and more. Before the band, we will be screening the movie Animal House. Oct. 20: All Khaki Oktoberfest. 6-10 p.m. at Focsle CPO Lounge. Don yer lederhosen & grab ye maiden for Focsle Lounges very first Oktoberfest Celebration! Festivities include live band One-Eyed Jakes, free German-inspired food, barrel roll obstacle course, bratwurst-eating contest, barrel toss, Oct. 24: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by HSL-48. To purchase tickets in advance, please call CMDCM Jim Key at (904) 270-6810 x119. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Oct. 11: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 12: Halloween Horror Nights Trip. Van departs 4:30 p.m. Cost $35. Sign up deadline Oct. 8. Oct. 12: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Oct. 12: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rent al, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Oct. 13: Fall Fest 2012. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pictures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. A variety of vendors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked goodies, and more. Purchase your sea sonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Oct. 13: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials through out the day. 270-7205 Oct. 13: UFC 153: Aldo vs. Edgar 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 Oct. 14: Ghosts & Gravestones Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $10. Sign up deadline Oct. 8. Oct. 15: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 16: Knock Out Domestic Violence 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Oct. 17: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Oct. 17: Candy/ Caramel Apple Making. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 18: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 19: Toga Party 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Rock out with your togas out. Featuring live band Southern Magic, free food, giveaways and more. Before the band, we will be screening the movie Animal House. 270-7205 LIBERTY Oct. 13: Fall Fest 2012. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pictures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. A variety of vendors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked good ies, and more. Purchase your seasonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Oct. 19: Freedom Friday Monster Mash Movie Bash. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 25: Drama Club Presents Casper. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. KID THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 13

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TA Eligibility Restored For Clock Hour ProgramsNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsThe Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) announced Oct. 4 the restoration of Tuition Assistance (TA) eligibil ity for clock hour-based vocational and technical programs. Announced in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 305-12, individuals may receive funds for clock hour pro grams provided the ser vice member meets all TA eligibility requirements, establishes an approved education plan with their local Navy College Office (NCO) and has received an electronic TA voucher. Clock hour programs provide vocational education opportunities that often enhance Sailors skills in technical career fields on active duty and can benefit them when they eventually return to the private sector, said Dr. Jonathan Woods, Voluntary Education spe cialist on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Manpower, Training and Education). Proper planning, includ ing determining TA eli gibility, is the key to suc cessful execution of these education programs. Many schools offer non-college degree pro grams in a variety of cer tificate and diploma pro grams on a clock hour basis rather than through award of semester or quarter hour credits. The Navy uses objec tive criteria established by the Department of Veterans Affairs for approving programs offered by non-college degree schools for deter mining TA funding eligi bility, said Tom Smith, enlisted education coor dinator for NETC. Navy approval also offers Sailors the option to use the GI Bill top-up pro gram to cover costs that exceed the TA cap for a given fiscal year. A list of VA-approved clock hour programs can be found online at http:// inquiry.vba.va.gov/. In the center of the screen, click on Click here to search for approved programs and then click on the appro priate state to find local programs. VA-approved clock hour programs are instructor-led, face-toface programs in order to meet strict attendance and performance requirements. Sailors are strongly encouraged to pursue clock hour programs that prepare them for Navy Credentialing Opportunities Online (COOL) funded certifica tion or licensing exami nations, added Woods. Certification and license eligibility for clock hour programs can be researched at www.cool. navy.mil. Each Sailor may use TA to fund only one voca tional/technical program that uses clock hours during a career. Sailors are required to discuss their educational goals with a Navy College counselor prior to enrolling in any program that is funded by TA. TA funds 100 percent of tuition and autho rized fees, up to $250 per semester hour, or $166.67 per quarter hour, or $16.67 per clock hour. TA is limited to 16 semester hours, 24-quarter hours, or 240 clock hours per fiscal year. Both credit and clock hours can be fund ed by TA, however the combined total cost for an individual Sailor can not exceed the maximum allowable annual TA cap of $4,500. Completion require ments for clock hour programs funded by TA are the same as other edu cational programs and require Sailors to reim burse the full cost of the TA voucher for dropping or failing a course. Credit for military training through the American Council on Military Education, credit by examination and the Navy College Program for Afloat College Education, all afford eligible Sailors the opportunity to earn a college degree. Its crucial that Sailors work closely with their Navy College Office or the Virtual Education Center to ensure they know how clock hour programs dovetail into their edu cational goals, added Smith. Bridging techni cal or vocational training with academic degree tracks can be challeng ing, so let the experts help you. Historically, nearly half of Sailors pursuing clock hour training have sought academic degrees. Additional information on educational programs, including clock hour programs is available on the Navy College web site: www.navycollege. navy.mil or the Virtual Education Center at: 877838-1659 (DSN) 492-4584.Navy Commissions USS Michael Murphy In Big AppleNaval Surfaces Forces Public AffairsUSS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), the Navys newest guided-missile destroyer, was commis sioned during a formal ceremony at pier 88 in Manhattan, Oct. 6. The newest destroy er honors Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy, a New York native who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions dur ing Operation Red Wings in Afghanistan, June 28, 2005. Thousands of spec tators, veterans and invited guests gathered in front of the ship to witness the ceremony, which included distin guished guests such as the Mayor of New York, the Honorable Michael Bloomberg, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Adm. William McRaven, commander, U.S. Special Operations Command. The Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, delivered the principal address and spoke of the ship, her crew and her namesakes heroic actions. This ship honors the courage, service and sacrifice of Lt. Michael Murphy, his Red Wings brothers, fellow SEALs, special operators and service members around the world who answer the call of duty every day, said Mabus. It is abso lutely fitting that the USS Michael Murphy bears a SEAL trident on her crest because, much like Michael and every Navy SEAL who has earned the honor of wearing the tri dent, this ship is designed to counter threats from above and below the sur face of the oceans, in the air and on land. Greenert reflected on the ships massive power and ability to protect our nations freedom. USS Michael Murphy, the most flexible, lethal and multi-mission capa ble ship of its kind, represents the backbone of our surface combatant fleet, Greenert said. It is one of the best destroyers in the world. This ship will operate forward around the globe, assuring allies, projecting power and defending our nation. And, like its namesake, Lt. Michael Murphy, this ship will serve to protect, influence and win in an era of uncertainty. At the conclusion of the remarks, Murphys moth er and ships sponsor Maureen Murphy gave the order to, man our ship and bring her to life! The crew responded by saying Aye, Aye, Maam and began to double time up the brows to man the ship as the Navy band played Anchors Aweigh. Crewmembers stood side by side, manning the rails as the ships systems came online. Radars, weapon systems, and other parts of the ship began moving to symbolize her coming to life. Cmdr. Thomas E. Shultz, a native of El Cajon, Calif., is the com manding officer of the ship and will lead the crew of 279 officers and enlisted personnel. The 9,200-ton Michael Murphy was built by General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. The ship is the 62nd ship in the Arleigh Burke class of Navy destroyers and the last of its class. It is 509 feet in length, has a waterline beam of 59 feet, and has a navigational draft of 31 feet. The commissioning was the culmination of a week-long celebration in New York City honor ing the ship, her crew and the legacy of Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy. The ship will be home ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. You can also follow the ship on Facebook: https://www.facebook. com/USSMichaelMurphy. -Photo by MC1 Peter D. LawlorThe ship's officers and crew man the ship during the commissioning ceremony of the Arleigh-Burke class destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112). Murphy is named after Lt. Michael Murphy, a Navy SEAL and Medal of Honor recipient who posthumously received the nation's highest military honor for bravery during combat in Afghanistan in 2005. Operation Homefront Acceptimg Military Child of the Year NominationsFrom Operation HomefrontOperation Homefront, the national nonprofit dedicated to provid ing emergency finan cial and other assis tance to military fami lies, has announced that nominations for the Military Child of the Year Awards are being accepted online at MilitaryChildOfTheYear. org through December 15, 2012. Winners will be recognized in April 2013. The Military Child of the Year Award recognizes children who stand out among their peers. Ideal candidates for the award demonstrate resil ience, strength of character, and thrive in the face of the challenges of mili tary life. These young heroes embody leadership within their families and com munities. This award is presented to an outstanding child from each branch of ser vice Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The winners each receive $5,000 and a lap top, and are flown with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for a special recognition cer emony on April 11. In previous years, recipi ents have had the honor of meeting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey, and First Lady Michelle Obama, who were guest speakers for the event awards ceremonies. For more information on how to nominate a child in your community, to become a sponsor, or to see photos from past events, please log on to MilitaryChildOfTheYear. org. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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GTMO Hosts USS Underwood, U.S. 4th Fleet Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Public AffairsUSS Underwood (FFG 36) and USS Anzio (CG 68) visited Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, from, Sept. 29-30 during their deployments in support of multina tional maritime exercise Southern Seas 2012 and UNITAS Atlantic 53. Underwood received logistic support from the installation including fuel, water and supplies, while UNITAS flagship USS Anzio disembarked attached staff members from Destroyer Squadron 40 including U.S 4th Fleet Commander, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris. UNITAS Atlantic 53 is a U.S. and South Americasponsored international naval exercise. This is the 53rd year partner nations have participated in UNITAS, which stands for unity, making it the longest ongoing maritime exercise in the region. Thirteen multinational ships from seven part ner nations participated in the exercise that origi nated in Key West, Fla. and officially ended in the Western Caribbean Sept. 29. Warships from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United States and the United Kingdom and observers from France, Jamaica, Panama and Peru participated in the exercise. UNITAS is designed to train each naval force in a variety of maritime sce narios, with each operat ing as a component of a multi-national force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. The exercise develops and sustains relationships that improve the capacity of emerg ing and enduring part ners maritime forces to achieve common desired effects. The annual exer cise fosters friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating navies. Southern Seas 2012 is a six-month U.S. Navy engagement and train ing operation to the Caribbean and Central and South America. During the deployment, USS Underwood and embarked units partici pated in a variety of exercises and multi-national exchanges to improve operational readiness and enhance relationships in the region. During the operation, assigned units focused on operating in the multi-national envi ronment, preparing to deal with unconventional threats such as illicit traf ficking, and improved training levels in a variety of mission areas. Participating forces took part in major regional exercises including UNITAS Atlantic, UNITAS Pacific, and Silent Force Exercise. Forces also partici pated in a series of the ater security cooperation events, including militaryto-military cooperation, humanitarian assistance, disaster response, com bined training, and mari time security. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, serves as a logisti cal hub in the U.S. 4th Fleet Caribbean theatre. The installations Port Operations department provides operational sup port for more than 150 vessels a year. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulAviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class (AW) Randolph Vasquez removes the air intake covers from an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to HSL-48 on the flight deck of USS Underwood (FFG 36). -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulVasquez transits through the portside helicopter hangar hatch to the flight deck of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) for the recovery of an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Four Eight (HSL-48). Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Logistics Specialist Seaman Michael Spears removes the power cable from an SH-60B Sea Hawk heli copter assigned to HSL-48 during a functional flight check on the flight deck of the Oliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frigate USS Underwood. -Photo by MC2 Stuart Phillips THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 15

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville Conducts Baby Boot Camp Navy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastExpecting parents were able to receive a crash course on infant care during a Baby Boot Camp class at Naval Hospital Jacksonville (NH Jacksonville) Oct. 3. Baby Boot Camp focuses on the newborn and what to expect the first few days and weeks at home as well as prepare them for a positive par enting experience. There is a lot of information that parents dont know they need until they need it. Parents are on a very steep learning curve, especially with a first child, so its important to give them as much infor mation ahead of time, said Alisa Davis R.N., perinatal nurse educa tor at NH Jacksonville where two to three babies are born each day. It makes a little less over whelming when they do bring their newborn home. Father-to-be, Aviation Electricians Mate 2nd Class Jonathan Musick, assigned to Fleet Readiness Reserve Southeast, found the class to be very informative. He particularly enjoyed the Happiest Baby on the Block section teaching a five-step method used for soothing infants to greatly reduce crying time. I had no idea what swaddling was, let alone how to swaddle a baby. Its giving me the con fidence to feel at ease, and comforting to know I can care for my child. I feel better prepared, said Musick. Participants were able to receive information from trained nurses on basic baby care, pediat ric dental health, tobacco cessation, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society visit ing nurse, Happiest Baby on the Block, injury pre vention, car seat safety and a demonstration on infant CPR. A pediatric provider was also on hand to dis cuss the importance of immunizations and answer any questions the expecting parents had. Sonar Technician (sur face) 3rd Class Kimberly Campbell, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, and her husband Brandon attended a few other classes at NH Jacksonville before Baby Boot Camp and feel all parents should participate in the prenatal classes. I feel the classes helped us to be more positive about the pregnancy and work better togeth er, said Campbell. We received a lot of informa tion that helped us really understand and prepare for the delivery. NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of free-ofcharge classes to patients giving birth at the hospi tal to include Baby Boot Camp, Prenatal Exercise, Hypnobirthing, Infant Massage, Breastfeeding, Prepared Childbirth and an orientation program. NH Jacksonville is the first hospital on Floridas First Coastmilitary or civilianto earn Baby Friendly des ignation from United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and World Health Organization. Its the 3rd hospital in DoD and 4th in Florida with the certification. Baby Friendly hospitals seek to improve the health of babies and moms by promoting breastfeeding. That means healthi er active duty moms and healthier families. Anyone wishing to develop a prenatal edu cation plan can call (904) 542BABY (542-2229) to register for classes or talk to a nurse. -Photo by MC1 Toiete JacksonAlisa Davis, lactation specialist at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, demonstrates proper procedures when giving infant CPR to expecting parents during a baby boot camp class at NH Jacksonville. -Photo by MC1 Toiete JacksonFirst time dad Aviation Electronic's Mate 2nd Class Jonathan Musick, assigned to Fleet Readiness Reserve Southeast, learns how to swaddle a baby with help from his wife Amber during a baby boot camp class at Naval Hospital (NH)Jacksonville. Baby boot camp is one of many free-of-charge classes offered by NH Jacksonville to help patients giving birth at its hospital, education on what to expect before, during and after giving birth.Get Into ShipShape With Health PromoFrom Health Promotion by the OceanDo you want to make some permanent healthy lifestyle changes before the holidays? Mayport Health Promotion will be start ing a free eight-week Nutrition and Weight Management Class on Oct. 30. Class will take place once a week on Tuesday mornings from 9-11 a.m. through Dec. 18. We cover topics such as calorie counting, the basic food groups, gro cery shopping, reading food labels, and much more. Class is open to active duty, adult dependents, and retir ees. The class location is Building 2050, Marshal Couch Drive. Call 2705251 for more informa tion. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.While he works to defend the country, St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease. Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Of cer 2 and his daughter Delilah, a St. Jude patient. Fruits, Veggies: More MattersNaval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness CenterIts Fruits & VeggiesMore Matters Month, raising awareness about fruits and vegetables in ones daily diet. Although people know that fruits and vegetables are associated with good nutrition, many still dont consume the recommended daily amount. The U.S. Department of Agricultures food guide, My Plate, recommends filling half of ones plateat each meal-with fruits and vegetables. Eating more fruits and veggies does mat ter. Theyre high in many vitamins and minerals, contain fiber that helps with digestion, are usu ally low in calories (which can help with a healthy weight), and can reduce the risk of many diseases (such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and some cancers). Plan ahead to add fruits and vegetables to each meal, and heres a few tips. Add fruit to cereal, or vegetables to an omelet. fruit and veggies, instead of chips and sweets. Include veggies as part of the main meal, and fruits as sides or desserts. gies instead of fries at restaurants. There are many fruits and vegetables to choose from, so dont be afraid to try new types. For more ideas and recipes, contact Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayports Wellness Center at 270-5251 or visit www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Saturday, Oct. 13 Join a park ranger to learn about the many common spe cies that inhabit the natural communities of the undevel oped barrier islands of north east Florida. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Friday, Oct. 19 The Marriage Ministry of Neptune Baptist Church will host The Art of Marriage videoconference series. This six-part event will present the principles of a strong, healthy, marriage relationship using a variety of speakers, engaging stories, humorous scenarios and interviews from real couples struggling to find solutions to improve their marriage. The conference was produced by Family Life and is receiving rave reviews nationwide. The conference will begin on Friday, Oct. 19 from 6-9 p.m. and continue on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Refreshments will be provided on Friday evening and lunch will be provided on Saturday. Dress is casual. Each couple will be provided with a workbook with useful tips, articles, and exercises to help reinforce conference topics. Childcare is available by appointment and donation. The cost to attend is $40 per couple ($20 for marriage-minded singles). Tickets may be purchased at LifeWay Christian Bookstore-Town Center, at www.neptunebaptist.org/ministries/marriage or by calling (904) 249-2307. Saturday, Oct. 20 Crafters Wanted! Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach will host its annual Craft Fair and Fall Festival on from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. To reserve your booth, please contact the church office today at 249-5370. The City of Atlantic Beach Family Fun Day and Campout under the Stars returns to Jack Russell Park, 1:30-10 p.m. Our 19th Annual Campout is one of the Citys most popular events. Reserve your campsite early before they sell out! Campers can reserve a 10 x 10 campsite for a $10 fee before Oct. 1, and $15 after Sept. 30. This year continues the Saturday Family Fun Day activities and performances for kids of all ages! Afternoon and evening events, including our Twilight Movie are free and open to the public. Russell Park field is located on Plaza St., north of Atlantic Beach City Hall on Seminole Rd. Registration forms are on the City website and campers can register by mail, or choose your campsite at the Recreation Office, 716 Ocean Blvd., weekdays 8-noon and 1-4:30 p.m. Call 247-5828 for more information or visit www.coab.us/events. Girls Inc of Jacksonville is sponsoring Fall into the Daddy Daughter Dance! 5:30-9:30 p.m. at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village. All proceeds benefit Girls Inc. of Jacksonville, a nonprofit organization that inspires all girls to be Strong, Smart & Bold. Cost is $80 per couple (Dad or significant adult male) and $30 per additional daughter. Find out more at www. DaddyDaughterDanceGIJ.com or call 904-731-9933 The Friends of Talbot Islands State Parks will host the annu al A Day for Hope and Friends benefit event at Amelia Island State Park from 3-6 p.m. at Kelly Seahorse Ranch, Amelia Island State Park, State Road A1A North, Jacksonville. Each year the Friends of Talbot Islands State Parks coordinate an equestrian event to increase membership and raise funds for Amelia Island, George Crady Bridge Fishing Pier, Big Talbot Island, Little Talbot Island, Fort George Island, Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve and Yellow Bluff Fort State Parks. All proceeds from the event will benefit these organizations. Participants will enjoy an afternoon of horse back riding on the beach, edu cational opportunities, a low country boil, barbeque and beverages. The cost is $10 per plate. While you are there, sign up to become a member of the Friends of Talbot Islands State Parks. Donations are also welcomed and are 100% tax deductible. For directions and additional information, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org Monday, Oct. 22 A Beauty Berry Jelly Class at the Duval County Canning Center will be held at 9 a.m.Noon and 1-4 p.m. at Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Avenue. Cost is $20 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 2557450. Saturday, Oct. 27 Join a Park Ranger for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural communities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Nov. 11 Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and hometown favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music.Along with numerous local businesses, national organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project will be involved in the event. Tickets, which start at $29, are on sale now. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR Southern Womens Show Your Greater Jacksonville USO Mayport and NAS Centers have discounted tickets avail able for this years Southern Womens Show Oct. 19-21. Tickets are $5 each and cash only. Enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health, beauty, and lifestyle ven dors at the Prime Osborn Convention Center October 18th-21st. For more information on this event, visit www. SouthernWomensShow. com. Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an individual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or emailing me at herb@jaxsignarama. com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned fran chise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. For information on quali fications and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 11, 2012 17

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