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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00266


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Officer in Charge Navy Food Management Team MayportMaster Chief Culinary Specialist Paulette Williams of the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville, Navy Food Management Team was named the Women of Color (WOC) 2012 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Technology AllStar Award winner. Technology All-Stars are accomplished women of color with approxi mately 22 or more years in the workforce and who have demonstrated excel lence in the workplace and in their communities. Williams is the senior instructor at Navy Food Management Team Mayport. She leads the training and development efforts for all of the Navy culinary specialists in the Southeastern Region, including afloat galleys onboard 14 U.S. Navy ships and 21 shore-duty galleys, including Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Williams educational and leadership efforts focus on the areas of food pro duction, sanitation, food safety, training, technical management, and administration. Additionally, Williams holds a Masters in Health Science from Trident University and is an avid volunteer involved with community events in Jacksonville. I am extremely hon ored and excited to be a recipient of the Women of Color STEM Technology All-Star Award. I couldnt have imagined that I would ever have the opportunity to receive this very prestigious award, said Williams, a 24-year veteran of the Navy. I am extremely thankful and grateful to my chain of command for their complete support and nomination for this award. This is definitely one of the highest honors Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com NEX Celebrates CPO Selects Williams Named Women of Color Technology All-Star Award Winner-Photo by Daphne Cassani CSCM Paulette Williams serves lunch to hungry Sailors and Marines during a site vist to the galley onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. -Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Aviation Machinists Mate Luis Ruiz shows his son the guitar that he won during a raffle for Chief Selects held at the on base Navy Exchange during its annual CPO Select Uniform Night on Aug. 29. See Williams, Page 10Help Clean Up Mayport BeachFrom Mayport EnvironmentalNaval Station Mayport is one of the official clean-up sites for the 2012 International Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 15. Volunteers are needed to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport. Participants should plan to meet at 8 a.m. at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 10 a.m. Volunteers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Community service hours may be earned. Pre-registration is not required. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact NS Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 2706781. Navy Sponsors Tri-Base Job FairFrom FFSCNaval Station Mayport, Kings Bay SUBASE, and NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) will sponsor the Navy Tri-Base Job Fair on Wednesday, Sept. 19 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center. Active duty, separating, retiring and retired service members, military spouses, family members and separated service mem bers up to 180 days after separation date are eligible to attend. Attendees are encouraged to bring several copies of their resumes and dress for interviewing. Local, state and national companies will be collecting resumes for numerous jobs. The Job Fair and parking are free. The Morocco Shrine Center is located at 3,800 St. Johns Bluff Road in the Southside of Jacksonville. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 904-270-6600 ext. 1700.Navy Focuses On Suicide Prevention AwarenessFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsSeptember is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and the Navy is using the month as a launch pad to focus on Navys ongoing suicide prevention efforts, officials announced in NAVADMIN 259/12 released Aug. 27. During each week of the month resources will be available to guide discus sion on stress navigation and suicide prevention con cepts. The weekly concepts to be explored are: building resilience, navigating stress, encouraging bystander intervention to A-C-T (Ask Care Treat), and reducing barriers for seeking support through counseling. The tools and resourc es are available on www. suicide.navy.mil and www.navynavstress.com. These tools emphasize the themes of dedication, optimism, determination and humor. Additionally, the winner of the Suicide Prevention Public Service Announcement Contest will be announced Sept. 28. The winning video will be avail able year-round online and will be broadcast regularly on Direct-to-Sailor televi sion, the American Forces Network and Pentagon channel. Our people are our great est asset, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Behavioral Health Programs director, Bureau of Naval Personnel. Were promoting a lifestyle of total fitness physically, mentally, socially and spiritually to ensure our Sailors are best able to meet the challenges they will face in todays Navy. See Prevent, Page 12

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Psychologist, Carl Rogers was 22 years old when he entered Union Theological Seminary in New York in 1924. While attending seminary, he participated in a seminar organized to explore reli gious doubts. Rogers later said of the group, The majority of members...in thinking their way through ques tions they had raised, thought themselves right out of religious work. I was one. Some Christians might balk at Rogers decision but there are two life les sons that may be extract ed from his life example. First, never intellectualize God. In other words, God has never been nor will He ever be confined by our minds. In fact, the moment you and I try to figure God out, we miss the most important aspect of who God is. God is not known through intellect or feeling, but rather by faith. Furthermore, Paul reminds us that God in his wisdom saw to it that the world would never know him through human wisdom (1 Cor. 1:21a, KJV). Thus many miss God by 18 inches (the average distance between ones head and heart) simply because they try to know him via human wisdom. It is not our songs, tears or the length of our prayers that grips the heart of God but rather our faith. And without faith it is impos sible to please God (Hebrews 11:6a, NIV). Notice what the text does not sayit does not say without prayer, albeit we need to pray; it does not say without going to church. The point is this, the aforementioned acts are the results of faith and that is why our faith pleas es God. The second life prin ciple Rogers experience teaches us is that we all are prone to doubt God, especially during uncom fortable times. If we are honest, we all can admit that there are times when our faith is fickle, incon sistent, and ambivalent. During Sunday wor ship we sing My faith looks up to Thee .until we receive bad news or things do not work out as we have planned. During these times our faith waivers and quite frankly it is hard to believe God is in the mist of our dis appointment. How do we stay consistent in our faith during these times? James 1:4a reminds us to Let endurance have its perfect result.be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing. Cross references: Hebrews 11:6 : Heb 7:19 The operable word in this text is endurance. In other words, it is through endurance that we learn that life is not a onetime 100-yard-dash in which the faster we run, that faster is it over. No one would mind going through a life challenge if it were that simple. But facing a life chal lenge that last weeks, months or even years is a another matter. Gods goal in allowing us to go through the crucibles of life is to perfect (mature) our faith so that we may help others through the very things we thought we could not endure.Knowing God Is An Act Of Heart, Not HeadLt. Calvin Gardner Sr. Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINS STREETBM3 Chad Lambert USS The Sullivans The weather, the beach and its close to home. IT2 Jerita Leverette USS The Sullivans Theres a lot to do in the area. Its better than Virginia. GSE1 Jose Diaz SERMC The weather, the peo ple are friendly and there are a lot of family activi ties around here. This is a small base with great ser vices. OS3 Laquanta George NS Mayport Small, and interact with superiors. Also superiors are interested in my wellbeing. BM2 Mykei Cruz Harbor Ops Being a part of Harbor Operations department and being able to cross train on day-to-day activi ties.SH3 Randolph CoplandBase Housing Relaxation and tran quility. Morale on base is excellent. The people I work for are excellent. Its paradise for the Navy.What do you like about being stationed at NS Mayport? This school year will be marked by many of the traditional signs of chil dren returning to school fresh hair cuts, new shoes, the latest back packs, sharpened pencils, and the grateful smiles of loving parents who have longed for that first day of school. While it is cer tainly important that the school year begins well, it is even more impor tant that parents and schools work together to make sure the entire school year continues well. Parents with chil dren entering school for the first time may experi ence some apprehension about where and how to become involved in their young childs school life. More experienced parents may struggle with making the transition as children move into new grades, schools, or districts. The involvement of a caring adult in the school life of a child can not be overemphasized. Research has suggested again and again that stu dent achievement can be tied to many factors, one of which is support from home. Many families struggle to balance work demands, family needs, and extra-curricular activities. Here are a few simple suggestions which could make a big differ ence in your childs suc cess in school: Communicate with the teacher on a regular basis Early in the school year, clarify how infor mation will be shared between home and school and how concerns and problems will be han dled. With the technology available, many teach ers post information on a classroom website, blog, or e-mail. Volunteer for school activities Schools, espe cially middle and high schools, struggle to get enough parent support to sustain programs and events. Your willingness to make yourself available will help create a coop erative working relation ship between you and the school. If your work schedule does not permit volunteering at daytime events, consider help ing out in the evening at sporting events, with tutoring programs, or pro viding refreshments for a PTA meeting. Monitor homework completion and work together on assignments which invite family par ticipation Set a regular time for homework, cre ate an actual schedule, post it where everyone in the family can see it, and stick to it. Find a place within your home where you can concentrate, away from distractions. Set and enforce appropri ate rules for homework time. During homework time, be available to work with your child. Know your childs friends and the friends parents it is important to know who your child interacts with in and out of school to make sure that you approve of the activities your child is involved in. An easy way to accomplish this is to participate in school events and to become involved in aca demic activities. Sporting events, PTA meetings, and choral concerts give you an opportunity to meet not only your childs friends, but also their par ents. Schedule informal meetings You do not need to wait for Open House to have a face-toface meeting with your childs teacher. Schedule a meeting early in the year especially is your child has a learning disability or had trouble last school year. These meetings should be brief and to the point. Write down your questions. It is important that you share your con cerns in a manner which demonstrates purpose, caring, and respect. Know your childs academic program Understanding the goals for a certain grade level or for a particular sub ject will better prepare you to support your childs learning at home. You can log on to www. SoarAtHome.org to view by grade level and subject the core curriculum your child will be responsible for this year. For elec tive classes, the syllabus or course outline can give you a better idea of what will be expected in a class. Looking at your childs textbook will also give you a good idea of what will be taught. Review your childs daily schedule Become familiar with your childs daily schedule. It will help you understand your childs day and how it may impact his or her learn ing. Middle and high school students may only have of their schedule each day. Note which classes are on A day and which ones are on B. One of the days may be mea surably more difficult or require much more homework. Knowing this will allow you to help your child become better orga nized. Establish a spot for communication While elementary schools often send home important information in the back pack, secondary schools leave it up to the stu dent on how to best get information home. By checking the backpack or establishing a special spot for handouts, home work to be signed, notes from the teacher, etc., you will stay better informed. This spot can also then be the place where you can put signed tests, notes to the teacher, or even your childs lunch. Having this spot can really reduce morning where did I put that headaches! At first glance, many of these suggestions seem rather simple but they can require a bit of commit ment. With a little help from home, this could be your childs best school year ever. Be that parent who makes a difference! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Tips For Fostering School ConnectednessJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowing Catholic Charities USA1-800-919-9338 www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Navy Medicine Announces ReorganizationFrom U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) detailed its reorgani zation and realignment plan for the Navy Medicine enterprise in a message to its staff Aug. 30. The message, sent from BUMED chief of staff Rear Adm. Rebecca McCormick-Boyle, announced the implementa tion phase of the reorganization designed to build a more effec tive, efficient and responsive organization. Over the past several months, Navy Medicine lead ership discussed and priori tized organizational opportunities and challenges to build a better and more integrated command around Navy and Marine Corps leadership, wrote McCormick-Boyle. As a result, we are engaged in executing a realignment plan for the Navy Medicine enterprise that will meet these requirements. The realignment is also closely linked to Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Matthew Nathans strategic vision for Navy Medicine which puts an emphasis on three core objec tives-value, readiness and joint ness, according to McCormickBoyle. We must concentrate on bringing more value to our cus tomers and stakeholders across the enterprise and improve our ability to operate in a joint environment while maintain ing a high state of medical readiness for our naval forces, McCormick-Boyle wrote. As Vice Adm. Nathan often says, when the world dials 9-1-1, it is not to make an appointment and we are taking the steps nec essary to ensure we are ready to answer without delay. The biggest change under way involved re-scoping the organization, responsibilities and structure of what was Navy Medicine Support Command (NMSC). In July 2012, NMSC was renamed and re-scoped from a Regional command into Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) with a primary focus on education and training. The new command is head quartered in San Antonio, Texas and has detachments in Jacksonville, Fla., and Bethesda, Md. NMETC will work closely with BUMED to ensure Navy medical personnel continue to be equipped with the best training military medicine can provide. They will also work closely with the leadership at the Medical Education and Training Campus (METC) in San Antonio to ensure Navy personnel are well-supported as well as maintain seamless and focused training for hospital corpsmen who keep Sailors and Marines medically fit and ready. Our job in Navy Medicine is to support the forward deployed force and ensure personnel readiness. Navy Medicine keeps the nations naval forces medically ready to operate around the world in support of U.S. national objec tives, wrote McCormick-Boyle. Our main mission is support to the warfighter and were in the fight to build an organization that can do just that. NMSC and its leadership did an outstanding job throughout their existence, but as the needs of our customers change and the dynamics of the environ ment we operate in changes, we also have to flex and adapt to meet those shifting require ments. The overall realignment was developed to enhance account ability, command and control, and ensure representation of Navy equities both across the enterprise and throughout the Fleet. Many of NMSCs for mer responsibilities will be absorbed by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) departments and many of NMSCs lower echelon commands will be function ally realigned to departments within BUMED including the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center which will be realigned under BUMEDs health care operations depart ment. The realignment also estab lished two new department codes, M2 to manage all research and development and M7 for education and train ing. Rear Adm. Bruce Doll has been appointed as BUMED M2 and will report to BUMED in October 2012. Rear Adm. William Roberts, who is report ing as the commandant of METC next month, will serve as BUMED M7. According to McCormick-Boyle, all person nel impacted by the realign ment have been notified and implementation of plan is underway. Our people are our most valuable asset and they enable us to meet our missions. With that, we are committed to mak ing the realignment process as transparent and seamless as possible for all of you, she said. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 personnel who provide health care support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high opera tional tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world.TRICARE Offers Plethora Of Pharmacy ChoicesTRICARE Management ActivityTRICARE beneficia ries have plenty of phar macy options, includ ing military pharmacies, TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and 56,000 network pharma cies. Wondering which option to choose from? Military treatment facility (MTF) pharma cies fill prescriptions free of charge, up to a 90-day supply for most medica tions. Not all medications are available at MTF phar macies, but beneficiaries can use the TRICARE formulary search tool, http://pec.ha.osd.mil/ formulary_search.php to find out if a medication is available. Registered users may also use TRICARE Online to request pre scription refills at www. tricareonline.com. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery is anoth er low-cost option giv ing beneficiaries low or no copays. Its safe, convenient and easy to use from home, when traveling on a tempo rary assignment or mov ing to another TRICARE region. Prescriptions are mailed to any address in the United States and its territories. Beneficiaries can get up to a 90-day supply for most medica tions with minimal outof-pocket costs. Once registered, beneficiaries can sign up for automatic refills or request them by mail, phone or online._ TRICARE recommends home delivery option for prescriptions needed on a regular basis. Beneficiaries who choose to fill or refill pre scriptions at a retail net work pharmacy can get up to a 30-day supply. Certain vaccines are cov ered for zero copayment at participating network pharmacies. Call 1-877363-1303 or visit www. express-scripts.com/ TRICARE/ to find a par ticipating pharmacy. TRICARE provides a world-class pharmacy benefit to all eligible uni formed service mem bers, retirees and family members, including ben eficiaries age 65 and older. Coverage is the same regardless of beneficiary category or health care plan being used. The pharmacy pro gram is available world wide, but there are some limitations in having pre scriptions refilled in some overseas areas. Home delivery does deliver to the Army Post Office (APO) and Fleet Post Office (FPO) over seas. Working together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com a CFC participant Provided as a public service THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 De Wert Stops In Toledo During 1812 Tour USS De Wert (FFG 45) PAOResidents of Toledo lined the Maumee River banks to welcome USS De Wert as she made her approach into the city of Toledo at the Maritime Plaza Pier. With a population of less than 300,000, it is the smallest city De Wert will visit throughout her Great Lakes Cruise. The smaller population size, however made no impact on the turnout for Navy Week. More than 4,000 people visited De Wert each day during her four day port visit; the largest turnout De Wert has seen yet. As a resident of Toledo, Operations Specialist 1st Class Petty Officer Joshua Snyder said, It was an amazing feeling to be pulling into my hometown. Ive been in the Navy almost twelve years and never thought I would get the chance to get a port call in Toledo. When the Mayor of Toledo and the rest of the Distinguished Visitors came aboard in Detroit Thursday morning I felt closer to home already. After participating in the Distinguished Visitors cruise from Detroit to Toledo, the Mayor of Toledo, Michael Bell, hosted a reception Thursday night for all Navy Week participants where he presented a key to the city of Toledo to De Werts Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joe Thomas. On Friday morning, De Wert had the opportunity to host a Naturalization Ceremony on board for 23 new American citi zens, including one of De Werts own, Damage Controlman 3rd Class Petty Officer Trevor Viguilla. It was a day I will never forget. I feel very blessed to be able to serve in the US Navy and to become an American citizen on the ship for which I serve. It truly is a privilege I am honored to have, said Viguilla. Thomas addressed all of the new citizens and led them in their American Oath, followed by Viguilla leading the new citizens in the Pledge of Allegiance for the clo sure of the ceremony. Two very special guests visited De Wert during her stay in Toledo. William De Wert, brother of USS De Werts namesake, Hospitalman Richard De Wert and a fellow Marine who served with HN Richard De Wert dur ing the Korean War. Once aboard, the men shared stories and memories with the crew about the honorable man from which De Wert received her name. The city of Toledo arranged many events for the crew of De Wert to participate in during her stay. Sailors volunteered for more than ten com munity relations projects (COMREL) where they worked with the Habitat for Humanity, Cherry Street Mission Homeless Shelter, and other various non-profit organizations. The crew also enjoyed their liberty time by par ticipating in batting prac tice with the local AAA baseball team, the Toledo Mudhens, visiting the roll er coaster capitol of the world at Cedar Point, and playing in a USO spon sored golf tournament at Detwiler Golf course. De Wert continues her Great Lakes Cruise to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 with upcoming port visits in Cleveland, Detroit, and Buffalo before returning home to Mayport. The War of 1812, also known as Americas sec ond war for indepen dence, is regarded by many as the conflict that started our countrys rise to global influence. From 1812 to 1815, we fought to expand to the north and west, and to assert our rights to trade freely with other coun tries, without interfer ence from Britains Royal Navy ships on the high seas. Our modern Navy and our role as a global maritime power are root ed in the events of 1812 to 1815. More informa tion on the Bicentennial Commemoration of the War of 1812 can be found at www.ourflagwasstill there.org. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertBoatswains Mate 2nd Class Alexander gives a speech at the Naturalization Ceremony and explains his journey to becoming an American citizen.-Photo by MC1 Mark ODonaldOnlookers greet the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG-45) as it transits the Maumee River in Toledo during Toledo Navy Week 2012. Toledo Navy Week is one of 15 signature events planned across America in 2012 and coincides with the Navys commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812, hosting service members from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertRear Adm. Nosal and the Mayor of Toledo, Michael Bell during the Distinguished Visitors Cruise from Detroit to Toledo. Mr. Bell was the first person to be named as an Honorary Tuskegee Airman. -Photo by MC1 John J. MikeElectronics Technician 1st Class Robert Warden shows visitors a radar range and baring monitor on the bridge of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Dustin Good Sailors demonstrate flight deck firefighting to distin guished visitors aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS De Wert.-Photo by MC1 Douglas MappinThe guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) pulls into Chicago to participate in the Navys commemoration of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. The commemora tion coincides with Chicago Navy Week, one of 15 signa ture events planned across America in 2012.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 5 -Photo courtesy of USS De WertSailors and Marines aboard De Wert man the rails while pulling into Toledo Thursday afternoon. The Marine Corps Band out of New Orleans is embarked with De Wert for her journey throughout the Great Lakes. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertBoatswains Mate 2nd Class Pennywell participates in a Question and Answer session for the Distinguished Visitors Cruise from Detroit to Toledo. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertDamage Controlman 3rd Class Viguilla leads the 23 new American citizens in the Pledge of Allegiance at the end of the Naturalization Ceremony. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertDe Wert hosts a Naturalization Ceremony on board for 23 new American citizens including De Werts own Sailor, Damage Controlman 3rd Class Trevor Viguilla. Thomas addresses our new citizens and leads them in taking their American oath. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertSeveral Sailors from De Wert had the opportunity to participate in batting practice with the Toledo Mudhens, the local AAA baseball team. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertThe De Wert golf team competed in the USO sponsored golf tournament at Detwiler Golf Aug. 24. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertThe crew of De Wert had the opportunity to host two very special visitors on board dur ing their visit to Toledo. Mr. William De Wert, brother of our namesake Richard De Wert, and a fellow Marine who served with Hospitalman Richard De Wert during the Korean War shared stories with Cmdr. Thomas about the honorable man from which we received our name. -Photo by MC1 John J. MikeVisitors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) are shown the ships MK-75 deck gun during a tour. -Photo by MC1 Mark ODonaldThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG-45) transits the Maumee River in Toledo during Toledo Navy Week 2012.

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NAVSUP FLC Jax Provides Logistics For PANAMAX Exercise NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville Operations OfficerNAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville partnered with U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO), U.S. 4th Fleet (C4F), and Commander Task Force (CTF) 43 to pro vide logistics support for PANAMAX 2012, which concluded on 16 August at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 was to exercise a variety of responses, in coordina tion with the governments of Panama and Colombia, to protect and guaran tee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal. This multinational exercise strengthens interoperability and builds joint capa bilities of the participat ing nations to plan and execute complex multinational operations. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville supported C4F and the exercise from its commence ment, attending the Initial Planning Conference through the Final Planning Conference. Additionally, four fulltime personnel were sent to both the Multi-National Forces South (MNF-S) (C4F) and Combined Forces Maritime Component Command (CFMCC) (Brazil) components during the exercise, all which were crucial in order to assist in building and maintaining an accu rate battle space picture across the air, land, and sea. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Lt. Cmdr. Dave Muhl was instru mental in the building of the Logistics Joint Manning documents for both staffs and all report ing procedures from components through the MNF-S on through to the SOUTHCOM Joint Logistics Operations Center (JLOC). Additionally, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville pro vided direct contract ing support during the Combined Acquisition Review Board (CARB) and the Combined Contract Review Board (CCCB) meetings. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, along with Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho concluded the exercise in which more than 1,000 military per sonnel from 17 nations, including the United States, participated. Of that number, 269 partici pants were from partner nations. I would to thank our partners in the Americas and other observers for their critical contribu tion and outstanding participation in key lead ership roles of this exer cise. Every nation shared unique and invaluable skills and their real-world experiences make this the best exercise ever, Harris said. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville, one of seven fleet logistics centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS), provides opera tional logistics, business and support services to fleet, shore and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and other Joint and Allied Forces. Services include contracting, regional transportation, fuel, material management, household goods move ment support, postal and consolidated mail, ware housing, global logistics and husbanding, haz ardous material management, and integrated logistics support. NAVSUP GLS compris es more than 5,700 mili tary and civilian logistics professionals, contrac tors and foreign nation als operating as a single cohesive team provid ing an array of integrated global logistics and con tracting services from 110 locations worldwide to Navy and Joint operation al units across all warfare enterprises. A component of the Naval Supply Systems Command headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pa., NAVSUP GLS is part of a worldwide logistics net work of more than 22,500 military and civilian per sonnel providing combat capability through logis tics. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulSeaman Joel Haworth aligns a rigid-hull inflatable boat as it is lowered onto the boat deck of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support Operation Martillo and 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Holding Steady 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Vicksburg Sailors Focus On FitnessEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsThroughout the final sched uled deployment of guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) the crew has remained focused on maintaining a high level of fitness. Physical readiness is an important part of Navy life and many Sailors use deployment as an opportunity to become more physically active. Working out is my Zen time, said Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 2nd Class Andrew C. Buzzanco, who exercises daily. It keeps me focused and gives me the energy I need to do my job properly. I always feel great after Im done. Staying healthy and fit involves more than just working out, however. I eat a lot of fruit and veg etables in my daily diet, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Charlon A. Clarke. I try to keep away from soda and sugary juices and stick to water. The key is staying hydrated. Although exercising regularly is important, it is also important not to take on more than you can handle. Go slow if you are just start ing out, said Clarke. Never try to lift more weight than you are capable of lifting and remember that Rome wasnt built in a day. During a time when the Navy is very competitive, maintaining the Navys physical fitness stan dards can be just as important as earning qualifications. We are assessed twice a year on our physical readi ness and the Navy has very high standards, said Lt. Dylan Richmond, navigation officer aboard Vicksburg, who exercis es six times a week. It is important for both the physical and mental health of Sailors to exercise regular ly and keep a balanced diet, Richmond also said. It also helps me feel free, even out to sea. It is a great stress reliever for those extra stressful days during deployment. To help its Sailors stay healthy, Vicksburg is equipped with cardio equipment, two weight rooms and addition al exercise equipment on the weather decks as well as a vic tory track that operates on the main weather deck at designat ed times during the day. Vicksburg is on her final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security opera tions, theater security coopera tion efforts and support mis sions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by CTT1 Billy BernalPetty Officer Third Class Alejandro Rojas from Helicopter Squadron Light 48 detachment 2 (HSL 48-2) monitors as a crewmember aboard the USNS Sacagawea hooks up a pallet to USS Carr's embarked SH-60B helicopter during a Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP). The underway replenishment is scheduled to be Carr's final one prior to decommissioning in 2013 after completing their deploy ment to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibility supporting Operation Martillo.HSL-48 DeliversU.S. Fleet Forces Selects New Fleet Master ChiefFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) announced the selec tion of the commands new fleet master chief, the senior enlisted lead er for the Navys Atlantic Fleet, Aug. 27. Command Master Chief Chuck Clarke, who is currently serving in the top enlist ed job at U.S. 5th Fleet in Bahrain, will take over for Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens, who is slated to become the 13th mas ter chief petty officer of the Navy at the end of September. Master Chief Chuck Clarke is a tremendous leader with a wealth of experience in a vari ety of assignments, said Stevens. He has our Navys and our Sailors best interests in mind and can provide the com mander with a unique perspective that will only help to increase mission readiness throughout the fleet. In his new assignment, Clarke will become the commands senior enlist ed advisor for more than 100,000 active duty and Reserve personnel who serve on more than 120 ships and submarines and nearly 80 shore activi ties within the U.S. Fleet Forces Command area of responsibility. Clarke, who was born in Georgetown, Guyana (South America), enlisted in the Navy in 1987. His previous assignments include USS Dubuque (LPD 8), USS Mount Vernon (LSD 39), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 40, Recruit Training Command and Personnel Support Detachment Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., Naval Support Activity, La Maddalena, Italy; and Helicopter Tactical Wing Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va. Prior to U.S. 5th Fleet, he served as the com mand master chief aboard the carriers USS Kitty Hawk (CVN 63) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Clark is a gradu ate of the Navys Senior Enlisted Academy, the Command Master Chief/ Chief of the Boat Course and the National Defense University Keystone Course. He holds an associ ate degree from National University, a bachelors degree from Excelsior College, and a masters in human relations from the University of Oklahoma. His personal deco rations include the Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (six awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (six awards), and the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 7

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Hu City Puts Four Chief Selects Thru PacesUSS Hue City Public AffairsFour Sailors aboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) are undergoing a rig orous training program as they prepare for advancement to chief petty officers (CPOs). Beginning with the notifica tion that they had been select ed for advancement, the Hu City chief-selects are now in the midst of a six-week CPO induc tion process designed to teach them to effectively handle the responsibilities of being a chief petty officer. Selectees will be challenged through this process and pushed to excel. Having to be open to other parts of the Navy and learn about them, along with your job is one of the biggest challenges Im facing right now, said Chief (select) Electricians Mate (SW) Javian Williams. This induction is making me a better Sailor and soon to be a better chief in the Navy. In the past few weeks, the selectees have experienced a number of leadership roles and team-building exercises to help them develop the thought pro cesses of a chief. I always knew that being a chief petty officer was a large responsibility, and Im learn ing as much as I can this induction season, said Chief (select) Yeoman (SCW/AW) Leydi Mendez. I look for ward to applying my newfound knowledge after the 14th of September. Im beyond proud and honored to have made it to this milestone. Hu City Command Master Chief (SW) Raymond Charest has helped guide the selectees through the induction process and feels honored to welcome new chiefs to the Chiefs Mess aboard Hu City. Im ready to see these chiefselects lead Sailors and do great things in the Navy, said Charest. We have a great batch of new chiefs aboard Hu City prepared to take on any chal lenges. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Life At Sea On USS Hu City Seaman Kenneth Wood, from Toledo, Ohio, prepares to put money on a Navy Cash card aboard USS Hu City. -Photos by MCSN Darien G. KenneyChief Damage Controlman Quincy Crockett, from Chicago, trains Sailors on proper hose handling during a crash and salvage drill on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 3rd Class Matt Cox, from Midland, Mich., analyzes readings on USS Hu City. Electronics Technician 3rd Class Meagan Bramble, from Jacksonville, Fla., works on a circuit board aboard USS Hu City 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Military Families Free Annual Pass To National ParksAmerican Forces Press ServiceThrough its America the Beautiful series, the National Park Service grants complimentary access to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites, national parks and wildlife refuges to active duty service members and activated Guardsmen and reservists and their families, said Kathy Kupper, National Park Service spokeswom an. The park service is just so grateful for the service of the military, so weve been looking for a way to show our gratitude, Kupper said. Its taken a couple of years to get all the details worked out, but were honored that we can pay back a little bit. Service members can get a pass, valued at $80, by showing their military identification card. Family mem bers can obtain their own passes, even if the service member is deployed or if they are traveling separately, Kupper explained. A pass covers entry and standard amenity fees for a driver and all passengers in a personal vehicle at per-vehicle fee areas, or up to four adults at sites that charge per person. Children age 15 or under are admitted free. Wounded warriors or any American citizen with a disability can get a free lifetime pass to all national parks. A 25-year National Park Service employee, Kupper recalled the organizations decades-long military ties, specifically to the Army, which oversaw national parks between the 1876 establishment of Yellowstone, the first national park, and the 1916 stand-up of NPS. For about 40 years, you had the U.S. Army, particu larly the U.S. Cavalry, including Buffalo Soldiers, care for our first national parks, Kupper said. Yellowstone, Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon all had roads set up, built, with trails established and wildlife protected ... by the U.S. Army. Kupper added that even park ranger uniforms are inspired by the cavalry uniform, symbolizing the enduring bond. Many national parks were set aside for use strictly by military, whether for rest and relaxation trips ... or for training, the spokeswoman said, adding that through the years, the parks have been home to some of Americas most iconic images of freedom. Our service members are fighting to protect our freedoms and a lot of them are manifested in these symbols like the Statue of Liberty, the Liberty Bell, Mount Rushmore all sites cared for by the Park Service, Kupper said. These places inspire the mil itary and remind them what theyre fighting for so where better for them and their families to visit? -Russian Federation navy photo by Capt. 1st rank Anatoly RomankoThe guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) arrives in Severomorsk for a two-day visit after complet ing exercise Northern Eagle 2012. Farragut Takes Break In SeveromorskNational Pow/Mia Recognition Day Honors All Sailors Until They Are HomeFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy will join the nation in commemorat ing Prisoners of War/ Missing in Action (POW/ MIA) Recognition Day Sept. 21, as announced in NAVADMIN 262/12. National POW/ MIA Recognition Day is a day of observance for all Americans to offer remembrance, honor, and respect to service members who were pris oners of war and those who remain missing as a result of the nations con flicts. The 2012 nation al theme, Until They Are Home, pays special tribute to the families of these service members who have sacrificed and endured on behalf of their loved ones. National POW/MIA Recognition Day gives us the opportunity to honor the sacrifices of our POW/MIA service members, and to reaffirm our sacred promise to our nation to bring every warrior home, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, direc tor of personnel readi ness and community sup port. This years theme especially recognizes family members of our POW/MIA Sailors, many of whom continue to wait for the return of their loved ones. All commands are encouraged to host or support local POW/MIA Recognition Day activi ties. Suggested activities include displaying the missing man table in a unit work space and host ing formal ceremonies in which a former POW or family member of a cur rent MIA Sailor is a guest speaker. This observance is also one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the flying of the National League of Families POW/ MIA flag. The others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day. Today, more than 33,000 Sailors from World War II through the Persian Gulf War remain unaccounted for. Each year, Navys POW/ MIA section assists with repatriating Sailors and returning them to their loved ones for burial in our homeland. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 9

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of my Navy career, she added. Williams will attend the Corporate Communications Group (CCG)-sponsored WOC STEM Conference on Oct. 11-13 2012 in Dallas, Texas, where she will be presented with the Technology All-Star Award, along with award winners in various other STEM award categories. Williams is the only active duty Navy recipient in the All-Star category. CCG promotes signifi cant minority achievement in STEM through such events as the WOC awards, the Black Engineer of the Year Awards (BEYA), and the Minorities in Research Science Awards. The Navy has maintained a rela tionship with CCG for the last 20 years. I applaud Master Chief Williams achievement and am extremely proud that she will represent this command and the Navy as a whole at the confer ence, said NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. She is a stand-out profes sional in her field, as evi denced by this award. We are fortunate to have her here as part of our Navy Food Management Team at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville.From Page 1WilliamsShipmates To Workmates Pays Off For FRCSE SailorFrom FRCSEThanks to the Shipmates to Workmates program designed to help separating Sailors find jobs, a Navy petty officer with 15 years of military service began a civilian career at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Aug. 6. Aviation Machinists Mate 1st Class Terrence Roach landed a federal job as a materials engi neer technician support ing the commands Navy Oil Analysis Program (NOAP), a position he held for three years at FRCSE Detachment Mayport, Fla., prior to separating from active duty in July. The opportunity that they gave me is great, said Roach of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Shipmates to Workmates program. It has allowed me to stay in the area with my family, and I have a career work ing in aviation similar to what I did before. Because FRCSE oper ates aircraft and aeronau tical-related equipment, the facility is required to participate in the NOAP. Roach is responsible for monitoring and diag nosing the condition of equipment or oil without the removal or extensive disassembly of the equip ment using approved sampling techniques. His efforts support local squadrons and FRCSE operations. Roach was born in Guyana, South America. At the age of 10, he immi grated to the United States with his fam ily in 1987. They settled in a poor neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y. where ille gal drug use was rampant and drive-by shootings a common occurrence. For a better life, he enlisted in the Navy in May 1997 and became a U.S. citizen while serving on active duty in Jacksonville. He credits his Navy experience for provid ing the specialized skills needed for the labora tory job. He served as the leading petty officer in a NOAP laboratory and prior to that on an Emergency Reclamation Team for two years when assigned with the Topcats of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 31 until its disestablishment in 2008 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. With four sea tours under his belt, two back-toback on the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Roach was track ing for advancement to chief when an Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) decision to reduce force strength in 2011 ended his Navy career. I knew about the ERB before November 2011 when we got our results, he said. I knew in April that they were going over records, everyone between 8 and 15 years of service. Roach learned his fate when the Phase II ERB reviewed the records of E-6 through E-8 Sailors from 31 over manned ratings. He said the ERB involuntarily separated about 2,900 Sailors. Faced with unemployment, a wife and two children to sup port, and no immediate job prospects, he was open to any transition assistance the Navy was offering. When a NAVAIR Shipmates to Workmates program representative contacted him offering to provide employment assistance, he said, yes. They called me and said they saw my resume and wanted me to apply for jobs, said Roach. They shot me a list of about 10 federal and civil ian jobs every day, a lot of them not in Florida. I didnt think I was going to get the FRCSE job, but I did. FRCSE Supervisory Chemist Gary Whitfield said he knew the labora tory was losing a chemist, a military spouse, and he desperately needed to fill the position. Given Terrences expe rience and background, he is a drop-in fit for the position, said Whitfield. It is also a good oppor tunity to support our military folks. He has already done a lot to get us pre pared for an Aviation Maintenance Inspection conducted for quality control. When people ask how he got the job, Roach gladly provides details about the Shipmates to Workmates program jointly managed by NAVAIR, along with sever al partnering commands and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He encourages his separating shipmates to pursue every opportunity, network, utilize human resource specialists and be open to relocating. Tania Dawson, the NAVAIR recruiting and retention program man ager, said the Shipmates to Workmates program is another means of get ting diverse skill sets into NAVAIR. She said 41 Sailors who worked for the command at multiple sites were impacted by the ERB decision. It makes good business sense; they are our own, said Dawson. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program, visit the official website at http://www.navair.navy. mil/jobs/sm2wm/. -U.S. Navy photoIn the Materials Engineering Laboratory at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Aug. 28, Terrence Roach, a materials engineer technician, prepares oil samples for testing in a Spectroil M Oil Analysis Spectrometer to analyze all the wear metals, contaminants and additives typically found in used oil samples. Roach secured his position through the Shipmates to Workmates program designed to assist separating Sailors impacted by the Enlistment Retention Boards in 2011 with finding federal jobs. Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Sept. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Sept. 7: Teen Base Round-Up and Pizza Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. This is a chance for Teens to round-up any newcomers to the base to introduce them to the Teen Center and invite them to a Pizza Party. Permission slip is required to participate in the round up on base. Staff will be on hand at the Teen Center with reg istration packets and per mission slips. 246-0347 Sept. 8: Military Classic Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 30. 270-5451 Sept. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 9: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Sept. 10: 7v7 Fall Soccer Begins Season ends Nov. 8. 270-5451. Sept. 11: Freedom 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Sept. 11: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Sept. 12: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Sept. 12: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 onegame payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. MWRSept. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Sept. 7: Teen Base Round-Up and Pizza Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. This is a chance for Teens to round-up any newcomers to the base to introduce them to the Teen Center and invite them to a Pizza Party. Permission slip is required to participate in the round up on base. Staff will be on hand at the Teen Center with reg istration packets and per mission slips. 246-0347 Sept. 8: Military Classic Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 30. 270-5451 Sept. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 9: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Sept. 10: 7v7 Fall Soccer Begins. Season ends Nov. 8. 270-5451. Sept. 11: Freedom 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Sept. 11: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Sept. 12: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Sept. 12: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 28: One Night in Mexico 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 11

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Learn What FFSC Has To Offer YouFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 5, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Stress Management, Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help participants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. Sept. 5, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 6, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 6, 10-11 a.m., Craft Hour, USO Sept. 10-13, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 12, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 12, 11 a.m.-noon, Survivor Benefit Plan FFSC Room 719 Sept. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 15, 10 a.m.-until, IA Families Outing To Zoo Jacksonville Zoo Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Sept. 17-21, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.. SAPR Initial Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., PFM/ CFS Forum FFSC Room 702 Sept. 19, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Room 719 Sept. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 24, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 24-27, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Sept. 26, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. These efforts reinforce the Secretary of the Navys 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, as well as support the Chief of Naval Operations direc tions. Most importantly, focusing on total fitness puts us on a path to pre vent suicides. For more information about suicide pre vention visit www.sui cide.navy.mil and www. navynavstress.com From Page1Prevent 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Friday, Sept. 7 Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach will host our annual Fall Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Church at 400 Penman Road. Come join us to search for your spe cial treasures! For infor mation, please contact the church office at 2495370 Saturday, Sept. 8 Join Wounded Warrior ProjectTM(WWP) for the WWP 8K Run in Jacksonville. Activities begin at 7 a.m. and a race start time of 9 a.m. at the Jacksonville Landing to help honor and empow er our nations Wounded Warriors. Race proceeds support the free programs WWP offers wounded service members nation wide. Advance registra tion is $25 (includes race day number, timing, and post-race festivities) and each runner must raise a minimum of $99. Top finisher awards and addi tional race-day options are available. Visit http:// www.woundedwarrior project.org/wwp-8k-runs. aspx to register. Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach will host our annual Fall Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Church at 400 Penman Road. Come join us to search for your spe cial treasures! For infor mation, please contact the church office at 2495370 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or play bocce ball? Join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Monday, Sept. 10 Beaches Photography Club meets at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be the Results of 2nd Annual Print Competition. Craig Monroe is the judge and will give live comments. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Saturday, Sept. 15 An Eating and Growing Seasonably Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow warm season veg etables will be held at Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cost is $10 with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Please call Jeannie to register, 255-7450. Find out from a park ranger at 2 p.m. what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so important. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Tuesday, Sept. 18 Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council, Duval County Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 Presents an Agent Orange Town Hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 Saint Johns Bluff Road South. Agent Orange, a herbi cide chemical contain ing dioxin, used to defoli ate the jungle in Vietnam may have exposed more than 2 million U.S. mili tary personnel from 1961 to 1970. This panel discus sion presents the facts one needs to know that affects not only the Vietnam vet eran, but his children and grandchildren. The United States Government just recently added Blue Water Navy Ships to a list that is now allowed to apply for veterans benefits. The Department of Veteran Affairs said that surviving spouses and decedents of Vietnam veterans might also be entitled to benefits. This is for the Vietnam vet, Children of Vietnam vets, grandchildren of Vietnam vets, and any one that has a Vietnam veteran in their familys history.Out in Town USS Robert G. Bradley FRG will meet from 5:309 p.m. on Sept. 6. USS Taylor FRG will meet from 7-8:30 p.m. on Sept. 6. USS Klakring FRG will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Sept. 7. 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Veteran Special Recognition Ceremony to honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm vet erans. Those eligi ble for the honor will receive certificates of Special Recognition in a ceremony on Nov. 8 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The appli cation deadline to regis ter for the honor is Oct. 5. The application can be found on Congressman Crenshaws site: www. crenshaw.house.gov. Another Sign-The Musical, Tickets On Sale Now Thursday, Sept. 27 at Florida State College, South Campus Military Appreciation Night for Another Sign The Musical. Mayport and NAS JAX USO have tickets on sale now for this show at 50 percent off, $15 cash only please. Another Sign approaches home lessness from many angles. For more information on the musical, visit www.itsanothersign.com Premier Wedding Expo-Free Tickets The wedding expo is on Sept. 9 from 1-4 p.m. at the University Center at UNF. Receiving the four free tickets is easy. All you have to do is go to www. PremierWeddingExpo. com, click on PreRegister & Buy Tickets, fill out the pre-registra tion online, and use the PROMO CODE USOPWE Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an indi vidual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or emailing me at herb@jaxsignarama. com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned franchise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more vet erans you will help. Our mission is to win this con test, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text 4970 to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an internet connection and webcam. The technology also comes with built in security, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Sign-up now via the fol lowing link: http://smile sovermiles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwa ter and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shredded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount pro vides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a fam ily annual pass, which allows up to eight peo ple in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addition, hon orably discharged vet erans who have service connected disabilities, and surviving spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifi cations and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ The USO and RocketLife have partnered to deliver a heart-warming oppor tunity for the men and women of the armed forces and their fami lies. The Personal Photo Book program enables troops serving abroad and their families to create 20-page personal photo books and ship them to any APO/FPO address for free. These full-color, customized photo books are small enough to fit in a soldiers cargo pockets yet can hold more than 60 photos of loved ones. RocketLife prints the books for free, and the USO pays for the ship ping. To get started, visit http://uso.myphotoprod ucts.com. United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. MCPON Names Gary Sinise Honorary Chief Office of the Master Chief Petty Officer of the NavyActor, humanitar ian and musician, Gary Sinise, was named an honorary chief petty offi cer during a ceremony held at the United States Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center Aug. 24. Sinise received the honor from Fleet Master Chief(AW/NAC) Michael D. Stevens on behalf of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy(MCPON) (SS/SW) Rick D. West. Stevens was named as the next MCPON by Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Jonathan Greenert June 27. It is very interesting how things work out and I believe that all things happen for a reason, said Stevens. MCPON was going to honor Mr. Sinise at the Year of the Chief kickoff event in April, but unfortunately Mr. Sinise was slightly injured in a car accident here in D.C. and was unable to attend the event. Thankfully, he was not seriously injured and MCPON is on a trip overseas visiting Sailors, so now I have the oppor tunity to preside over this event tonight. Sinise has been exposed to the military all of his life through his familys deep roots in military service. His father served in the Navy in the 1950s, two of his uncles served in World War II, three brother-in-laws served in Vietnam, his sister-inlaw served for 10 years, and his nephew served in Afghanistan and was recently accepted into the Green Berets. While not serving in the military himself, Sinise has raised millions of dollars for various chari ties dedicated to helping the military and veterans through his Gary Sinise Foundation launched in 2010. He has also per formed free concerts all over the world for service members with his Lt. Dan Band, named after his role in the 1994 Oscarwinning movie Forrest Gump. I am a big fan of your work as an actor, but I am an even bigger fan of the role you play in real life, said Stevens. And it is that body of work that we honor here today. Stevens presented Sinise with the honorary chief petty officer certifi cate signed by MCPON, while his daughter, Ella, pinned the chiefs anchor on his lapel. Stevens helped Sinise don a chiefs cover, which was followed by a salute to the crowd by honorary Chief Sinise, bringing the large crowd of chief petty offi cers, chief petty officer selectees, Sailors, families and the general public to their feet in a standing ovation. What a humbling day it is for me to receive this, said Sinise. Im truly touched by it. I dont take it for granted, and I dont take it lightly. The cornerstone of Sinises foundation was built upon his life-long principals and long stand ing commitment to be a citizen of action, and to help in any way that one can to serve the nation by honoring and helping the people who serve our country. Im always amazed and humbled at the skill and dedication of the men and women who serve in our Navy ...God bless you all for doing what you do in defense of our freedom all around the world, said Sinise. -Photo by MC2 Thomas L. RosprimGary Sinise left, is named an honorary chief petty officer by Fleet Master Chief Michael Stevens during a ceremony at the Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center. Stevens presented the honor on behalf of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Rick D. West. Stevens was named as the next MCPON. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 13



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Officer in Charge Navy Food Management Team MayportMaster Chief Culinary Specialist Paulette Williams of the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville, Navy Food Management Team was named the Women of Color (WOC) 2012 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Technology AllStar Award winner. Technology All-Stars are accomplished women of color with approxi mately 22 or more years in the workforce and who have demonstrated excellence in the workplace and in their communities. Williams is the senior instructor at Navy Food Management Team Mayport. She leads the training and development efforts for all of the Navy culinary specialists in the Southeastern Region, including afloat galleys onboard 14 U.S. Navy ships and 21 shore-duty galleys, including Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Williams educational and leadership efforts focus on the areas of food pro duction, sanitation, food safety, training, technical management, and administration. Additionally, Williams holds a Masters in Health Science from Trident University and is an avid volunteer involved with community events in Jacksonville. I am extremely hon ored and excited to be a recipient of the Women of Color STEM Technology All-Star Award. I couldnt have imagined that I would ever have the opportunity to receive this very prestigious award, said Williams, a 24-year veteran of the Navy. I am extremely thankful and grateful to my chain of command for their complete support and nomination for this award. This is definitely one of the highest honors Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com NEX Celebrates CPO Selects Williams Named Women of Color Technology All-Star Award Winner-Photo by Daphne Cassani CSCM Paulette Williams serves lunch to hungry Sailors and Marines during a site vist to the galley onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. -Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Aviation Machinists Mate Luis Ruiz shows his son the guitar that he won during a raffle for Chief Selects held at the on base Navy Exchange during its annual CPO Select Uniform Night on Aug. 29. See Williams, Page 10Help Clean Up Mayport BeachFrom Mayport EnvironmentalNaval Station Mayport is one of the official clean-up sites for the 2012 International Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 15. Volunteers are needed to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport. Participants should plan to meet at 8 a.m. at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion) near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 10 a.m. Volunteers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Community service hours may be earned. Pre-registration is not required. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact NS Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 2706781. Navy Sponsors Tri-Base Job FairFrom FFSCNaval Station Mayport, Kings Bay SUBASE, and NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) will sponsor the Navy Tri-Base Job Fair on Wednesday, Sept. 19 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center. Active duty, separating, retiring and retired service members, military spouses, family members and separated service mem bers up to 180 days after separation date are eligible to attend. Attendees are encouraged to bring several copies of their resumes and dress for interviewing. Local, state and national companies will be collecting resumes for numerous jobs. The Job Fair and parking are free. The Morocco Shrine Center is located at 3,800 St. Johns Bluff Road in the Southside of Jacksonville. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 904-270-6600 ext. 1700.Navy Focuses On Suicide Prevention AwarenessFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsSeptember is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and the Navy is using the month as a launch pad to focus on Navys ongoing suicide prevention efforts, officials announced in NAVADMIN 259/12 released Aug. 27. During each week of the month resources will be available to guide discus sion on stress navigation and suicide prevention con cepts. The weekly concepts to be explored are: building resilience, navigating stress, encouraging bystander intervention to A-C-T (Ask Care Treat), and reducing barriers for seeking support through counseling. The tools and resourc es are available on www. suicide.navy.mil and www.navynavstress.com. These tools emphasize the themes of dedication, optimism, determination and humor. Additionally, the winner of the Suicide Prevention Public Service Announcement Contest will be announced Sept. 28. The winning video will be avail able year-round online and will be broadcast regularly on Direct-to-Sailor televi sion, the American Forces Network and Pentagon channel. Our people are our greatest asset, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Behavioral Health Programs director, Bureau of Naval Personnel. Were promoting a lifestyle of total fitness physically, mentally, socially and spiritually to ensure our Sailors are best able to meet the challenges they will face in todays Navy. See Prevent, Page 12

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Psychologist, Carl Rogers was 22 years old when he entered Union Theological Seminary in New York in 1924. While attending seminary, he participated in a seminar organized to explore reli gious doubts. Rogers later said of the group, The majority of members...in thinking their way through ques tions they had raised, thought themselves right out of religious work. I was one. Some Christians might balk at Rogers decision but there are two life les sons that may be extract ed from his life example. First, never intellectualize God. In other words, God has never been nor will He ever be confined by our minds. In fact, the moment you and I try to figure God out, we miss the most important aspect of who God is. God is not known through intellect or feeling, but rather by faith. Furthermore, Paul reminds us that God in his wisdom saw to it that the world would never know him through human wisdom (1 Cor. 1:21a, KJV). Thus many miss God by 18 inches (the average distance between ones head and heart) simply because they try to know him via human wisdom. It is not our songs, tears or the length of our prayers that grips the heart of God but rather our faith. And without faith it is impos sible to please God (Hebrews 11:6a, NIV). Notice what the text does not sayit does not say without prayer, albeit we need to pray; it does not say without going to church. The point is this, the aforementioned acts are the results of faith and that is why our faith pleases God. The second life prin ciple Rogers experience teaches us is that we all are prone to doubt God, especially during uncom fortable times. If we are honest, we all can admit that there are times when our faith is fickle, incon sistent, and ambivalent. During Sunday wor ship we sing My faith looks up to Thee .until we receive bad news or things do not work out as we have planned. During these times our faith waivers and quite frankly it is hard to believe God is in the mist of our dis appointment. How do we stay consistent in our faith during these times? James 1:4a reminds us to Let endurance have its perfect result.be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing. Cross references: Hebrews 11:6 : Heb 7:19 The operable word in this text is endurance. In other words, it is through endurance that we learn that life is not a onetime 100-yard-dash in which the faster we run, that faster is it over. No one would mind going through a life challenge if it were that simple. But facing a life chal lenge that last weeks, months or even years is a another matter. Gods goal in allowing us to go through the crucibles of life is to perfect (mature) our faith so that we may help others through the very things we thought we could not endure.Knowing God Is An Act Of Heart, Not HeadLt. Calvin Gardner Sr. Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINS STREETBM3 Chad Lambert USS The Sullivans The weather, the beach and its close to home. IT2 Jerita Leverette USS The Sullivans Theres a lot to do in the area. Its better than Virginia. GSE1 Jose Diaz SERMC The weather, the peo ple are friendly and there are a lot of family activi ties around here. This is a small base with great ser vices. OS3 Laquanta George NS Mayport Small, and interact with superiors. Also superiors are interested in my wellbeing. BM2 Mykei Cruz Harbor Ops Being a part of Harbor Operations department and being able to cross train on day-to-day activities.SH3 Randolph CoplandBase Housing Relaxation and tran quility. Morale on base is excellent. The people I work for are excellent. Its paradise for the Navy.What do you like about being stationed at NS Mayport? This school year will be marked by many of the traditional signs of chil dren returning to school fresh hair cuts, new shoes, the latest back packs, sharpened pencils, and the grateful smiles of loving parents who have longed for that first day of school. While it is certainly important that the school year begins well, it is even more impor tant that parents and schools work together to make sure the entire school year continues well. Parents with chil dren entering school for the first time may experi ence some apprehension about where and how to become involved in their young childs school life. More experienced parents may struggle with making the transition as children move into new grades, schools, or districts. The involvement of a caring adult in the school life of a child cannot be overemphasized. Research has suggested again and again that stu dent achievement can be tied to many factors, one of which is support from home. Many families struggle to balance work demands, family needs, and extra-curricular activities. Here are a few simple suggestions which could make a big differ ence in your childs suc cess in school: Communicate with the teacher on a regular basis Early in the school year, clarify how infor mation will be shared between home and school and how concerns and problems will be handled. With the technology available, many teach ers post information on a classroom website, blog, or e-mail. Volunteer for school activities Schools, especially middle and high schools, struggle to get enough parent support to sustain programs and events. Your willingness to make yourself available will help create a coop erative working relation ship between you and the school. If your work schedule does not permit volunteering at daytime events, consider help ing out in the evening at sporting events, with tutoring programs, or providing refreshments for a PTA meeting. Monitor homework completion and work together on assignments which invite family par ticipation Set a regular time for homework, cre ate an actual schedule, post it where everyone in the family can see it, and stick to it. Find a place within your home where you can concentrate, away from distractions. Set and enforce appropriate rules for homework time. During homework time, be available to work with your child. Know your childs friends and the friends parents it is important to know who your child interacts with in and out of school to make sure that you approve of the activities your child is involved in. An easy way to accomplish this is to participate in school events and to become involved in aca demic activities. Sporting events, PTA meetings, and choral concerts give you an opportunity to meet not only your childs friends, but also their parents. Schedule informal meetings You do not need to wait for Open House to have a face-toface meeting with your childs teacher. Schedule a meeting early in the year especially is your child has a learning disability or had trouble last school year. These meetings should be brief and to the point. Write down your questions. It is important that you share your con cerns in a manner which demonstrates purpose, caring, and respect. Know your childs academic program Understanding the goals for a certain grade level or for a particular sub ject will better prepare you to support your childs learning at home. You can log on to www. SoarAtHome.org to view by grade level and subject the core curriculum your child will be responsible for this year. For elec tive classes, the syllabus or course outline can give you a better idea of what will be expected in a class. Looking at your childs textbook will also give you a good idea of what will be taught. Review your childs daily schedule Become familiar with your childs daily schedule. It will help you understand your childs day and how it may impact his or her learn ing. Middle and high school students may only have of their schedule each day. Note which classes are on A day and which ones are on B. One of the days may be mea surably more difficult or require much more homework. Knowing this will allow you to help your child become better organized. Establish a spot for communication While elementary schools often send home important information in the back pack, secondary schools leave it up to the stu dent on how to best get information home. By checking the backpack or establishing a special spot for handouts, home work to be signed, notes from the teacher, etc., you will stay better informed. This spot can also then be the place where you can put signed tests, notes to the teacher, or even your childs lunch. Having this spot can really reduce morning where did I put that headaches! At first glance, many of these suggestions seem rather simple but they can require a bit of commit ment. With a little help from home, this could be your childs best school year ever. Be that parent who makes a difference! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Tips For Fostering School ConnectednessJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Knowing Catholic Charities USA1-800-919-9338 www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Navy Medicine Announces ReorganizationFrom U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) detailed its reorgani zation and realignment plan for the Navy Medicine enterprise in a message to its staff Aug. 30. The message, sent from BUMED chief of staff Rear Adm. Rebecca McCormick-Boyle, announced the implementa tion phase of the reorganization designed to build a more effec tive, efficient and responsive organization. Over the past several months, Navy Medicine lead ership discussed and priori tized organizational opportunities and challenges to build a better and more integrated command around Navy and Marine Corps leadership, wrote McCormick-Boyle. As a result, we are engaged in executing a realignment plan for the Navy Medicine enterprise that will meet these requirements. The realignment is also closely linked to Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Matthew Nathans strategic vision for Navy Medicine which puts an emphasis on three core objec tives-value, readiness and jointness, according to McCormickBoyle. We must concentrate on bringing more value to our customers and stakeholders across the enterprise and improve our ability to operate in a joint environment while maintain ing a high state of medical readiness for our naval forces, McCormick-Boyle wrote. As Vice Adm. Nathan often says, when the world dials 9-1-1, it is not to make an appointment and we are taking the steps necessary to ensure we are ready to answer without delay. The biggest change under way involved re-scoping the organization, responsibilities and structure of what was Navy Medicine Support Command (NMSC). In July 2012, NMSC was renamed and re-scoped from a Regional command into Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) with a primary focus on education and training. The new command is head quartered in San Antonio, Texas and has detachments in Jacksonville, Fla., and Bethesda, Md. NMETC will work closely with BUMED to ensure Navy medical personnel continue to be equipped with the best training military medicine can provide. They will also work closely with the leadership at the Medical Education and Training Campus (METC) in San Antonio to ensure Navy personnel are well-supported as well as maintain seamless and focused training for hospital corpsmen who keep Sailors and Marines medically fit and ready. Our job in Navy Medicine is to support the forward deployed force and ensure personnel readiness. Navy Medicine keeps the nations naval forces medically ready to operate around the world in support of U.S. national objec tives, wrote McCormick-Boyle. Our main mission is support to the warfighter and were in the fight to build an organization that can do just that. NMSC and its leadership did an outstanding job throughout their existence, but as the needs of our customers change and the dynamics of the environ ment we operate in changes, we also have to flex and adapt to meet those shifting require ments. The overall realignment was developed to enhance accountability, command and control, and ensure representation of Navy equities both across the enterprise and throughout the Fleet. Many of NMSCs for mer responsibilities will be absorbed by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) departments and many of NMSCs lower echelon commands will be function ally realigned to departments within BUMED including the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center which will be realigned under BUMEDs health care operations depart ment. The realignment also estab lished two new department codes, M2 to manage all research and development and M7 for education and train ing. Rear Adm. Bruce Doll has been appointed as BUMED M2 and will report to BUMED in October 2012. Rear Adm. William Roberts, who is report ing as the commandant of METC next month, will serve as BUMED M7. According to McCormick-Boyle, all person nel impacted by the realign ment have been notified and implementation of plan is underway. Our people are our most valuable asset and they enable us to meet our missions. With that, we are committed to making the realignment process as transparent and seamless as possible for all of you, she said. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 personnel who provide health care support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high opera tional tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world.TRICARE Offers Plethora Of Pharmacy ChoicesTRICARE Management ActivityTRICARE beneficia ries have plenty of phar macy options, includ ing military pharmacies, TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and 56,000 network pharma cies. Wondering which option to choose from? Military treatment facility (MTF) pharma cies fill prescriptions free of charge, up to a 90-day supply for most medica tions. Not all medications are available at MTF pharmacies, but beneficiaries can use the TRICARE formulary search tool, http://pec.ha.osd.mil/ formulary_search.php to find out if a medication is available. Registered users may also use TRICARE Online to request pre scription refills at www. tricareonline.com. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery is anoth er low-cost option giv ing beneficiaries low or no copays. Its safe, convenient and easy to use from home, when traveling on a tempo rary assignment or mov ing to another TRICARE region. Prescriptions are mailed to any address in the United States and its territories. Beneficiaries can get up to a 90-day supply for most medica tions with minimal outof-pocket costs. Once registered, beneficiaries can sign up for automatic refills or request them by mail, phone or online._ TRICARE recommends home delivery option for prescriptions needed on a regular basis. Beneficiaries who choose to fill or refill prescriptions at a retail net work pharmacy can get up to a 30-day supply. Certain vaccines are cov ered for zero copayment at participating network pharmacies. Call 1-877363-1303 or visit www. express-scripts.com/ TRICARE/ to find a par ticipating pharmacy. TRICARE provides a world-class pharmacy benefit to all eligible uni formed service mem bers, retirees and family members, including ben eficiaries age 65 and older. Coverage is the same regardless of beneficiary category or health care plan being used. The pharmacy pro gram is available world wide, but there are some limitations in having pre scriptions refilled in some overseas areas. Home delivery does deliver to the Army Post Office (APO) and Fleet Post Office (FPO) over seas. Working together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com a CFC participant Provided as a public service THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 De Wert Stops In Toledo During 1812 Tour USS De Wert (FFG 45) PAOResidents of Toledo lined the Maumee River banks to welcome USS De Wert as she made her approach into the city of Toledo at the Maritime Plaza Pier. With a population of less than 300,000, it is the smallest city De Wert will visit throughout her Great Lakes Cruise. The smaller population size, however made no impact on the turnout for Navy Week. More than 4,000 people visited De Wert each day during her four day port visit; the largest turnout De Wert has seen yet. As a resident of Toledo, Operations Specialist 1st Class Petty Officer Joshua Snyder said, It was an amazing feeling to be pulling into my hometown. Ive been in the Navy almost twelve years and never thought I would get the chance to get a port call in Toledo. When the Mayor of Toledo and the rest of the Distinguished Visitors came aboard in Detroit Thursday morning I felt closer to home already. After participating in the Distinguished Visitors cruise from Detroit to Toledo, the Mayor of Toledo, Michael Bell, hosted a reception Thursday night for all Navy Week participants where he presented a key to the city of Toledo to De Werts Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joe Thomas. On Friday morning, De Wert had the opportunity to host a Naturalization Ceremony on board for 23 new American citi zens, including one of De Werts own, Damage Controlman 3rd Class Petty Officer Trevor Viguilla. It was a day I will never forget. I feel very blessed to be able to serve in the US Navy and to become an American citizen on the ship for which I serve. It truly is a privilege I am honored to have, said Viguilla. Thomas addressed all of the new citizens and led them in their American Oath, followed by Viguilla leading the new citizens in the Pledge of Allegiance for the clo sure of the ceremony. Two very special guests visited De Wert during her stay in Toledo. William De Wert, brother of USS De Werts namesake, Hospitalman Richard De Wert and a fellow Marine who served with HN Richard De Wert dur ing the Korean War. Once aboard, the men shared stories and memories with the crew about the honorable man from which De Wert received her name. The city of Toledo arranged many events for the crew of De Wert to participate in during her stay. Sailors volunteered for more than ten com munity relations projects (COMREL) where they worked with the Habitat for Humanity, Cherry Street Mission Homeless Shelter, and other various non-profit organizations. The crew also enjoyed their liberty time by par ticipating in batting prac tice with the local AAA baseball team, the Toledo Mudhens, visiting the roller coaster capitol of the world at Cedar Point, and playing in a USO spon sored golf tournament at Detwiler Golf course. De Wert continues her Great Lakes Cruise to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 with upcoming port visits in Cleveland, Detroit, and Buffalo before returning home to Mayport. The War of 1812, also known as Americas sec ond war for indepen dence, is regarded by many as the conflict that started our countrys rise to global influence. From 1812 to 1815, we fought to expand to the north and west, and to assert our rights to trade freely with other coun tries, without interfer ence from Britains Royal Navy ships on the high seas. Our modern Navy and our role as a global maritime power are root ed in the events of 1812 to 1815. More informa tion on the Bicentennial Commemoration of the War of 1812 can be found at www.ourflagwasstill there.org. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertBoatswains Mate 2nd Class Alexander gives a speech at the Naturalization Ceremony and explains his journey to becoming an American citizen.-Photo by MC1 Mark ODonaldOnlookers greet the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG-45) as it transits the Maumee River in Toledo during Toledo Navy Week 2012. Toledo Navy Week is one of 15 signature events planned across America in 2012 and coincides with the Navys commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812, hosting service members from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertRear Adm. Nosal and the Mayor of Toledo, Michael Bell during the Distinguished Visitors Cruise from Detroit to Toledo. Mr. Bell was the first person to be named as an Honorary Tuskegee Airman. -Photo by MC1 John J. MikeElectronics Technician 1st Class Robert Warden shows visitors a radar range and baring monitor on the bridge of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Dustin Good Sailors demonstrate flight deck firefighting to distin guished visitors aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS De Wert.-Photo by MC1 Douglas MappinThe guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) pulls into Chicago to participate in the Navys commemoration of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. The commemoration coincides with Chicago Navy Week, one of 15 signature events planned across America in 2012.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 5 -Photo courtesy of USS De WertSailors and Marines aboard De Wert man the rails while pulling into Toledo Thursday afternoon. The Marine Corps Band out of New Orleans is embarked with De Wert for her journey throughout the Great Lakes. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertBoatswains Mate 2nd Class Pennywell participates in a Question and Answer session for the Distinguished Visitors Cruise from Detroit to Toledo. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertDamage Controlman 3rd Class Viguilla leads the 23 new American citizens in the Pledge of Allegiance at the end of the Naturalization Ceremony. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertDe Wert hosts a Naturalization Ceremony on board for 23 new American citizens including De Werts own Sailor, Damage Controlman 3rd Class Trevor Viguilla. Thomas addresses our new citizens and leads them in taking their American oath. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertSeveral Sailors from De Wert had the opportunity to participate in batting practice with the Toledo Mudhens, the local AAA baseball team. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertThe De Wert golf team competed in the USO sponsored golf tournament at Detwiler Golf Aug. 24. -Photo courtesy of USS De WertThe crew of De Wert had the opportunity to host two very special visitors on board during their visit to Toledo. Mr. William De Wert, brother of our namesake Richard De Wert, and a fellow Marine who served with Hospitalman Richard De Wert during the Korean War shared stories with Cmdr. Thomas about the honorable man from which we received our name. -Photo by MC1 John J. MikeVisitors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) are shown the ships MK-75 deck gun during a tour. -Photo by MC1 Mark ODonaldThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG-45) transits the Maumee River in Toledo during Toledo Navy Week 2012.

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NAVSUP FLC Jax Provides Logistics For PANAMAX Exercise NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville Operations OfficerNAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville partnered with U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO), U.S. 4th Fleet (C4F), and Commander Task Force (CTF) 43 to pro vide logistics support for PANAMAX 2012, which concluded on 16 August at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 was to exercise a variety of responses, in coordina tion with the governments of Panama and Colombia, to protect and guaran tee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal. This multinational exercise strengthens interoperability and builds joint capa bilities of the participat ing nations to plan and execute complex multinational operations. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville supported C4F and the exercise from its commence ment, attending the Initial Planning Conference through the Final Planning Conference. Additionally, four fulltime personnel were sent to both the Multi-National Forces South (MNF-S) (C4F) and Combined Forces Maritime Component Command (CFMCC) (Brazil) components during the exercise, all which were crucial in order to assist in building and maintaining an accurate battle space picture across the air, land, and sea. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Lt. Cmdr. Dave Muhl was instru mental in the building of the Logistics Joint Manning documents for both staffs and all report ing procedures from components through the MNF-S on through to the SOUTHCOM Joint Logistics Operations Center (JLOC). Additionally, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville pro vided direct contract ing support during the Combined Acquisition Review Board (CARB) and the Combined Contract Review Board (CCCB) meetings. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, along with Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho concluded the exercise in which more than 1,000 military per sonnel from 17 nations, including the United States, participated. Of that number, 269 partici pants were from partner nations. I would to thank our partners in the Americas and other observers for their critical contribu tion and outstanding participation in key lead ership roles of this exer cise. Every nation shared unique and invaluable skills and their real-world experiences make this the best exercise ever, Harris said. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville, one of seven fleet logistics centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS), provides opera tional logistics, business and support services to fleet, shore and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and other Joint and Allied Forces. Services include contracting, regional transportation, fuel, material management, household goods move ment support, postal and consolidated mail, ware housing, global logistics and husbanding, haz ardous material management, and integrated logistics support. NAVSUP GLS compris es more than 5,700 mili tary and civilian logistics professionals, contrac tors and foreign nation als operating as a single cohesive team provid ing an array of integrated global logistics and con tracting services from 110 locations worldwide to Navy and Joint operational units across all warfare enterprises. A component of the Naval Supply Systems Command headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pa., NAVSUP GLS is part of a worldwide logistics net work of more than 22,500 military and civilian per sonnel providing combat capability through logis tics. -Photo by MC3 Frank J. PikulSeaman Joel Haworth aligns a rigid-hull inflatable boat as it is lowered onto the boat deck of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support Operation Martillo and 4th Fleets mission, Southern Seas 2012. Holding Steady 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Vicksburg Sailors Focus On FitnessEnterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsThroughout the final sched uled deployment of guidedmissile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) the crew has remained focused on maintaining a high level of fitness. Physical readiness is an important part of Navy life and many Sailors use deployment as an opportunity to become more physically active. Working out is my Zen time, said Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 2nd Class Andrew C. Buzzanco, who exercises daily. It keeps me focused and gives me the energy I need to do my job properly. I always feel great after Im done. Staying healthy and fit involves more than just working out, however. I eat a lot of fruit and veg etables in my daily diet, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Charlon A. Clarke. I try to keep away from soda and sugary juices and stick to water. The key is staying hydrated. Although exercising regularly is important, it is also important not to take on more than you can handle. Go slow if you are just starting out, said Clarke. Never try to lift more weight than you are capable of lifting and remember that Rome wasnt built in a day. During a time when the Navy is very competitive, maintaining the Navys physical fitness standards can be just as important as earning qualifications. We are assessed twice a year on our physical readi ness and the Navy has very high standards, said Lt. Dylan Richmond, navigation officer aboard Vicksburg, who exercis es six times a week. It is important for both the physical and mental health of Sailors to exercise regular ly and keep a balanced diet, Richmond also said. It also helps me feel free, even out to sea. It is a great stress reliever for those extra stressful days during deployment. To help its Sailors stay healthy, Vicksburg is equipped with cardio equipment, two weight rooms and addition al exercise equipment on the weather decks as well as a victory track that operates on the main weather deck at designated times during the day. Vicksburg is on her final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security opera tions, theater security coopera tion efforts and support mis sions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. -Photo by CTT1 Billy BernalPetty Officer Third Class Alejandro Rojas from Helicopter Squadron Light 48 detachment 2 (HSL 48-2) monitors as a crewmember aboard the USNS Sacagawea hooks up a pallet to USS Carr's embarked SH-60B helicopter during a Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP). The underway replenishment is scheduled to be Carr's final one prior to decommissioning in 2013 after completing their deploy ment to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibility supporting Operation Martillo.HSL-48 DeliversU.S. Fleet Forces Selects New Fleet Master ChiefFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) announced the selec tion of the commands new fleet master chief, the senior enlisted lead er for the Navys Atlantic Fleet, Aug. 27. Command Master Chief Chuck Clarke, who is currently serving in the top enlist ed job at U.S. 5th Fleet in Bahrain, will take over for Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens, who is slated to become the 13th mas ter chief petty officer of the Navy at the end of September. Master Chief Chuck Clarke is a tremendous leader with a wealth of experience in a vari ety of assignments, said Stevens. He has our Navys and our Sailors best interests in mind and can provide the commander with a unique perspective that will only help to increase mission readiness throughout the fleet. In his new assignment, Clarke will become the commands senior enlist ed advisor for more than 100,000 active duty and Reserve personnel who serve on more than 120 ships and submarines and nearly 80 shore activities within the U.S. Fleet Forces Command area of responsibility. Clarke, who was born in Georgetown, Guyana (South America), enlisted in the Navy in 1987. His previous assignments include USS Dubuque (LPD 8), USS Mount Vernon (LSD 39), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 40, Recruit Training Command and Personnel Support Detachment Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., Naval Support Activity, La Maddalena, Italy; and Helicopter Tactical Wing Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va. Prior to U.S. 5th Fleet, he served as the com mand master chief aboard the carriers USS Kitty Hawk (CVN 63) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Clark is a gradu ate of the Navys Senior Enlisted Academy, the Command Master Chief/ Chief of the Boat Course and the National Defense University Keystone Course. He holds an associ ate degree from National University, a bachelors degree from Excelsior College, and a masters in human relations from the University of Oklahoma. His personal deco rations include the Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (six awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (six awards), and the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal. 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 7

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Hu City Puts Four Chief Selects Thru PacesUSS Hue City Public AffairsFour Sailors aboard guidedmissile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) are undergoing a rig orous training program as they prepare for advancement to chief petty officers (CPOs). Beginning with the notifica tion that they had been select ed for advancement, the Hu City chief-selects are now in the midst of a six-week CPO induction process designed to teach them to effectively handle the responsibilities of being a chief petty officer. Selectees will be challenged through this process and pushed to excel. Having to be open to other parts of the Navy and learn about them, along with your job is one of the biggest challenges Im facing right now, said Chief (select) Electricians Mate (SW) Javian Williams. This induction is making me a better Sailor and soon to be a better chief in the Navy. In the past few weeks, the selectees have experienced a number of leadership roles and team-building exercises to help them develop the thought pro cesses of a chief. I always knew that being a chief petty officer was a large responsibility, and Im learn ing as much as I can this induction season, said Chief (select) Yeoman (SCW/AW) Leydi Mendez. I look for ward to applying my newfound knowledge after the 14th of September. Im beyond proud and honored to have made it to this milestone. Hu City Command Master Chief (SW) Raymond Charest has helped guide the selectees through the induction process and feels honored to welcome new chiefs to the Chiefs Mess aboard Hu City. Im ready to see these chiefselects lead Sailors and do great things in the Navy, said Charest. We have a great batch of new chiefs aboard Hu City prepared to take on any chal lenges. Hu City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Life At Sea On USS Hu City Seaman Kenneth Wood, from Toledo, Ohio, prepares to put money on a Navy Cash card aboard USS Hu City. -Photos by MCSN Darien G. KenneyChief Damage Controlman Quincy Crockett, from Chicago, trains Sailors on proper hose handling during a crash and salvage drill on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 3rd Class Matt Cox, from Midland, Mich., analyzes readings on USS Hu City. Electronics Technician 3rd Class Meagan Bramble, from Jacksonville, Fla., works on a circuit board aboard USS Hu City 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Military Families Free Annual Pass To National ParksAmerican Forces Press ServiceThrough its America the Beautiful series, the National Park Service grants complimentary access to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites, national parks and wildlife refuges to active duty service members and activated Guardsmen and reservists and their families, said Kathy Kupper, National Park Service spokeswoman. The park service is just so grateful for the service of the military, so weve been looking for a way to show our gratitude, Kupper said. Its taken a couple of years to get all the details worked out, but were honored that we can pay back a little bit. Service members can get a pass, valued at $80, by showing their military identification card. Family members can obtain their own passes, even if the service member is deployed or if they are traveling separately, Kupper explained. A pass covers entry and standard amenity fees for a driver and all passengers in a personal vehicle at per-vehicle fee areas, or up to four adults at sites that charge per person. Children age 15 or under are admitted free. Wounded warriors or any American citizen with a disability can get a free lifetime pass to all national parks. A 25-year National Park Service employee, Kupper recalled the organizations decades-long military ties, specifically to the Army, which oversaw national parks between the 1876 establishment of Yellowstone, the first national park, and the 1916 stand-up of NPS. For about 40 years, you had the U.S. Army, particularly the U.S. Cavalry, including Buffalo Soldiers, care for our first national parks, Kupper said. Yellowstone, Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon all had roads set up, built, with trails established and wildlife protected ... by the U.S. Army. Kupper added that even park ranger uniforms are inspired by the cavalry uniform, symbolizing the enduring bond. Many national parks were set aside for use strictly by military, whether for rest and relaxation trips ... or for training, the spokeswoman said, adding that through the years, the parks have been home to some of Americas most iconic images of freedom. Our service members are fighting to protect our freedoms and a lot of them are manifested in these symbols like the Statue of Liberty, the Liberty Bell, Mount Rushmore all sites cared for by the Park Service, Kupper said. These places inspire the mil itary and remind them what theyre fighting for so where better for them and their families to visit? -Russian Federation navy photo by Capt. 1st rank Anatoly RomankoThe guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) arrives in Severomorsk for a two-day visit after completing exercise Northern Eagle 2012. Farragut Takes Break In SeveromorskNational Pow/Mia Recognition Day Honors All Sailors Until They Are HomeFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy will join the nation in commemorat ing Prisoners of War/ Missing in Action (POW/ MIA) Recognition Day Sept. 21, as announced in NAVADMIN 262/12. National POW/ MIA Recognition Day is a day of observance for all Americans to offer remembrance, honor, and respect to service members who were pris oners of war and those who remain missing as a result of the nations conflicts. The 2012 nation al theme, Until They Are Home, pays special tribute to the families of these service members who have sacrificed and endured on behalf of their loved ones. National POW/MIA Recognition Day gives us the opportunity to honor the sacrifices of our POW/MIA service members, and to reaffirm our sacred promise to our nation to bring every warrior home, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director of personnel readi ness and community support. This years theme especially recognizes family members of our POW/MIA Sailors, many of whom continue to wait for the return of their loved ones. All commands are encouraged to host or support local POW/MIA Recognition Day activi ties. Suggested activities include displaying the missing man table in a unit work space and hosting formal ceremonies in which a former POW or family member of a cur rent MIA Sailor is a guest speaker. This observance is also one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the flying of the National League of Families POW/ MIA flag. The others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day. Today, more than 33,000 Sailors from World War II through the Persian Gulf War remain unaccounted for. Each year, Navys POW/ MIA section assists with repatriating Sailors and returning them to their loved ones for burial in our homeland. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 9

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of my Navy career, she added. Williams will attend the Corporate Communications Group (CCG)-sponsored WOC STEM Conference on Oct. 11-13 2012 in Dallas, Texas, where she will be presented with the Technology All-Star Award, along with award winners in various other STEM award categories. Williams is the only active duty Navy recipient in the All-Star category. CCG promotes signifi cant minority achievement in STEM through such events as the WOC awards, the Black Engineer of the Year Awards (BEYA), and the Minorities in Research Science Awards. The Navy has maintained a rela tionship with CCG for the last 20 years. I applaud Master Chief Williams achievement and am extremely proud that she will represent this command and the Navy as a whole at the confer ence, said NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. She is a stand-out professional in her field, as evi denced by this award. We are fortunate to have her here as part of our Navy Food Management Team at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville.From Page 1WilliamsShipmates To Workmates Pays Off For FRCSE SailorFrom FRCSEThanks to the Shipmates to Workmates program designed to help separating Sailors find jobs, a Navy petty officer with 15 years of military service began a civilian career at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Aug. 6. Aviation Machinists Mate 1st Class Terrence Roach landed a federal job as a materials engi neer technician support ing the commands Navy Oil Analysis Program (NOAP), a position he held for three years at FRCSE Detachment Mayport, Fla., prior to separating from active duty in July. The opportunity that they gave me is great, said Roach of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Shipmates to Workmates program. It has allowed me to stay in the area with my family, and I have a career work ing in aviation similar to what I did before. Because FRCSE oper ates aircraft and aeronautical-related equipment, the facility is required to participate in the NOAP. Roach is responsible for monitoring and diag nosing the condition of equipment or oil without the removal or extensive disassembly of the equipment using approved sampling techniques. His efforts support local squadrons and FRCSE operations. Roach was born in Guyana, South America. At the age of 10, he immigrated to the United States with his fam ily in 1987. They settled in a poor neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y. where ille gal drug use was rampant and drive-by shootings a common occurrence. For a better life, he enlisted in the Navy in May 1997 and became a U.S. citizen while serving on active duty in Jacksonville. He credits his Navy experience for provid ing the specialized skills needed for the labora tory job. He served as the leading petty officer in a NOAP laboratory and prior to that on an Emergency Reclamation Team for two years when assigned with the Topcats of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 31 until its disestablishment in 2008 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. With four sea tours under his belt, two back-toback on the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Roach was track ing for advancement to chief when an Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) decision to reduce force strength in 2011 ended his Navy career. I knew about the ERB before November 2011 when we got our results, he said. I knew in April that they were going over records, everyone between 8 and 15 years of service. Roach learned his fate when the Phase II ERB reviewed the records of E-6 through E-8 Sailors from 31 over manned ratings. He said the ERB involuntarily separated about 2,900 Sailors. Faced with unemployment, a wife and two children to sup port, and no immediate job prospects, he was open to any transition assistance the Navy was offering. When a NAVAIR Shipmates to Workmates program representative contacted him offering to provide employment assistance, he said, yes. They called me and said they saw my resume and wanted me to apply for jobs, said Roach. They shot me a list of about 10 federal and civilian jobs every day, a lot of them not in Florida. I didnt think I was going to get the FRCSE job, but I did. FRCSE Supervisory Chemist Gary Whitfield said he knew the labora tory was losing a chemist, a military spouse, and he desperately needed to fill the position. Given Terrences expe rience and background, he is a drop-in fit for the position, said Whitfield. It is also a good oppor tunity to support our military folks. He has already done a lot to get us pre pared for an Aviation Maintenance Inspection conducted for quality control. When people ask how he got the job, Roach gladly provides details about the Shipmates to Workmates program jointly managed by NAVAIR, along with several partnering commands and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He encourages his separating shipmates to pursue every opportunity, network, utilize human resource specialists and be open to relocating. Tania Dawson, the NAVAIR recruiting and retention program man ager, said the Shipmates to Workmates program is another means of get ting diverse skill sets into NAVAIR. She said 41 Sailors who worked for the command at multiple sites were impacted by the ERB decision. It makes good business sense; they are our own, said Dawson. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program, visit the official website at http://www.navair.navy. mil/jobs/sm2wm/. -U.S. Navy photoIn the Materials Engineering Laboratory at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Aug. 28, Terrence Roach, a materials engineer technician, prepares oil samples for testing in a Spectroil M Oil Analysis Spectrometer to analyze all the wear metals, contaminants and additives typically found in used oil samples. Roach secured his position through the Shipmates to Workmates program designed to assist separating Sailors impacted by the Enlistment Retention Boards in 2011 with finding federal jobs. Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Sept. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Sept. 7: Teen Base Round-Up and Pizza Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. This is a chance for Teens to round-up any newcomers to the base to introduce them to the Teen Center and invite them to a Pizza Party. Permission slip is required to participate in the round up on base. Staff will be on hand at the Teen Center with registration packets and per mission slips. 246-0347 Sept. 8: Military Classic Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 30. 270-5451 Sept. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 9: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Sept. 10: 7v7 Fall Soccer Begins Season ends Nov. 8. 270-5451. Sept. 11: Freedom 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Sept. 11: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Sept. 12: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Sept. 12: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 onegame payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. MWRSept. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Sept. 7: Teen Base Round-Up and Pizza Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. This is a chance for Teens to round-up any newcomers to the base to introduce them to the Teen Center and invite them to a Pizza Party. Permission slip is required to participate in the round up on base. Staff will be on hand at the Teen Center with registration packets and per mission slips. 246-0347 Sept. 8: Military Classic Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 30. 270-5451 Sept. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 9: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. 2707205 Sept. 10: 7v7 Fall Soccer Begins. Season ends Nov. 8. 270-5451. Sept. 11: Freedom 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Sept. 11: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Sept. 12: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Sept. 12: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Sept. 14: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 15: ESPN College Gameday. Every Saturday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NCAA Football teams on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day. 270-7205 Sept. 15: Singles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by Sept. 6. 270-5451 Sept. 21: Bingo Extravaganza. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Our first ever $25,000 one-game payout. Ten $1000 games, Ten $500 games and more. Only 225 packages available; multiple pack ages may be purchased. Advanced purchase required. 270-7204. Sept. 26: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored HSM 46. For tickets, call AMC Mani Bitor (904) 270-6010 x144. Sept. 28: One Night in Mexico 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 11

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Learn What FFSC Has To Offer YouFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 5, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Stress Management, Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help participants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. Sept. 5, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 6, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 6, 10-11 a.m., Craft Hour, USO Sept. 10-13, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 12, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 12, 11 a.m.-noon, Survivor Benefit Plan FFSC Room 719 Sept. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 15, 10 a.m.-until, IA Families Outing To Zoo Jacksonville Zoo Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Sept. 17-21, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.. SAPR Initial Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., PFM/ CFS Forum FFSC Room 702 Sept. 19, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Room 719 Sept. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 24, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Sept. 24-27, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Sept. 26, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. These efforts reinforce the Secretary of the Navys 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, as well as support the Chief of Naval Operations direc tions. Most importantly, focusing on total fitness puts us on a path to pre vent suicides. For more information about suicide pre vention visit www.sui cide.navy.mil and www. navynavstress.com From Page1Prevent 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Friday, Sept. 7 Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach will host our annual Fall Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Church at 400 Penman Road. Come join us to search for your special treasures! For infor mation, please contact the church office at 2495370 Saturday, Sept. 8 Join Wounded Warrior ProjectTM(WWP) for the WWP 8K Run in Jacksonville. Activities begin at 7 a.m. and a race start time of 9 a.m. at the Jacksonville Landing to help honor and empow er our nations Wounded Warriors. Race proceeds support the free programs WWP offers wounded service members nation wide. Advance registra tion is $25 (includes race day number, timing, and post-race festivities) and each runner must raise a minimum of $99. Top finisher awards and addi tional race-day options are available. Visit http:// www.woundedwarrior project.org/wwp-8k-runs. aspx to register. Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach will host our annual Fall Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Church at 400 Penman Road. Come join us to search for your special treasures! For infor mation, please contact the church office at 2495370 Want to find out how to lawn bowl or play bocce ball? Join a ranger at 2 p.m. on the green to learn about these fun outdoor games. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are nec essary and the program is free. Monday, Sept. 10 Beaches Photography Club meets at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be the Results of 2nd Annual Print Competition. Craig Monroe is the judge and will give live comments. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Saturday, Sept. 15 An Eating and Growing Seasonably Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow warm season veg etables will be held at Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cost is $10 with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Please call Jeannie to register, 255-7450. Find out from a park ranger at 2 p.m. what a gopher is, where they live and why they are so important. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Tuesday, Sept. 18 Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council, Duval County Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 Presents an Agent Orange Town Hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 Saint Johns Bluff Road South. Agent Orange, a herbi cide chemical contain ing dioxin, used to defoli ate the jungle in Vietnam may have exposed more than 2 million U.S. mili tary personnel from 1961 to 1970. This panel discus sion presents the facts one needs to know that affects not only the Vietnam vet eran, but his children and grandchildren. The United States Government just recently added Blue Water Navy Ships to a list that is now allowed to apply for veterans benefits. The Department of Veteran Affairs said that surviving spouses and decedents of Vietnam veterans might also be entitled to benefits. This is for the Vietnam vet, Children of Vietnam vets, grandchildren of Vietnam vets, and any one that has a Vietnam veteran in their familys history.Out in Town USS Robert G. Bradley FRG will meet from 5:309 p.m. on Sept. 6. USS Taylor FRG will meet from 7-8:30 p.m. on Sept. 6. USS Klakring FRG will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Sept. 7. 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Veteran Special Recognition Ceremony to honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm vet erans. Those eligi ble for the honor will receive certificates of Special Recognition in a ceremony on Nov. 8 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The appli cation deadline to regis ter for the honor is Oct. 5. The application can be found on Congressman Crenshaws site: www. crenshaw.house.gov. Another Sign-The Musical, Tickets On Sale Now Thursday, Sept. 27 at Florida State College, South Campus Military Appreciation Night for Another Sign The Musical. Mayport and NAS JAX USO have tickets on sale now for this show at 50 percent off, $15 cash only please. Another Sign approaches home lessness from many angles. For more information on the musical, visit www.itsanothersign.com Premier Wedding Expo-Free Tickets The wedding expo is on Sept. 9 from 1-4 p.m. at the University Center at UNF. Receiving the four free tickets is easy. All you have to do is go to www. PremierWeddingExpo. com, click on PreRegister & Buy Tickets, fill out the pre-registra tion online, and use the PROMO CODE USOPWE Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an individual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or emailing me at herb@jaxsignarama. com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned franchise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more veterans you will help. Our mission is to win this contest, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text 4970 to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an internet connection and webcam. The technology also comes with built in security, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Sign-up now via the fol lowing link: http://smile sovermiles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwa ter and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shredded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount pro vides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a fam ily annual pass, which allows up to eight peo ple in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addition, hon orably discharged vet erans who have service connected disabilities, and surviving spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifi cations and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ The USO and RocketLife have partnered to deliver a heart-warming oppor tunity for the men and women of the armed forces and their fami lies. The Personal Photo Book program enables troops serving abroad and their families to create 20-page personal photo books and ship them to any APO/FPO address for free. These full-color, customized photo books are small enough to fit in a soldiers cargo pockets yet can hold more than 60 photos of loved ones. RocketLife prints the books for free, and the USO pays for the ship ping. To get started, visit http://uso.myphotoprod ucts.com. United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. MCPON Names Gary Sinise Honorary Chief Office of the Master Chief Petty Officer of the NavyActor, humanitar ian and musician, Gary Sinise, was named an honorary chief petty offi cer during a ceremony held at the United States Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center Aug. 24. Sinise received the honor from Fleet Master Chief(AW/NAC) Michael D. Stevens on behalf of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy(MCPON) (SS/SW) Rick D. West. Stevens was named as the next MCPON by Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Jonathan Greenert June 27. It is very interesting how things work out and I believe that all things happen for a reason, said Stevens. MCPON was going to honor Mr. Sinise at the Year of the Chief kickoff event in April, but unfortunately Mr. Sinise was slightly injured in a car accident here in D.C. and was unable to attend the event. Thankfully, he was not seriously injured and MCPON is on a trip overseas visiting Sailors, so now I have the oppor tunity to preside over this event tonight. Sinise has been exposed to the military all of his life through his familys deep roots in military service. His father served in the Navy in the 1950s, two of his uncles served in World War II, three brother-in-laws served in Vietnam, his sister-inlaw served for 10 years, and his nephew served in Afghanistan and was recently accepted into the Green Berets. While not serving in the military himself, Sinise has raised millions of dollars for various chari ties dedicated to helping the military and veterans through his Gary Sinise Foundation launched in 2010. He has also per formed free concerts all over the world for service members with his Lt. Dan Band, named after his role in the 1994 Oscarwinning movie Forrest Gump. I am a big fan of your work as an actor, but I am an even bigger fan of the role you play in real life, said Stevens. And it is that body of work that we honor here today. Stevens presented Sinise with the honorary chief petty officer certifi cate signed by MCPON, while his daughter, Ella, pinned the chiefs anchor on his lapel. Stevens helped Sinise don a chiefs cover, which was followed by a salute to the crowd by honorary Chief Sinise, bringing the large crowd of chief petty offi cers, chief petty officer selectees, Sailors, families and the general public to their feet in a standing ovation. What a humbling day it is for me to receive this, said Sinise. Im truly touched by it. I dont take it for granted, and I dont take it lightly. The cornerstone of Sinises foundation was built upon his life-long principals and long standing commitment to be a citizen of action, and to help in any way that one can to serve the nation by honoring and helping the people who serve our country. Im always amazed and humbled at the skill and dedication of the men and women who serve in our Navy ...God bless you all for doing what you do in defense of our freedom all around the world, said Sinise. -Photo by MC2 Thomas L. RosprimGary Sinise left, is named an honorary chief petty officer by Fleet Master Chief Michael Stevens during a ceremony at the Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center. Stevens presented the honor on behalf of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Rick D. West. Stevens was named as the next MCPON. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 6, 2012 13