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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00268


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Managing Military IDs Just Got EasierAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Manpower Data Center is making it easier for service mem bers and their families to get and maintain identifi cation cards. The center has launched its RAPIDS Real-time Automated Personnel Identification System self-service por tal to allow anyone with the Defense Departments common access card, or CAC, to apply for family ID or retirement cards or update dependents sta tuses online. Its really excit ing, Mary Dixon, the centers director, said. Weve been working for some time now to try to improve and transform our whole ID card appli cation process so people can do things online and not spend long hours going to a site and waiting to be seen. The change may seem procedural, but its impact will be big for those who, without it, have had to spend countless hours waiting in line with their families to get ID cards. Before RAPIDS, service members, retirees and families had to go togeth er to a Defense Manpower Data Center to submit an application form and wait while the ID card is being made, Dixon said. This is big project, she said. It takes away time from your work, and if you are separated maybe the spouse is out on a ship or New Energy Contract To Save $$FROM NAVFACNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Public Works Department (PWD) Mayport awarded $3.2 million Utility Energy Services Contract (UESC) Sept. 10 to TECO Peoples Gas., of Jacksonville, Fla., for an energy conservation project at Naval Station (NS) Mayport, Mayport, Fla. Our energy Team here at Mayport has worked extraordinarily hard to meet our very aggressive goals of reducing our energy appetite, said Capt. Doug Cochrane, NS Mayport Commanding Officer. The UESC project is a very important next step in our integrated Energy Conservation program that returned $3 million dollars to our Government this year. The annual energy savings from this project is anticipated to be more than 5,000 MWHs or a dol lar savings of over $421,000 per year, based on cur rent utility costs, said Ryan Howard, PWD Mayport Facilities Management Division Director. The project includes installation of Direct Digital Controls (DDCs) for efficient management of the Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Systems of 55 facilities aboard NS Mayport. Prior to the contract award, the PWD Mayport staff audited multiple facilities on station to deter mine which facilities would yield an adequate return on investment based on more efficient control and management of their HVAC systems. This included reviewing facility energy usage data, ana lyzing prior maintenance work orders and assess ing the risk of implementing new technologies as well as validating the projected savings. Additionally, the energy savings will make significant contributions toward the mandated require ments of the Energy Independence Security Act of 2007 which requires specific reductions in energy in federal facilities of at least 30 percent by fiscal year 2015. Anchors Up!-Photo by Paige GnannChief Navy Counselor Jonathan Dingler is piped through a line of fellow chiefs after receiving his new anchors during Naval Station Mayports Chief Petty Officer pinning ceremony on Friday at the Base Chapel. -Photo by NASA/Bill IngallsU.S. Navy Captain Steve Shinego, commanding officer of USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), presents the US flag to Carol Armstrong following the burial at sea service for her husband Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) in the Atlantic Ocean. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Phil Sea Hosts Burial For Neil ArmstrongFrom StaffThe crew of USS Philippine Sea helped say goodbye to one of the countrys most favorite astronauts on Sept. 14 during a burial at sea for Neil Armstrong. Only the family, a few close friends, NASA representatives and the crew of USS Philippine Sea attended the event at sea. It followed a memorial held on Set 12 at the Washington National Cathedral. The former Navy pilot and astronaut was the first man to walk on the moon. He passed away Aug. 25 from compli cations following a heart surgery per formed Aug. 8. He was 82 years old. Neil will always be remembered for taking human kinds first small step in a world beyond our own, Charles Bolden, current administrator of NASA, said during the memorial. But it was cour age, grace and humility he displayed throughout his life that lifted him above the stars. Neil Armstrong left more than footprints and a flag on the moon. In fact, as President Obama said in a letter to [Neils widow Carol] and family this morning, Future generations will draw inspiration from his spirit of discovery, humble composure and pioneering leadership, in setting a bold new course for space exploration. The imprint he left on the surface of the moon, and the story of human history, is matched only by the extraordinary mark he left on the hearts of all Americans. Family, friends, politicians and fellow astronauts lined the pews at the ceremo ny, sharing their thoughts on the life of the notoriously private veteran. Retired Navy Capt. and former astronaut Eugene Cernan recalled Armstrongs generous spirit. Neil was always willing to give of him self. When Neil, Jim Lovell and myself had the opportunity to visit the troops in Iraq... meeting them in chow halls, See RAPIDS, Page 6 See Armstrong, Page 12 Renew Your Family IDs From AnywhereUse this self-service website if you are a sponsor with CAC card and CAC-enabled personal computer. Go to http://www. dmdc.osd.mil/self_service

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Last week we had the honor of pay ing last respects to the first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong. The buri al at sea conducted on USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) was held with dignity and respect. There are so many to thank for orchestrating this historic cere mony, and I want to thank Philippine Sea Commanding Officer Capt. Steve Shinego and his entire crew for hosting the Armstrong family and for fulfilling Neil Armstrongs wishes. Many others at Naval Station Mayport were involved as well, and each and every one of you have my heartfelt thanks for making this such a memorable event for the Armstrong family. Welcome back is in order for the crews of USS Taylor (FFG 50) and HSL-48 Detachment Nine with their return after a seven-month deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet Area of Responsibility. The ship participated in several counter pira cy operations throughout the Horne of Africa and Somali basin and made sever al port calls to ports like Crete, Portugal and Oman. Your hard work has paid off with a successful deployment and my hat is off to each of you for a job well done. On Sept. 14, Navy commands throughout the country recognized thousands of Navy Ombudsmen who volunteer their time, talents and energy and make a difference in the lives of Navy families. These volunteers help Sailors and fami lies during all phases of deployment, disaster or crisis. They are also there to assist with the everyday questions and challenges facing Navy families. The Navy Ombudsman plays an important role in the success of a com mands mission. Ombudsmen are the first step for family members to turn to during a crisis, guiding Navy fami lies to the proper resources they need. Connecting Navy families to help is what the Ombudsmen have been doing for 42 years and I thank all of them for their service, and tireless dedication. On Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville/ Branch Health Clinic Mayport will give the public another opportunity to pre vent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your medications for dis posal to the Target Superstore, next door to NAS Jacksonville, or the Mayport Navy Exchange (Main Entrance). The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds 276 tons of prescrip tion drugs at over 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. In its four previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in over 1.5 million pounds nearly 775 tons of pills. Huge events on our planning table as we ready for the Blue Angels on Oct. 19 and the Nov. 9 Navy-Marine Corps Classic Basketball Game on USS Bataan (LHD 5). Tons of moving parts to make this happen and your support is cer tainly appreciated. Stand by for more as we work with the city of Jacksonville to put on both of these amazing events. We have the A-team planning as we speak! Finally, a word for our newly pinned Chief Petty Officers. Congratulations to each one of you. My hope is that this new chapter in your naval career will be filled with providing mentorship, leader ship and sage advice to all that needs it. Our Sailors rely on your wealth of experi ence. I am extremely proud of all of you. Well done! Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSAll students can learn. However, a student who is troubled cannot learn as easily. When students deal with physical illness, divorce, substance abuse, child abuse, and poverty, it places them at-risk of educational failure and maybe dropping out of school. Military students have the added social stressor of deployment: transi tions, family relocations, and extended separa tions. Students and par ents report mobility as the most challenging aspect of the military especially for teenagers. Most young people report the great est stress is anticipation of the move and then the first month of the move. Add to that academic adjustment and peer acceptance throughout the first year of the move and a family may be left with a sense of little con trol over their environ ment. Early intervention is essential, and parents and guardians play a vital role. Professional school counselors can also help. A school counsel ing program which pro vides direct services and is directed by a profes sionally trained school counselor is a critical component of a schools prevention efforts in the 21st century. The profes sional school counselor is a certified/licensed edu cator trained in school counseling with unique qualifications and skills to address all students aca demic, personal/social, and career development needs. As a parent, your past experiences with a school counselor may be vastly different than the experi ences your child will have. Today professional school counselors advocate, mediate, coordinate, refer, lead and collaborate with teachers, administrators and parents to help stu dents be successful. They provide services not only to students in need but to all students through parent nights, academic planning programs, inter pretation of assessment results, exploration of col lege/career options, and one-on-one conferencing to name of few. The beginning of a school year is an excellent opportunity to initiate contact with your childs school counselor, and by doing so, you help to provide a positive school experience for your child. Depending on the grade your child is in, whether he is in a special pro gram, a magnet school, or on a special diploma track, the beginning of the year is the perfect time to determine what needs to happen when. Youll be in the loop of important dates/deadlines for the rest of the school year. At part of this confer ence, discuss your childs challenges and concerns, especially if this is your childs first year in this school. As a parent, you know your child best. However, school counsel ors can offer options for dealing with concerns, including better ways to communicate with your child. By sharing infor mation with each other, you begin to establish a helping relationship. School counselors are excellent resources; how ever, they do not provide therapy or long-term counseling. Referrals to outside agencies may be initiated at the school. But remember that par ent-school collaboration takes time and work. This collaboration requires tenacity because things dont always go perfectly at first. But when parents work with schools, their children tend to have greater social adjustment. They get along better with fellow students and teachers. They communicate more effectively, and believe it or not, some times they do their home work more willingly. By taking advantage of all the school counseling depart ment has to offer, you can help your child start off on the right foot and stay there this school year. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Connecting with Your Childs School Counselor For Successful School YearJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAre you ready for some football? Football fans around the country are quite excited with the start of the new season. Unfortunately, not everyone is a football fan! But today I want to take just a few minutes to reflect on how football can offer so many lessons for life. For starters any football player knows the value that can come from play ing on such a challeng ing team sport. For one thing you learn the abso lutely critical skill of how there is no substitute for hard work and prepara tion. All that time in prac tice and working hard on those two-a-days has one goal in mind, which is victory on the field of battle. Everyone quickly learns that without hard and effective practices the team will surely suffer defeat on the field. God given talent is important, but the discipline learned by working together and Life Lessons Can Come From The GridironChap Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSgetting into physical and mental shape cannot be replaced. Hard work and practice are essential in honing your skills as indi viduals and as a team. A good coach will also teach his team not only how to have some great victories but also how to be gracious in defeat. You learn that there is no place for a sore loser. You also learn that you can have class and dignity no matter whether you win or lose. Of course, the flip side is that you learn there is no substitute for victory! That competitive spirit is ever so helpful in other areas of life as well. Who does not want to succeed in life? Knowing and understanding the importance of teamwork, diligence, effort, and act ing with dignity all help people be successful in whatever endeavors they make in life. In addition, you learn how to work with peo ple who are a lot differ ent than yourself on the football field. You learn that it is not the color of a persons skin that matters but rather how well he contributes to the team. You learn that everyone has something to contrib ute. You learn that you all have to work together and that you have to trust your teammate. You learn that as long as you share a common goal you can get along with almost anyone and set aside your differ ences to achieve great ness. If all of this sounds familiar it is because the things you learn on the football field are also critical to what we do as a Navy. We too know the value of hard work and sacrifice. We too know that raw talent is no sub stitute for hard work. We too learn how to be cel ebratory in success but dignified in our disap pointments. We too are continually learning the value of working with people a lot different than ourselves. So, this season I hope everyone enjoys some football. And take along with it some lessons for life.go Niners and go Bulldogs! Huraah!MOPS At ChapelFrom NS Mayport ChapelRegistration for the 2012-2013 MOPS year is ongoing. The group meets the 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month at 9:30 am in the Chapel fellowship Hall. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) is focused on the needs of moms with at least one child age 0-6. Mayport MOPS exists to meet the needs of every mom in the Mayport community regardless of age, race, religion, or rank. At MOPS youll be wel comed, accepted and inspired to reach your full potential. Our MOPS group is a place to anchor your hope and share your joys and frustrations with other moms. The relation ships that develop within a MOPS group help you sustain hope during the daily act of mothering, even when you feel you have no more of yourself to give! MOPS provide authentic friendships, practical help and spiri tual hope. More information can be found on the Mayport Military Mops Facebook page or by calling 2705212.

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U.S. Fleet Forces Changes Leadership U.S. Fleet Forces Command U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) held a change-of-command cer emony aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sept. 14 in port Naval Station Norfolk. Adm. Bill Gortney relieved Adm. John C. Harvey Jr., as USFF com mander in the traditional ceremony in front of hun dreds of distinguished guests, shipmates, and crew members. Harvey, a surface war fare officer and a 1973 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, assumed command of U.S. Fleet Forces in July 2009. In his more than three-year tenure, he led the command with a stra tegic focus supporting the nations maritime strat egy through operational readiness, training effec tiveness, and professional and personal develop ment. Todays not about me. Its about us-who we are, what we do, and why we do it, said Harvey. The power of our Navy is in our people not our platforms. Over the past three years, theres been no shortage of challenges, but because of your hard work and dedication, we had a positive influence on this fleet. Your work ensured we provided a unified voice to our CNO in partnership with our Pacific Fleet counterparts, and I am so proud to have had the privilege of serv ing with you. During his distin guished nearly 40 years of naval service as a com missioned officer, Harvey served in a variety of sea and shore billets. He was the Chief of Naval Personnel, and he com manded USS David R. Ray (DD 971), USS Cape St. George (CG 71) and Cruiser-Destroyer Group Eight as part of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Strike Group. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert served as the events guest speaker and spoke of the many accomplishments Harvey was responsible for as the fleet commander. Hes had a steady hand on the till for nearly four decades, said Greenert. He saw the opportuni ties; he took action; he got results. He made the Fleet tangibly better during his tenure, and hes got us on the right track and speed. Speaking to all the guests and participants, Harvey thanked everyone who supported the USFF posture to meet global mission requirements. I will certainly miss the Navy because of the peo ple I got to work with in the sense of mission, said Harvey. I did this for 39 + years because I loved it, not because I had to. Gortney, a naval avia tor and 1977 graduate of Elon College in N.C., becomes the 32nd com mander of USFF. He has served in a variety of command positions afloat and ashore, including most recently as Director, Joint Staff for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command; Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commanders. He also commanded Carrier Strike Group-10, on the Norfolk-based USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. I have spent all but six of my 35 years of ser vice in the fleet. It is great to be back in the fleet, said Gortney. Here at Fleet Forces Command, our missions are few but they could not be more important to our nation. If executed correctly, the overall mission of the command will succeed and most importantly our Sailors and civilians deployed or stationed around the globe will suc ceed. Greenert also took the opportunity to discuss the importance of payloads in maintaining an adaptable maritime force. Adaptability is the absolute essence of being a Sailor, and we get that adaptability when we think about pay load before platform. Replacing platforms is expensive, but when we look at payloads first, payloads that support cutting edge technology it can be a game changer. Greenert pointed to the Navys CVNs as an example of maximizing the platforms adaptability through the use of a vari ety of payloads. The CVN is in many ways our most adaptable platform, said Greenert. You pay once, and youve got a half century of ser vice. Enterprise is 50 years old; shes seen everything from A-4s to F-14s to a variety of F/A-18s, and we can now launch an unmanned strike aircraft from that aircraft carrier. Thats the way we need to be thinking. United States Fleet Forces Command sup ports both the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and combatant com manders worldwide by providing responsive, rel evant, sustainable naval forces ready-for-tasking. The command provides operational and planning support to combatant commanders and inte grated warfighter capa bility requirements to the CNO. Additionally, USFF serves as the CNOs designated executive agent for anti-terrorism/force pro tection, individual aug mentees and sea-basing. In collaboration with U.S. Pacific Fleet, USFF organizes, mans, trains, maintains, and equips Navy forces, develops and submits budgets, and exe cutes readiness and per sonnel accounts to devel op both required and sustainable levels of fleet readiness. Additionally, the command serves as the unified voice for fleet training requirements and policies. -Photo by MC1 Rafael MartieAdm. John C. Harvey Jr. congratulates Adm. Bill Gortney as he assumes command of U.S. Fleet Forces Command aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 USS Taylor Returns From 5th Fleet USS Taylor PAOFamilies and friends welcomed back guidedmissile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and members of HSL-48 Detachment 9 at Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 10 following the completion of a success ful seven-month deploy ment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy require ments. I am extremely pleased and proud of the out standing efforts of every Sailor aboard Taylor dur ing the last seven months. Taylors efforts, com bined with the efforts of the other maritime task forces, ensured the safe transit of thousands of merchant and smaller vessels throughout the Horn of Africa area in order to enable greater regional stability, said Cmdr. Dennis Volpe, Taylors executive officer. Every Sailor should be proud of our accomplish ments and I know they are looking forward to a welldeserved opportunity to relax and unwind with family and friends. Taylor and its crew of more than 200 Sailors successfully conducted a wide range of operations supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Ocean Shield while assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508. Counter-piracy was the primary mis sion focus of the deploy ment, which included operational coordina tion with European Naval Force (TF 465), independent nations sup porting the mission, and Coalition Maritime Force (CMF) assets operat ing in the Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) and Somali Basin. Over the past seven months, Taylor was involved with three significant escort and safety-of-life-at-sea missions and multiple Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions to provide pat tern of life information for regional trend analysis in order to support future operational planning. In direct support of the counter-piracy mission, the ships Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) Team dedicated over one hundred man hours conducting more than 70 Maritime Security Assistance visits of ves sels operating through out the Horn of Africa region from the Gulf of Aden to Gulf of Oman to the Indian Ocean and the Somali Basin. Taylors single SH-60B helicopter detachment supported the counterpiracy effort and amassed seven hundred flight hours, reaching an air frame fatigue life limit, while providing over See Taylor, Page 5 -Photo by MC1 Ian W. AndersonEnsign Caitlyn Levinson assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), embraces her family during a home coming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. The Taylor completed a successful seven-month deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy requirements. -Photo by MC1 Ian W. Anderson Gas Turbine Systems Technician Mechanical Chief (Select) Kevin Limbrick assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), meets his newborn daughter for the first time during a homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannChief Gunners Mate Kirby Dickerson gets a big welcome from his family after return ing to Naval Station Mayport Sept. 10 with USS Taylor.-Photo by Paige GnannLogistics Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Chad Butler gets the first kiss from his wife Audrey during the ships homecoming at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannTonya Smith and her five-year-old daughter, Savannah, wave as USS Taylor pulls into port bringing back Ensign Chris Smith.-Photo by Paige GnannFriends and family members of USS Taylor look for their Sailors as the ship pulls pierside on Sept. 10.-Photo by Paige GnannJan Castro, 7, and mom Jannelly, look for Information System Technician 1st Class (SW) Orlando Castro at the ships homecoming.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 5 watch for VBSS opera tions, conducting SSC and ISR missions, and nine vertical replenishments. Each dawn seemed to bring a new challenge for the aircrew and main tainers of Heartache 17. Whether it was tracking the large volume of mer chant ships transiting the IRTC or observing known pirate camps along the coastline, the Barefoot Bandits of Detachment NINE could be counted on to execute the mission. The exceptional per formance of our aircraft maintainers in one of the worlds most demand ing environments was the foundation for our suc cess at deterring piracy in the region, said Lt. Cmdr. Greg Arnold, Taylors Airboss. Additionally, the ship and her crew participated in 25 replenishments at sea (RAS) and safely con ducted 22 special Sea and Anchor evolutions, while pulling in and out of multiple overseas ports and transiting the Suez Canal twice. No piracy in our patrol area was the deploy ment motto and that is exactly what the crew ensured while patrolling the waterways known for piracy. They took on the challenge of self-suf ficiency in maintaining their equipment which helped keep the ship on station and ready for all missions assigned. Every individual was chal lenged in achieving a warfare qualification, major in-rate qualifica tion, or advancement to the next higher paygrade. They achieved those goals and many achieved all of them throughout the past seven months. Said Cmdr. Jeremy Hill, Taylors Commanding Officer. I am extremely proud and honored to be part of their accomplish ments and professional growth. The officers and crew enjoyed a few port visits during the deployment including Portugal, Crete, Oman, and the Seychelles for a little rest and relax ation from the arduous underway periods while conducting maintenance and upkeep to ensure continued operational readiness. While in port, the Chain-of-Command continued the U.S. Navys longstanding tradition of ambassadorship by pro viding tours to Ministry of Aviation in the Seychelles, hosting several foreign attachs while in Muscat, Oman, and conducting official calls with the Task Force Commanders of both TF508 and TF465. USS Taylor (FFG 50) performed superbly over the past seven months, satisfying all mission requirements and main taining high spirits with a can-do and a stay on mission through self sufficiency attitude. Taylors crew will spend the next couple of weeks with family, friends, and loved ones and enjoy some well-deserved post-deployment leave to decompress after being away from home. During their leave and upkeep period, the crew will undoubtedly maintain their unsurpassed work ethic and high standards of professionalism to pre pare the ship for future training requirements and operational tasking.From Page 4Taylor -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeEnsign Justin Boily, attached to USS Taylor (FFG 50), returns early from a seven-month deployment and surprises his eleven year-old son during lunch at Finegan Elementary School. Taylor is deployed to the U.S. Fifth Fleet Area of Operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy requirements. -Photo by MC1 Ian W. AndersonFamily and friends await the arrival of their loved ones assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and HSL-48 Detachment 9 during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannInformation Systems Technician 2nd Class Tony Johnston gets the first hug from his family.-Photo by Paige GnannSailors wave as they spot their loved ones waiting on the pier.-Photo by Paige GnannFamilies and friends reunite pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 10 with USS Taylor. -Photo by MC1 Ian W. AndersonSailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) man the rails as the ship arrives in Naval Station Mayport after a successful seven-month deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy require ments.

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HSL-48 Sailor Reenlists In Home Nation Of Cuba HSL-48 Det 3On almost any given day in the Navy, you will find U.S. Sailors reenlist ing. Although each reen listment is special in its own right, on July 18, 2012 there was a quiet gather ing for a reenlistment of a unique nature. Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 2nd Class Yanier Cabrera chose to reenlist in the United States Navy for an additional six years while in port Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Cabrera was born in Havana City, Cuba and lived there with his fam ily until he was eight years old. He told the story of his father who made it pos sible for his family to live the American dream by fleeing communist Cuba. His first three attempts failed and he was labeled a political dissident and incarcerated. Eventually, Cabreras family received visas to enter the United States and established roots in the Miami area. Cabrera is extremely proud of his heritage and his service. Twenty members of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light Four Eight (HSL48) Detachment Three, embarked in USS Underwood (FFG 36) in support of Southern Seas 2012 attended the reen listment. Lt. Cmdr. Raisner com mented, It is refreshing to hear a young person give so much credit to his family and the Navy for his success. Too often we hear about the entitle ment crowd. AZ2 Cabrera is far removed from those people. Cabrera has a bright future both in America and in the Navy. His goal is to one day wear the anchors of a Master Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. -Photo courtesy of HSL-48Cuban native Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 2nd Class Yanier Cabrera of HSL-48 Detachment Three reenlists while visiting Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba with USS Underwood.Mayport Branch Health Clinic Lynn Caudilla RetiresNaval Branch Health Clinic MayportBranch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport staff gathered around Calinica Lynn Caudilla at a luncheon on Aug. 24 to say thank you and farewell after 22 years of faithful govern ment service. Joining the staff were Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Director of Nursing Services Capt. Michelle McKenzie and Associate Director of Nursing Services Cmdr. Nicole Polinsky. Caudillas first assignment was NH Jacksonville, where she worked as an Intensive Care Unit nurse in 1990. In 1991 she transferred to NH Portsmouths ICU and trained as a non-invasive vascular technician, working for Vice Adm. Adam Robinsonwho later became the 36th Surgeon General of the Navy. Caudilla credits Robinson with inspir ing her to continue her edu cation. In 1994, she returned to NH Jacksonville where she worked on the first team to implement the military nurse call center. After transferring to BHC Mayport in 2008, she served as womens health coor dinator and nurse for a Medical Homeport team, coordinating care for over 6,000 patients. Throughout her career, Caudilla pursued her education. She completed her masters in nurs ing, a bachelors in education, and was certified as a legal nurse consultant. And shes currently one year away from receiving her family nurse prac titioner license. Married and with three children, Caudilla and her hus band are now both retired and plan to remain in the area. She has a passion for caring for the uninsured and plans to remain strongly involved in local volunteering. She is the recipient of many awards, including the Meritorious Civilian Service Award, awards for volun teer work, and in 2007 she was selected as one of the Great 100 Nurses of Northeast Florida. With many fond memo ries from her 22-year career, Caudilla advises, Its up to you to make the best of any assign ment. Continue to grow, per sonally and professionally, and never stop learning. The priority of BHC Mayport and its parent command, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, is to heal the nations heroes and their families. BHC staff consists of 25 health care providers and 190 allied and support staff, who perform 98,000 outpatient visits each year and fill 17,000 to 20,000 prescriptions each month. on deployment or your child is away at college it makes it a huge problem. Now, the CAC holder can go onto the RAPIDS site, call up the listing of their dependents, and fill out and digitally sign form No. 1172-2 for their family members to receive an ID card. That family mem ber then can go alone to the closest DMDC office they are are listed on the website and linked to Google Maps for driving directions to pick up the card, Dixon said. RAPIDS is a win for both the department and families, the director said. You can do this from your desk, she said. As long as your computer is CAC-enabled, it could be from your home or office. You can do it without going to a physical site, which is huge. The site also allows you to get a DOD self-service user name and password, known as a DS Logon, that allows you to access several DOD and VA websites with the logon information, rather than a CAC. DS Logon, which is available only to CAC holders, also has a pre mium account, which gives the highest level of access, allowing you to view personal data about yourself in the DOD and VA systems, apply for benefits online, check the status of your claims and update your address records. Dixon said she hopes the site also will one day include alerts for when an ID card is about to expire, and will be integrated with DMDCs MilConnect website to access all DOD and Veterans Affairs ben efits.From Page1RAPIDS 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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HSL-46 Drills In 5th Fleet -Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonU.S. Navy Sailors examine an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter from HSL-46 Detachment Eight during a damage control drill aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). Nitze is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, the ater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. Dispose Safely Of Prescription DrugFrom NCISThe Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Branch Health Clinic Mayport will give the public anoth er opportunity to pre vent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially danger ous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs on Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Bring your medications for disposal to the Navy Exchange Main Entrance, Mayport or the Target Superstore, next door to NAS Jacksonville. The service is free and anony mous, no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds-276 tons-of pre scription drugs at over 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. In its four previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in over 1.5 million pounds-nearly 775 tons-of pills. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescrip tion drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of acci dental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for dispos ing of unused medicinesflushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards. Law enforcement agen cies like NCIS and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug takeback events every few months. Additional local area collection sites and information can be found by visiting www.dea.gov, and clicking on the link, Got Drugs?Scorby Recognizes Ombudsman Program Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsThe commander of Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a procla mation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 6. Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. signed the proc lamation commemorat ing the 42nd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman program has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to support our warfight ers and their families, Scorby said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more difficult task without you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by then-Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist com mands in maintaining the morale, health and welfare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liai sons between command ing officers and the fami lies of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family mem bers with official informa tion and emergency assis tance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen volunteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 mil lion annually. According to Dianne Parker, NRSE deployment support program manager and ombuds man program coordina tor, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledges the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to rec ognize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the com mand support team, they make sure families know what resources are avail able to them, and help them adjust to the mili tary way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 7

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UNITAS Kicks Off In Key WestFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States will kick off the Atlantic Phase of UNITAS, an annual multinational exercise, in Key West, Sept. 17 hosted by Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. Thirteen warships will conduct operations in the Western Caribbean through, Sept. 28, 2012. UNITAS is designed to train participating forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test com mand and control of forces at sea, while oper ating as a multination al force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoper ability. Observers from France, Jamaica, Panama and Peru are also partici pating this year. UNITAS develops and sustains relationships to improve the capac ity of our partners mari time forces. This annual exercise fosters friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating navies. While the overarch ing goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, Commander U.S. Fourth Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris said. Specifically, there will be high end war fare scenarios address ing Electronic Warfare, Anti-Air Warfare and Air Defense, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, and Maritime Interdiction Operations, he said. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsThe visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team from the Brazilian frigate BNS Greenhalgh (F-46) approaches the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) during a maritime interdiction operation (MIO) subject matter expert exchange exercise. Underwood and Greenhalgh are group sailing en route to Key West, Fla. for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in sup port of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. A member of the visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team from the Brazilian frigate BNS Greenhalgh (F-46) searches Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Jeffrey Pettway aboard USS Underwood (FFG 36) during a maritime interdiction operation (MIO) sub ject matter expert exchange exercise. Quartermaster 3rd Class Kaiser Chowdhury takes a ranging with a pelorus on the port bridge wing of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) during the approach to Key West, Fla. for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Underwood Arrives For UNITAS, Pins New Chiefs USS UnderwoodOliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) arrived in Key West, Fla., for the start of UNITAS Atlantic (LANT) 53-2012 and pinned seven new Chief Petty Officers, Sept. 14. UNITAS is a multina tional exercise including ships from the U.S. Navy and seven partner nation navies that include mari time interdiction opera tion exercises, flight oper ations, replenishments at sea, and communication exercises. This is the culmina tion of everything we have worked for up to this point during our deploy ment, said Cmdr. Peter T. Mirisola, command ing officer of Underwood. I am looking forward to working with the navies from the participating countries and I know the crew is ready to execute the evolutions involved to the best of their ability. The exercise is designed to increase cooperation and interoperability with the other participating navies and to promote friendly relationships with them. UNITAS gives us a chance to showcase how professional we are and to learn how to operate with other navies in a multinational environment, said Mirisola. Mirisola also pinned seven new Chief Petty Officers in a ceremony aboard Underwood. The Chief Petty Officers went through a six-week induc tion process after being selected in August to become Chiefs. All of the hard work over the years has paid off, said Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) (SW) Maurice Gil. I am proud of my peers who went through the same process as me and now we can call ourselves true leaders who want to take care of our junior enlisted guys. Naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States will officially start UNITAS LANT 53-12, an annual multinational naval exercise, in Key West, Fla., Sept. 17. UNITAS is the lon gest running and largest maritime exercise in the Western Hemisphere and is hosted by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, com mander of U.S. 4th Fleet. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. COMUSNAVSO/ COMFOURTHFLT sup ports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulChief petty officer selectees receive their covers from their sponsors during a pinning ceremony on the flight deck of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsChief selects stand at attention during the fiscal year 2013 chief petty officer pinning ceremony aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) while moored in Key West for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsInformation Systems Technician 2nd Class (SW) Philip Coburn (right) and Personnel Specialist 3rd Class William Hancock lower the national ensign from the mainmast as the USS Underwood moors in Key West for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 9

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Bahrain Welcomes USS Hu City For Port VisitUSS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) vis ited Manama, Bahrain, after weeks at sea, Aug. 31. Sailors took advantage of their time in port to take in the sights and cul ture, tour the town, stay at an array of world-class hotels, sample local cui sine, and purchase sou venirs. I really enjoyed the shopping, especially the gold jewelry, said Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Steven Miranda. Hu Citys Morale, Welfare, and Recreation program, spearheaded by Lt. Karen Rector and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Jessica Haywood, coor dinated the opportunity for the ship to compete against athletic teams from other commands in Bahrain as part of a Challenge Cup. Hu City fielded partici pants for soccer, softball and a handful of other sports, performing admi rably and bonded with shipmates from other ships as part of the events. The soccer game was awesome, said Engineman 3rd Class Job Jean-Baptiste. In fact, it was my best day in Bahrain. I am looking frward to another game like that in the future. Bahrain offered a wel come respite for Hu City Sailors that spent a long time at sea, and they took full advantage of every thing the city had to offer. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.German Naval Officer Serves Aboard Hu City USS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) has some extra help in opera tional planning and coali tion teambuilding, while currently on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsi bility, thanks to a German exchange officer serving aboard. German Naval Officer Lt. Florian Gocht checked aboard Hu City last September as part of a two-year personnel exchange program (PEP) between the German and U.S. Navies, where U.S. personnel will serve on German ships and com mand staffs and Germans will serve on U.S. naval platforms. Since his arrival, Gocht has steadily integrated into the Hu City crew. At first I was wor ried that I would not be accepted, but it was the total opposite. I was treat ed not only like part of the crew but part of the fam ily, said Gocht. Gochts main job is to compile operational briefs for the daily brief ings with Hu City lead ership. In addition, he manages the short term and long term opera tional schedule, ensuring the ships routine flows smoothly. A deep relationship has formed between the crew and Gocht. Gocht works diligently to train junior officers, consistently devoting his attention to others in order to keep Hu Citys operations run ning smoothly. Flo keeps the depart ment running, said Lt. Cmdr. Jynelle McCoy, Hu City operations officer. He is definitely having a positive impact on the department. Gocht is one of three officers serving in the German navys PEP program. The other two officers participat ing are serving in the Netherlands and Great Britain, respectively. Gocht takes pride in representing his country and his navy. I was ecstatic when I found out I was being given the opportunity to serve as a German officer with the U.S. Navy, said Gocht. To summarize his expe rience thus far, Gocht uses the word wunderbar which means something exceptionally good, and to the crew of Hu City, Gocht himself embodies the definition of that term. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MCSN Darien G. KenneyGerman Officer Lt. Florian Gocht, right, and Quartermaster Seaman Nicholas Frank plot coordinates during a replen ishment-at-sea aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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USS Vicksburg Welcomes Newest ChiefsEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsNew chief petty officers were pinned in a ceremo ny aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) Sept. 14. The chief petty officer induction process, which began six weeks ago for selectees, was meant to train the new chiefs in preparation for their new tier of leadership. You have great er responsibility {as a chief}, said Chief Operations Specialist (SW) Luis Sandoval, who was pinned during the ceremony. Theres no more running to the chief for answers, you are the chief. A benefit is that you have the whole chiefs mess backing you up and helping you. The pinning ceremo ny marks the end of the induction process and represents a new begin ning through a proud naval tradition. As chiefs we are now proud upholders of tradition, said Chief Information Systems Technician (SW/EXW) Michael Burns, who was pinned during the cer emony. We are the only branch of service that has a rank like chief. I think it builds camaraderie between us that the other branches dont get to experience. Becoming a chief can be a long and difficult journey, but there is a rea son it isnt easy. {Induction} reminds you where you came from and doesnt let you forget how you got to where you are, said Chief Damage Controlman (SW/AW) Gary Lee, another of Vicksburgs newly-pinned chiefs. Ultimately its the Sailors that got us where we are. They are they ones who built us up and helped us become good leaders. The Sailors that have helped the new chiefs get to where they are now have the benefit of being helped by the new chiefs as they assume greater leadership roles. We have a new role, we have to be more involved, said Chief Fire Controlman (SW) Lawrence Evans, who was also pinned during the ceremony. We have to know more about administration and know the Navy instruc tions, said Evans. Its not just that though, you have to be involved with Sailors lives personally and professionally. That could be the most important thing of all. Sailors depend on you. Vicksburg is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsi bility conducting mari time security operations, theater security coop eration efforts and sup port missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottBoatswain's Mate 2nd Class Jeremy Anthony stands watch on the bridge aboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottSailors participate in a fresh-water wash down aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). U.S. Navy Sailors practice pipe-patching techniques during a general quarters exercise aboard guidedmissile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95). James E. Williams is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MC3 Randy J. Savarese -Photo by MC3 Daniel MeshelU.S. Navy Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon 12-3-1 fast rope to the flight deck of USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and post security posi tions during a helicopter visit, board, search and seizure training exercise. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 11

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Jax Jaguars Shake Hands, Give Out Tickets To Mayport control centers, and yes, even armored carrier and helicopters, those enthusiastic men and women, yet to be born when Neil walked on the moon, were mesmerized by his presence. In a typical Neil fashion, he would always walk in, introduce him self as if they didnt know who he was, and hed always give them a Hi, how are you guys doing. Asked one overwhelmed, inquisitive Marine, Mr. Armstrong, why are you here? Neils thought ful and sincerely honest reply was, Because you are here. Addressing Armstrong, a visibly emotional Cernan added, Its now for you a new beginning, but for us, I promise you, it is not the end. Farewell, my friend. Armstrong flew nearly 80 missions during the Korean War. During one such flight, the right wing of Armstongs plane was clipped by a cable wire over North Korea. He managed to fly into friendly territory before parachuting to safety. After being honor ably discharged from the Navy, Armstrong joined NASA as part of its sec ond group of astronauts. He then went on to com mand the Apollo 11 mis sion that saw him walk on the moon in July of 1969. After the mission was successfully com pleted, Armstrong and his crew landed in the Pacific Ocean where they were picked up by Sailors. Returning to the water meant his mission was complete, said Lovell, Armstrongs friend and fellow astronaut, in an interview with USA Today. Hes a Navy man, said Lovell. Its how he knew he was finished. Its how he knew his work was done. Armstrong was buried at sea with the help of Naval Station Mayportbased USS Philippine Sea.From Page1Armstrong-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyGabbert, along with a few teammates, autograph a mem orabilia for Sailors on board the Ticonderoga-class guid ed missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) at Naval Station Mayport. C.J. Mosley, defensive lineman for the Jacksonville Jaguars, autographs team memora bilia for Sailors on board the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at Arms 3rd Class Stephanie Ferrara gets a picture an autographed poster from Jacksonville Jaguars Quarterback Blaine Gabbert during a visit to Naval Station Mayport last week. Blaine Gabbert, quarterback for the Jacksonville Jaguars shakes a Sailors hand and thanks him for his service as his teammates autograph memorabilia for Sailors on board the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) at Naval Station Mayport. Players and cheerleaders for the Jacksonville Jaguars visited Sailors to show their appreciation to the military for their service and pass out free tickets to their upcoming game. USO Mayport is currently selling tickets for the Jags/Bengals game on Sept. 30. Tickets are $15 cash and available to all active duty, fam ily members, reservists, retirees, veterans and DoD employees. For more information, call the center at 246-3481. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 28: One Night in Mexico. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a fiesta! Well have a taco and nacho bar, mock-aritas, jalapeo eating contest, Spanish music and much more. 246-0347 MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 22: Kennedy Space Center Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. Cost $20. Sign up deadline Sept. 18. Sept. 23: Laser Tag. 7-9 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free. Sept. 26: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 27: Liberty Bash 4-7:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free food, DJ, Laser Tag, games, rock wall, t-shirts and more! FREE Sept. 28: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Sept. 30: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Cincinnati Bengals. Van departs 2 p.m. Cost $10. LIBERTY Serving Those Who Serve Our Country.Catholic Charities USAA CFC participant. Provided as a public service.1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 13

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Relationship Counseling Available At FFSCFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 24, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 24-27, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Sept. 26, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Saturday, Sept. 22 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an adventur ous hike to discover the islands wondrous wild flowers. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Come out and join River Region Human Services and Gateway Community Services for the annual Recovery Walk. September marks the 23rd annual obser vance of National Recovery Month (Recovery Month). The walk takes place at 8 a.m., River Region, 390 Park St., Jacksonville, Florida 32206, and ends at the Landing. Contact Kenneth Arnold at (904) 899-6300, ext. 4444, or KArnold@rrhs.org for more details.Visit our Strength through Recovery Facebook page at: www.facebook.com/ StrengththroughRecovery Thursday, Sept. 27 The Duval County Extension Offices/ UF IFAS will be offer ing a workshop on Fall Gardening at the Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Road, Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The cost is $5 for mate rials and light snacks. Payment can be made at the door. Topics covered will be Fall Gardening and Landscape Tips, Planting Wildflowers and Misconceptions about Trees. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Saturday, Sept. 29 The Duval County Extension Office and the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs District IV will be hosting the 2012 GardenFest at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N McDuff Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 9-2 p.m. The cost is $10 without lunch or $15 with lunch. Drinks will be provided. To reg ister, call Rachel Wilson at 904-272-4252 or pick up a registration form at the extension office. The deadline to register is Sept. 24. Speakers are Terry DelValle, Options for Managing Pests, Jim DeValerio, Vegetable Gardening Gold Nuggets, Larry Figart, Money does grow on Trees, and Joe Stewards, Water: Waste Not, Want Not. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. The pro gram will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reser vations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Oct. 20 Crafters Wanted! Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach will host its annual Craft Fair and Fall Festival on from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. To reserve your booth, please con tact the church office today at 249-5370. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Raising The Ensign -Photo by Paul FarleyA Sailor raises the national ensign as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guidedmissile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) arrives for a scheduled port visit. Halyburton is homeported in Mayport, Fla. and is on a scheduled deployment operating in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. USS Farragut Departs Germany, Arrives In FranceUSS Farragut Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) arrived in La Rochelle, France, for a port visit, Sept. 7. During the visit, Farragut Sailors will have a busy schedule including partici pating in sporting events against local teams, conducting a community service project, and experiencing the local cul ture. Farraguts visit to La Rochelle comes after its visit to Wilhelmshaven, Germany, during which Farragut Sailors competed in sporting events with German sailors, toured historical monu ments and enjoyed the local culture. I was incredibly happy with our visit to Wilhelmshaven, said Cmdr. Glen B. Quast, commanding officer of Farragut. Germany and the U.S. share a joint set of goals and priorities, and I am confi dent that we will achieve these together as we continue combined operations around the world. Farragut also hosted tours of the ship for local military representatives and civilians, giving Wilhelmshaven resi dents the opportunity to explore the ship as Farragut Sailors explained shipboard life and the U.S. Navy in general. Farragut is on a scheduled deploy ment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility.Household Goods Goes SocialFrom NAVSUPNAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS) Household Goods (HHG) services initiated social media campaign to reach out to customers and further reduce confusion and make a household move easier on families. HHG is now employing the public web, YouTube and Facebook to unrav el some of remaining mystery associ ated with moving, shipping and storing household goods. Our number one goal is easing the whole moving process for families mov ing across the country or around the world, said Deborah McGlennon, pro gram manager, Household Goods and Global Distance Support Center in San Diego. Were choosing new mediums to reach out and social media will help us reach our audiences with a message that we know how hard a move is, and heres how we can be there to help you. We believe our web presence, plus YouTube and Facebook Fan Page will provide relevant and interesting infor mation to NAVY service members and civilians initiating a household goods move. In addition, the YouTube Channel provides customers with instructions to set up their household goods move using the Defense Personal Property System (DPS), McGlennon said. The idea is to use YouTube as a source for education. According to McGlennon, even as the process incorporated www. move.mil and the Defense Personal Property System (DPS), the process can still be a bit daunting. The YouTube and FaceBook sites are designed to ease families into the move.mil and DPS process. It will be like pre-learning designed to familiarize families with how these systems operate and integrate, McGlennon said. You can subscribe now to the HHG YouTube Channel at http://www.you tube.com/user/NavyHHG and for tips, updates and additional informa tion, make sure to like our Facebook Fan Page at http://www.facebook. com/pages/NAVY-HouseholdGoods/294799990565426. In addition, the Navy Household Goods webpage also provides customers with informa tion on getting started with their move, entitlements and contact information. Check us out at https://www.navsup. navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/navsupgls/ prod_serv/household. McGlennon said, We value your feed back and suggestions on how we can further help you to have a successful move. Finally, In addition to leaving comments on our social media pages, you can email them at householdgoods@ navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 15

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Ft. Worth Departs Mayport For CommissioningFrom Program Executive Office for Littoral Combat Ships Public AffairsThe Navys newest Littoral Combat Ship, USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), sailed away from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Sep. 13, beginning the final leg of its maiden voyage to its commissioning site in Galveston, Texas. Fort Worth is the third LCS delivered to the Navy the second of the steel, semi-planing monohull Freedom variant and will be commissioned Sept. 22. During a two-week stay in Mayport, the ship underwent a scheduled preventive maintenance availability and con ducted initial Combat Support Systems Onboard Testing and TRS-3D RADAR Electronic Target Generator Testing in support of the Combat System Ship Qualification Test that will take place later this year after the ship arrives in its home port of San Diego, Calif. The ship departed the Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis., Aug. 6, sailing through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, before eventually mak ing her way down the East Coast of the United States. The trip through the Seaway was particu larly complex, as the ship transited 11 narrow locks that were, in many cases, only a few feet wider than the ship itself a feat few Navy vessels ever get the opportunity to experi ence. Fort Worth complet ed a challenging transit, and Im impressed with how well she handled, said Rear Adm. James Murdoch, Program Executive Officer for Littoral Combat Ships. Both the ship and crew performed superbly. LCS 3 has incorporat ed a number of design changes based on lessons learned from the first ship of class, USS Freedom (LCS 1). These changes are now part of the base line design and will be incorporated into future ships of the class prior to construction. LCS is a high-speed, agile, shal low-draft, focused-mis sion surface combatant designed for operation in near-shore environ ments yet fully capable of open-ocean operation. Fort Worth is designed to defeat asymmetric antiaccess threats such as mines, quiet diesel sub marines and fast surface craft. The 387-foot Fort Worth will be outfit ted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages, which can be changed quickly, and focus on three mission areas: mine countermea sures, surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare. In addition to the three focused warfare missions it will conduct, the Littoral Combat Ships inherent capabilities and suitabil ity to conduct lower-end missions will free up our more expensive, multimission cruisers and destroyers to conduct higher-end missions. The Lockheed Martin team now has Milwaukee (LCS 5), Detroit (LCS 7), Little Rock (LCS 9), and Sioux City (LCS 11) under construction in Marinette. Austal USA is construct ing Independencevariant ships Coronado (LCS 4), Jackson (LCS 6), Montgomery (LCS 8), Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and Omaha (LCS 12) at the companys shipyard in Mobile, Ala. -Photo courtesy of Lockheed MartinThe littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Fort Worth (LCS 3) departs Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis. Fort Worth is scheduled to be com missioned Sept. 22 in Galveston, Texas. Deploying Soldiers Test New Female Body Armor PrototypeAmerican Forces Press ServiceFemale soldiers at Fort Campbell, Ky., preparing for an upcoming deploy ment to Afghanistan are getting a chance to weigh in on the latest innova tion in personal protective equipment: body armor designed specifically to fit them. Any woman who has deployed to the combat zone can tell you whats wrong with wearing the improved outer tactical vest military-speak for body armor its designed for a mans body. Women were having a real problem with the fit of the IOTV, said Lynn Hennessey, lead designer for the female body armor prototype being tested at Fort Campbell. The size extra-small was too large for 85 percent of the females, so they werent getting a good fit. It was too loose and too long. That left vulnerabilities where the body armor left gaps, particularly under the arms. But it also made the vests uncomfortable enough to affect per formance, Hennessey explained. In some cases, women were reporting bruis ing on their hip bones because the side plates dragged down to their hips, she said. And when they were sitting down, it was riding up to their chins, because the torso was so long. This kind of feed back, both anecdotal and through a formal process of surveys and focus groups, led the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center here to launch a program to design female-specific body armor. The program kicked off in January 2011, with pro totypes now undergoing testing by members of the 101st Airborne Divisions 1st Brigade Combat Team. To design the new vests, the design team studied anthropometric data a series of measurements to reflect the size and shape of female soldiers bodies, with a particular focus on the bust, torso length and shoulders. Females are not small males, said Beverly Kimball, project engi neer for female Army aviation combat uniforms also being developed at Natick. We have specific proportions that require designs for fit and func tion for uniforms as well as equipment. The Natick team came up with eight differ ent sizes of female body armor, in two different lengths, to accommodate the force. Although the vests use the same protec tive plates as the gener ic body armor, the side plates are slightly scaled down to fit the new con tours. During the initial fit tests, 120 female soldiers at Fort Campbell, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.; Fort Benning, Ga.; and an Army Reserve Center in Milford, Mass., gave the prototypes a resounding thumbs-up. Of the 100 secondgeneration female body armor prototypes, 19 were issued to Fort Campbell soldiers in mid-August. Soldiers who participat ed in the test are assigned to a female engagement team that will interact closely with the Afghan population, particularly women, when they deploy later this year. The plan, Hennessey explained, was to let the soldiers get accustomed to wearing the new body armor and then to train in it for about five weeks. This week, they are wrapping up a human factors evaluation that includes such things as weapons firing and climbing in and out of vehicles all of the things the soldiers are likely to do in combat. The project team will assess the feedback to determine if the female body armor is ready for fielding throughout the Army. Army officials hope to produce 3,000 of the new vests and to field them to an Army brigade to be selected next year as a major step. This is a project that will have a direct impact on the soldiers who wear this, Hennessey said. It will make them a lot more comfortable but even more important, safer and more effective. -Photo SubmittedSpecialist Gilliann Campbell, a Female Engagement team Soldier with 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, is strapped into her protoype Generation III Improved Outer Tactical Vest with help from PM Soldier Protective Equipment Project Engineer Deana Archambault. Campbell is one of 19 female Soldiers from the 101st to participate in the fielding of this vest designed specifically for the needs of Army women. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Are You Ready To Receive Notifications In Emergency Or Base ClosureFrom CNIC Are you ready to be notified in the event of an emergency or base closure? A quick and easy sign up to the Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system could save you in more ways than you can imagine. Deployed by the Navy in 2008, the WAAN system provides Navy Installations (worldwide) with an effec tive and reliable mass notification sys tem that can be used during a crisis to warn and direct affected personnel. As a civilian employee, I thought that my home phone or cell phone num bers were none of my commands busi ness. And certainly they didnt need to know my kids personal information, says Marcher Castell, CIV CNIC HQ. Of course, that meant that they couldnt call me to tell me to evacuate, or include my children in the evacuation count. Heck, they couldnt even call me to tell me something simple like the power being out in my building and not to drive all the way in to the office. All military (active duty and Reserve), civil service, and contractor personnel with an NMCI or One Net user account are required to register their office email address and phone number, at mini mum, in the WAAN. Registering person al emergency contact information also is strongly encouraged. As Marcher discovered, the Navy cant alert you, if it cannot find you. Registration is not automatic, but by providing your personal contact information, you take advantage of the following benefits: and empowers you to react in times of crisis. alerts provide information to you and your family on what to do and where to go in an emergency. about base closures due to weather or an emergency, before you show up. fied when it is clear/safe to return to the installation. Rest assured; your personal informa tion is safeguarded. How to Register NMCI/One Net usersRight-click on the Purple Globe icon (bottom right cor ner on desktop). Select Access Self Service. Select the My Info tab and update your Last Name, First Name, and Display Name and save. Select the Devices tab and enter your work and personal contact infor mation in the appropriate mandatory and optional device fields. SAVE. Update your profile any time you have a change. If needed, use a Workaroundto Register If you have trouble with registering through the Purple Globe, try the work around for your region. Links can be found under Mass Notification>Wide Area Alert Notification System on the Ready Navy website at www.ready.navy. mil. Click on (or copy and paste into your browsers address bar) the link for the workaround below for your region. Southeast Region: https://waansecdap01. nmci.navy.mil/corp/atlaunch. asp?opt=uid&nextUrl=https://waans ecdap01.nmci.navy.mil/SelfService/ Entry.aspx?uid=%5bUID%5d For questions about the WAAN or sup port, contact the CNIC Support Center at 888-264-4255, DSN 942-6597 or http:// www.cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/sup portcenter/index.htm. Be Ready Navy! I am. Are You? Navys 2nd Joint High-Speed Vessel ChristenedMilitary Sealift Command Public AffairsUSNS Choctaw County (JHSV 2), the second of the Navys new joint highspeed vessels (JHSV) designed for rapid intratheater transport of troops and military equipment, was christened, Sept. 15, during a ceremony at Austal USA in Mobile, Ala. Military Sealift Command (MSC) will own and operate Choctaw County and the other JHSVs, that are under contract to be built for the Navy. Choctaw County will have a crew of 21 civil service mariners working for MSC who will operate, navigate and maintain the ship. The ships perfor mance will be matched by the unique qualities of her crew 21 civil ser vice mariners commit ted to freedom, democ racy and compassion, said Rear Adm. Brian LaRoche, deputy com mander, Military Sealift Command, during his address to an audi ence of more than 700 people including lead ers from the military ser vices, Congress and the maritime industry. The impressive ship awaiting the crack of the cham pagne bottle will help safeguard those ideals. Choctaw County will carry the Military Sealift Command funnel stripes and the strength of the U.S. military anywhere America needs it. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was the cer emonys principal speak er. The ship is named for three counties in America, located in Mississippi, Alabama and Oklahoma, which share the name Choctaw County. Twenty-nine women from the 1966 graduat ing class of Ackerman High School in Ackerman, Miss., served as the ships sponsors. Lead sponsor, Theresa Gilliam Pitts, a retired teacher, broke the traditional bottle of champagne across the bow to formally christen the ship while she and the other sponsors present said in unison, For the United States of America, we christen thee USNS Choctaw County. May God bless this ship and all who sail in her. The 338-foot-long alu minum catamarans are designed to be fast, flex ible and maneuverable, even in shallow waters, making them ideal for transporting troops and equipment quickly within a theater of operations. The 20,000-square-foot mission bay area aboard JHSVs can be reconfig ured to quickly adapt to whatever mission the ship is tasked with, such as carrying container ized portable hospitals to support disaster relief or transporting tanks and troops. This ship class fits perfectly with the new concept of forward-bas ing, said civilian Capt. Jose Delfaus, Choctaw Countys civil service master who has been sail ing for MSC for 31 years. The goal of forwardbasing is to cut back on the number of overseas bases by equipping more forward-deployed ships with troops and gear. JHSVs can join up with these ships and help them essentially by being their delivery truck, delivering anything they need from troops and gear, to provi sions or cargo, Delfaus said. JHSVs are capable of transporting 600 tons of military troops, vehicles, supplies and equipment 1,200 nautical miles at a high average speed of 35 knots and can operate in shallow-draft, austere ports and waterways, providing U.S. forces added mobility and flexibility. The JHSVs aviation flight decks can support day and night flight oper ations. Each JHSV also has sleeping accommodations for up to 146 person nel and airline-style seat ing for up to 312. One of the things Delfaus said he is most looking forward to in his role as master of the second JHSV is the new technology. The JHSV bridge functions more like a 747-cockpit than a tradi tional ships bridge. The design is for the officer to operate the entire ship from a chair. Everything you need to move the ship is available through an elaborate control panel. The navigation team also sits in the bridge, as does the engineering consul. Its a very unique set-up the rows of people make it look a bit like Star Trek. Following acceptance trials, delivery to the Navy and operational testing, Choctaw County will operate out of Little Creek, Va., and is expect ed to begin conducting missions for the Navy in the first quarter of fiscal year 2014. The Navys current con tract with Austal is for the construction of 10 JHSVs, one of which is yet-to-be awarded construction options. As MSC assets, all of the JHSVs will be civilian-crewed. The first four of the 10 currently under con tract including Choctaw County and USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) will be crewed by feder ally employed civil service mariners, while the next six are slated to be crewed by civilian mariners work ing for private companies under contract to MSC. -Photo by MCC Sam ShaversTheresa Gilliam Pitts, Sponsor of the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) 2, USNS Choctaw County, breaks a bot tle of champagne during the christening at the Austal Shipyard. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus named the ship after three U.S. counties located in Mississippi, Alabama and Oklahoma; places he said demonstrate core American values of hard work, putting family first, and community service. Money App Puts Finances In HandAmerican Forces Press ServiceFinancial planners often talk about being smart when it comes to your finances where, when and how to save, spend, and invest your money and how to man age your credit. The ins and outs of getting and staying in good financial shape can feel like a full-time job. From buying a house to researching tax breaks to asking about lower inter est rates on credit cards or auto insurance, get ting smart about finances takes effort. That endeavor can be made easier, however, with a free website and app created especially for military members by the Better Business Bureau and McGraw Hill Companies. The consumer advocacy groups mili tary division teamed up with the global financial information company to create militaryandmoney. com and its smartphone app, which is available for the iPhone and iPad. There will also soon be an Android version available, Brenda Linnington, direc tor of the BBB Military Line, told me today. Linnington, wife of Army Gen. Mike Linnington, who com mands the Military District of Washington, creates curriculum for the Military Lines personal finance workshops, which are given at military bases around the coun try as part of the Defense Department and services financial readiness out reach. BBBs Military Line also is a partner in the Kipplinger/BBB Financial Field Manual. Linnington replaced Holly Petraeus last year as MilitaryLines direc tor when Petraeus was appointed to head the military division of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Both have worked to ease per sonal finance for service members and their fami lies. We dont want it be laborious kind of thing, Linnington said of the website and app. They can just plug in their numbers, so they have their personal financial situation in palm of their hands. The digital aids came about after the bureau and McGraw Hill sepa rately pledged to help Joining Forces, the campaign First Lady Michelle Obama and Second Lady Jill Biden created last year to support military fami lies, Linnington said. The campaign fostered the partnership, merging the bureaus military finan cial acumen with McGraw Hills global financial reach. The website and app provide basic training in personal finance with video instructions on budgeting and managing credit. They also offer an action center with a cal culator for entering your own financial informa tion to help with build ing savings you can set a reminder for regular installments and reduc ing debt. The great thing about the app is its very userfriendly, and it puts that persons financial situa tion in the palm of their hands, Linnington said They can have it with them wherever they go. The website and app can help families through the financial shift of deployments and how to ease the burden when combat and hazard pay go away, she noted. That reunion period, as wonderful as it is, espe cially during the honey moon period, also is full of a lot of stressors, she said. Add in the changes to your financial situa tion now you have less income, your children are getting older, and becom ing more expensive that can cause more stress on an already stressful situ ation. The website and app are tailored to enlisted members at the E6 level and below, Linnington said, because that is who the bureau found needs it most. Most complaints of financial problems from service members come from the E5 and E6 level, she said. Unlike junior service members, they most in their mid-20s are beginning to develop credit and make enough money to pay off debt and save. And they are starting families. They have more money than they had before, but they also have more expenses and theyre getting into larger purchases, she said. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 17

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Managing Military IDs Just Got EasierAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Manpower Data Center is making it easier for service mem bers and their families to get and maintain identifi cation cards. The center has launched its RAPIDS Real-time Automated Personnel Identification System self-service portal to allow anyone with the Defense Departments common access card, or CAC, to apply for family ID or retirement cards or update dependents sta tuses online. Its really excit ing, Mary Dixon, the centers director, said. Weve been working for some time now to try to improve and transform our whole ID card appli cation process so people can do things online and not spend long hours going to a site and waiting to be seen. The change may seem procedural, but its impact will be big for those who, without it, have had to spend countless hours waiting in line with their families to get ID cards. Before RAPIDS, service members, retirees and families had to go together to a Defense Manpower Data Center to submit an application form and wait while the ID card is being made, Dixon said. This is big project, she said. It takes away time from your work, and if you are separated maybe the spouse is out on a ship or New Energy Contract To Save $$FROM NAVFACNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Public Works Department (PWD) Mayport awarded $3.2 million Utility Energy Services Contract (UESC) Sept. 10 to TECO Peoples Gas., of Jacksonville, Fla., for an energy conservation project at Naval Station (NS) Mayport, Mayport, Fla. Our energy Team here at Mayport has worked extraordinarily hard to meet our very aggressive goals of reducing our energy appetite, said Capt. Doug Cochrane, NS Mayport Commanding Officer. The UESC project is a very important next step in our integrated Energy Conservation program that returned $3 million dollars to our Government this year. The annual energy savings from this project is anticipated to be more than 5,000 MWHs or a dollar savings of over $421,000 per year, based on current utility costs, said Ryan Howard, PWD Mayport Facilities Management Division Director. The project includes installation of Direct Digital Controls (DDCs) for efficient management of the Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Systems of 55 facilities aboard NS Mayport. Prior to the contract award, the PWD Mayport staff audited multiple facilities on station to deter mine which facilities would yield an adequate return on investment based on more efficient control and management of their HVAC systems. This included reviewing facility energy usage data, analyzing prior maintenance work orders and assessing the risk of implementing new technologies as well as validating the projected savings. Additionally, the energy savings will make significant contributions toward the mandated require ments of the Energy Independence Security Act of 2007 which requires specific reductions in energy in federal facilities of at least 30 percent by fiscal year 2015. Anchors Up!-Photo by Paige GnannChief Navy Counselor Jonathan Dingler is piped through a line of fellow chiefs after receiving his new anchors during Naval Station Mayports Chief Petty Officer pinning ceremony on Friday at the Base Chapel. -Photo by NASA/Bill IngallsU.S. Navy Captain Steve Shinego, commanding officer of USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), presents the US flag to Carol Armstrong following the burial at sea service for her husband Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) in the Atlantic Ocean. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Phil Sea Hosts Burial For Neil ArmstrongFrom StaffThe crew of USS Philippine Sea helped say goodbye to one of the countrys most favorite astronauts on Sept. 14 during a burial at sea for Neil Armstrong. Only the family, a few close friends, NASA representatives and the crew of USS Philippine Sea attended the event at sea. It followed a memorial held on Set 12 at the Washington National Cathedral. The former Navy pilot and astronaut was the first man to walk on the moon. He passed away Aug. 25 from compli cations following a heart surgery per formed Aug. 8. He was 82 years old. Neil will always be remembered for taking human kinds first small step in a world beyond our own, Charles Bolden, current administrator of NASA, said during the memorial. But it was cour age, grace and humility he displayed throughout his life that lifted him above the stars. Neil Armstrong left more than footprints and a flag on the moon. In fact, as President Obama said in a letter to [Neils widow Carol] and family this morning, Future generations will draw inspiration from his spirit of discovery, humble composure and pioneering leadership, in setting a bold new course for space exploration. The imprint he left on the surface of the moon, and the story of human history, is matched only by the extraordinary mark he left on the hearts of all Americans. Family, friends, politicians and fellow astronauts lined the pews at the ceremony, sharing their thoughts on the life of the notoriously private veteran. Retired Navy Capt. and former astronaut Eugene Cernan recalled Armstrongs generous spirit. Neil was always willing to give of himself. When Neil, Jim Lovell and myself had the opportunity to visit the troops in Iraq... meeting them in chow halls, See RAPIDS, Page 6 See Armstrong, Page 12 Renew Your Family IDs From AnywhereUse this self-service website if you are a sponsor with CAC card and CAC-enabled personal computer. Go to http://www. dmdc.osd.mil/self_service

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Last week we had the honor of pay ing last respects to the first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong. The buri al at sea conducted on USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) was held with dignity and respect. There are so many to thank for orchestrating this historic cere mony, and I want to thank Philippine Sea Commanding Officer Capt. Steve Shinego and his entire crew for hosting the Armstrong family and for fulfilling Neil Armstrongs wishes. Many others at Naval Station Mayport were involved as well, and each and every one of you have my heartfelt thanks for making this such a memorable event for the Armstrong family. Welcome back is in order for the crews of USS Taylor (FFG 50) and HSL-48 Detachment Nine with their return after a seven-month deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet Area of Responsibility. The ship participated in several counter piracy operations throughout the Horne of Africa and Somali basin and made several port calls to ports like Crete, Portugal and Oman. Your hard work has paid off with a successful deployment and my hat is off to each of you for a job well done. On Sept. 14, Navy commands throughout the country recognized thousands of Navy Ombudsmen who volunteer their time, talents and energy and make a difference in the lives of Navy families. These volunteers help Sailors and families during all phases of deployment, disaster or crisis. They are also there to assist with the everyday questions and challenges facing Navy families. The Navy Ombudsman plays an important role in the success of a com mands mission. Ombudsmen are the first step for family members to turn to during a crisis, guiding Navy fami lies to the proper resources they need. Connecting Navy families to help is what the Ombudsmen have been doing for 42 years and I thank all of them for their service, and tireless dedication. On Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville/ Branch Health Clinic Mayport will give the public another opportunity to pre vent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your medications for dis posal to the Target Superstore, next door to NAS Jacksonville, or the Mayport Navy Exchange (Main Entrance). The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds 276 tons of prescription drugs at over 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. In its four previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in over 1.5 million pounds nearly 775 tons of pills. Huge events on our planning table as we ready for the Blue Angels on Oct. 19 and the Nov. 9 Navy-Marine Corps Classic Basketball Game on USS Bataan (LHD 5). Tons of moving parts to make this happen and your support is cer tainly appreciated. Stand by for more as we work with the city of Jacksonville to put on both of these amazing events. We have the A-team planning as we speak! Finally, a word for our newly pinned Chief Petty Officers. Congratulations to each one of you. My hope is that this new chapter in your naval career will be filled with providing mentorship, leadership and sage advice to all that needs it. Our Sailors rely on your wealth of experience. I am extremely proud of all of you. Well done! Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSAll students can learn. However, a student who is troubled cannot learn as easily. When students deal with physical illness, divorce, substance abuse, child abuse, and poverty, it places them at-risk of educational failure and maybe dropping out of school. Military students have the added social stressor of deployment: transi tions, family relocations, and extended separa tions. Students and par ents report mobility as the most challenging aspect of the military especially for teenagers. Most young people report the great est stress is anticipation of the move and then the first month of the move. Add to that academic adjustment and peer acceptance throughout the first year of the move and a family may be left with a sense of little con trol over their environ ment. Early intervention is essential, and parents and guardians play a vital role. Professional school counselors can also help. A school counsel ing program which pro vides direct services and is directed by a profes sionally trained school counselor is a critical component of a schools prevention efforts in the 21st century. The profes sional school counselor is a certified/licensed edu cator trained in school counseling with unique qualifications and skills to address all students aca demic, personal/social, and career development needs. As a parent, your past experiences with a school counselor may be vastly different than the experi ences your child will have. Today professional school counselors advocate, mediate, coordinate, refer, lead and collaborate with teachers, administrators and parents to help stu dents be successful. They provide services not only to students in need but to all students through parent nights, academic planning programs, inter pretation of assessment results, exploration of college/career options, and one-on-one conferencing to name of few. The beginning of a school year is an excellent opportunity to initiate contact with your childs school counselor, and by doing so, you help to provide a positive school experience for your child. Depending on the grade your child is in, whether he is in a special pro gram, a magnet school, or on a special diploma track, the beginning of the year is the perfect time to determine what needs to happen when. Youll be in the loop of important dates/deadlines for the rest of the school year. At part of this confer ence, discuss your childs challenges and concerns, especially if this is your childs first year in this school. As a parent, you know your child best. However, school counselors can offer options for dealing with concerns, including better ways to communicate with your child. By sharing infor mation with each other, you begin to establish a helping relationship. School counselors are excellent resources; how ever, they do not provide therapy or long-term counseling. Referrals to outside agencies may be initiated at the school. But remember that parent-school collaboration takes time and work. This collaboration requires tenacity because things dont always go perfectly at first. But when parents work with schools, their children tend to have greater social adjustment. They get along better with fellow students and teachers. They communicate more effectively, and believe it or not, some times they do their homework more willingly. By taking advantage of all the school counseling department has to offer, you can help your child start off on the right foot and stay there this school year. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Connecting with Your Childs School Counselor For Successful School YearJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAre you ready for some football? Football fans around the country are quite excited with the start of the new season. Unfortunately, not everyone is a football fan! But today I want to take just a few minutes to reflect on how football can offer so many lessons for life. For starters any football player knows the value that can come from play ing on such a challeng ing team sport. For one thing you learn the abso lutely critical skill of how there is no substitute for hard work and prepara tion. All that time in practice and working hard on those two-a-days has one goal in mind, which is victory on the field of battle. Everyone quickly learns that without hard and effective practices the team will surely suffer defeat on the field. God given talent is important, but the discipline learned by working together and Life Lessons Can Come From The GridironChap Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSgetting into physical and mental shape cannot be replaced. Hard work and practice are essential in honing your skills as individuals and as a team. A good coach will also teach his team not only how to have some great victories but also how to be gracious in defeat. You learn that there is no place for a sore loser. You also learn that you can have class and dignity no matter whether you win or lose. Of course, the flip side is that you learn there is no substitute for victory! That competitive spirit is ever so helpful in other areas of life as well. Who does not want to succeed in life? Knowing and understanding the importance of teamwork, diligence, effort, and act ing with dignity all help people be successful in whatever endeavors they make in life. In addition, you learn how to work with peo ple who are a lot differ ent than yourself on the football field. You learn that it is not the color of a persons skin that matters but rather how well he contributes to the team. You learn that everyone has something to contribute. You learn that you all have to work together and that you have to trust your teammate. You learn that as long as you share a common goal you can get along with almost anyone and set aside your differ ences to achieve great ness. If all of this sounds familiar it is because the things you learn on the football field are also critical to what we do as a Navy. We too know the value of hard work and sacrifice. We too know that raw talent is no sub stitute for hard work. We too learn how to be cel ebratory in success but dignified in our disap pointments. We too are continually learning the value of working with people a lot different than ourselves. So, this season I hope everyone enjoys some football. And take along with it some lessons for life.go Niners and go Bulldogs! Huraah!MOPS At ChapelFrom NS Mayport ChapelRegistration for the 2012-2013 MOPS year is ongoing. The group meets the 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month at 9:30 am in the Chapel fellowship Hall. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) is focused on the needs of moms with at least one child age 0-6. Mayport MOPS exists to meet the needs of every mom in the Mayport community regardless of age, race, religion, or rank. At MOPS youll be wel comed, accepted and inspired to reach your full potential. Our MOPS group is a place to anchor your hope and share your joys and frustrations with other moms. The relationships that develop within a MOPS group help you sustain hope during the daily act of mothering, even when you feel you have no more of yourself to give! MOPS provide authentic friendships, practical help and spiri tual hope. More information can be found on the Mayport Military Mops Facebook page or by calling 2705212.

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U.S. Fleet Forces Changes Leadership U.S. Fleet Forces Command U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) held a change-of-command cer emony aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sept. 14 in port Naval Station Norfolk. Adm. Bill Gortney relieved Adm. John C. Harvey Jr., as USFF com mander in the traditional ceremony in front of hundreds of distinguished guests, shipmates, and crew members. Harvey, a surface war fare officer and a 1973 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, assumed command of U.S. Fleet Forces in July 2009. In his more than three-year tenure, he led the command with a strategic focus supporting the nations maritime strat egy through operational readiness, training effec tiveness, and professional and personal develop ment. Todays not about me. Its about us-who we are, what we do, and why we do it, said Harvey. The power of our Navy is in our people not our platforms. Over the past three years, theres been no shortage of challenges, but because of your hard work and dedication, we had a positive influence on this fleet. Your work ensured we provided a unified voice to our CNO in partnership with our Pacific Fleet counterparts, and I am so proud to have had the privilege of serv ing with you. During his distin guished nearly 40 years of naval service as a commissioned officer, Harvey served in a variety of sea and shore billets. He was the Chief of Naval Personnel, and he com manded USS David R. Ray (DD 971), USS Cape St. George (CG 71) and Cruiser-Destroyer Group Eight as part of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Strike Group. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert served as the events guest speaker and spoke of the many accomplishments Harvey was responsible for as the fleet commander. Hes had a steady hand on the till for nearly four decades, said Greenert. He saw the opportuni ties; he took action; he got results. He made the Fleet tangibly better during his tenure, and hes got us on the right track and speed. Speaking to all the guests and participants, Harvey thanked everyone who supported the USFF posture to meet global mission requirements. I will certainly miss the Navy because of the peo ple I got to work with in the sense of mission, said Harvey. I did this for 39 + years because I loved it, not because I had to. Gortney, a naval avia tor and 1977 graduate of Elon College in N.C., becomes the 32nd com mander of USFF. He has served in a variety of command positions afloat and ashore, including most recently as Director, Joint Staff for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command; Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commanders. He also commanded Carrier Strike Group-10, on the Norfolk-based USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. I have spent all but six of my 35 years of ser vice in the fleet. It is great to be back in the fleet, said Gortney. Here at Fleet Forces Command, our missions are few but they could not be more important to our nation. If executed correctly, the overall mission of the command will succeed and most importantly our Sailors and civilians deployed or stationed around the globe will succeed. Greenert also took the opportunity to discuss the importance of payloads in maintaining an adaptable maritime force. Adaptability is the absolute essence of being a Sailor, and we get that adaptability when we think about pay load before platform. Replacing platforms is expensive, but when we look at payloads first, payloads that support cutting edge technology it can be a game changer. Greenert pointed to the Navys CVNs as an example of maximizing the platforms adaptability through the use of a vari ety of payloads. The CVN is in many ways our most adaptable platform, said Greenert. You pay once, and youve got a half century of ser vice. Enterprise is 50 years old; shes seen everything from A-4s to F-14s to a variety of F/A-18s, and we can now launch an unmanned strike aircraft from that aircraft carrier. Thats the way we need to be thinking. United States Fleet Forces Command sup ports both the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and combatant com manders worldwide by providing responsive, rel evant, sustainable naval forces ready-for-tasking. The command provides operational and planning support to combatant commanders and inte grated warfighter capa bility requirements to the CNO. Additionally, USFF serves as the CNOs designated executive agent for anti-terrorism/force pro tection, individual aug mentees and sea-basing. In collaboration with U.S. Pacific Fleet, USFF organizes, mans, trains, maintains, and equips Navy forces, develops and submits budgets, and executes readiness and per sonnel accounts to devel op both required and sustainable levels of fleet readiness. Additionally, the command serves as the unified voice for fleet training requirements and policies. -Photo by MC1 Rafael MartieAdm. John C. Harvey Jr. congratulates Adm. Bill Gortney as he assumes command of U.S. Fleet Forces Command aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 USS Taylor Returns From 5th Fleet USS Taylor PAOFamilies and friends welcomed back guidedmissile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and members of HSL-48 Detachment 9 at Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 10 following the completion of a success ful seven-month deploy ment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy require ments. I am extremely pleased and proud of the out standing efforts of every Sailor aboard Taylor dur ing the last seven months. Taylors efforts, com bined with the efforts of the other maritime task forces, ensured the safe transit of thousands of merchant and smaller vessels throughout the Horn of Africa area in order to enable greater regional stability, said Cmdr. Dennis Volpe, Taylors executive officer. Every Sailor should be proud of our accomplish ments and I know they are looking forward to a welldeserved opportunity to relax and unwind with family and friends. Taylor and its crew of more than 200 Sailors successfully conducted a wide range of operations supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Ocean Shield while assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508. Counter-piracy was the primary mis sion focus of the deploy ment, which included operational coordina tion with European Naval Force (TF 465), independent nations sup porting the mission, and Coalition Maritime Force (CMF) assets operat ing in the Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) and Somali Basin. Over the past seven months, Taylor was involved with three significant escort and safety-of-life-at-sea missions and multiple Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions to provide pat tern of life information for regional trend analysis in order to support future operational planning. In direct support of the counter-piracy mission, the ships Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) Team dedicated over one hundred man hours conducting more than 70 Maritime Security Assistance visits of ves sels operating through out the Horn of Africa region from the Gulf of Aden to Gulf of Oman to the Indian Ocean and the Somali Basin. Taylors single SH-60B helicopter detachment supported the counterpiracy effort and amassed seven hundred flight hours, reaching an air frame fatigue life limit, while providing over See Taylor, Page 5 -Photo by MC1 Ian W. AndersonEnsign Caitlyn Levinson assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), embraces her family during a homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. The Taylor completed a successful seven-month deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy requirements. -Photo by MC1 Ian W. Anderson Gas Turbine Systems Technician Mechanical Chief (Select) Kevin Limbrick assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), meets his newborn daughter for the first time during a homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannChief Gunners Mate Kirby Dickerson gets a big welcome from his family after returning to Naval Station Mayport Sept. 10 with USS Taylor.-Photo by Paige GnannLogistics Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Chad Butler gets the first kiss from his wife Audrey during the ships homecoming at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannTonya Smith and her five-year-old daughter, Savannah, wave as USS Taylor pulls into port bringing back Ensign Chris Smith.-Photo by Paige GnannFriends and family members of USS Taylor look for their Sailors as the ship pulls pierside on Sept. 10.-Photo by Paige GnannJan Castro, 7, and mom Jannelly, look for Information System Technician 1st Class (SW) Orlando Castro at the ships homecoming.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 5 watch for VBSS opera tions, conducting SSC and ISR missions, and nine vertical replenishments. Each dawn seemed to bring a new challenge for the aircrew and maintainers of Heartache 17. Whether it was tracking the large volume of mer chant ships transiting the IRTC or observing known pirate camps along the coastline, the Barefoot Bandits of Detachment NINE could be counted on to execute the mission. The exceptional per formance of our aircraft maintainers in one of the worlds most demand ing environments was the foundation for our suc cess at deterring piracy in the region, said Lt. Cmdr. Greg Arnold, Taylors Airboss. Additionally, the ship and her crew participated in 25 replenishments at sea (RAS) and safely conducted 22 special Sea and Anchor evolutions, while pulling in and out of multiple overseas ports and transiting the Suez Canal twice. No piracy in our patrol area was the deploy ment motto and that is exactly what the crew ensured while patrolling the waterways known for piracy. They took on the challenge of self-suf ficiency in maintaining their equipment which helped keep the ship on station and ready for all missions assigned. Every individual was chal lenged in achieving a warfare qualification, major in-rate qualifica tion, or advancement to the next higher paygrade. They achieved those goals and many achieved all of them throughout the past seven months. Said Cmdr. Jeremy Hill, Taylors Commanding Officer. I am extremely proud and honored to be part of their accomplish ments and professional growth. The officers and crew enjoyed a few port visits during the deployment including Portugal, Crete, Oman, and the Seychelles for a little rest and relax ation from the arduous underway periods while conducting maintenance and upkeep to ensure continued operational readiness. While in port, the Chain-of-Command continued the U.S. Navys longstanding tradition of ambassadorship by pro viding tours to Ministry of Aviation in the Seychelles, hosting several foreign attachs while in Muscat, Oman, and conducting official calls with the Task Force Commanders of both TF508 and TF465. USS Taylor (FFG 50) performed superbly over the past seven months, satisfying all mission requirements and main taining high spirits with a can-do and a stay on mission through self sufficiency attitude. Taylors crew will spend the next couple of weeks with family, friends, and loved ones and enjoy some well-deserved post-deployment leave to decompress after being away from home. During their leave and upkeep period, the crew will undoubtedly maintain their unsurpassed work ethic and high standards of professionalism to prepare the ship for future training requirements and operational tasking.From Page 4Taylor -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeEnsign Justin Boily, attached to USS Taylor (FFG 50), returns early from a seven-month deployment and surprises his eleven year-old son during lunch at Finegan Elementary School. Taylor is deployed to the U.S. Fifth Fleet Area of Operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy requirements. -Photo by MC1 Ian W. AndersonFamily and friends await the arrival of their loved ones assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and HSL-48 Detachment 9 during the ship's homecoming celebration at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannInformation Systems Technician 2nd Class Tony Johnston gets the first hug from his family.-Photo by Paige GnannSailors wave as they spot their loved ones waiting on the pier.-Photo by Paige GnannFamilies and friends reunite pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 10 with USS Taylor. -Photo by MC1 Ian W. AndersonSailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) man the rails as the ship arrives in Naval Station Mayport after a successful seven-month deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of operation in support of U.S. and NATO Counter-Piracy requirements.

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HSL-48 Sailor Reenlists In Home Nation Of Cuba HSL-48 Det 3On almost any given day in the Navy, you will find U.S. Sailors reenlist ing. Although each reenlistment is special in its own right, on July 18, 2012 there was a quiet gather ing for a reenlistment of a unique nature. Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 2nd Class Yanier Cabrera chose to reenlist in the United States Navy for an additional six years while in port Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Cabrera was born in Havana City, Cuba and lived there with his fam ily until he was eight years old. He told the story of his father who made it pos sible for his family to live the American dream by fleeing communist Cuba. His first three attempts failed and he was labeled a political dissident and incarcerated. Eventually, Cabreras family received visas to enter the United States and established roots in the Miami area. Cabrera is extremely proud of his heritage and his service. Twenty members of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light Four Eight (HSL48) Detachment Three, embarked in USS Underwood (FFG 36) in support of Southern Seas 2012 attended the reen listment. Lt. Cmdr. Raisner com mented, It is refreshing to hear a young person give so much credit to his family and the Navy for his success. Too often we hear about the entitle ment crowd. AZ2 Cabrera is far removed from those people. Cabrera has a bright future both in America and in the Navy. His goal is to one day wear the anchors of a Master Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. -Photo courtesy of HSL-48Cuban native Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 2nd Class Yanier Cabrera of HSL-48 Detachment Three reenlists while visiting Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba with USS Underwood.Mayport Branch Health Clinic Lynn Caudilla RetiresNaval Branch Health Clinic MayportBranch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport staff gathered around Calinica Lynn Caudilla at a luncheon on Aug. 24 to say thank you and farewell after 22 years of faithful govern ment service. Joining the staff were Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Director of Nursing Services Capt. Michelle McKenzie and Associate Director of Nursing Services Cmdr. Nicole Polinsky. Caudillas first assignment was NH Jacksonville, where she worked as an Intensive Care Unit nurse in 1990. In 1991 she transferred to NH Portsmouths ICU and trained as a non-invasive vascular technician, working for Vice Adm. Adam Robinsonwho later became the 36th Surgeon General of the Navy. Caudilla credits Robinson with inspir ing her to continue her edu cation. In 1994, she returned to NH Jacksonville where she worked on the first team to implement the military nurse call center. After transferring to BHC Mayport in 2008, she served as womens health coordinator and nurse for a Medical Homeport team, coordinating care for over 6,000 patients. Throughout her career, Caudilla pursued her education. She completed her masters in nursing, a bachelors in education, and was certified as a legal nurse consultant. And shes currently one year away from receiving her family nurse practitioner license. Married and with three children, Caudilla and her hus band are now both retired and plan to remain in the area. She has a passion for caring for the uninsured and plans to remain strongly involved in local volunteering. She is the recipient of many awards, including the Meritorious Civilian Service Award, awards for volun teer work, and in 2007 she was selected as one of the Great 100 Nurses of Northeast Florida. With many fond memo ries from her 22-year career, Caudilla advises, Its up to you to make the best of any assign ment. Continue to grow, per sonally and professionally, and never stop learning. The priority of BHC Mayport and its parent command, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, is to heal the nations heroes and their families. BHC staff consists of 25 health care providers and 190 allied and support staff, who perform 98,000 outpatient visits each year and fill 17,000 to 20,000 prescriptions each month. on deployment or your child is away at college it makes it a huge problem. Now, the CAC holder can go onto the RAPIDS site, call up the listing of their dependents, and fill out and digitally sign form No. 1172-2 for their family members to receive an ID card. That family mem ber then can go alone to the closest DMDC office they are are listed on the website and linked to Google Maps for driving directions to pick up the card, Dixon said. RAPIDS is a win for both the department and families, the director said. You can do this from your desk, she said. As long as your computer is CAC-enabled, it could be from your home or office. You can do it without going to a physical site, which is huge. The site also allows you to get a DOD self-service user name and password, known as a DS Logon, that allows you to access several DOD and VA websites with the logon information, rather than a CAC. DS Logon, which is available only to CAC holders, also has a pre mium account, which gives the highest level of access, allowing you to view personal data about yourself in the DOD and VA systems, apply for benefits online, check the status of your claims and update your address records. Dixon said she hopes the site also will one day include alerts for when an ID card is about to expire, and will be integrated with DMDCs MilConnect website to access all DOD and Veterans Affairs ben efits.From Page1RAPIDS 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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HSL-46 Drills In 5th Fleet -Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonU.S. Navy Sailors examine an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter from HSL-46 Detachment Eight during a damage control drill aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). Nitze is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. Dispose Safely Of Prescription DrugFrom NCISThe Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Branch Health Clinic Mayport will give the public another opportunity to pre vent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially danger ous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs on Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Bring your medications for disposal to the Navy Exchange Main Entrance, Mayport or the Target Superstore, next door to NAS Jacksonville. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds-276 tons-of pre scription drugs at over 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. In its four previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in over 1.5 million pounds-nearly 775 tons-of pills. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescrip tion drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicinesflushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards. Law enforcement agen cies like NCIS and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug takeback events every few months. Additional local area collection sites and information can be found by visiting www.dea.gov, and clicking on the link, Got Drugs?Scorby Recognizes Ombudsman Program Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsThe commander of Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a procla mation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 6. Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. signed the proclamation commemorat ing the 42nd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman program has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to support our warfight ers and their families, Scorby said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more difficult task without you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by then-Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist com mands in maintaining the morale, health and welfare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liai sons between command ing officers and the fami lies of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family members with official information and emergency assistance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen volunteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 mil lion annually. According to Dianne Parker, NRSE deployment support program manager and ombuds man program coordina tor, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledges the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to rec ognize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the com mand support team, they make sure families know what resources are avail able to them, and help them adjust to the mili tary way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 7

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UNITAS Kicks Off In Key WestFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States will kick off the Atlantic Phase of UNITAS, an annual multinational exercise, in Key West, Sept. 17 hosted by Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. Thirteen warships will conduct operations in the Western Caribbean through, Sept. 28, 2012. UNITAS is designed to train participating forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test com mand and control of forces at sea, while oper ating as a multination al force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoper ability. Observers from France, Jamaica, Panama and Peru are also partici pating this year. UNITAS develops and sustains relationships to improve the capac ity of our partners mari time forces. This annual exercise fosters friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating navies. While the overarch ing goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, Commander U.S. Fourth Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris said. Specifically, there will be high end war fare scenarios address ing Electronic Warfare, Anti-Air Warfare and Air Defense, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, and Maritime Interdiction Operations, he said. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsThe visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team from the Brazilian frigate BNS Greenhalgh (F-46) approaches the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) during a maritime interdiction operation (MIO) subject matter expert exchange exercise. Underwood and Greenhalgh are group sailing en route to Key West, Fla. for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. A member of the visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team from the Brazilian frigate BNS Greenhalgh (F-46) searches Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Jeffrey Pettway aboard USS Underwood (FFG 36) during a maritime interdiction operation (MIO) subject matter expert exchange exercise. Quartermaster 3rd Class Kaiser Chowdhury takes a ranging with a pelorus on the port bridge wing of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) during the approach to Key West, Fla. for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Underwood Arrives For UNITAS, Pins New Chiefs USS UnderwoodOliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) arrived in Key West, Fla., for the start of UNITAS Atlantic (LANT) 53-2012 and pinned seven new Chief Petty Officers, Sept. 14. UNITAS is a multina tional exercise including ships from the U.S. Navy and seven partner nation navies that include mari time interdiction opera tion exercises, flight operations, replenishments at sea, and communication exercises. This is the culmina tion of everything we have worked for up to this point during our deploy ment, said Cmdr. Peter T. Mirisola, command ing officer of Underwood. I am looking forward to working with the navies from the participating countries and I know the crew is ready to execute the evolutions involved to the best of their ability. The exercise is designed to increase cooperation and interoperability with the other participating navies and to promote friendly relationships with them. UNITAS gives us a chance to showcase how professional we are and to learn how to operate with other navies in a multinational environment, said Mirisola. Mirisola also pinned seven new Chief Petty Officers in a ceremony aboard Underwood. The Chief Petty Officers went through a six-week induction process after being selected in August to become Chiefs. All of the hard work over the years has paid off, said Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) (SW) Maurice Gil. I am proud of my peers who went through the same process as me and now we can call ourselves true leaders who want to take care of our junior enlisted guys. Naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States will officially start UNITAS LANT 53-12, an annual multinational naval exercise, in Key West, Fla., Sept. 17. UNITAS is the lon gest running and largest maritime exercise in the Western Hemisphere and is hosted by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, com mander of U.S. 4th Fleet. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. COMUSNAVSO/ COMFOURTHFLT sup ports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulChief petty officer selectees receive their covers from their sponsors during a pinning ceremony on the flight deck of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsChief selects stand at attention during the fiscal year 2013 chief petty officer pinning ceremony aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) while moored in Key West for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsInformation Systems Technician 2nd Class (SW) Philip Coburn (right) and Personnel Specialist 3rd Class William Hancock lower the national ensign from the mainmast as the USS Underwood moors in Key West for UNITAS Atlantic 53-2012. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 9

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Bahrain Welcomes USS Hu City For Port VisitUSS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) visited Manama, Bahrain, after weeks at sea, Aug. 31. Sailors took advantage of their time in port to take in the sights and culture, tour the town, stay at an array of world-class hotels, sample local cui sine, and purchase sou venirs. I really enjoyed the shopping, especially the gold jewelry, said Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Steven Miranda. Hu Citys Morale, Welfare, and Recreation program, spearheaded by Lt. Karen Rector and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Jessica Haywood, coor dinated the opportunity for the ship to compete against athletic teams from other commands in Bahrain as part of a Challenge Cup. Hu City fielded participants for soccer, softball and a handful of other sports, performing admi rably and bonded with shipmates from other ships as part of the events. The soccer game was awesome, said Engineman 3rd Class Job Jean-Baptiste. In fact, it was my best day in Bahrain. I am looking frward to another game like that in the future. Bahrain offered a wel come respite for Hu City Sailors that spent a long time at sea, and they took full advantage of every thing the city had to offer. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.German Naval Officer Serves Aboard Hu City USS Hu City (CG 66) Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) has some extra help in operational planning and coalition teambuilding, while currently on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, thanks to a German exchange officer serving aboard. German Naval Officer Lt. Florian Gocht checked aboard Hu City last September as part of a two-year personnel exchange program (PEP) between the German and U.S. Navies, where U.S. personnel will serve on German ships and com mand staffs and Germans will serve on U.S. naval platforms. Since his arrival, Gocht has steadily integrated into the Hu City crew. At first I was wor ried that I would not be accepted, but it was the total opposite. I was treated not only like part of the crew but part of the fam ily, said Gocht. Gochts main job is to compile operational briefs for the daily brief ings with Hu City lead ership. In addition, he manages the short term and long term opera tional schedule, ensuring the ships routine flows smoothly. A deep relationship has formed between the crew and Gocht. Gocht works diligently to train junior officers, consistently devoting his attention to others in order to keep Hu Citys operations running smoothly. Flo keeps the depart ment running, said Lt. Cmdr. Jynelle McCoy, Hu City operations officer. He is definitely having a positive impact on the department. Gocht is one of three officers serving in the German navys PEP program. The other two officers participat ing are serving in the Netherlands and Great Britain, respectively. Gocht takes pride in representing his country and his navy. I was ecstatic when I found out I was being given the opportunity to serve as a German officer with the U.S. Navy, said Gocht. To summarize his experience thus far, Gocht uses the word wunderbar which means something exceptionally good, and to the crew of Hu City, Gocht himself embodies the definition of that term. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MCSN Darien G. KenneyGerman Officer Lt. Florian Gocht, right, and Quartermaster Seaman Nicholas Frank plot coordinates during a replenishment-at-sea aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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USS Vicksburg Welcomes Newest ChiefsEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsNew chief petty officers were pinned in a ceremony aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) Sept. 14. The chief petty officer induction process, which began six weeks ago for selectees, was meant to train the new chiefs in preparation for their new tier of leadership. You have great er responsibility {as a chief}, said Chief Operations Specialist (SW) Luis Sandoval, who was pinned during the ceremony. Theres no more running to the chief for answers, you are the chief. A benefit is that you have the whole chiefs mess backing you up and helping you. The pinning ceremo ny marks the end of the induction process and represents a new begin ning through a proud naval tradition. As chiefs we are now proud upholders of tradition, said Chief Information Systems Technician (SW/EXW) Michael Burns, who was pinned during the cer emony. We are the only branch of service that has a rank like chief. I think it builds camaraderie between us that the other branches dont get to experience. Becoming a chief can be a long and difficult journey, but there is a reason it isnt easy. {Induction} reminds you where you came from and doesnt let you forget how you got to where you are, said Chief Damage Controlman (SW/AW) Gary Lee, another of Vicksburgs newly-pinned chiefs. Ultimately its the Sailors that got us where we are. They are they ones who built us up and helped us become good leaders. The Sailors that have helped the new chiefs get to where they are now have the benefit of being helped by the new chiefs as they assume greater leadership roles. We have a new role, we have to be more involved, said Chief Fire Controlman (SW) Lawrence Evans, who was also pinned during the ceremony. We have to know more about administration and know the Navy instruc tions, said Evans. Its not just that though, you have to be involved with Sailors lives personally and professionally. That could be the most important thing of all. Sailors depend on you. Vicksburg is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsi bility conducting mari time security operations, theater security coop eration efforts and sup port missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottBoatswain's Mate 2nd Class Jeremy Anthony stands watch on the bridge aboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottSailors participate in a fresh-water wash down aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). U.S. Navy Sailors practice pipe-patching techniques during a general quarters exercise aboard guidedmissile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95). James E. Williams is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by MC3 Randy J. Savarese -Photo by MC3 Daniel MeshelU.S. Navy Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon 12-3-1 fast rope to the flight deck of USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and post security posi tions during a helicopter visit, board, search and seizure training exercise. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 11

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Jax Jaguars Shake Hands, Give Out Tickets To Mayport control centers, and yes, even armored carrier and helicopters, those enthusiastic men and women, yet to be born when Neil walked on the moon, were mesmerized by his presence. In a typical Neil fashion, he would always walk in, introduce him self as if they didnt know who he was, and hed always give them a Hi, how are you guys doing. Asked one overwhelmed, inquisitive Marine, Mr. Armstrong, why are you here? Neils thought ful and sincerely honest reply was, Because you are here. Addressing Armstrong, a visibly emotional Cernan added, Its now for you a new beginning, but for us, I promise you, it is not the end. Farewell, my friend. Armstrong flew nearly 80 missions during the Korean War. During one such flight, the right wing of Armstongs plane was clipped by a cable wire over North Korea. He managed to fly into friendly territory before parachuting to safety. After being honor ably discharged from the Navy, Armstrong joined NASA as part of its sec ond group of astronauts. He then went on to com mand the Apollo 11 mis sion that saw him walk on the moon in July of 1969. After the mission was successfully com pleted, Armstrong and his crew landed in the Pacific Ocean where they were picked up by Sailors. Returning to the water meant his mission was complete, said Lovell, Armstrongs friend and fellow astronaut, in an interview with USA Today. Hes a Navy man, said Lovell. Its how he knew he was finished. Its how he knew his work was done. Armstrong was buried at sea with the help of Naval Station Mayportbased USS Philippine Sea.From Page1Armstrong-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyGabbert, along with a few teammates, autograph a memorabilia for Sailors on board the Ticonderoga-class guid ed missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) at Naval Station Mayport. C.J. Mosley, defensive lineman for the Jacksonville Jaguars, autographs team memorabilia for Sailors on board the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by Paige GnannMaster-at Arms 3rd Class Stephanie Ferrara gets a picture an autographed poster from Jacksonville Jaguars Quarterback Blaine Gabbert during a visit to Naval Station Mayport last week. Blaine Gabbert, quarterback for the Jacksonville Jaguars shakes a Sailors hand and thanks him for his service as his teammates autograph memorabilia for Sailors on board the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) at Naval Station Mayport. Players and cheerleaders for the Jacksonville Jaguars visited Sailors to show their appreciation to the military for their service and pass out free tickets to their upcoming game. USO Mayport is currently selling tickets for the Jags/Bengals game on Sept. 30. Tickets are $15 cash and available to all active duty, family members, reservists, retirees, veterans and DoD employees. For more information, call the center at 246-3481. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 28: One Night in Mexico. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a fiesta! Well have a taco and nacho bar, mock-aritas, jalapeo eating contest, Spanish music and much more. 246-0347 MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 22: Kennedy Space Center Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. Cost $20. Sign up deadline Sept. 18. Sept. 23: Laser Tag. 7-9 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free. Sept. 26: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 27: Liberty Bash 4-7:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free food, DJ, Laser Tag, games, rock wall, t-shirts and more! FREE Sept. 28: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Sept. 30: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Cincinnati Bengals. Van departs 2 p.m. Cost $10. LIBERTY Serving Those Who Serve Our Country.Catholic Charities USAA CFC participant. Provided as a public service.1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 13

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Relationship Counseling Available At FFSCFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 24, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 24-27, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Sept. 26, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Saturday, Sept. 22 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an adventur ous hike to discover the islands wondrous wild flowers. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Come out and join River Region Human Services and Gateway Community Services for the annual Recovery Walk. September marks the 23rd annual obser vance of National Recovery Month (Recovery Month). The walk takes place at 8 a.m., River Region, 390 Park St., Jacksonville, Florida 32206, and ends at the Landing. Contact Kenneth Arnold at (904) 899-6300, ext. 4444, or KArnold@rrhs.org for more details.Visit our Strength through Recovery Facebook page at: www.facebook.com/ StrengththroughRecovery Thursday, Sept. 27 The Duval County Extension Offices/ UF IFAS will be offer ing a workshop on Fall Gardening at the Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Road, Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The cost is $5 for mate rials and light snacks. Payment can be made at the door. Topics covered will be Fall Gardening and Landscape Tips, Planting Wildflowers and Misconceptions about Trees. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Saturday, Sept. 29 The Duval County Extension Office and the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs District IV will be hosting the 2012 GardenFest at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N McDuff Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 9-2 p.m. The cost is $10 without lunch or $15 with lunch. Drinks will be provided. To reg ister, call Rachel Wilson at 904-272-4252 or pick up a registration form at the extension office. The deadline to register is Sept. 24. Speakers are Terry DelValle, Options for Managing Pests, Jim DeValerio, Vegetable Gardening Gold Nuggets, Larry Figart, Money does grow on Trees, and Joe Stewards, Water: Waste Not, Want Not. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. The pro gram will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reser vations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Oct. 20 Crafters Wanted! Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach will host its annual Craft Fair and Fall Festival on from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. To reserve your booth, please con tact the church office today at 249-5370. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Raising The Ensign -Photo by Paul FarleyA Sailor raises the national ensign as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guidedmissile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) arrives for a scheduled port visit. Halyburton is homeported in Mayport, Fla. and is on a scheduled deployment operating in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. USS Farragut Departs Germany, Arrives In FranceUSS Farragut Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) arrived in La Rochelle, France, for a port visit, Sept. 7. During the visit, Farragut Sailors will have a busy schedule including participating in sporting events against local teams, conducting a community service project, and experiencing the local cul ture. Farraguts visit to La Rochelle comes after its visit to Wilhelmshaven, Germany, during which Farragut Sailors competed in sporting events with German sailors, toured historical monuments and enjoyed the local culture. I was incredibly happy with our visit to Wilhelmshaven, said Cmdr. Glen B. Quast, commanding officer of Farragut. Germany and the U.S. share a joint set of goals and priorities, and I am confi dent that we will achieve these together as we continue combined operations around the world. Farragut also hosted tours of the ship for local military representatives and civilians, giving Wilhelmshaven resi dents the opportunity to explore the ship as Farragut Sailors explained shipboard life and the U.S. Navy in general. Farragut is on a scheduled deploy ment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility.Household Goods Goes SocialFrom NAVSUPNAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS) Household Goods (HHG) services initiated social media campaign to reach out to customers and further reduce confusion and make a household move easier on families. HHG is now employing the public web, YouTube and Facebook to unrav el some of remaining mystery associ ated with moving, shipping and storing household goods. Our number one goal is easing the whole moving process for families moving across the country or around the world, said Deborah McGlennon, pro gram manager, Household Goods and Global Distance Support Center in San Diego. Were choosing new mediums to reach out and social media will help us reach our audiences with a message that we know how hard a move is, and heres how we can be there to help you. We believe our web presence, plus YouTube and Facebook Fan Page will provide relevant and interesting infor mation to NAVY service members and civilians initiating a household goods move. In addition, the YouTube Channel provides customers with instructions to set up their household goods move using the Defense Personal Property System (DPS), McGlennon said. The idea is to use YouTube as a source for education. According to McGlennon, even as the process incorporated www. move.mil and the Defense Personal Property System (DPS), the process can still be a bit daunting. The YouTube and FaceBook sites are designed to ease families into the move.mil and DPS process. It will be like pre-learning designed to familiarize families with how these systems operate and integrate, McGlennon said. You can subscribe now to the HHG YouTube Channel at http://www.you tube.com/user/NavyHHG and for tips, updates and additional informa tion, make sure to like our Facebook Fan Page at http://www.facebook. com/pages/NAVY-HouseholdGoods/294799990565426. In addition, the Navy Household Goods webpage also provides customers with informa tion on getting started with their move, entitlements and contact information. Check us out at https://www.navsup. navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/navsupgls/ prod_serv/household. McGlennon said, We value your feedback and suggestions on how we can further help you to have a successful move. Finally, In addition to leaving comments on our social media pages, you can email them at householdgoods@ navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 15

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Ft. Worth Departs Mayport For CommissioningFrom Program Executive Office for Littoral Combat Ships Public AffairsThe Navys newest Littoral Combat Ship, USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), sailed away from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Sep. 13, beginning the final leg of its maiden voyage to its commissioning site in Galveston, Texas. Fort Worth is the third LCS delivered to the Navy the second of the steel, semi-planing monohull Freedom variant and will be commissioned Sept. 22. During a two-week stay in Mayport, the ship underwent a scheduled preventive maintenance availability and con ducted initial Combat Support Systems Onboard Testing and TRS-3D RADAR Electronic Target Generator Testing in support of the Combat System Ship Qualification Test that will take place later this year after the ship arrives in its home port of San Diego, Calif. The ship departed the Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis., Aug. 6, sailing through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, before eventually mak ing her way down the East Coast of the United States. The trip through the Seaway was particu larly complex, as the ship transited 11 narrow locks that were, in many cases, only a few feet wider than the ship itself a feat few Navy vessels ever get the opportunity to experi ence. Fort Worth complet ed a challenging transit, and Im impressed with how well she handled, said Rear Adm. James Murdoch, Program Executive Officer for Littoral Combat Ships. Both the ship and crew performed superbly. LCS 3 has incorporat ed a number of design changes based on lessons learned from the first ship of class, USS Freedom (LCS 1). These changes are now part of the base line design and will be incorporated into future ships of the class prior to construction. LCS is a high-speed, agile, shal low-draft, focused-mis sion surface combatant designed for operation in near-shore environ ments yet fully capable of open-ocean operation. Fort Worth is designed to defeat asymmetric antiaccess threats such as mines, quiet diesel sub marines and fast surface craft. The 387-foot Fort Worth will be outfit ted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages, which can be changed quickly, and focus on three mission areas: mine countermea sures, surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare. In addition to the three focused warfare missions it will conduct, the Littoral Combat Ships inherent capabilities and suitabil ity to conduct lower-end missions will free up our more expensive, multimission cruisers and destroyers to conduct higher-end missions. The Lockheed Martin team now has Milwaukee (LCS 5), Detroit (LCS 7), Little Rock (LCS 9), and Sioux City (LCS 11) under construction in Marinette. Austal USA is construct ing Independencevariant ships Coronado (LCS 4), Jackson (LCS 6), Montgomery (LCS 8), Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and Omaha (LCS 12) at the companys shipyard in Mobile, Ala. -Photo courtesy of Lockheed MartinThe littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Fort Worth (LCS 3) departs Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis. Fort Worth is scheduled to be commissioned Sept. 22 in Galveston, Texas. Deploying Soldiers Test New Female Body Armor PrototypeAmerican Forces Press ServiceFemale soldiers at Fort Campbell, Ky., preparing for an upcoming deploy ment to Afghanistan are getting a chance to weigh in on the latest innova tion in personal protective equipment: body armor designed specifically to fit them. Any woman who has deployed to the combat zone can tell you whats wrong with wearing the improved outer tactical vest military-speak for body armor its designed for a mans body. Women were having a real problem with the fit of the IOTV, said Lynn Hennessey, lead designer for the female body armor prototype being tested at Fort Campbell. The size extra-small was too large for 85 percent of the females, so they werent getting a good fit. It was too loose and too long. That left vulnerabilities where the body armor left gaps, particularly under the arms. But it also made the vests uncomfortable enough to affect per formance, Hennessey explained. In some cases, women were reporting bruis ing on their hip bones because the side plates dragged down to their hips, she said. And when they were sitting down, it was riding up to their chins, because the torso was so long. This kind of feed back, both anecdotal and through a formal process of surveys and focus groups, led the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center here to launch a program to design female-specific body armor. The program kicked off in January 2011, with prototypes now undergoing testing by members of the 101st Airborne Divisions 1st Brigade Combat Team. To design the new vests, the design team studied anthropometric data a series of measurements to reflect the size and shape of female soldiers bodies, with a particular focus on the bust, torso length and shoulders. Females are not small males, said Beverly Kimball, project engi neer for female Army aviation combat uniforms also being developed at Natick. We have specific proportions that require designs for fit and func tion for uniforms as well as equipment. The Natick team came up with eight differ ent sizes of female body armor, in two different lengths, to accommodate the force. Although the vests use the same protective plates as the gener ic body armor, the side plates are slightly scaled down to fit the new con tours. During the initial fit tests, 120 female soldiers at Fort Campbell, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.; Fort Benning, Ga.; and an Army Reserve Center in Milford, Mass., gave the prototypes a resounding thumbs-up. Of the 100 secondgeneration female body armor prototypes, 19 were issued to Fort Campbell soldiers in mid-August. Soldiers who participated in the test are assigned to a female engagement team that will interact closely with the Afghan population, particularly women, when they deploy later this year. The plan, Hennessey explained, was to let the soldiers get accustomed to wearing the new body armor and then to train in it for about five weeks. This week, they are wrapping up a human factors evaluation that includes such things as weapons firing and climbing in and out of vehicles all of the things the soldiers are likely to do in combat. The project team will assess the feedback to determine if the female body armor is ready for fielding throughout the Army. Army officials hope to produce 3,000 of the new vests and to field them to an Army brigade to be selected next year as a major step. This is a project that will have a direct impact on the soldiers who wear this, Hennessey said. It will make them a lot more comfortable but even more important, safer and more effective. -Photo SubmittedSpecialist Gilliann Campbell, a Female Engagement team Soldier with 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, is strapped into her protoype Generation III Improved Outer Tactical Vest with help from PM Soldier Protective Equipment Project Engineer Deana Archambault. Campbell is one of 19 female Soldiers from the 101st to participate in the fielding of this vest designed specifically for the needs of Army women. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Are You Ready To Receive Notifications In Emergency Or Base ClosureFrom CNIC Are you ready to be notified in the event of an emergency or base closure? A quick and easy sign up to the Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system could save you in more ways than you can imagine. Deployed by the Navy in 2008, the WAAN system provides Navy Installations (worldwide) with an effec tive and reliable mass notification sys tem that can be used during a crisis to warn and direct affected personnel. As a civilian employee, I thought that my home phone or cell phone num bers were none of my commands busi ness. And certainly they didnt need to know my kids personal information, says Marcher Castell, CIV CNIC HQ. Of course, that meant that they couldnt call me to tell me to evacuate, or include my children in the evacuation count. Heck, they couldnt even call me to tell me something simple like the power being out in my building and not to drive all the way in to the office. All military (active duty and Reserve), civil service, and contractor personnel with an NMCI or One Net user account are required to register their office email address and phone number, at mini mum, in the WAAN. Registering personal emergency contact information also is strongly encouraged. As Marcher discovered, the Navy cant alert you, if it cannot find you. Registration is not automatic, but by providing your personal contact information, you take advantage of the following benefits: and empowers you to react in times of crisis. alerts provide information to you and your family on what to do and where to go in an emergency. about base closures due to weather or an emergency, before you show up. fied when it is clear/safe to return to the installation. Rest assured; your personal informa tion is safeguarded. How to Register NMCI/One Net usersRight-click on the Purple Globe icon (bottom right corner on desktop). Select Access Self Service. Select the My Info tab and update your Last Name, First Name, and Display Name and save. Select the Devices tab and enter your work and personal contact infor mation in the appropriate mandatory and optional device fields. SAVE. Update your profile any time you have a change. If needed, use a Workaroundto Register If you have trouble with registering through the Purple Globe, try the work around for your region. Links can be found under Mass Notification>Wide Area Alert Notification System on the Ready Navy website at www.ready.navy. mil. Click on (or copy and paste into your browsers address bar) the link for the workaround below for your region. Southeast Region: https://waansecdap01. nmci.navy.mil/corp/atlaunch. asp?opt=uid&nextUrl=https://waans ecdap01.nmci.navy.mil/SelfService/ Entry.aspx?uid=%5bUID%5d For questions about the WAAN or support, contact the CNIC Support Center at 888-264-4255, DSN 942-6597 or http:// www.cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/sup portcenter/index.htm. Be Ready Navy! I am. Are You? Navys 2nd Joint High-Speed Vessel ChristenedMilitary Sealift Command Public AffairsUSNS Choctaw County (JHSV 2), the second of the Navys new joint highspeed vessels (JHSV) designed for rapid intratheater transport of troops and military equipment, was christened, Sept. 15, during a ceremony at Austal USA in Mobile, Ala. Military Sealift Command (MSC) will own and operate Choctaw County and the other JHSVs, that are under contract to be built for the Navy. Choctaw County will have a crew of 21 civil service mariners working for MSC who will operate, navigate and maintain the ship. The ships perfor mance will be matched by the unique qualities of her crew 21 civil ser vice mariners commit ted to freedom, democ racy and compassion, said Rear Adm. Brian LaRoche, deputy com mander, Military Sealift Command, during his address to an audi ence of more than 700 people including lead ers from the military ser vices, Congress and the maritime industry. The impressive ship awaiting the crack of the cham pagne bottle will help safeguard those ideals. Choctaw County will carry the Military Sealift Command funnel stripes and the strength of the U.S. military anywhere America needs it. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was the cer emonys principal speak er. The ship is named for three counties in America, located in Mississippi, Alabama and Oklahoma, which share the name Choctaw County. Twenty-nine women from the 1966 graduat ing class of Ackerman High School in Ackerman, Miss., served as the ships sponsors. Lead sponsor, Theresa Gilliam Pitts, a retired teacher, broke the traditional bottle of champagne across the bow to formally christen the ship while she and the other sponsors present said in unison, For the United States of America, we christen thee USNS Choctaw County. May God bless this ship and all who sail in her. The 338-foot-long alu minum catamarans are designed to be fast, flex ible and maneuverable, even in shallow waters, making them ideal for transporting troops and equipment quickly within a theater of operations. The 20,000-square-foot mission bay area aboard JHSVs can be reconfig ured to quickly adapt to whatever mission the ship is tasked with, such as carrying container ized portable hospitals to support disaster relief or transporting tanks and troops. This ship class fits perfectly with the new concept of forward-bas ing, said civilian Capt. Jose Delfaus, Choctaw Countys civil service master who has been sailing for MSC for 31 years. The goal of forwardbasing is to cut back on the number of overseas bases by equipping more forward-deployed ships with troops and gear. JHSVs can join up with these ships and help them essentially by being their delivery truck, delivering anything they need from troops and gear, to provi sions or cargo, Delfaus said. JHSVs are capable of transporting 600 tons of military troops, vehicles, supplies and equipment 1,200 nautical miles at a high average speed of 35 knots and can operate in shallow-draft, austere ports and waterways, providing U.S. forces added mobility and flexibility. The JHSVs aviation flight decks can support day and night flight oper ations. Each JHSV also has sleeping accommodations for up to 146 personnel and airline-style seat ing for up to 312. One of the things Delfaus said he is most looking forward to in his role as master of the second JHSV is the new technology. The JHSV bridge functions more like a 747-cockpit than a tradi tional ships bridge. The design is for the officer to operate the entire ship from a chair. Everything you need to move the ship is available through an elaborate control panel. The navigation team also sits in the bridge, as does the engineering consul. Its a very unique set-up the rows of people make it look a bit like Star Trek. Following acceptance trials, delivery to the Navy and operational testing, Choctaw County will operate out of Little Creek, Va., and is expect ed to begin conducting missions for the Navy in the first quarter of fiscal year 2014. The Navys current contract with Austal is for the construction of 10 JHSVs, one of which is yet-to-be awarded construction options. As MSC assets, all of the JHSVs will be civilian-crewed. The first four of the 10 currently under con tract including Choctaw County and USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) will be crewed by feder ally employed civil service mariners, while the next six are slated to be crewed by civilian mariners working for private companies under contract to MSC. -Photo by MCC Sam ShaversTheresa Gilliam Pitts, Sponsor of the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) 2, USNS Choctaw County, breaks a bot tle of champagne during the christening at the Austal Shipyard. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus named the ship after three U.S. counties located in Mississippi, Alabama and Oklahoma; places he said demonstrate core American values of hard work, putting family first, and community service. Money App Puts Finances In HandAmerican Forces Press ServiceFinancial planners often talk about being smart when it comes to your finances where, when and how to save, spend, and invest your money and how to man age your credit. The ins and outs of getting and staying in good financial shape can feel like a full-time job. From buying a house to researching tax breaks to asking about lower inter est rates on credit cards or auto insurance, get ting smart about finances takes effort. That endeavor can be made easier, however, with a free website and app created especially for military members by the Better Business Bureau and McGraw Hill Companies. The consumer advocacy groups mili tary division teamed up with the global financial information company to create militaryandmoney. com and its smartphone app, which is available for the iPhone and iPad. There will also soon be an Android version available, Brenda Linnington, director of the BBB Military Line, told me today. Linnington, wife of Army Gen. Mike Linnington, who com mands the Military District of Washington, creates curriculum for the Military Lines personal finance workshops, which are given at military bases around the coun try as part of the Defense Department and services financial readiness out reach. BBBs Military Line also is a partner in the Kipplinger/BBB Financial Field Manual. Linnington replaced Holly Petraeus last year as MilitaryLines direc tor when Petraeus was appointed to head the military division of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Both have worked to ease per sonal finance for service members and their fami lies. We dont want it be laborious kind of thing, Linnington said of the website and app. They can just plug in their numbers, so they have their personal financial situation in palm of their hands. The digital aids came about after the bureau and McGraw Hill sepa rately pledged to help Joining Forces, the campaign First Lady Michelle Obama and Second Lady Jill Biden created last year to support military fami lies, Linnington said. The campaign fostered the partnership, merging the bureaus military finan cial acumen with McGraw Hills global financial reach. The website and app provide basic training in personal finance with video instructions on budgeting and managing credit. They also offer an action center with a calculator for entering your own financial informa tion to help with build ing savings you can set a reminder for regular installments and reducing debt. The great thing about the app is its very userfriendly, and it puts that persons financial situa tion in the palm of their hands, Linnington said They can have it with them wherever they go. The website and app can help families through the financial shift of deployments and how to ease the burden when combat and hazard pay go away, she noted. That reunion period, as wonderful as it is, especially during the honey moon period, also is full of a lot of stressors, she said. Add in the changes to your financial situa tion now you have less income, your children are getting older, and becoming more expensive that can cause more stress on an already stressful situ ation. The website and app are tailored to enlisted members at the E6 level and below, Linnington said, because that is who the bureau found needs it most. Most complaints of financial problems from service members come from the E5 and E6 level, she said. Unlike junior service members, they most in their mid-20s are beginning to develop credit and make enough money to pay off debt and save. And they are starting families. They have more money than they had before, but they also have more expenses and theyre getting into larger purchases, she said. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 20, 2012 17

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