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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00267


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com 2012 Holiday Season Mailing Dates ReleasedFrom Naval Supply Systems Command Corporate CommunicationsThe Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25, delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were announced Sept. 5. The dates are as follows: Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962-966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov 26 *Parcel Post: Nov. 13 Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 *Express mail Military Service: N/A *First-Class Letters/Cards/Priority Mail: Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 1 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) *Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 *First-Class Mail (Letters/cards, priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceed ing 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of post age for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size lim its are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottCartoonist Sam Viviano, art director for MAD Magazine, draws for Sailors during a USO event aboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) hosted a group of nation ally-renowned cartoonists during a USO-sponsored visit to the cruiser Aug. 30. The cartoonists includ ed Jeff Keane, creator and illustrator of The Family Circus, Rick Kirkman, creator and illustrator of Baby Blues, Dave Coverly, creator and illustrator of Speed Bump and Sam Viviano, art director for MAD Magazine. The visit marked the second USO-sponsored tour to come to Vicksburg and included several hours where the visiting artists were able to inter act with Sailors and even create personal drawings of their characters as well as caricatures of some of the servicemembers. It was really cool that they came aboard, said Operations Specialist Seaman Jose E. Rosas. I was very excited to meet all of them, Mr. Viviano in particular. As an art ist myself, I really respect what these artists do and I hope one day I can make a living on my art as well. The cartoonists set up shop on the Vicksburgs mess decks and drew for Sailors until their depar ture. I got a personal ized drawing from Rick Kirkman, said Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class (SW) Eric C. Askea. Chiefs Run For Those Who Cant Cartoonists Visit Vicksburg -Photo by MC2 Jacob SippelNavy Region Southeast chief selectees participate in the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) 8k Run at the Jacksonville Landing. WWP is a non-profit organization that works to raise awareness and enlist the public's aid for the needs of severely injured service men and women, to help severely injured service members aid and assist each other, and to provide unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. See Mail, Page 3 See Vicksburg, Page 8

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Navy service members and their families have FREE, unlimited access to online tutoring and career help from Tutor. com. Expert tutors help students of all agesfrom K-12 to college to adult learnersone-to-one in math, science, social studies and English, as well as with test prep and college coursework. Check out information on career transitions, includ ing resume writing and interview preparation. One-to-One help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can now get help on the go by using the Tutor.com To Go app! Tutor.com offers help with homework, study ing, and test preparation in more than 16 subjects from elementary math to physics. All students worldwide can use the program, regardless of where they attend school. This is especially ben eficial for military-depen dent students trying to keep up with schoolwork when moving or changing schools. Whenever a student or adult needs help, he will just enter the question and will be connected to a tutor in an interactive online classroom which features an interactive whiteboard, file sharing, and instant messaging. The student will work one-to-one in math, sci ence, social studies, and English until the problem is solved. There is also access to the ProofPoint Writing Center. Here students can get real-time help with reports, essays, and papers. Tutors explain the writing and proof reading process. Later they will help with edits. Currently Tutor.com has more than 2,000 tutors. Each of them has been screened, cer tified and backgroundchecked. These tutors are experts in the subject they tutor. All sessions are anonymous, and no personal information is shared between tutor and student. Additionally all sessions are recorded and reviewed for quality con trol. This program is pro vided by the Department of Defense. Authorized patrons include U.S. active duty military ser vice members, U.S. military reservists, U.S. National Guard personnel on active duty in a deployed status, and DoD civilians in a deployed status, and their depen dents. You can check out a complete list of who is eligible to access the pro gram by going to www. tutor.com/military/eligi bility. To access the program, login to Navy Knowledge Online account and click on the REFERENCE tab. Look for the Tutor. com box in the right col umn, and click on the links Kids and Teens or Adults to get a tutor. Authorized users will then follow instructions on the Web site for password and login information. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Need Easy, Free Access To Tutoring?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingI talk too much. Countless thoughts are spawned in the fer tile recesses of my mind, and are only given a few moments of incubation time before I give in to the irresistible impulse to birth them into the world in the form of unsolicited speech. The poor people who happen to be with in earshot of me tend to get that glazed-over look in their eye, the tell-tale sign that they are bored, praying for the end of the story, trying to find a point, or just simply thinking, She never shuts up. Recently, I decided to channel my thoughts into something worthwhile and less annoying, so I took up writing and dove into my new hobby with vim and vigor. However, my excite ment quickly turned to self-doubt when I real ized who wants to read the mundane rants of a middle-aged military spouse? Surprisingly, the clutter of my mind parted like the Red Sea to reveal the answer: My mundane middle-aged military life is exactly what thousands (well maybe a couple hundred) of readers want to know about. I mean, who doesnt wonder, what specifically is middle age? Are we there yet? Is there any way to turn around and go back? We throw the term middle age around like so many other vague phrases common in daily vernacular, without really understanding what the words really mean. The definition of middle age is definitely debatable some believe that statisti cal life-expectancy charts dictate that one is middle aged when one is between 40 and 60 years old. But this view is almost univer sally met with resistance . What? Im not middle aged! Such non-believers opine that they are only as old as they look, act or feel. But if this vague standard was the basis for determining middle age, I would bet my pric ey wrinkle cream that the only people who would admit to being middle age would be standing in the early bird line on senior citizens night at the local Country Buffet, likely wearing pants well above their waistlines and orthopedic shoes, and definitely planning on getting seconds of the tapioca. What are we so afraid of? For many of us, mid dle age represents the real meat and potatoes of life, when selfish interests are put on hold for hard work in the form of home buying, bill paying, child rearing, taxes, the struggle to ward off the physical effects of aging, and the battle to keep marriages intact through it all. Gone are the days of carefree self-discovery and unbri dled fun-seeking its time to get serious and figure out what the hell we are doing before we screw things up. Middle age probably plays the most significant role in determining our long-term happiness. It is during this time that mar riages are either cement ed or broken, we face the decision to stay in our get out of the military, our children are forming their personalities (or crimi nal tendencies), and we either become comfort able with ourselves or we experience the proverbial mid-life crisis. How on earth are we supposed to perform this tight rope act without falling into a deep dark abyss? Truthfully, I have no clue; however, I can not help but think that if we just sit back and relax, we might just enjoy the ride. Why spend our sub stantive years pathetically fighting what nature and instinct have dictated for us? Im not saying we should stop plucking our chin hairs and burn our extra supportive bras, I just think that the key to surviving middle age must be based at least partially on our will ingness to give in and embrace the natural pro gression of our lives with a fun-loving spirit and the ability to laugh at it all. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comAre We There Yet? Middle Age Is DebatableLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOne of the most difficult things to embrace in life is change. Most of us have a hard time adjusting to change even when it is something that is inevi table in our lives. Seemingly, military personnel would have an easier time adjusting to change because it is nor mal to transition from one duty station to another every two to three years. With the foreknowledge that change is inevitable some of us still struggle with change. As a reservist, I have the privilege of living in two worlds simultaneously. I am a Navy chaplain as well as a local church pas tor and there are times when I am confronted with change in both worlds. Just recently I was appointed to serve a church in a different dis trict in South Carolinas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. Upon learning that I would be appointed to serve another church, I had to begin making preparation for my move. As I began putting my check list together for the move, I started to reflect on all of the good times that I had encountered over the eight year period that I had been blessed to serve in my previous appointment. One could say that I was experi encing signs of grief as I attempted to embrace my new pastoral appoint ment. When the actual time came to transition, I did make the move from one area of the state of South Carolina to anoth er, although I was torn. I knew I had to leave and start anew but there was something within me that was also causing me to resist the change. What was it that I sought to hold onto? In retrospect, I firmly feel that it was those solid relationships that I had established over that eight year period. I also believe that I was attempting to hold onto the familiar. Realistically speaking, I had become comfortable. Still, it was time for me to make the move and I finally embraced it. Since moving from one pastoral appointment to another, I am able to see that there was nothing wrong with having the struggles I had prior to the actual move. As Sailors and their families prepare to transi tion from one duty station to the next or from active duty to civilian life or reserve duty, it is safe to say that you will encoun ter comparable experi ences to the ones I expe rienced. When this occurs, remember that you are not alone. There are oth ers who have already gone through what you are going through and are willing to assist you with your transition. Also remember that you can go to God in earnest prayer and God will give you the strength and encourage ment to deal with your transition. Change is never easy but it can be dealt with in a positive way. As we all know, change is inevita ble so the best approach any of us can take when faced with transitions is to be positive and trust God.Transition 101: Remember You Are Not AloneChap. Anthony Hodge Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHelp Clean Up Mayport BeachFrom Mayport EnvironmentalNaval Station Mayport is one of the official cleanup sites for the 2012 International Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 15. Volunteers are needed to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport. Participants should plan to meet at 8 a.m. at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 10 a.m. Volunteers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. Pre-registration is not required. Gloves and gar bage bags will be provid ed. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. Catholic Charities USA1-800-919-9338 www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Navy Joins Nation In Honoring 2012 Hispanic American Heritage Month Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy joins the nation Sept. 15 in cel ebrating Hispanic Heritage Month, which will be observed through Oct. 15. With a nation al theme of Diversity United, Building Americas Future Today, the observance celebrates the histories, cultures and contribu tions of Americans who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. According to 2010 data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanics com prise 16.3 percent of the total United States population, or 50.5 mil lion people, forming our countys largest racial or ethnic minority. Additionally, it is project ed that by 2050, a quarter of the nations workforce will be Hispanic. The Navys workforce reflects this diversity today, omore than 58,000 Hispanic active duty and Reserve Sailors and offi cers and nearly 15,000 Hispanic civilians serve in the Navy Total Force, including four Hispanic flag officers and 172 Hispanic master chiefs. In his 2011 National Hispanic Heritage Month Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama noted, The future of America is inextricably linked to the future of our Hispanic community. Our country thrives on the diversity and ingenuity of all our people, and our ability to out innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world will depend greatly on the success of Hispanics. All commands are encouraged to expand their awareness of Hispanic American Heritage Month through programs, exhibits, pub lications, and participa tion in military and com munity events. Resources for use in planning com mand heritage events including a video pre sentation about Hispanic American Heritage Month can be found online at the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion obser vances web page, http:// www.public.navy.mil/ BUPERS-NPC/SUPPORT/ DIVERSITY/Pages/ DiversityObservances. aspx. Commands are also encouraged to support the sea services affin ity group, the Association of Naval Service Officers (ANSO). ANSO aims to foster personal growth and professional development through mentor ships and networking for officers, enlisted mem bers and civilians. More information on ANSO can be found online at http:// www.ansomil.org/ For more information about the history of Hispanics in the Navy, visit http://www.history. navy.mil/special%20high lights/hispanic/hispanicindex.htm. For more information and resources on Hispanics in the military and Hispanic American Heritage Month, visit http://www.deomi.org/ SpecialObservance/. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity combined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is also recommended that customers check with their local civilian or mili tary post office for infor mation on size restric tions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Additionally, cus tomers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items can not be mailed. Examples are: switch blade knives, pornog raphy, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, custom ers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alco hol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. The NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission--to deliver sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warfighter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfo lio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply opera tions, conventional ord nance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, secu rity assistance, and quality of life issues for the naval forces.From Page1Mail THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Damage Controlman 2nd Class Juan Garcia helps his teammate, Hull Technician Fireman Justin Kendell of USS The Sullivans dress out in CBR gear during the CBR Dressout event as his shipmates yell words of encouragement. A Sailor from USS Samuel B. Roberts quickly connects a hose as his team works on the P-100 pump, one of several events held as part of the annual DC Olympics Sept. 5. Lt.j.g. Paul Ferro of USS Truxton locates fire sites using information from his team dur ing the Message Blank Relay. USS Simpson Team 1 dominates the tug-o-war competition, coming out as the winners against all the competitors, including the SWOS instructors. SWOS instructors check a stretcher for strap placement, tightness and other safety concerns for USS Simpson Team 1 during the Oscar Relay event. Overspray from a nearby hose cools down one of the competing teams as they work on the Quick Reaction event during the fifth annual DC Olympics.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 5 First attempt to secure a door in the top portion of the wet trainer doesnt work for the USS Gettysburg team. The team had to figure out how to secure the door at three critical points using just the wood planks.Fifth Annual DC OlympicsRoosevelt Shores Up WinFrom StaffNine Damage Control teams gathered Sept. 5 to compete in the fifth annu al Naval Station Mayport Damage Control (DC) Olympics held at the base Fire Fighting School. During the competition, teams participated in 10 events with individual event scores being added up to determine the over all winner. Events includ ed pipe patching, Oscar relay, damage control written test, quick reac tion team test, shoring, fire hose relay, CBR dress out, P-100 rigging, and a fire hose tug-o-war. This year, USS Roosevelts team took the title of overall win ner back to the ship after beating out two teams from USS Simpson, USS The Sullivans, USS Samuel B. Roberts, USS Gettysburg and returning three-time champion USS Carney. The DC Olympics was sponsored by Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site Mayport and Destroyer Squadron Fourteen (DESRON 14). -Photos by Paige GnannMembers of USS Roosevelts Damage Control Olympics team pose with the trophy after winning this years competition against eight other commands from around Naval Station Mayports basin and USS Truxton from NS Norfolk, Va. USS Roosevelt Sailor moves his water spray in hopes of hitting his target with directions provided by his team members. USS Gettysburg competes in the Quick Reaction event. The team placed third overall. USS Carney tries to patch pipes as water fills a room during the first of two events held in the wet trainer. USS Simpson Team 2 scrambles to untangle fire hoses during the Fire Hose Relay event. Team 2 also received the best Team Spirit award and came in second overall.

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Using Hanna Gate Access Is PrivilegeFrom NS Mayport SecurityAccessing Naval Station Mayport via Hanna Park is a privilege for base per sonnel afforded to us by the City of Jacksonville. Recently there have been some incidents involv ing Mayport personnel not adhering to the rules set forth for use of Hanna Park/Seminole Gate, which could result in loss of these privileges. To access the Seminole Gate, you must be an active duty military or government service employee and have a Mayport decal and a Hanna Park decal tab, which can be obtained from the Pass and Decal Office. All persons obtaining a decal shall read and sign the rules and regula tions regarding the use of Hanna Park for entrance to the naval station. The rules and regula tions are as follows: By applying for and accepting this permit and Hanna-Navy Commuter Decal, the user (Permit Holder) agrees to comply with the rules of Kathryn Abbey Hanna Park and the City of Jacksonville. Any violation could lead to an immediate and permanent loss of privi leges to enter or pass through Hanna Park for any purpose. Naval Station Mayport access and parking privileges may be revoked at the discretion of the Navy. Other penalties includ ing law enforcement by the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office may apply. The permit is only for pass through traffic dur ing specified commuter times when the Naval Station Mayport gate to Hanna Park is open by mutual agreement of the Navy and the City of Jacksonville. When using this permit, diversion into Hanna Park or stopping to access or use Hanna Park facilities is expressly pro hibited. All Hanna Park users must enter the front entrance of Hanna Park and pay the Park entry fee during approved Park entry hours and proce dures. When intending to use the park for purposes other than direct passthrough during commut er hours, Permit Holders must pay the park entre fee and display the receipt on the dashboard of the vehicle at all times while in Hanna Park or be sub ject to violation of the Commuter Access agree ment and subject to loss of privileges. Permit Holder agrees to ensure that all pas sengers in the vehicle are authorized to enter Naval Station Mayport and have to required identification. If access for any person is denied at the Navy Gate the vehicle must immediately and directly depart completely from City of Jacksonville, Hanna Park property. There is to be no stopping no waiting to place telephone calls, no waiting for another vehi cle to arrive, or otherwise no delay or diversion to departing immediately from Hanna Park. All Permit Holders must obey all traffic laws in Hanna Park or be subject to the loss of this permit, this is includes, but is not limited to the following : The maximum speed limit is 25 mph in Hanna Park. Vehicles must come to a complete stop at all stop signs. road rage, driving offroad, littering are prohib ited. entry gate and security personnel, drivers must slow down, dim vehicle headlights, and prepare to communicate with the guard and display proper identification. Vehicles must prepare to stop for the guard to verify authorization and direct the vehicle to enter. Vehicles with recreational equip ment such as surfboards, kayaks, bicycles, fish ing rods, or beach attire should be prepared to explain their intentions. Hanna Park annual pass es or submitting pre-pur chased early bird tickets, must stop and give their vehicle tag and descrip tion information for the security guard to write down. They must leave pass of ticket stubs on dashboard when parked inside Hanna Park. Permit Holders are responsible for any per sons using the vehicle to access Hanna Park and may be subject to pen alties even if the permit holder is not present in the vehicle. -Photo by Paige GnannA sign at the entrance to Hanna Park reminds Naval Station Mayport Hanna permit holders to proceed to the base and not to detour for recreational purposes. Master-atArms Seaman Zachary Duguay stands with a Hanna Park attendant to check vehicles for Hanna Park and Mayport vehicle pass decals.NEX To Sell Combined Federal Campaign CouponFrom NEXCOMNEX Mayport, Jacksonville and Kings Bay are now selling a Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) benefit coupon to customers for $5 for those individuals who wish to voluntarily donate. When purchased, the benefit coupon will entitle customers to spe cific percent-off discounts for a one-time purchase on either October 15 or 16. All donations made through the sale of the benefit coupon will go to the CFC General Fund as an undesignated dona tion. The benefit coupon entitles customers to 10 percent off merchandise storewide including the furniture store as well as the entire stock of fine jewelry. There are some exclusions including gift cards and prepaid cards, e-commerce, Autoport services & Exchange Catalog. The discount may not be applied to merchandise previ ously purchased, exist ing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alco holic beverages, elec tronics, cameras, com puters, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DvDs, CDs and conces sion departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic, Rolex and Omega watches, Maui Divers, Pandora and clearance jewelry. Customers will receive 20 percent off all apparel, shoes, watches and sun glasses and 30 percent off already reduced furniture with prices ending in $.94, $.96 and $.97. The maxi mum discount a customer can receive is $250 per coupon. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT.Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT. Fight deadly childhood diseases. www.stjude.org 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 7

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Ive always been a fan of Baby Blues. I hope we can more events like this. I had a great time. The USO provides this type of entertainment throughout the fleet and they attempt to find enter tainers that appeal to a large group of service members. We keep current on the demographic, said Jeremy Wilcox, a USO entertainment tour pro vider who accompa nied the visiting artists. Cartoonists are unique and popular and people want to meet the people behind the legendary comics. There is a lot of interaction {with Sailors} on this particular tour. In this case, you get quality over quantity. The Vicksburg crew experienced the quality of the artists work first hand and the artists themselves enjoyed meeting crew members from all walks of life. The best thing was meeting all the Sailors, said Jeff Keane, creator and illustrator of The Family Circus. I like coming to ships because I feel less rushed {than on a base} and I really get the time to know the {crew}. Vicksburg is on her final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom.From Page1VicksburgUSS Vicksburg Completes Bahrain Port VisitEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) departed Bahrain Aug. 24 following a regularlyscheduled port visit. The visit helped to con tinue U.S. 5th Fleet effort building global mari time partnerships with Middle Eastern nations and improving maritime safety and security in the region. It was good to have some much needed (rest and relaxation) after a lengthy underway, said Lt. Robert E. Danielson, operations officer aboard Vicksburg. The long underway was strenuous, but we are here to (com plete) a mission and that always comes first. Though Sailors still had to stand duty and per form regular maintenance while the ship was in port, they were also able to take advantage of the facilities at Naval Support Activity, Bahrain. There were a lot of uniform items I needed, so it was good to be close to a Navy Exchange again, said Operations Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Priestly J. Birks. In addition to hav ing access to the base, Sailors were able to take part in Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) tours such as go-cart rac ing, a beach barbeque at the Al Bander Resort, a fishing trip, a trip to the Lost Paradise Water Park and a trip to the Bahrain Dolphin Resort, complete with a chance to swim with dolphins. Apart from the MWRsponsored tours, there were many other activities to choose from, including sampling the wide vari ety of cuisine available in Bahrain. I spent most of my time using the internet and enjoying the local food, said Birks. Overall, it was nice to be back on land. Others used the port visit as an opportunity to dis play their athletic abilities. Sailors from Vicksburgs Deck department defeat ed a group of Vicksburg officers, including the ships commanding offi cer, in a basketball game 45-35. The officers played very well, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Jeremy Anthony who played on the Deck department team. We had a lot of fun. The com manding officer played well, the executive officer played well, but in the end, nobody beats Deck. This was Vicksburgs sec ond visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain this deploy ment. Vicksburg is on her final deployment, and is cur rently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photos by MC2 Nick ScottU.S. Navy chiefs grill hamburgers and hot dogs during a steel beach picnic aboard guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security coopera tion efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Electronics Technician 1st Class Matthew S. Harvey participates in a fresh water washdown aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). United Through Reading Connects Vicksburg FamiliesEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsSailors aboard guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) have been staying connected to their families through the ships United Through Reading program. United Through Reading is a non-profit public benefit organiza tion founded in 1989 with the purpose of uniting deployed service-mem bers with their families back home. Through the program, Sailors are able to video tape themselves reading books to their children and loved ones. The vid eos are then sent to the Sailors families to view. Kids will touch the screen and real ly feel closer to their {loved ones}, said Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Gregory L. Bosworth, coordinator of the ships United Through Reading program. I was in charge of the program on {USS Carney (DDG 64)}, so when they were looking for someone for Vicksburg, I jumped at the chance, said Bosworth. I participated on my last deployment and sent videos to my nieces and nephews, but now I am sending videos to my wife who is expect ing our first child while I am deployed. Most Sailors who par ticipate in the program take part more than once. I have recorded for my son at least five times, said Operations Specialist 3rd Class Derek J. Marsik. It helps me feel con nected to my family back home. {United Through Reading} helps me and my family stay in touch. Some Sailors aboard Vicksburg received proof of their children enjoy ing their United Through Reading videos. My wife has sent me photos of my kids watch ing the videos I send, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class (SW/ IDW) Mark D. Simpson. I have two girls and one boy and I make videos for all of them. I never new about it before I was on Vicksburg, but this program has made this deployment go so much more smoothly for me and my family. More than 30 Sailors take advantage of this program every month aboard Vicksburg. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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U.S. 4Th Fleet Welcomes Political Advisor To StaffU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) welcomed Lance Hegerle to the staff as the new Political Advisor (POLAD), September 7, at COMUSNAVSO/C4F Headquarters. Over the past 50 years, POLADs have played key roles as liaisons between the Department of State (DoS) and the Department of Defense (DoD) when it comes to interagency communications and collaboration. Political Advisors are well utilized by senior military commanders as they provide analysis and advice to the com mander on political perspectives and foreign policy positions on political-military issues and the potential employ ment of military forces. POLADs also engage with partner nations on matters of political interest and resolution of political-military issues impacting oper ations. As POLADs, we can provide the State Department viewpoints on international relations, as well as a wealth of down range Embassy knowledge to the com mander and staff, Hegerle said. We can quickly source information and reach out to interagency partners and embassy personnel. Along with providing a bridge for COMUSNAVSO/C4F and DOS, Hegerle brings regional experience to the staff. His last post was director of Narcotics Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Panama City, Panama, for three-and-a-half years where he helped develop Operation Martillo, a countering trans-national organized crime (C-TOC) mission, with partner nations and interagency organi zations, including the drug enforcement agency (DEA) and immigration and cus toms enforcement (ICE). Hegerle served as the political/ military advisor at the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala from October 2007 to January 2009, where he spent two weeks underway on the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) as the POLAD to the embarked admiral and staff supporting Southern Partnership Station in 2008. He also spent three years of embassy service in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the extreme corner of COMUSNAVSO/C4Fs area of responsi bility. I am very pleased to have Lance join the NAVSO team. He comes with a wealth of experience and I know he will provide all of us with a unique perspective on our operations at sea and ashore, said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, COMUSNAVSO/ C4F. Lance will be vital in achiev ing our goals in the SOUTHCOM (United States Southern Command) area of operations and key to improv ing our ability to work with the State Department, partner nations and our other interagency partners. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military operations by pro viding principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneu ver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosper ity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 9

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Underwood Celebrates 50TH Anniversary Of Trinidad And Tobagos IndependenceSouthern Seas Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class guidedmissile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) pulled into Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, Sept. 7, just in time to help celebrate the coun trys 50th anniversary of independence. The port call provid ed an opportunity for Underwood and the U.S. Embassy to host a recep tion aboard the ship to honor the milestone anni versary. Our countries enjoy a strong relationship through both commercial ties and military partner ships, said Cmdr. Peter Mirisola, commanding officer of Underwood. This bilateral relation ship enhances political and social stability and both nations goal of stemming transnational crime, health promotion and international law. Co-hosting the recep tion and representing the U.S. Embassy was U.S. Charge dAffaires to Trinidad and Tobago, David C. Wolfe. We are here to cele brate the 50th anniversary of Trinidad and Tobagos independence day and to mark more than 200 years of commercial, personal and military ties between our two nations, said Wolfe. This ship and crew are working with nations throughout the Caribbean to combat narcotics traf ficking and build ties so that we can work together to address other com mon problems such as trafficking in persons and responding to natural disasters, Wolfe added. Officers from the Brazilian Naval Ship BNS Greenhalgh (F-46), also visiting Trinidad and Tobago, were invited to join in the festivities. Underwood and Greenhalgh will be sail ing from Port of Spain en route to Key West, Fla., to participate in the multinational UNITAS exer cise later this weekend. Coincidentally, Sept. 7 is also the anniversary of Brazils independence. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet support U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulSailors man the rails on the forecastle of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) as the ship departs Willemstad, Curacao after a scheduled port visit. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Sailors fire the 40 mm saluting battery as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) approaches Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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CPOs Pay Tribute To Those Who Paved WayStaffTri-base chief petty officers and selectees celebrated Jacksonvilles inaugural CPO Pride Day on Sept 3 at Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall. The event paid tribute to chief petty officers of the past, recognized the lead ership of tri-base chiefs and motivated selectees for the completion of the induction process. Navy Region Southeast Command Master Chief Mack Ellis spoke to select ees about the responsibil ities of a Navy chief. Every step you take, every word you speak, youre representing an entire force, he said. Youre representing an exclusive organization thats known as a Chief Petty Officers Mess. Guest of honor, Chief Commissary Steward James C. Philips, a perma nently appointed veteran and surviving crewmem ber of USS Luce (DD 522), spoke of the important influence CPO leader ship had on his years as a junior Sailor. We have all learned true leadership from the finest example any young man has ever given chief petty officers, Philips said. He urged the chiefs and selectees to remember those who came before them. Chief Select Masterat-Arms James Watkins of Mayport Security was among the 30 select ees who put the advice of Philips into immedi ate action. The group of selectees visited with and served lunch to homeless veterans at Clara White Mission Monday after noon. One of the biggest parts of the Navy is giv ing back to the commu nity that were in, here at Clara White, some of the veterans that are occu pants here fell on some hard times and were just unable to pull themselves out of a hole, Watkins said, So heres our chance to come and say thank you for what you did for us. -Photos by MCC(SEL) William TownsendAbove, Chief Petty Officers and Selects stand outside of the Clara White Mission during a community relations project held during CPO Pride Day on Sept. 3. Bottom right, Selects help feed homeless veterans at the mission. Bottom left, CPO Selects stand at the Veterans Memorial Wall. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 11

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-Photos by Paige GnannAmber Lea buys sweets for her children from the USS Klakring family readiness group (FRG) at the Navy Exchange Mayport Cupcake Wars on Sept. 7. The Klakring team won the event with its margarita cupcakes, followed closely by Mayport Harbor Security in second place, and a tied third for USS Underwood FRG and Mayport Security. Klakring Wins Cupcake WarsCupcake War competitors line the atrium of the off-base Mayport Navy Exchange dur ing the second annual Cupcake Wars. Groups were able to sell their baked goods to ben efit group and MWR funds. See more photos online at www.mayportmirror.com. Mayport NEX will host Customer Appreciation Day on Sept. 28 with door prizes, refreshments, tasting, unadvertised specials, and a special demo by Chef Marty Griffin on Kitchen Aid products. Enter to win a special door prize from Swarovski. You must be present to win from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Navy Announces RC To AC Program For Reservists To Pursue Active Duty CareersFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy is establish ing a new augmenta tion program that will offer enlisted Reservists opportunities to con vert to permanent active duty careers, as outlined in NAVADMIN 274/12, released September 9. The Reserve Component to Active Component (RC to AC) augmentation program seeks to place qualified enlisted reserve members in specific rates and year groups to fill active community needs in the fleet. Once released from their Reserve obligations and assigned to their new billets, RC to AC partici pants will become active duty Sailors in every respect, including being eligible for AC advance ment, permanent change of station orders, and selective reenlistment bonus eligibility. The active Navy needs Sailors with talent and experience, and the Navy Reserve is a great place to find them, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military per sonnel plans and policy. Through this program, were aiming to lever age our Reserve Sailors skill sets and experience to place select reserve Sailors in needed billets in the Fleet. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the RC to AC program is designed to streamline Sailors transi tion between Reserve and active service. Additionally, the RC to AC program comple ments the variety of ini tiatives Navy uses to fill needed operational bil lets, enabling Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warf ighting needs. To improve the effi ciency of Reserve to active conversions, the RC to AC program changes the application process. Rather than meet with a recruiter to discuss active duty prospects, interested Reservists can apply to Navy Personnel Command (PERS-92) through his or her unit and Naval Reserve Activity commanding officer in response to advertised vacancies with specific proficiency, yeargroup and other require ments. Vacancies will be adver tised via the GovDelivery system, and will specify available augmentation quotas by rate and year group. Reservists can sign up for GovDelivery notifi cations through the Navy Reserve Forces Command homepage at www.navy reserve.navy.mil. Quotas and adver tised vacancies will be reviewed regularly and updated based on needs of the Fleet. Selections are made by AC enlisted commu nity managers, who will consider each applicants performance history, experience, proficiency, and time in grade. Sailors must also meet the eligibility criteria outlined in MILPERSMAN arti cle 1326-021, including in-rate proficiency and physical and medical readiness requirements. Additionally, Sailors must be within the advertised year group and not within two years of their AC High Year Tenure (HYT) dates based upon their active duty service date. Once selected, a Sailor will be given the opportunity to negotiate for a billet based on the needs of the Navy and his or her pref erences. Orders to the new billet will include a projected rotation date and authorization for per manent change of station expenses, if appropriate. To learn more about the RC to AC program, Sailors may speak with their chain of command, read the NAVADMIN and MILPERSMAN article at www.npc.navy.mil, or call the NPC customer service center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC, (1-866-827-5672) or e-mail at CSCMailbox@ navy.mil.Voting Assistance Eases Registration, Ballot ProcessAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith Election Day about two months away, absentee military and overseas citizen vot ers can enjoy a stream lined process to register, obtain a ballot and exer cise their right to vote, a Federal Voting Assistance Program official said in a Pentagon news confer ence today. Pam Mitchell, the pro grams acting director, outlined new outreach initiatives designed to make voting assistance more innovative and user-friendly than ever before, with an emphasis on engaging junior mili tary personnel, the largest segment of the Defense Department population. We firmly believe that voting assistance for our absentee voters is abso lutely the best that its ever been, Mitchell said. There are a lot of tools in our arsenal to help those voters both register, get an absentee ballot and to exercise their right to vote. Mitchell explained that FVAP offers a variety of tools through its online wizard, which among other features, can even help users ready bal lot envelopes for posting by printing the correct address on them. FVAP has customized its tools, Mitchell said, focusing on the 18-to-25year-old demographic, given their familiarity and general preference for gleaning information from the Internet and communicating through social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. We have a mobile website we just unveiled last week so that using a smartphone or a tablet from anywhere you may be, you can obtain access to our information and our tools, Mitchell said. In January, Mitchell said, officials also took to email accounts to broaden outreach. We use email blasts to every member within a dot-mil email address to remind them how they can reg ister to vote and that its time to vote, Mitchell said. Outside of the electron ic domain, FVAP main tains a call center that operates five days a week from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT and can be used by vot ers worldwide to get help on how to file an absentee ballot. For in-person interac tion, Mitchell said, vot ing assistance officers and installation voter assistance offices remain available as prescribed by the 2009 Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act. She acknowledged findings in a recently released DOD Inspector General report that indicated difficul ties in reaching a number of IVA offices based on dated contact informa tion. In a military environment, things change, Mitchell said, citing per sonnel movements and joint basing as factors. We ... agree with the IG that the most important thing we can do is to find the most effective way to maintain assistance for all of our absentee vot ers, and we are absolute ly committed [to that]. Investing in intuitive, easy-to-use Web-based tools, supplemented by well-trained unit voting assistance officers -rath er than installation voter assistance offices -could substantially reduce cost and improve voting assis tance, she added. By law, all states must offer electronic delivery of the ballot, but the voter, when applying for the bal lot, can elect to receive it that way or may elect to receive it in the mail, Mitchell said. Over the last six months, we spent a lot of time reaching out to every single one of the 221 installation voting offices. Were confident that the information on our website today is accu rate and has the most upto-date contact [informa tion]. Between now and the election, Mitchell said, FVAP officials will contin ue to make weekly calls to each of the installation voter assistance offices s to ensure they are accu rately able to capture changes that may occur. Our goal is to make sure that anyone who wants to vote has the resources and tools they need from anywhere in the world to success fully exercise that right, Mitchell said. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 13

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FFSC Workshop Schedule Focuses On Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 15, 10 a.m.-until, IA Families Outing To Zoo Jacksonville Zoo Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Sept. 17-21, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.. SAPR Initial Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., PFM/ CFS Forum FFSC Room 702 Sept. 19, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Room 719 Sept. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 24, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 24-27, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Sept. 26, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Upcoming Navy Tri-Base Job FairFrom FFSCNaval Station Mayport, Kings Bay SUBASE, and NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) will spon sor the Navy Tri-Base Job Fair on Wednesday, Sept. 19 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center. Active duty, separating, retiring and retired ser vice members, military spouses, family mem bers and separated ser vice members up to 180 days after separation date are eligible to attend. Attendees are encouraged to bring several copies of their resumes and dress for interviewing. Local, state and nation al companies will be collecting resumes for numerous jobs. The fol lowing types of compa nies will be at the Job Fair: energy, defense contrac tors, government, law enforcement, financial healthcare, engineering logistics, aviation, naval ship repair, education, industrial, construction, maritime, technology, and more. The Job Fair and park ing are free. The Morocco Shrine Center is located at 3,800 St. Johns Bluff Road in the Southside of Jacksonville. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 904270-6600 ext. 1700.City To Offer Military Vets Free Professional Career CounselingFrom the City of JacksonvilleCity of Jacksonville, in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition (JMVC) Jobs for Vets ini tiative, will offer career counseling to military vet erans and service mem bers planning their transi tion back to civilian life. This free service will be offered at City Hall Mezzanine Floor, 117 W. Duval St., on the third Thursday of each month from 3-6 p.m., starting Sept. 20. Military veterans who are interested in career counseling, resume help, interview prepara tion, translation of mili tary skills to civilian jobs, and overall assistance in preparing for a success ful post-military career are encouraged to take advantage of the service. The Military Affairs, Veteran and Disabled Services Department of the City of Jacksonville and the JMVC are dedi cated to helping veterans and their families transi tion to and excel in civil ian life. A key to achieving this success is having the right approach and guid ance in finding the best career for each veteran. The following JMVC employment staffing companies are also offer ing career counseling services via telephone, at no charge to veterans, Monday through Friday: Mondays: Stafftime, 904-215-1313 Tuesdays: Incepture, 877-347-7151 Wednesdays: I-Tech Personnel, 904-381-1911 Thursdays: Apex Systems, 866-594-2739 Fridays: Genuent, 904551-1906 Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 28: One Night in Mexico. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a fiesta! Well have a taco and nacho bar, mock-aritas, jalapeo eating contest, Spanish music and much more. 246-0347 MWRThe following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 14: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Sept. 15: International Coastal Clean-Up. Great volunteer opportunity. 8-10 a.m. at the Jetties. Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 16: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Houston Texans. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Sept. 17: St. Johns Town Center Shopping Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Sept. 19: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 22: Kennedy Space Center Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. Cost $20. Sign up deadline Sept. 18. Sept. 23: Laser Tag. 7-9 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free. Sept. 26: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 27: Liberty Bash 4-7:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free food, DJ, Laser Tag, games, rock wall, t-shirts and more! FREE Sept. 28: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Sept. 30: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Cincinnati Bengals. Van departs 2 p.m. Cost $10. LIBERTYSept. 28: One Night in Mexico 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a fiesta! Well have a taco and nacho bar, mock-aritas, jalapeo eating contest, Spanish music and much more. 246-0347 KID Teeing Up With CPO Selects-Photo by MCC(SEL) William TownsendChief Select Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) Travis Lea from USS Carney quiets the green as his team gets ready to tee off during the annual CPO Golf Tournament held on Sept. 6 at Windy Harbor Golf Course at Naval Station Mayport. Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., The After Party Mayport Sandbox Monday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7: 30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT A four-part prerequisite training program, which will prepare Mayports personnel for safe and effective incorporation into Mayports HIT pro gram. All four training segments of Intro to HIT must be completed before entry into HIT and par ticipation in the WOD (workout of the day). Intro to HIT includes protocol review, physi cal assessment, Rowing 101, pillar and movement preparation, flexibil ity training, tissue man agement, refueling and the fundamentals of the Olympic lifts, the squat and the pull-up. Tuesday 6:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp Take your entire com mand to the next level, oceanfront! This com mand class is packed full of challenging cardio drills, muscular resistance training and explosive intervals. Meets at the Sandbox and can accommodate 200+ personnel, weather permitting. 6:30 a.m., HIT 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Noon, Intro to HIT Wednesday 5:30 p.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 5:30 p.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Weight Training For Warfighters 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Friday 7 a.m., Spinning MWR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 15

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Friday, Sept. 14 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association Unit #290, 390 Mayport Rd., will hold an enchi lada and Spanish rice dinner from 5-8 p.m. The event is open to the public. Take out orders are welcome. Donation $8. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, Sept. 15 An Eating and Growing Seasonably Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow cool season veg etables will be held at Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cost is $10 with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Please call Jeannie to register, 255-7450. Find out from a park ranger at 2 p.m. what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so important. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Families are invited to learn more about what 4-H has to offer by attend ing free expo from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds, 510 Fairgrounds Place. Clubs leaders and mem bers from around the county will be available to answer questions about 4-H, and help kids find just the right club. There will be free games and activities, free parking, and free hot dogs. 4-H is a national organization that helps young people develop knowledge and skills to become produc tive members of society. 4-H helps youth to meet the diverse challenges of todays world by building self-confidence, learning responsibility and mak ing positive decisions. In a safe environment, 4-H brings youth and adults together to learn everyday skills for living. To learn more, call (904) 2557450and ask to speak to a local 4-H agent, or log on to duval.ifas.ufl.edu/4-H. shtml or www.4-h.org. Monday, Sept. 17 Haven Hospice is host ing a grief and loss sup port group from 6-7:30 p.m. This support group is for parents and care givers who have experi enced the loss of a child. The event will take place at the Haven office at 200 Southpark Blvd., Suite 207,St. Augustine, FL 32086. For more infor mation, contact the local office at 904-810-2377. Tuesday, Sept. 18 Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council, Duval County Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 Presents an Agent Orange Town Hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 Saint Johns Bluff Road South. Agent Orange, a herbi cide chemical containing dioxin, used to defoliate the jungle in Vietnam may have exposed more than 2 million U.S. military per sonnel from 1961 to 1970. This panel discussion pres ents the facts one needs to know that affects not only the Vietnam veteran, but his children and grand children. Our Town Hall meeting hopes to present and collect stories of how Agent Orange is affect ing Vietnam veterans and their families. The United States Government just recently added Blue Water Navy Ships to a list that is now allowed to apply for veterans benefits. The Department of Veteran Affairs said that surviving spouses and decedents of Vietnam veterans might also be entitled to benefits. This is for the Vietnam vet, Children of Vietnam vets, grandchildren of Vietnam vets, and any one that has a Vietnam veteran in their familys history. Saturday, Sept. 22 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an adventur ous hike to discover the islands wondrous wild flowers. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Thursday, Sept. 27 The Duval County Extension Offices/ UF IFAS will be offer ing a workshop on Fall Gardening at the Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Road, Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The cost is $5 for mate rials and light snacks. Payment can be made at the door. Topics covered will be Fall Gardening and Landscape Tips, Planting Wildflowers and Misconceptions about Trees. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Saturday, Sept. 29 The Duval County Extension Office and the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs District IV will be hosting the 2012 GardenFest at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N McDuff Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 9-2 p.m. The cost is $10 without lunch or $15 with lunch. Drinks will be provided. To reg ister, call Rachel Wilson at 904-272-4252 or pick up a registration form at the extension office. The deadline to register is Sept. 24. Speakers are Terry DelValle, Options for Managing Pests, Jim DeValerio, Vegetable Gardening Gold Nuggets, Larry Figart, Money does grow on Trees, and Joe Stewards, Water: Waste Not, Want Not. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. The pro gram will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reser vations are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. Saturday, Oct. 20 Crafters Wanted! Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach will host its annual Craft Fair and Fall Festival on from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. To reserve your booth, please con tact the church office today at 249-5370. The City of Atlantic Beach Family Fun Day and Campout under the Stars returns to Jack Russell Park, 1:30-10 p.m. Our 19th Annual Campout is one of the Citys most popu lar events. Reserve your campsite early before they sell out! Campers can reserve a 10 x 10 camp site for a $10 fee before Oct. 1, and $15 after Sept. 30. This year continues the Saturday Family Fun Day activities and per formances for kids of all ages! Afternoon and evening events, includ ing our Twilight Movie are free and open to the public. Russell Park field is located on Plaza St., north of Atlantic Beach City Hall on Seminole Rd. Registration forms are on the City website and campers can reg ister by mail, or choose your campsite at the Recreation Office, 716 Ocean Blvd., weekdays 8-noon and 1-4:30 p.m. Call 247-5828 for more information or visit www. coab.us/events. Sunday, Nov. 11 Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and home town favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music. Along with numerous local businesses, nation al organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project will be involved in the event. Tickets, which start at $29, are on sale now. 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Veteran Special Recognition Ceremony to honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm vet erans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of Special Recognition in a cere mony on Nov. 8 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The application deadline to register for the honor is Oct. 5. The applica tion can be found on Congressman Crenshaws site: www.crenshaw. house.gov. Another Sign-The Musical, Tickets On Sale Now Thursday, Sept. 27 at Florida State College, South Campus Military Appreciation Night for Another Sign The Musical. Mayport and NAS JAX USO have tickets on sale now for this show at 50 percent off, $15 cash only please. Another Sign approaches home lessness from many angles. For more informa tion on the musical, visit www.itsanothersign.com Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an indi vidual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or email ing me at herb@jaxsig narama.com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned fran chise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwa ter and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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DoD Launches Tomodachi Registry WebsiteFrom DoDThe Department of Defense (DoD) launched today the Operation Tomodachi Registry web site. The website provides location-based radiation dose estimate reports for adults and children com prising the DoD-affiliated population on or near mainland Japan follow ing the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of March 11, 2011. DoD-affiliated mem bers who were in Japan during the nuclear reac tor crisis, medical provid ers, and the public at large will be able to download location-based radiation dose estimate reports from the website. These reports include medical interpretations and pro vide comparisons of the Operation Tomodachi radiation doses with more commonly experienced radiation doses. The website also includes information on the event, DoDs response to the crisis, and answers to frequently asked ques tions. By the end of the calendar year, individu als in the registry may request a dose assess ment that is individually tailored for them, based on more detailed location data that they can provide using the Contact Us function on the Operation Tomodachi Registry web site. After extensive envi ronmental monitoring and analysis, it has been determined that none of the nearly 70,000 mem bers of the DoD-affiliated population (service members, DoD civilian employees and contrac tors, and family members of service members and civilian employees) who were on or near the mainland of Japan between March 12 and May 11, 2011, are known to have been exposed to radiation at levels associated with adverse medical condi tions. Operation Tomodachi Registry, which will be housed in a secure data base containing the names, locations, and radiation doses for all members of the DoDaffiliated population, will be completed by Dec. 31, 2012. Personally identified information will be omit ted from this website. The registry can be found online at http:// registry.csd.disa.mil/otr.Use ASVAB/AFCT To Expand Conversion, Career OpportunitiesNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsSailors interested in changing ratings to improve career options can use their Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) scores to help deter mine which ratings they may qualify for, officials said Sept. 7. The ASVAB score is a major fac tor used to determine which ratings a recruit is eligible to pursue, said Senior Chief Navy Counselor (SW/AW) Mark Rush, force career counselor, Navy Personnel Command (NPC). The ASVAB is given to all non-prior-ser vice recruits to determine eligibility for enlistment, future Navy-wide advance ment examination participation and Class A School training qualification. Basically, the ASVAB tests an indi viduals knowledge and aptitude in nine areas: arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, mathematics knowledge, general sci ence, electronics information, auto shop, mechanical comprehension and assem bling objects. The combined scores from different ASVAB areas determine which ratings prospective recruits are best qualified for and are used again for Sailors looking to change ratings, or convert in PerformTo-Serve/Fleet Rating Identification Engine (FR/PTS). Low ASVAB scores minimize Sailors conversion options, however, Sailors who have improved their educational experience since join ing the Navy through completion of col lege courses or certain Navy E-Learning courses via Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) may be eligible to retest with the Armed Forces Classification Test (AFCT). Retesting using the AFCT may give Sailors more opportunities to qualify for in-service rating conversions, said Rush. The command career counselor can update AFCT scores in FR/PTS and then re-qualify the Sailor to get updated results. The new scores will become the Sailors official score even if it is lower than the previous test, so it is impor tant that Sailors work with their career counselor or educational services office to determine if retesting is in their best interest. The ASVAB and AFCT are just one part of the equation for Sailors who wish to convert. Sailors should be screened at their reporting career development board to review ASVAB scores and not wait until they reach their FR/PTS win dow, according to Rush. If the scores are below 50, it may be beneficial for the Sailor to take the AFCT to improve conversion opportunities before they reach their FR/PTS window. At every CDB, commands should review rating community health slides found on the enlisted community man ager pages on the NPC website to let the Sailors know what their opportunities are to remain in their current rating or what the conversion opportunities are, said Rush. Early detection and early engagement is the key to success. Retesting can be administered on shore at Personnel Support Detachments and on board large plat form ships. MILPERSMAN 1236-010 lists criteria required for a retest. For more information, Sailors should speak with their command career counselor or edu cational services office. Maintaining The Equipment-Photo by MC3 A.J. JonesAviation Ordnanceman Airman Matthew DePumpo of HSL-48 Detachment 7 washes an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck of the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is on deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Florida Vet Affairs Launches New Campaign To Connect Veterans With Earned BenefitsFrom FVAFlorida veterans may be missing out on millions of dollars in benefits to which they are entitled, so the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs has launched a statewide multimedia campaign to connect them with feder al and state benefits and services they have earned. Floridas 1.6 million veterans range from the nations largest popu lation of World War II vets to those returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. Just as the states veteran population spans the generations, so does the outreach cam paign utilizing every thing from traditional newspaper ads and dis plays to a new website and smart phone app. Some of Floridas vet erans fought for our free dom in the days before television while others never knew a time with out personal comput ers, yet they all share the admiration of a grate ful nation, said Mike Prendergast, executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs. If they arent receiving the benefits and services they right fully earned, we must use every approach available to reach them and set things right. Floridas veteran population is the third larg est in the nation, and its Department of Veterans Affairs plays a critical role in advocating for veter ans and connecting them to federal and state ben efits and services they have earned. Currently, Florida veterans draw down more than $13.7 billion a year in federal compensation, education and pension benefits, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical services and military retired pay, but agency leaders say veterans are leaving mil lions more on the table. For example, of Floridas 1.6 million vet erans, only 260,000 are receiving service-related compensation or pension from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition, many of Floridas 449,000 Vietnam veterans may be unaware they could be entitled to a monthly payment for a service-connected dis ability if they suffer from one of several diseases associated with expo sure to herbicides such as Agent Orange diseases ranging from Ischemic Heart Disease and Hodgkins Disease to Type 2 diabetes to prostate can cer. Currently, only one third of Vietnam veterans nationally are enrolled in VA health care or have applied for benefits they earned as a result of mili tary service. We strongly encour age our eligible Vietnam veterans to enroll in health care and apply for service-related dis ability payments, said Prendergast. We want our veterans to be identi fied, treated and compen sated for any effects they may be having as a result of exposure. To help bring a fresh new awareness to the situation, the 23-yearold state agency unveiled a new logo, website, smart phone app, col lateral materials, public service announcements and outreach strategies, and reframed its mission, vision and motto. The department embraced a renewed commitment to reach Vietnam veterans, Floridas largest veteran demographic; women veterans, who num ber more than 140,000; and younger, return ing veterans, since more than 230,000 veterans of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom call Florida home. The new, easier-tonavigate website will act as a portal to help vet erans find the informa tion that they need to access benefits and ser vices more efficiently and effectively. All of the English and Spanish public service announce ments and radio spots will raise awareness about the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs and its services, while also directing veterans to the website. In addition, the mobile application, offered in the Android and Apple markets, will not only integrate with the website and offer veterans reminders and updates about services through push notifications, but also lead veterans to Employ Florida Vets, the states veteran employ ment website, to help them find jobs. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 17



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com 2012 Holiday Season Mailing Dates ReleasedFrom Naval Supply Systems Command Corporate CommunicationsThe Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25, delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were announced Sept. 5. The dates are as follows: Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962-966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov 26 *Parcel Post: Nov. 13 Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 *Express mail Military Service: N/A *First-Class Letters/Cards/Priority Mail: Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 1 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) *Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 *First-Class Mail (Letters/cards, priority mail): Dec. 10 *Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 *Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottCartoonist Sam Viviano, art director for MAD Magazine, draws for Sailors during a USO event aboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) hosted a group of nation ally-renowned cartoonists during a USO-sponsored visit to the cruiser Aug. 30. The cartoonists includ ed Jeff Keane, creator and illustrator of The Family Circus, Rick Kirkman, creator and illustrator of Baby Blues, Dave Coverly, creator and illustrator of Speed Bump and Sam Viviano, art director for MAD Magazine. The visit marked the second USO-sponsored tour to come to Vicksburg and included several hours where the visiting artists were able to inter act with Sailors and even create personal drawings of their characters as well as caricatures of some of the servicemembers. It was really cool that they came aboard, said Operations Specialist Seaman Jose E. Rosas. I was very excited to meet all of them, Mr. Viviano in particular. As an art ist myself, I really respect what these artists do and I hope one day I can make a living on my art as well. The cartoonists set up shop on the Vicksburgs mess decks and drew for Sailors until their depar ture. I got a personal ized drawing from Rick Kirkman, said Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class (SW) Eric C. Askea. Chiefs Run For Those Who Cant Cartoonists Visit Vicksburg -Photo by MC2 Jacob SippelNavy Region Southeast chief selectees participate in the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) 8k Run at the Jacksonville Landing. WWP is a non-profit organization that works to raise awareness and enlist the public's aid for the needs of severely injured service men and women, to help severely injured service members aid and assist each other, and to provide unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. See Mail, Page 3 See Vicksburg, Page 8

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Navy service members and their families have FREE, unlimited access to online tutoring and career help from Tutor. com. Expert tutors help students of all agesfrom K-12 to college to adult learnersone-to-one in math, science, social studies and English, as well as with test prep and college coursework. Check out information on career transitions, including resume writing and interview preparation. One-to-One help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can now get help on the go by using the Tutor.com To Go app! Tutor.com offers help with homework, study ing, and test preparation in more than 16 subjects from elementary math to physics. All students worldwide can use the program, regardless of where they attend school. This is especially ben eficial for military-depen dent students trying to keep up with schoolwork when moving or changing schools. Whenever a student or adult needs help, he will just enter the question and will be connected to a tutor in an interactive online classroom which features an interactive whiteboard, file sharing, and instant messaging. The student will work one-to-one in math, sci ence, social studies, and English until the problem is solved. There is also access to the ProofPoint Writing Center. Here students can get real-time help with reports, essays, and papers. Tutors explain the writing and proof reading process. Later they will help with edits. Currently Tutor.com has more than 2,000 tutors. Each of them has been screened, cer tified and backgroundchecked. These tutors are experts in the subject they tutor. All sessions are anonymous, and no personal information is shared between tutor and student. Additionally all sessions are recorded and reviewed for quality con trol. This program is pro vided by the Department of Defense. Authorized patrons include U.S. active duty military ser vice members, U.S. military reservists, U.S. National Guard personnel on active duty in a deployed status, and DoD civilians in a deployed status, and their depen dents. You can check out a complete list of who is eligible to access the pro gram by going to www. tutor.com/military/eligi bility. To access the program, login to Navy Knowledge Online account and click on the REFERENCE tab. Look for the Tutor. com box in the right col umn, and click on the links Kids and Teens or Adults to get a tutor. Authorized users will then follow instructions on the Web site for password and login information. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Need Easy, Free Access To Tutoring?Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingI talk too much. Countless thoughts are spawned in the fer tile recesses of my mind, and are only given a few moments of incubation time before I give in to the irresistible impulse to birth them into the world in the form of unsolicited speech. The poor people who happen to be with in earshot of me tend to get that glazed-over look in their eye, the tell-tale sign that they are bored, praying for the end of the story, trying to find a point, or just simply thinking, She never shuts up. Recently, I decided to channel my thoughts into something worthwhile and less annoying, so I took up writing and dove into my new hobby with vim and vigor. However, my excite ment quickly turned to self-doubt when I real ized who wants to read the mundane rants of a middle-aged military spouse? Surprisingly, the clutter of my mind parted like the Red Sea to reveal the answer: My mundane middle-aged military life is exactly what thousands (well maybe a couple hundred) of readers want to know about. I mean, who doesnt wonder, what specifically is middle age? Are we there yet? Is there any way to turn around and go back? We throw the term middle age around like so many other vague phrases common in daily vernacular, without really understanding what the words really mean. The definition of middle age is definitely debatable some believe that statistical life-expectancy charts dictate that one is middle aged when one is between 40 and 60 years old. But this view is almost universally met with resistance . What? Im not middle aged! Such non-believers opine that they are only as old as they look, act or feel. But if this vague standard was the basis for determining middle age, I would bet my pric ey wrinkle cream that the only people who would admit to being middle age would be standing in the early bird line on senior citizens night at the local Country Buffet, likely wearing pants well above their waistlines and orthopedic shoes, and definitely planning on getting seconds of the tapioca. What are we so afraid of? For many of us, mid dle age represents the real meat and potatoes of life, when selfish interests are put on hold for hard work in the form of home buying, bill paying, child rearing, taxes, the struggle to ward off the physical effects of aging, and the battle to keep marriages intact through it all. Gone are the days of carefree self-discovery and unbri dled fun-seeking its time to get serious and figure out what the hell we are doing before we screw things up. Middle age probably plays the most significant role in determining our long-term happiness. It is during this time that marriages are either cement ed or broken, we face the decision to stay in our get out of the military, our children are forming their personalities (or crimi nal tendencies), and we either become comfort able with ourselves or we experience the proverbial mid-life crisis. How on earth are we supposed to perform this tight rope act without falling into a deep dark abyss? Truthfully, I have no clue; however, I can not help but think that if we just sit back and relax, we might just enjoy the ride. Why spend our substantive years pathetically fighting what nature and instinct have dictated for us? Im not saying we should stop plucking our chin hairs and burn our extra supportive bras, I just think that the key to surviving middle age must be based at least partially on our will ingness to give in and embrace the natural pro gression of our lives with a fun-loving spirit and the ability to laugh at it all. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comAre We There Yet? Middle Age Is DebatableLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOne of the most difficult things to embrace in life is change. Most of us have a hard time adjusting to change even when it is something that is inevi table in our lives. Seemingly, military personnel would have an easier time adjusting to change because it is nor mal to transition from one duty station to another every two to three years. With the foreknowledge that change is inevitable some of us still struggle with change. As a reservist, I have the privilege of living in two worlds simultaneously. I am a Navy chaplain as well as a local church pastor and there are times when I am confronted with change in both worlds. Just recently I was appointed to serve a church in a different dis trict in South Carolinas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. Upon learning that I would be appointed to serve another church, I had to begin making preparation for my move. As I began putting my check list together for the move, I started to reflect on all of the good times that I had encountered over the eight year period that I had been blessed to serve in my previous appointment. One could say that I was experi encing signs of grief as I attempted to embrace my new pastoral appointment. When the actual time came to transition, I did make the move from one area of the state of South Carolina to anoth er, although I was torn. I knew I had to leave and start anew but there was something within me that was also causing me to resist the change. What was it that I sought to hold onto? In retrospect, I firmly feel that it was those solid relationships that I had established over that eight year period. I also believe that I was attempting to hold onto the familiar. Realistically speaking, I had become comfortable. Still, it was time for me to make the move and I finally embraced it. Since moving from one pastoral appointment to another, I am able to see that there was nothing wrong with having the struggles I had prior to the actual move. As Sailors and their families prepare to transition from one duty station to the next or from active duty to civilian life or reserve duty, it is safe to say that you will encoun ter comparable experi ences to the ones I expe rienced. When this occurs, remember that you are not alone. There are oth ers who have already gone through what you are going through and are willing to assist you with your transition. Also remember that you can go to God in earnest prayer and God will give you the strength and encourage ment to deal with your transition. Change is never easy but it can be dealt with in a positive way. As we all know, change is inevita ble so the best approach any of us can take when faced with transitions is to be positive and trust God.Transition 101: Remember You Are Not AloneChap. Anthony Hodge Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSHelp Clean Up Mayport BeachFrom Mayport EnvironmentalNaval Station Mayport is one of the official cleanup sites for the 2012 International Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 15. Volunteers are needed to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport. Participants should plan to meet at 8 a.m. at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 10 a.m. Volunteers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. Pre-registration is not required. Gloves and gar bage bags will be provid ed. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. Catholic Charities USA1-800-919-9338 www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Navy Joins Nation In Honoring 2012 Hispanic American Heritage Month Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy joins the nation Sept. 15 in cel ebrating Hispanic Heritage Month, which will be observed through Oct. 15. With a nation al theme of Diversity United, Building Americas Future Today, the observance celebrates the histories, cultures and contribu tions of Americans who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. According to 2010 data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanics com prise 16.3 percent of the total United States population, or 50.5 mil lion people, forming our countys largest racial or ethnic minority. Additionally, it is project ed that by 2050, a quarter of the nations workforce will be Hispanic. The Navys workforce reflects this diversity today, omore than 58,000 Hispanic active duty and Reserve Sailors and offi cers and nearly 15,000 Hispanic civilians serve in the Navy Total Force, including four Hispanic flag officers and 172 Hispanic master chiefs. In his 2011 National Hispanic Heritage Month Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama noted, The future of America is inextricably linked to the future of our Hispanic community. Our country thrives on the diversity and ingenuity of all our people, and our ability to out innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world will depend greatly on the success of Hispanics. All commands are encouraged to expand their awareness of Hispanic American Heritage Month through programs, exhibits, pub lications, and participa tion in military and com munity events. Resources for use in planning com mand heritage events including a video pre sentation about Hispanic American Heritage Month can be found online at the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion obser vances web page, http:// www.public.navy.mil/ BUPERS-NPC/SUPPORT/ DIVERSITY/Pages/ DiversityObservances. aspx. Commands are also encouraged to support the sea services affin ity group, the Association of Naval Service Officers (ANSO). ANSO aims to foster personal growth and professional development through mentor ships and networking for officers, enlisted mem bers and civilians. More information on ANSO can be found online at http:// www.ansomil.org/ For more information about the history of Hispanics in the Navy, visit http://www.history. navy.mil/special%20highlights/hispanic/hispanicindex.htm. For more information and resources on Hispanics in the military and Hispanic American Heritage Month, visit http://www.deomi.org/ SpecialObservance/. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity combined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is also recommended that customers check with their local civilian or military post office for infor mation on size restric tions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Additionally, cus tomers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items can not be mailed. Examples are: switch blade knives, pornog raphy, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, customers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alco hol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. The NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission--to deliver sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warfighter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfo lio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply opera tions, conventional ord nance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, security assistance, and quality of life issues for the naval forces.From Page1Mail THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Damage Controlman 2nd Class Juan Garcia helps his teammate, Hull Technician Fireman Justin Kendell of USS The Sullivans dress out in CBR gear during the CBR Dressout event as his shipmates yell words of encouragement. A Sailor from USS Samuel B. Roberts quickly connects a hose as his team works on the P-100 pump, one of several events held as part of the annual DC Olympics Sept. 5. Lt.j.g. Paul Ferro of USS Truxton locates fire sites using information from his team during the Message Blank Relay. USS Simpson Team 1 dominates the tug-o-war competition, coming out as the winners against all the competitors, including the SWOS instructors. SWOS instructors check a stretcher for strap placement, tightness and other safety concerns for USS Simpson Team 1 during the Oscar Relay event. Overspray from a nearby hose cools down one of the competing teams as they work on the Quick Reaction event during the fifth annual DC Olympics.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 5 First attempt to secure a door in the top portion of the wet trainer doesnt work for the USS Gettysburg team. The team had to figure out how to secure the door at three critical points using just the wood planks.Fifth Annual DC OlympicsRoosevelt Shores Up WinFrom StaffNine Damage Control teams gathered Sept. 5 to compete in the fifth annual Naval Station Mayport Damage Control (DC) Olympics held at the base Fire Fighting School. During the competition, teams participated in 10 events with individual event scores being added up to determine the overall winner. Events included pipe patching, Oscar relay, damage control written test, quick reac tion team test, shoring, fire hose relay, CBR dress out, P-100 rigging, and a fire hose tug-o-war. This year, USS Roosevelts team took the title of overall win ner back to the ship after beating out two teams from USS Simpson, USS The Sullivans, USS Samuel B. Roberts, USS Gettysburg and returning three-time champion USS Carney. The DC Olympics was sponsored by Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site Mayport and Destroyer Squadron Fourteen (DESRON 14). -Photos by Paige GnannMembers of USS Roosevelts Damage Control Olympics team pose with the trophy after winning this years competition against eight other commands from around Naval Station Mayports basin and USS Truxton from NS Norfolk, Va. USS Roosevelt Sailor moves his water spray in hopes of hitting his target with directions provided by his team members. USS Gettysburg competes in the Quick Reaction event. The team placed third overall. USS Carney tries to patch pipes as water fills a room during the first of two events held in the wet trainer. USS Simpson Team 2 scrambles to untangle fire hoses during the Fire Hose Relay event. Team 2 also received the best Team Spirit award and came in second overall.

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Using Hanna Gate Access Is PrivilegeFrom NS Mayport SecurityAccessing Naval Station Mayport via Hanna Park is a privilege for base personnel afforded to us by the City of Jacksonville. Recently there have been some incidents involv ing Mayport personnel not adhering to the rules set forth for use of Hanna Park/Seminole Gate, which could result in loss of these privileges. To access the Seminole Gate, you must be an active duty military or government service employee and have a Mayport decal and a Hanna Park decal tab, which can be obtained from the Pass and Decal Office. All persons obtaining a decal shall read and sign the rules and regulations regarding the use of Hanna Park for entrance to the naval station. The rules and regula tions are as follows: By applying for and accepting this permit and Hanna-Navy Commuter Decal, the user (Permit Holder) agrees to comply with the rules of Kathryn Abbey Hanna Park and the City of Jacksonville. Any violation could lead to an immediate and permanent loss of privi leges to enter or pass through Hanna Park for any purpose. Naval Station Mayport access and parking privileges may be revoked at the discretion of the Navy. Other penalties includ ing law enforcement by the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office may apply. The permit is only for pass through traffic dur ing specified commuter times when the Naval Station Mayport gate to Hanna Park is open by mutual agreement of the Navy and the City of Jacksonville. When using this permit, diversion into Hanna Park or stopping to access or use Hanna Park facilities is expressly pro hibited. All Hanna Park users must enter the front entrance of Hanna Park and pay the Park entry fee during approved Park entry hours and proce dures. When intending to use the park for purposes other than direct passthrough during commut er hours, Permit Holders must pay the park entre fee and display the receipt on the dashboard of the vehicle at all times while in Hanna Park or be sub ject to violation of the Commuter Access agree ment and subject to loss of privileges. Permit Holder agrees to ensure that all pas sengers in the vehicle are authorized to enter Naval Station Mayport and have to required identification. If access for any person is denied at the Navy Gate the vehicle must immediately and directly depart completely from City of Jacksonville, Hanna Park property. There is to be no stopping no waiting to place telephone calls, no waiting for another vehi cle to arrive, or otherwise no delay or diversion to departing immediately from Hanna Park. All Permit Holders must obey all traffic laws in Hanna Park or be subject to the loss of this permit, this is includes, but is not limited to the following : The maximum speed limit is 25 mph in Hanna Park. Vehicles must come to a complete stop at all stop signs. road rage, driving offroad, littering are prohib ited. entry gate and security personnel, drivers must slow down, dim vehicle headlights, and prepare to communicate with the guard and display proper identification. Vehicles must prepare to stop for the guard to verify authorization and direct the vehicle to enter. Vehicles with recreational equip ment such as surfboards, kayaks, bicycles, fish ing rods, or beach attire should be prepared to explain their intentions. Hanna Park annual pass es or submitting pre-pur chased early bird tickets, must stop and give their vehicle tag and descrip tion information for the security guard to write down. They must leave pass of ticket stubs on dashboard when parked inside Hanna Park. Permit Holders are responsible for any per sons using the vehicle to access Hanna Park and may be subject to pen alties even if the permit holder is not present in the vehicle. -Photo by Paige GnannA sign at the entrance to Hanna Park reminds Naval Station Mayport Hanna permit holders to proceed to the base and not to detour for recreational purposes. Master-atArms Seaman Zachary Duguay stands with a Hanna Park attendant to check vehicles for Hanna Park and Mayport vehicle pass decals.NEX To Sell Combined Federal Campaign CouponFrom NEXCOMNEX Mayport, Jacksonville and Kings Bay are now selling a Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) benefit coupon to customers for $5 for those individuals who wish to voluntarily donate. When purchased, the benefit coupon will entitle customers to spe cific percent-off discounts for a one-time purchase on either October 15 or 16. All donations made through the sale of the benefit coupon will go to the CFC General Fund as an undesignated dona tion. The benefit coupon entitles customers to 10 percent off merchandise storewide including the furniture store as well as the entire stock of fine jewelry. There are some exclusions including gift cards and prepaid cards, e-commerce, Autoport services & Exchange Catalog. The discount may not be applied to merchandise previ ously purchased, exist ing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alco holic beverages, elec tronics, cameras, com puters, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DvDs, CDs and conces sion departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic, Rolex and Omega watches, Maui Divers, Pandora and clearance jewelry. Customers will receive 20 percent off all apparel, shoes, watches and sun glasses and 30 percent off already reduced furniture with prices ending in $.94, $.96 and $.97. The maxi mum discount a customer can receive is $250 per coupon. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT.Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. DONT ACCEPT DEFEAT. Fight deadly childhood diseases. www.stjude.org 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Ive always been a fan of Baby Blues. I hope we can more events like this. I had a great time. The USO provides this type of entertainment throughout the fleet and they attempt to find entertainers that appeal to a large group of service members. We keep current on the demographic, said Jeremy Wilcox, a USO entertainment tour pro vider who accompa nied the visiting artists. Cartoonists are unique and popular and people want to meet the people behind the legendary comics. There is a lot of interaction {with Sailors} on this particular tour. In this case, you get quality over quantity. The Vicksburg crew experienced the quality of the artists work first hand and the artists themselves enjoyed meeting crew members from all walks of life. The best thing was meeting all the Sailors, said Jeff Keane, creator and illustrator of The Family Circus. I like coming to ships because I feel less rushed {than on a base} and I really get the time to know the {crew}. Vicksburg is on her final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom.From Page1VicksburgUSS Vicksburg Completes Bahrain Port VisitEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) departed Bahrain Aug. 24 following a regularlyscheduled port visit. The visit helped to con tinue U.S. 5th Fleet effort building global mari time partnerships with Middle Eastern nations and improving maritime safety and security in the region. It was good to have some much needed (rest and relaxation) after a lengthy underway, said Lt. Robert E. Danielson, operations officer aboard Vicksburg. The long underway was strenuous, but we are here to (com plete) a mission and that always comes first. Though Sailors still had to stand duty and per form regular maintenance while the ship was in port, they were also able to take advantage of the facilities at Naval Support Activity, Bahrain. There were a lot of uniform items I needed, so it was good to be close to a Navy Exchange again, said Operations Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Priestly J. Birks. In addition to having access to the base, Sailors were able to take part in Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) tours such as go-cart racing, a beach barbeque at the Al Bander Resort, a fishing trip, a trip to the Lost Paradise Water Park and a trip to the Bahrain Dolphin Resort, complete with a chance to swim with dolphins. Apart from the MWRsponsored tours, there were many other activities to choose from, including sampling the wide vari ety of cuisine available in Bahrain. I spent most of my time using the internet and enjoying the local food, said Birks. Overall, it was nice to be back on land. Others used the port visit as an opportunity to dis play their athletic abilities. Sailors from Vicksburgs Deck department defeat ed a group of Vicksburg officers, including the ships commanding offi cer, in a basketball game 45-35. The officers played very well, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Jeremy Anthony who played on the Deck department team. We had a lot of fun. The commanding officer played well, the executive officer played well, but in the end, nobody beats Deck. This was Vicksburgs sec ond visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain this deploy ment. Vicksburg is on her final deployment, and is cur rently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photos by MC2 Nick ScottU.S. Navy chiefs grill hamburgers and hot dogs during a steel beach picnic aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Electronics Technician 1st Class Matthew S. Harvey participates in a fresh water washdown aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). United Through Reading Connects Vicksburg FamiliesEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsSailors aboard guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) have been staying connected to their families through the ships United Through Reading program. United Through Reading is a non-profit public benefit organiza tion founded in 1989 with the purpose of uniting deployed service-mem bers with their families back home. Through the program, Sailors are able to video tape themselves reading books to their children and loved ones. The videos are then sent to the Sailors families to view. Kids will touch the screen and real ly feel closer to their {loved ones}, said Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Gregory L. Bosworth, coordinator of the ships United Through Reading program. I was in charge of the program on {USS Carney (DDG 64)}, so when they were looking for someone for Vicksburg, I jumped at the chance, said Bosworth. I participated on my last deployment and sent videos to my nieces and nephews, but now I am sending videos to my wife who is expect ing our first child while I am deployed. Most Sailors who par ticipate in the program take part more than once. I have recorded for my son at least five times, said Operations Specialist 3rd Class Derek J. Marsik. It helps me feel con nected to my family back home. {United Through Reading} helps me and my family stay in touch. Some Sailors aboard Vicksburg received proof of their children enjoy ing their United Through Reading videos. My wife has sent me photos of my kids watch ing the videos I send, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class (SW/ IDW) Mark D. Simpson. I have two girls and one boy and I make videos for all of them. I never new about it before I was on Vicksburg, but this program has made this deployment go so much more smoothly for me and my family. More than 30 Sailors take advantage of this program every month aboard Vicksburg. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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U.S. 4Th Fleet Welcomes Political Advisor To StaffU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) welcomed Lance Hegerle to the staff as the new Political Advisor (POLAD), September 7, at COMUSNAVSO/C4F Headquarters. Over the past 50 years, POLADs have played key roles as liaisons between the Department of State (DoS) and the Department of Defense (DoD) when it comes to interagency communications and collaboration. Political Advisors are well utilized by senior military commanders as they provide analysis and advice to the commander on political perspectives and foreign policy positions on political-military issues and the potential employ ment of military forces. POLADs also engage with partner nations on matters of political interest and resolution of political-military issues impacting oper ations. As POLADs, we can provide the State Department viewpoints on international relations, as well as a wealth of down range Embassy knowledge to the com mander and staff, Hegerle said. We can quickly source information and reach out to interagency partners and embassy personnel. Along with providing a bridge for COMUSNAVSO/C4F and DOS, Hegerle brings regional experience to the staff. His last post was director of Narcotics Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Panama City, Panama, for three-and-a-half years where he helped develop Operation Martillo, a countering trans-national organized crime (C-TOC) mission, with partner nations and interagency organizations, including the drug enforcement agency (DEA) and immigration and customs enforcement (ICE). Hegerle served as the political/ military advisor at the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala from October 2007 to January 2009, where he spent two weeks underway on the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) as the POLAD to the embarked admiral and staff supporting Southern Partnership Station in 2008. He also spent three years of embassy service in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the extreme corner of COMUSNAVSO/C4Fs area of responsi bility. I am very pleased to have Lance join the NAVSO team. He comes with a wealth of experience and I know he will provide all of us with a unique perspective on our operations at sea and ashore, said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, COMUSNAVSO/ C4F. Lance will be vital in achiev ing our goals in the SOUTHCOM (United States Southern Command) area of operations and key to improv ing our ability to work with the State Department, partner nations and our other interagency partners. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military operations by pro viding principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneu ver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosper ity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 9

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Underwood Celebrates 50TH Anniversary Of Trinidad And Tobagos IndependenceSouthern Seas Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class guidedmissile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) pulled into Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, Sept. 7, just in time to help celebrate the coun trys 50th anniversary of independence. The port call provid ed an opportunity for Underwood and the U.S. Embassy to host a recep tion aboard the ship to honor the milestone anniversary. Our countries enjoy a strong relationship through both commercial ties and military partner ships, said Cmdr. Peter Mirisola, commanding officer of Underwood. This bilateral relation ship enhances political and social stability and both nations goal of stemming transnational crime, health promotion and international law. Co-hosting the recep tion and representing the U.S. Embassy was U.S. Charge dAffaires to Trinidad and Tobago, David C. Wolfe. We are here to cele brate the 50th anniversary of Trinidad and Tobagos independence day and to mark more than 200 years of commercial, personal and military ties between our two nations, said Wolfe. This ship and crew are working with nations throughout the Caribbean to combat narcotics traf ficking and build ties so that we can work together to address other com mon problems such as trafficking in persons and responding to natural disasters, Wolfe added. Officers from the Brazilian Naval Ship BNS Greenhalgh (F-46), also visiting Trinidad and Tobago, were invited to join in the festivities. Underwood and Greenhalgh will be sail ing from Port of Spain en route to Key West, Fla., to participate in the multinational UNITAS exer cise later this weekend. Coincidentally, Sept. 7 is also the anniversary of Brazils independence. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of U.S. 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet support U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulSailors man the rails on the forecastle of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) as the ship departs Willemstad, Curacao after a scheduled port visit. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Sailors fire the 40 mm saluting battery as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) approaches Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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CPOs Pay Tribute To Those Who Paved WayStaffTri-base chief petty officers and selectees celebrated Jacksonvilles inaugural CPO Pride Day on Sept 3 at Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall. The event paid tribute to chief petty officers of the past, recognized the leadership of tri-base chiefs and motivated selectees for the completion of the induction process. Navy Region Southeast Command Master Chief Mack Ellis spoke to selectees about the responsibilities of a Navy chief. Every step you take, every word you speak, youre representing an entire force, he said. Youre representing an exclusive organization thats known as a Chief Petty Officers Mess. Guest of honor, Chief Commissary Steward James C. Philips, a permanently appointed veteran and surviving crewmem ber of USS Luce (DD 522), spoke of the important influence CPO leader ship had on his years as a junior Sailor. We have all learned true leadership from the finest example any young man has ever given chief petty officers, Philips said. He urged the chiefs and selectees to remember those who came before them. Chief Select Masterat-Arms James Watkins of Mayport Security was among the 30 select ees who put the advice of Philips into immedi ate action. The group of selectees visited with and served lunch to homeless veterans at Clara White Mission Monday after noon. One of the biggest parts of the Navy is giv ing back to the commu nity that were in, here at Clara White, some of the veterans that are occu pants here fell on some hard times and were just unable to pull themselves out of a hole, Watkins said, So heres our chance to come and say thank you for what you did for us. -Photos by MCC(SEL) William TownsendAbove, Chief Petty Officers and Selects stand outside of the Clara White Mission during a community relations project held during CPO Pride Day on Sept. 3. Bottom right, Selects help feed homeless veterans at the mission. Bottom left, CPO Selects stand at the Veterans Memorial Wall. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 11

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-Photos by Paige GnannAmber Lea buys sweets for her children from the USS Klakring family readiness group (FRG) at the Navy Exchange Mayport Cupcake Wars on Sept. 7. The Klakring team won the event with its margarita cupcakes, followed closely by Mayport Harbor Security in second place, and a tied third for USS Underwood FRG and Mayport Security. Klakring Wins Cupcake WarsCupcake War competitors line the atrium of the off-base Mayport Navy Exchange during the second annual Cupcake Wars. Groups were able to sell their baked goods to benefit group and MWR funds. See more photos online at www.mayportmirror.com. Mayport NEX will host Customer Appreciation Day on Sept. 28 with door prizes, refreshments, tasting, unadvertised specials, and a special demo by Chef Marty Griffin on Kitchen Aid products. Enter to win a special door prize from Swarovski. You must be present to win from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Navy Announces RC To AC Program For Reservists To Pursue Active Duty CareersFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy is establish ing a new augmenta tion program that will offer enlisted Reservists opportunities to con vert to permanent active duty careers, as outlined in NAVADMIN 274/12, released September 9. The Reserve Component to Active Component (RC to AC) augmentation program seeks to place qualified enlisted reserve members in specific rates and year groups to fill active community needs in the fleet. Once released from their Reserve obligations and assigned to their new billets, RC to AC partici pants will become active duty Sailors in every respect, including being eligible for AC advance ment, permanent change of station orders, and selective reenlistment bonus eligibility. The active Navy needs Sailors with talent and experience, and the Navy Reserve is a great place to find them, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military per sonnel plans and policy. Through this program, were aiming to lever age our Reserve Sailors skill sets and experience to place select reserve Sailors in needed billets in the Fleet. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the RC to AC program is designed to streamline Sailors transi tion between Reserve and active service. Additionally, the RC to AC program comple ments the variety of ini tiatives Navy uses to fill needed operational bil lets, enabling Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warf ighting needs. To improve the effi ciency of Reserve to active conversions, the RC to AC program changes the application process. Rather than meet with a recruiter to discuss active duty prospects, interested Reservists can apply to Navy Personnel Command (PERS-92) through his or her unit and Naval Reserve Activity commanding officer in response to advertised vacancies with specific proficiency, yeargroup and other require ments. Vacancies will be advertised via the GovDelivery system, and will specify available augmentation quotas by rate and year group. Reservists can sign up for GovDelivery notifications through the Navy Reserve Forces Command homepage at www.navy reserve.navy.mil. Quotas and adver tised vacancies will be reviewed regularly and updated based on needs of the Fleet. Selections are made by AC enlisted commu nity managers, who will consider each applicants performance history, experience, proficiency, and time in grade. Sailors must also meet the eligibility criteria outlined in MILPERSMAN arti cle 1326-021, including in-rate proficiency and physical and medical readiness requirements. Additionally, Sailors must be within the advertised year group and not within two years of their AC High Year Tenure (HYT) dates based upon their active duty service date. Once selected, a Sailor will be given the opportunity to negotiate for a billet based on the needs of the Navy and his or her pref erences. Orders to the new billet will include a projected rotation date and authorization for permanent change of station expenses, if appropriate. To learn more about the RC to AC program, Sailors may speak with their chain of command, read the NAVADMIN and MILPERSMAN article at www.npc.navy.mil, or call the NPC customer service center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC, (1-866-827-5672) or e-mail at CSCMailbox@ navy.mil.Voting Assistance Eases Registration, Ballot ProcessAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith Election Day about two months away, absentee military and overseas citizen vot ers can enjoy a stream lined process to register, obtain a ballot and exer cise their right to vote, a Federal Voting Assistance Program official said in a Pentagon news confer ence today. Pam Mitchell, the pro grams acting director, outlined new outreach initiatives designed to make voting assistance more innovative and user-friendly than ever before, with an emphasis on engaging junior mili tary personnel, the largest segment of the Defense Department population. We firmly believe that voting assistance for our absentee voters is abso lutely the best that its ever been, Mitchell said. There are a lot of tools in our arsenal to help those voters both register, get an absentee ballot and to exercise their right to vote. Mitchell explained that FVAP offers a variety of tools through its online wizard, which among other features, can even help users ready bal lot envelopes for posting by printing the correct address on them. FVAP has customized its tools, Mitchell said, focusing on the 18-to-25year-old demographic, given their familiarity and general preference for gleaning information from the Internet and communicating through social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. We have a mobile website we just unveiled last week so that using a smartphone or a tablet from anywhere you may be, you can obtain access to our information and our tools, Mitchell said. In January, Mitchell said, officials also took to email accounts to broaden outreach. We use email blasts to every member within a dot-mil email address to remind them how they can reg ister to vote and that its time to vote, Mitchell said. Outside of the electronic domain, FVAP main tains a call center that operates five days a week from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT and can be used by vot ers worldwide to get help on how to file an absentee ballot. For in-person interac tion, Mitchell said, vot ing assistance officers and installation voter assistance offices remain available as prescribed by the 2009 Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act. She acknowledged findings in a recently released DOD Inspector General report that indicated difficul ties in reaching a number of IVA offices based on dated contact informa tion. In a military environment, things change, Mitchell said, citing per sonnel movements and joint basing as factors. We ... agree with the IG that the most important thing we can do is to find the most effective way to maintain assistance for all of our absentee vot ers, and we are absolute ly committed [to that]. Investing in intuitive, easy-to-use Web-based tools, supplemented by well-trained unit voting assistance officers -rather than installation voter assistance offices -could substantially reduce cost and improve voting assis tance, she added. By law, all states must offer electronic delivery of the ballot, but the voter, when applying for the ballot, can elect to receive it that way or may elect to receive it in the mail, Mitchell said. Over the last six months, we spent a lot of time reaching out to every single one of the 221 installation voting offices. Were confident that the information on our website today is accurate and has the most upto-date contact [informa tion]. Between now and the election, Mitchell said, FVAP officials will continue to make weekly calls to each of the installation voter assistance offices s to ensure they are accu rately able to capture changes that may occur. Our goal is to make sure that anyone who wants to vote has the resources and tools they need from anywhere in the world to success fully exercise that right, Mitchell said. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 13

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FFSC Workshop Schedule Focuses On Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 15, 10 a.m.-until, IA Families Outing To Zoo Jacksonville Zoo Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Sept. 17-21, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.. SAPR Initial Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., PFM/ CFS Forum FFSC Room 702 Sept. 19, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Room 719 Sept. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 24, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 24-27, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Sept. 26, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Upcoming Navy Tri-Base Job FairFrom FFSCNaval Station Mayport, Kings Bay SUBASE, and NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) will sponsor the Navy Tri-Base Job Fair on Wednesday, Sept. 19 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center. Active duty, separating, retiring and retired ser vice members, military spouses, family mem bers and separated ser vice members up to 180 days after separation date are eligible to attend. Attendees are encouraged to bring several copies of their resumes and dress for interviewing. Local, state and national companies will be collecting resumes for numerous jobs. The fol lowing types of compa nies will be at the Job Fair: energy, defense contrac tors, government, law enforcement, financial healthcare, engineering logistics, aviation, naval ship repair, education, industrial, construction, maritime, technology, and more. The Job Fair and park ing are free. The Morocco Shrine Center is located at 3,800 St. Johns Bluff Road in the Southside of Jacksonville. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 904270-6600 ext. 1700.City To Offer Military Vets Free Professional Career CounselingFrom the City of JacksonvilleCity of Jacksonville, in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition (JMVC) Jobs for Vets ini tiative, will offer career counseling to military veterans and service mem bers planning their transition back to civilian life. This free service will be offered at City Hall Mezzanine Floor, 117 W. Duval St., on the third Thursday of each month from 3-6 p.m., starting Sept. 20. Military veterans who are interested in career counseling, resume help, interview prepara tion, translation of mili tary skills to civilian jobs, and overall assistance in preparing for a success ful post-military career are encouraged to take advantage of the service. The Military Affairs, Veteran and Disabled Services Department of the City of Jacksonville and the JMVC are dedi cated to helping veterans and their families transi tion to and excel in civil ian life. A key to achieving this success is having the right approach and guid ance in finding the best career for each veteran. The following JMVC employment staffing companies are also offer ing career counseling services via telephone, at no charge to veterans, Monday through Friday: Mondays: Stafftime, 904-215-1313 Tuesdays: Incepture, 877-347-7151 Wednesdays: I-Tech Personnel, 904-381-1911 Thursdays: Apex Systems, 866-594-2739 Fridays: Genuent, 904551-1906 Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 28: One Night in Mexico. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a fiesta! Well have a taco and nacho bar, mock-aritas, jalapeo eating contest, Spanish music and much more. 246-0347 MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 14: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Sept. 15: International Coastal Clean-Up. Great volunteer opportunity. 8-10 a.m. at the Jetties. Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 16: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Houston Texans. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $10. Sept. 17: St. Johns Town Center Shopping Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Sept. 19: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 22: Kennedy Space Center Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. Cost $20. Sign up deadline Sept. 18. Sept. 23: Laser Tag. 7-9 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free. Sept. 26: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 27: Liberty Bash 4-7:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free food, DJ, Laser Tag, games, rock wall, t-shirts and more! FREE Sept. 28: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Cost $5. Sept. 30: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Cincinnati Bengals. Van departs 2 p.m. Cost $10. LIBERTYSept. 28: One Night in Mexico 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a fiesta! Well have a taco and nacho bar, mock-aritas, jalapeo eating contest, Spanish music and much more. 246-0347 KID Teeing Up With CPO Selects-Photo by MCC(SEL) William TownsendChief Select Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) Travis Lea from USS Carney quiets the green as his team gets ready to tee off during the annual CPO Golf Tournament held on Sept. 6 at Windy Harbor Golf Course at Naval Station Mayport. Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., The After Party Mayport Sandbox Monday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7: 30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT A four-part prerequisite training program, which will prepare Mayports personnel for safe and effective incorporation into Mayports HIT pro gram. All four training segments of Intro to HIT must be completed before entry into HIT and par ticipation in the WOD (workout of the day). Intro to HIT includes protocol review, physi cal assessment, Rowing 101, pillar and movement preparation, flexibil ity training, tissue man agement, refueling and the fundamentals of the Olympic lifts, the squat and the pull-up. Tuesday 6:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp Take your entire com mand to the next level, oceanfront! This com mand class is packed full of challenging cardio drills, muscular resistance training and explosive intervals. Meets at the Sandbox and can accommodate 200+ personnel, weather permitting. 6:30 a.m., HIT 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Noon, Intro to HIT Wednesday 5:30 p.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 5:30 p.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Weight Training For Warfighters 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Friday 7 a.m., Spinning MWR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 15

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Friday, Sept. 14 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association Unit #290, 390 Mayport Rd., will hold an enchi lada and Spanish rice dinner from 5-8 p.m. The event is open to the public. Take out orders are welcome. Donation $8. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, Sept. 15 An Eating and Growing Seasonably Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow cool season veg etables will be held at Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cost is $10 with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Please call Jeannie to register, 255-7450. Find out from a park ranger at 2 p.m. what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so important. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Families are invited to learn more about what 4-H has to offer by attending free expo from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds, 510 Fairgrounds Place. Clubs leaders and mem bers from around the county will be available to answer questions about 4-H, and help kids find just the right club. There will be free games and activities, free parking, and free hot dogs. 4-H is a national organization that helps young people develop knowledge and skills to become produc tive members of society. 4-H helps youth to meet the diverse challenges of todays world by building self-confidence, learning responsibility and mak ing positive decisions. In a safe environment, 4-H brings youth and adults together to learn everyday skills for living. To learn more, call (904) 2557450and ask to speak to a local 4-H agent, or log on to duval.ifas.ufl.edu/4-H. shtml or www.4-h.org. Monday, Sept. 17 Haven Hospice is hosting a grief and loss sup port group from 6-7:30 p.m. This support group is for parents and care givers who have experi enced the loss of a child. The event will take place at the Haven office at 200 Southpark Blvd., Suite 207,St. Augustine, FL 32086. For more infor mation, contact the local office at 904-810-2377. Tuesday, Sept. 18 Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council, Duval County Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 Presents an Agent Orange Town Hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 Saint Johns Bluff Road South. Agent Orange, a herbi cide chemical containing dioxin, used to defoliate the jungle in Vietnam may have exposed more than 2 million U.S. military per sonnel from 1961 to 1970. This panel discussion pres ents the facts one needs to know that affects not only the Vietnam veteran, but his children and grand children. Our Town Hall meeting hopes to present and collect stories of how Agent Orange is affect ing Vietnam veterans and their families. The United States Government just recently added Blue Water Navy Ships to a list that is now allowed to apply for veterans benefits. The Department of Veteran Affairs said that surviving spouses and decedents of Vietnam veterans might also be entitled to benefits. This is for the Vietnam vet, Children of Vietnam vets, grandchildren of Vietnam vets, and any one that has a Vietnam veteran in their familys history. Saturday, Sept. 22 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an adventur ous hike to discover the islands wondrous wild flowers. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Thursday, Sept. 27 The Duval County Extension Offices/ UF IFAS will be offer ing a workshop on Fall Gardening at the Mandarin Garden Club, 2892 Loretto Road, Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The cost is $5 for mate rials and light snacks. Payment can be made at the door. Topics covered will be Fall Gardening and Landscape Tips, Planting Wildflowers and Misconceptions about Trees. To pre-register, please call Becky at 904255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net with your name and phone number. Saturday, Sept. 29 The Duval County Extension Office and the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs District IV will be hosting the 2012 GardenFest at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N McDuff Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. The time is 9-2 p.m. The cost is $10 without lunch or $15 with lunch. Drinks will be provided. To reg ister, call Rachel Wilson at 904-272-4252 or pick up a registration form at the extension office. The deadline to register is Sept. 24. Speakers are Terry DelValle, Options for Managing Pests, Jim DeValerio, Vegetable Gardening Gold Nuggets, Larry Figart, Money does grow on Trees, and Joe Stewards, Water: Waste Not, Want Not. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. The pro gram will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reser vations are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. Saturday, Oct. 20 Crafters Wanted! Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach will host its annual Craft Fair and Fall Festival on from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. To reserve your booth, please con tact the church office today at 249-5370. The City of Atlantic Beach Family Fun Day and Campout under the Stars returns to Jack Russell Park, 1:30-10 p.m. Our 19th Annual Campout is one of the Citys most popu lar events. Reserve your campsite early before they sell out! Campers can reserve a 10 x 10 camp site for a $10 fee before Oct. 1, and $15 after Sept. 30. This year continues the Saturday Family Fun Day activities and per formances for kids of all ages! Afternoon and evening events, includ ing our Twilight Movie are free and open to the public. Russell Park field is located on Plaza St., north of Atlantic Beach City Hall on Seminole Rd. Registration forms are on the City website and campers can reg ister by mail, or choose your campsite at the Recreation Office, 716 Ocean Blvd., weekdays 8-noon and 1-4:30 p.m. Call 247-5828 for more information or visit www. coab.us/events. Sunday, Nov. 11 Organizers of The Old City Music Fest will be held at The MarketPlace in St. Augustine (I-95 & Hwy 207). The Charlie Daniels Band, Gloriana, Craig Morgan and home town favorites 38 Special are already confirmed for the exciting day of music. Along with numerous local businesses, nation al organizations based in the area such as the Wounded Warrior Project will be involved in the event. Tickets, which start at $29, are on sale now. 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Veteran Special Recognition Ceremony to honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm vet erans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of Special Recognition in a cere mony on Nov. 8 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The application deadline to register for the honor is Oct. 5. The applica tion can be found on Congressman Crenshaws site: www.crenshaw. house.gov. Another Sign-The Musical, Tickets On Sale Now Thursday, Sept. 27 at Florida State College, South Campus Military Appreciation Night for Another Sign The Musical. Mayport and NAS JAX USO have tickets on sale now for this show at 50 percent off, $15 cash only please. Another Sign approaches home lessness from many angles. For more information on the musical, visit www.itsanothersign.com Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an individual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or email ing me at herb@jaxsig narama.com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned fran chise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwa ter and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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DoD Launches Tomodachi Registry WebsiteFrom DoDThe Department of Defense (DoD) launched today the Operation Tomodachi Registry web site. The website provides location-based radiation dose estimate reports for adults and children com prising the DoD-affiliated population on or near mainland Japan follow ing the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of March 11, 2011. DoD-affiliated mem bers who were in Japan during the nuclear reac tor crisis, medical providers, and the public at large will be able to download location-based radiation dose estimate reports from the website. These reports include medical interpretations and pro vide comparisons of the Operation Tomodachi radiation doses with more commonly experienced radiation doses. The website also includes information on the event, DoDs response to the crisis, and answers to frequently asked questions. By the end of the calendar year, individu als in the registry may request a dose assess ment that is individually tailored for them, based on more detailed location data that they can provide using the Contact Us function on the Operation Tomodachi Registry web site. After extensive envi ronmental monitoring and analysis, it has been determined that none of the nearly 70,000 mem bers of the DoD-affiliated population (service members, DoD civilian employees and contrac tors, and family members of service members and civilian employees) who were on or near the mainland of Japan between March 12 and May 11, 2011, are known to have been exposed to radiation at levels associated with adverse medical condi tions. Operation Tomodachi Registry, which will be housed in a secure data base containing the names, locations, and radiation doses for all members of the DoDaffiliated population, will be completed by Dec. 31, 2012. Personally identified information will be omit ted from this website. The registry can be found online at http:// registry.csd.disa.mil/otr.Use ASVAB/AFCT To Expand Conversion, Career OpportunitiesNavy Personnel Command Public AffairsSailors interested in changing ratings to improve career options can use their Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) scores to help deter mine which ratings they may qualify for, officials said Sept. 7. The ASVAB score is a major fac tor used to determine which ratings a recruit is eligible to pursue, said Senior Chief Navy Counselor (SW/AW) Mark Rush, force career counselor, Navy Personnel Command (NPC). The ASVAB is given to all non-prior-ser vice recruits to determine eligibility for enlistment, future Navy-wide advance ment examination participation and Class A School training qualification. Basically, the ASVAB tests an indi viduals knowledge and aptitude in nine areas: arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, mathematics knowledge, general sci ence, electronics information, auto shop, mechanical comprehension and assembling objects. The combined scores from different ASVAB areas determine which ratings prospective recruits are best qualified for and are used again for Sailors looking to change ratings, or convert in PerformTo-Serve/Fleet Rating Identification Engine (FR/PTS). Low ASVAB scores minimize Sailors conversion options, however, Sailors who have improved their educational experience since join ing the Navy through completion of college courses or certain Navy E-Learning courses via Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) may be eligible to retest with the Armed Forces Classification Test (AFCT). Retesting using the AFCT may give Sailors more opportunities to qualify for in-service rating conversions, said Rush. The command career counselor can update AFCT scores in FR/PTS and then re-qualify the Sailor to get updated results. The new scores will become the Sailors official score even if it is lower than the previous test, so it is impor tant that Sailors work with their career counselor or educational services office to determine if retesting is in their best interest. The ASVAB and AFCT are just one part of the equation for Sailors who wish to convert. Sailors should be screened at their reporting career development board to review ASVAB scores and not wait until they reach their FR/PTS window, according to Rush. If the scores are below 50, it may be beneficial for the Sailor to take the AFCT to improve conversion opportunities before they reach their FR/PTS window. At every CDB, commands should review rating community health slides found on the enlisted community manager pages on the NPC website to let the Sailors know what their opportunities are to remain in their current rating or what the conversion opportunities are, said Rush. Early detection and early engagement is the key to success. Retesting can be administered on shore at Personnel Support Detachments and on board large plat form ships. MILPERSMAN 1236-010 lists criteria required for a retest. For more information, Sailors should speak with their command career counselor or educational services office. Maintaining The Equipment-Photo by MC3 A.J. JonesAviation Ordnanceman Airman Matthew DePumpo of HSL-48 Detachment 7 washes an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck of the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is on deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Florida Vet Affairs Launches New Campaign To Connect Veterans With Earned BenefitsFrom FVAFlorida veterans may be missing out on millions of dollars in benefits to which they are entitled, so the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs has launched a statewide multimedia campaign to connect them with feder al and state benefits and services they have earned. Floridas 1.6 million veterans range from the nations largest popu lation of World War II vets to those returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. Just as the states veteran population spans the generations, so does the outreach cam paign utilizing every thing from traditional newspaper ads and dis plays to a new website and smart phone app. Some of Floridas vet erans fought for our freedom in the days before television while others never knew a time with out personal comput ers, yet they all share the admiration of a grate ful nation, said Mike Prendergast, executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs. If they arent receiving the benefits and services they right fully earned, we must use every approach available to reach them and set things right. Floridas veteran population is the third larg est in the nation, and its Department of Veterans Affairs plays a critical role in advocating for veter ans and connecting them to federal and state ben efits and services they have earned. Currently, Florida veterans draw down more than $13.7 billion a year in federal compensation, education and pension benefits, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical services and military retired pay, but agency leaders say veterans are leaving mil lions more on the table. For example, of Floridas 1.6 million vet erans, only 260,000 are receiving service-related compensation or pension from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition, many of Floridas 449,000 Vietnam veterans may be unaware they could be entitled to a monthly payment for a service-connected dis ability if they suffer from one of several diseases associated with expo sure to herbicides such as Agent Orange diseases ranging from Ischemic Heart Disease and Hodgkins Disease to Type 2 diabetes to prostate cancer. Currently, only one third of Vietnam veterans nationally are enrolled in VA health care or have applied for benefits they earned as a result of military service. We strongly encour age our eligible Vietnam veterans to enroll in health care and apply for service-related dis ability payments, said Prendergast. We want our veterans to be identified, treated and compensated for any effects they may be having as a result of exposure. To help bring a fresh new awareness to the situation, the 23-yearold state agency unveiled a new logo, website, smart phone app, col lateral materials, public service announcements and outreach strategies, and reframed its mission, vision and motto. The department embraced a renewed commitment to reach Vietnam veterans, Floridas largest veteran demographic; women veterans, who num ber more than 140,000; and younger, return ing veterans, since more than 230,000 veterans of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom call Florida home. The new, easier-tonavigate website will act as a portal to help vet erans find the informa tion that they need to access benefits and ser vices more efficiently and effectively. All of the English and Spanish public service announce ments and radio spots will raise awareness about the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs and its services, while also directing veterans to the website. In addition, the mobile application, offered in the Android and Apple markets, will not only integrate with the website and offer veterans reminders and updates about services through push notifications, but also lead veterans to Employ Florida Vets, the states veteran employ ment website, to help them find jobs. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 13, 2012 17