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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00264


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Annual PANAMAX Military Exercise ConcludesFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) officially concluded the annual 2012 PANAMAX exercise Aug. 16 at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris along with Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho concluded the exercise in which more than 1,000 military personnel from 17 nations, including the United States, partici pated. Of that number, 269 participants were from partner nations. I would to thank our partners in the Americas and other observers for their criti cal contribution and outstanding participa tion in key leadership roles of this exercise. Every nation shared unique and invaluable skills and their real-world experiences make Service Assumes Charge Of Mayport ClinicFrom StaffCmdr. Michael Service relieved Capt. Alan Siewertsen as officer in charge of Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport during a change of charge on Aug. 17 at the clinic. Guest speaker was Capt. Michael McGinnis, Director, Branch Health Clinics, Naval Hospital, Jacksonville and presiding offi cer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, com manding officer, Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Service is a native of Guthrie, Kentucky and was commis sioned an Ensign in the Navy Nurse Corps in June 1993. He began his career at Naval Medical Center, San Diego (NMCSD) where he initially served as a staff nurse on the inpatient multi-surgical ward and then as specialty nurse pro viding intravenous conscious sedation in eight various surgi cal specialty clinics. Next,he was assigned to Naval Hospital Millington, Tenn., where he served as Department Head of Beneficiary Access and Health Promotion officer for the Mid-South area of operations. In 1999, he was selected for full-time duty under instruc tion at the University of Tennessee earning a Master of Science degree as a Family Nurse Practitioner. His follow-on tour at Naval Hospital Yokosuka, Japan included duties as staff FNP, Department Head of Family Practice, senior nurse for Directorate of Ambulatory Care and inter im Officer in Charge at Naval Branch Clinic Chinhae, Korea. He served on the Executive Committee of Medical Staff (ECOMS), Executive Committee of Nursing Staff (ECONS), Credentials Review Board and the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. In June 2004, Service trans ferred to Naval Hospital Cherry Point, North Carolina. He additionally served as the Command Managed Equal Opportunity (CMEO) offi cer, Advanced Practice Representative for ECOMS and the Clinical Director for the Special Operations Clinical Training (SOCT) program. In 2005, Service deployed with Marine Wing Support Squadron 274 (MWSS-274) to Anbar Province in Iraq where he served as the unit medical -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Alan Siewertsen shakes hands with Cmdr. Michael Service after a change of charge ceremony held at Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport on Aug. 17. Getting In Shape To Be A Chief-Photo by MCCS Eric PowellChief Select Mass Communications Specialist William Townsend performs sit-ups during an early morning PFAN with his fellow Chief Selects. The Selects PT together three times a week, as part of their initiation season at Naval Station Mayport. Mayport Blowing SmokeFrom StaffOver the next couple of months, Public Works Department Mayport will conduct a study to evalu ate the bases sanitary sewer collection system. Workers and residents aboard Naval Station Mayport may notice a haze around some of the bases structures and roadways as contractors from AH Environmental pump smoke throughout the systems underground pipelines. Dont call the fire department, its just part of the testing. According to AH program manager Anthony Gruber, the smoke is harmless no odor, non-toxic and non-staining. It doesnt create a fire hazard and residents should not see smoke in their buildings or homes unless there is defective plumbing or dried up drain traps. Residents and facility managers are advised to pour a gallon of water into any unused drains, show -See PANAMAX, Page 3 HSL-46 Works Day ... And Night-Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonU.S. Navy Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) prepare an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter from Mayport-based HSL-46 Detachment Eight for departure during nighttime flight operations. Nitze is deployed as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.See Clinic, Page 2 See Smoke, Page 6

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.In a report commis sioned by the College Board Advocacy & Policy Center* to highlight the critical importance of teachers, to salute their great work, and to amplify their voices, two practic ing classroom teachers provide an overview of some issues they identi fy as barriers to student learning. Along with their own ideas, they included responses from their col leagues addressing such issues as class size, lack of family support and involvement, absentee ism, plagiarism, and lack of resources. Following is a brief synopsis of their remarks concern ing parental support with very little editing on to maintain their original voices. Tom White, a 3rd grade teacher at a public school in Lynnwood, WA, recent ly taught a math lesson on the difference between perimeter and area. After the hour lesson about 24 of the 28 students showed a solid understanding, two others had a pretty good grasp, and the other two, well. . they werent quite there, according to White. Later reflecting on how the lesson could have gone better, he identi fied four factors which could have led to greater understanding among his students. These factors included class size, inclass support, curricular mandates, and parental support. With the school year just starting through out NE Florida, his com ments on parental sup port could provide some keys to students academic success. Twenty-five percent of his colleagues felt that parent support is key to student success with eight percent stating that it is the most important issue which impacts their abil ity to teach their students. He shared a typical class room teacher response which describes what most teachers feel when trying to work with sleepy-eyed students who consistently fail to do their homework: I have learned to teach with minimal parent support. I think if parents were more involved with their chil dren after the school day is over, more of our stu dents would take school seriously and meet stan dards. But White is not very optimistic about improv ing the level of parental support for two reasons. He cites two reasons: First of all no one wants to be told how to raise their child, no matter how crucial the advice may be. Secondly whenever our school has parenting classes or subject-specif ic events, such as math nights designed to help parents better support their children, most of the attendees are parents who least need our advice, which only exacerbates the divide between their children and those who lack critical parental sup port. Nancy Barile, a 17 year veteran of high school English at Revere High just outside of Boston, provides a more posi tive view about some of the major hurdles she and her colleagues face, including lack of fam ily engagement. While bemoaning this lack of family engagement result ing from strategies which are geared to elementary and middle school years: bake sales, field trip chaperoning, and room moni toring which would mor tify most high schoolers, she is optimistic about the role parents can play. Academic ethos, the dis cipline to study when oth ers are out with friends, socializing, and having fun, can be cultivated in children by their parents and family. In her comments, Barile cites lack of teacher train ing as a barrier to improv ing family engagement. She notes that since research shows that par ent from lower economic backgrounds sometimes tend to be less comfort able interacting with authorities, including teachers, she recom mends educators be trained in this research to improve parent-teacher interaction. Barile also believes that teachers need training on how to overcome child care and transportation issues which frequently become obstacles for successful parent-teacher interac tions. She additionally cites lack of understand ing of cultural issues as becoming a barrier to student achievement. If, for example, school informa tion is not disseminated in a language the family understands, the family is left out of the process of helping the student to succeed. The purpose of this report was to spark con versations among edu cation professionals and parents about what we must do to improve stu dent learning. Hopefully this report will cre ate conversations in the home, the workplace, or at the gym about school reform. Until these kinds of exchanges begin, real progress will be elusive. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. The College Board Advocacy & Policy Center was established to help transform education in America. Guided by the College Boards principles of excellence and equity in education, we work to ensure that students from all backgrounds have the opportunity to succeed in college and beyond. We make critical connections between policy, research and real-world practice to develop innovative solu tions to the most pressing challenges in education today.Parent Involvement Is Key To SuccessJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingRecently the airwaves have been bombarded with media coverage of the altercation involving Chad Johnson formerly known as Ocho Cinco and his wife Evelyn Lozada. Johnson was arrested for his actions and is now apparently having to deal with the repercussions of that action. From a public perspective, he has lost the opportunity to play football with the Miami Dolphins. Additionally, a deal he made with VH1 has now fallen through. And, it appears that his wife Evelyn Lozada has decid ed to file for divorce. Without knowing the intricate details regard ing all that took place prior to Johnsons arrest, we are aware that he had to choose some course of action. Unfortunately for Chad and his wife Evelyn, the course of action he chose has caused him some discomfort and creates a financial disruption for him at least momentarily. Its probably easy for many to say that he should not have done what he did. Thats a good assessment. Hopefully, Chad will come to the place where he sees that the action he took recent ly was not the right action. This is one of those incidents where a high profile individuals action gives us an opportunity to self assess. Given a simi lar situation, how would we handle the ordeal? Its always easier said than done. Naturally, the preferred course of action when addressing controversial issues is to try to remain calm. It is also better to consider consequences before doing something than having to deal with the backlash after an inci dent has taken place. I dont know Chad Johnson personally. To be honest, I have not even followed his professional football career. What I do know is Chad, his wife Evelyn and many oth ers have been adversely affected by the recent course of action he took. Such is the case with each of us. We should always remember that any time we choose to act from a positive or nega tive perspective, there will be a reaction. Just because we do not know an individual personally does not mean that we cannot empathize with that person. In the case of Chad Johnson and his wife Evelyn, I do empathize with both of them. I am empathetic with them because they are forced to deal with this issue in the public. Although most of us are not high profile individu als, we will also be held to a high standard when it comes to our actions. Every action that we take will result in some type of reaction. It is my hope that each of us remember that our actions not only affect our lives, but the lives of those around us. The action of one shipmate can affect the lives of other ship mates. The action of one partner can affect the life of another partner. Needless to say, all of our actions will cause a reaction. Thus, we should consider all of our actions very carefully! For Every Action, There Is A ReactionLt. Anthony Hodge CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSofficer providing combat medical care to forces in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Service received orders to NMCSD in 2006 where he was assigned to Expeditionary Health Services Pacific (EHSP) providing direct medi cal and consultative support to over 48 ships assigned to Expeditionary Strike Group-3 and other SURFOR Pacific assets. Additionally, he served as primary preceptor for over 30 independent duty corpsmen (IDC) and completed the require ments for designation as an Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) Surgeon. In 2007, he reported aboard NBHC Sasebo, Japan where he served as interim Officer in Charge and Head of Medical Services over seeing the delivery of quality medical care to over 6,800 beneficiaries in support of ESG-7 and CTF-76 assets. During the tour, he deployed as a medical provider to Expeditionary Medical Facility-Kuwait coordinat ing care for more than 18 transiting combat Army Brigades and two Marine Expeditionary Units in support of CENTCOM operations. In 2010, he reported to the Navy Personnel Command serving as one of the senior Nurse Corps detailers responsible for the distribution, assign ment, and career man agement of more than 900 nurses representing 16 different subspecialties. Service is board-cer tified as a Family Nurse Practitioner. He is a member of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and the University of Tennessee Imhotep Honor Society. Capt. Alan V. Siewertsen, a native of Mason City, Iowa, enlisted in the United States Navy after gradu ating from high school. He reported to Naval Aerospace Medicine School in Pensacola for Aviation Medicine Technician C school. He completed his enlistment as a Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class and returned to Iowa where he enrolled into Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. He later trans ferred to the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, where he graduated with a Bachelors of Science and a Masters of Science in Human Nutrition. In 1988, while work ing at Childrens Hospital, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Siewertsen accept ed a direct commission as a Medical Service Corps Officer. During his first assignment, he was Department Head, Clinical Nutrition, Naval Hospital, Orlando, Florida. He transferred to Naval Hospital, Naples, Italy where he served as Department Head. In 1994, he trans ferred to National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland where he served as Staff Dietitian. After com pleting deployment, he returned to Bethesda to assume the duties as Department Head, Nutrition Management. In 2000, he transferred to Naval Medical Center, San Diego, California, as Assistant Department Head, Nutrition Management. He served as Department Head, Nutrition Management, Naval Hospital, Camp Pendleton. In 2005, he trans ferred to Naval Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida as Department Head, Nutrition Management. He volunteered for an Individual Augmentee deployment in sup port of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He served as the Deputy Director of Health Affairs for the Multi-National Security Transition CommandIraq in Baghdad, Iraq. In 2007, he became the Officer in Charge, Naval Branch Health Clinic, NAS Jax. In May 2008, he deployed as a GSA in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. He was assigned as the Team Leader, Medical Embedded Training Team, Combined Security Transition Command, Kabul, Afghanistan. He completed his deploy ment in August 2009 and served as the Officer in Charge, Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport.From Page 1Clinic 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Contract For Massey Ave Work AwardedFrom NAVFAC SoutheastNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $6.6 million con tract Aug. 15 to TMG Services, Inc., a small business, out of Cleveland, Ohio the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvements at Naval Station (NS) Mayport, Mayport, Fla. NAVFAC Southeast contin ues with its pledge to support small businesses, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast deputy for Small Business. Americas 27 million small businesses employ more that 58 percent of the private work force, generate more than 51 percent of the nations gross domestic product, and are the principal source of new jobs. The work to be performed provides for construction of a boulevard-style roadway with two lanes each way divided with a turfed median along the Massey Avenue corridor. This project award, is once again a tangible demonstration of the strategic value and worldwide relevance of Naval Station Mayport, said NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Douglas Cochrane. As a practical matter, the improved traffic flow will enable the 2,000 new Sailors who will arrive with the USS Iwo Jima ARG, to safely and efficiently transit the Installation. Construction includes turn ing lanes, curb and gutters and pedestrian sidewalks on the north side of Massey Avenue. It includes realignment of inter secting streets and all required signalization and intersection reconstruction and all inciden tal related work. This project also includes improvements at the intersec tion of Maine Street and Moale Avenue and at the intersection of Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue to improve capacities and safety of these intersec tions. A round-about will be constructed at the Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue inter section. Site preparation includes site clearing, excavation and prepa ration for construction. Paving and site improvements include a storm water drainage, side walks and curbing. Electrical utilities include traffic signals, roadway lights and utility relo cations. The project is expected to be completed by February 2014. NAVFAC is the Systems Command that delivers and maintains quality, sustainable facilities, acquires and man ages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, provides contingency engi neering response, and enables energy security and environ mental stewardship. Additional updates and information about NAVFAC can be found on social media sites Facebook and Twitter. Become a Fan at www. facebook.com/navfac and fol low us at www.twitter.com/nav fac this the best exercise ever, Harris said. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 was to exercise a variety of responses, in coordina tion with the governments of Panama and Colombia, to protect and guaran tee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sover eignty. This multina tional exercise strength ens interoperability and builds joint capabilities of the participating nations to plan and execute com plex multinational opera tions. PANAMAX is a good opportunity to exchange knowledge and increase interoperability among the many partner nations that have a common interest in the safety and security of the Panama Canal, Lima Filho said. PANAMAX is a U.S.sponsored, multina tional annual exercise that includes partici pants from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States. As we complete this years PANAMAX exer cise I know that each of us will take away many good lessons from each other. I encourage all our partners in the Americas to continue to value the professional and personal bonds that were devel oped here as they will last for many years to come, Harris said. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks to participants of this year's closing ceremony for PANAMAX 2012 at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. PANAMAX is an annual U.S. Southern Command-sponsored exercise series that focuses on ensuring the defense of the Panama Canal. From Page 1PANAMAX While he works to protect the country,St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344www.stjude.orgMatt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2 and his daughter Delilah A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 -Photos by MC3A.J. JonesSailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) clear old paint and rust off of a fence at the Tondi School for Special Needs Children in Tallinn, Estonia. Chief Boatswains Mate (SW) Mitch Inkpen mans the nozzle of a firehose during a fresh water washdown aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Farragut Sailors Strengthen BondsFarragut Public AffairsThe guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) continued to strengthen rela tionships with Baltic nations as it began a four-day port visit in Riga, Latvia, Aug. 4. During the port visit, Sailors played a game of basketball against members of the Latvian National Armed Forces and participated in two community service projects. The city of Riga offered incredible inter actions for our Sailors during the community service projects, and the basketball game was a highlight as well, said U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Christopher J. Sill, Defense, Naval and Marine Attach for the U.S. Embassy in Riga. Latvia and the United States have a long standing partner ship, and I know that Farraguts visit helped to strengthen this rela tionship. The community ser vice projects provided Sailors the opportu nity to build and install new birdhouses for the Love Island Ecological Site and visit the Stella Maris Riga City Social Care Centre, a care facility for the elderly run by the government. It was a great oppor tunity to contribute to the community, meet the people and see what the culture is like, said Chief Electronics Technician Jason Howes. It really gave us a good feeling to come help out and show our support. Farragut concluded its visit with a reception aboard the ship. We would like to thank the Sailors of the Farragut for their visit, said Lt. Col. Sill. Their visit has shown a lot of support toward a close NATO ally, and has gone a long way toward making that relation ship stronger. Farragut is on a scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooper ation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. Prime Minister of Estonia Andrus Ansip receives honors from sideboys as he arrives aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security oper ations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Farragut deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), which includes CSG 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guidedmissile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), as well as the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 and Destroyer Squadron 28. Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) prepare to moor in Riga, Latvia. Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Paul Chism, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), removes a mooring line in preparation to depart Riga, Latvia.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 5 Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) heave a mooring line during a sea and anchor detail in Riga, Latvia. Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) undergo a dress white uniform inspection. Boatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Cedric Taylor gives Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) training aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class (SW) Adam Caldwell tightens chains on an SH-60B Seahawk from the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Light Squadron (HSL) 48, Detachment 7, on the flight deck of guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Sailors simulate fighting a fire during a general quarters exercise aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) brace for shock during a general quarters exercise.

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NATO TF508 Commander Visits Taylor USS Taylor Public AffairsThe commander of NATO Task Force 508 vis ited guided-missile frig ate USS Taylor (FFG 50) to thank the crew for their service and wish them a safe voyage home, Aug. 9. Royal Netherlands Navy Commodore Ben Bekkering was welcomed by Cmdr. Jeremy R. Hill. Taylors commanding officer. The two discussed Taylors contributions to the counter-piracy effort, and the lessons learned from Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) patrols and intelligence, surveil lance, and reconnaissance missions. Taylor has spent more than 160 days assigned to NATO Task Force 508 supporting Operation Ocean Shield, the maritime interdiction operation and counter-piracy mis sion in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Taylor has worked alongside Turkish Navy frigate TCG Giresun (F-491), Royal Netherlands Navy frigate HLMNS Evertsen (F805), and Royal Netherlands Navy amphibious trans port ship HNLMS Rotterdam (L800), while patrolling the IRTC, the Somali Basin, and the coast of the Horn of Africa. Bekkering toured the ship and met with the crew. We always take the time to prepare for official visits, but we dont always get the opportunity to meet the visitors, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Henry Wells. It was a pleasure to see the com modore in person, espe cially around our work spaces. Following his tour, the commodore spoke to the crew during an all hands call on the mess decks. He thanked the crew for their hard work, which helped ensure the safe transit of more than 4,000 merchant ships through the Horn of Africa region. At the conclusion of his remarks, Bekkering presented Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class Chadwick Anderson with a chal lenge coin in recognition of his outstanding perfor mance as a visit, board, search and seizure team member. Taylor is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508 supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interception operations and counterpiracy missions in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility. Balfour Hosts Back To School Brigade At RBCCBalfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport hosted Operation Homefronts Back to School Brigade to provide military fami lies with backpacks full of donated school supplies. The event took place at the Ribault Bay Community Center on Aug. 12 and provided more than 200 backpacks to Mayports military fam ilies. The Back to School Brigade is a nationwide campaign that helps military families with the burden of the expense of school supplies. Operation Homefront has hosted the event for the past five years at the Jacksonville Armory and this is the first time they have been at Naval Station Mayport. In 2011, the Back-ToSchool Brigade program raised more than $2 mil lion in school supplies nationwide through its partnership with Dollar Tree. Through the gener osity of individual and corporate contributors, Operation Homefront provided 33,000 back packs to children of mili tary service members. Operation Homefront provides emergency financial and other assis tance to the families of our service members and Wounded Warriors. A national nonprofit, Operation Homefront leads more than 4,500 vol unteers across 25 chapters and has met more than 400,000 needs since 2002. For more information about the organization, visit their website at www. operationhomefront.net -Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers with Balfour Beatty Communities and Operation Homefront pack back packs with donated school supplies to be distributed to military families during a Back to School Brigade event held at Ribault Bay Community Center.USS Hue City Offers At-Sea College Classes USS Hue City (CG 66) Public AffairsForty-seven Sailors aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) started a second term of classes through the Navy College Program for Afloat College Education (NCPACE), Aug. 13. Hue City Sailors are participating in both instructor-led and CD-ROM selfpaced courses such as Fundamentals of Writing, Academic Skills, English Composition I/II and American Literature I/II. There are usu ally three instructor-led classes per term and 260 courses available via CD-ROM. Those enrolled in courses are appreciative of the oppor tunity to pursue educa tional goals. Im grateful for the opportunity that I can advance my education while we are at sea, and I dont have to put a stop to going to school because Im gone, said Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Seaman (SW) Juanita Funderburk. The three instructorled classes are taught at various times through out the day in the ships training resource class room. Sailors are afford ed time to attend class, but must balance work day requirements with homework. Its hard trying to find the time to study and do my school work, but I find a way to get it done, said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Meagan Bramble. I have a goal set in mind of getting my degree and I wont be stopped until it is com plete. NCPACE professor Joshua Shinn takes pride in seeing Sailors advance toward their educational goals. Having family that served in the military and now an NCPACE profes sor for the past two years, Shinn said he has gotten a sense of the challenges service members face. He is glad he can give back to them in his own way. This program is a great opportunity for Sailors to advance their lives by having the chance to earn a degree while at sea, said Shinn. There are so many opportunities with this program and it should definitely be taken advantage of. Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. ers, or sinks prior to the testing. If smoke enters a building, this could mean sewer gases are also present and should be repaired. If smoke does enter a building, notify Scott McPherson with NS Mayport Public Works at 270-5441. Gruber said teams of inspection crews will allow the base to detect any sewers that have prohibited connections to storm water drainage systems, a practice that was common up until the 1980s. Gruber said the study will allow those connections to be locat ed and repaired, keeping stormwater drainage out of the water treatment plant where it doesnt belong.From Page 1Smoke 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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-Photo by MCSN Darien G. KenneyCulinary Specialist Seaman Mitchell Johnson, from North Augusta, S.C., left, speaks with a crewmember aboard the Iranian-flagged dhow M/V Payam. The guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) provided medical assistance, food, water and fuel to the vessel after it had issued a distress call. Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. USS Hue City Aids Distressed IraniansFrom USS Hue City Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) ren dered medical assistance and provided food, water and fuel to an Iranianflagged dhow, M/V Payam, Aug. 15, approxi mately 45 miles southeast of Muscat, Oman. At approximately 2:20 p.m. local time, Hue City responded to a distress call for medical assistance relayed by a U.S. P-3C Orion, operating under Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) conducting a routine maritime patrol. After arriving on scene, Hue City dispatched two rigid-hull inflatable boats, transporting the ships hospital corpsman, and the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team to assess the injured per sonnel. It was discovered that of the 13 dhow crew members six Pakistani and seven Iranian, two required medical assis tance and were subsequently treated by Hue Citys hospital corpsman. The dhows crew mem bers reported that the ves sel had been pirated and was lacking food, water and fuel. Hue City then provided four bags of rice, six cans of kidney beans, 70 gallons of water, and 50 gallons of fuel; enough supplies and fuel to allow the dhow to continue on to its next port of call. Providing assistance to our fellow mariners is an essential part of our mis sion here and this was an opportunity to demon strate our commitment to the welfare and safety of those in the region, said Capt. Daniel Uhls, Hue City commanding officer. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 7

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De Wert In Milwaukee For 1812 Commemoration USS De Wert Public AffairsUSS De Wert (FFG 45) continued her cruise throughout the Great Lakes to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 by arriving in her first American port of Milwaukee on Aug. 9. The crews of USS De Wert, USS Hurricane (PC 3), and the Royal Canadian Navys HMCS Ville de Quebec were greeted with a warm welcome from the city of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin upon their arrival. Public offi cials including the Mayor and the Lt. Governor attended the welcoming ceremony. More than 25 Sailors devoted part of their lib erty time to help the citizens of Milwaukee through communi ty relations projects. Some chose to visit the Childrens Hospital of Milwaukee, while others stocked the shelves at the Hunger Task Force Food Pantry or served meals at a local shelter. While on duty, Sailors gave tours of De Wert to more than 7,000 people and hosted another Distinguished Visitors reception. The city of Milwaukee gave all Sailors the chance to fully experi ence the city while enjoy ing their liberty by offer ing tours of the Miller Coors Brewery and Harley Davidson Factory along with Navy Night at the Wisconsin State Fair and the Air and Water show. Fifty-two distinguished visitors joined De Wert upon her departure from Milwaukee on Aug. 14 for an eight-hour tran sit to Chicago. The dis tinguished visitors were entertained through demonstrations by the Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure Team, pipe patch ing scenarios, and an emergency flight quarters drill. The distinguished visitor cruise was capped off as De Wert rendered a 21-gun salute to the city of Chicago and anchored outside the Navy Pier. The War of 1812, also known as Americas sec ond war for indepen dence, is regarded by many as the conflict that started our countrys rise to global influence. From 1812 to 1815, we fought to expand to the north and west, and to assert our rights to trade freely with other countries, without interference from Britains Royal Navy ships on the high seas. -Photos courtesy of USS De WertThe crews of USS De Wert, USS Hurricane, and HMCS Ville de Quebec are greeted by Milwaukee public officials during the Welcoming Ceremony. De Wert hosted 54 Distinguished Visitors onboard during her 8-hour transit from Milwaukee to Chicago. Boatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Raheem Mitchell takes his oath from Lt. Michel during his reenlistment ceremo ny while import Milwaukee. Seaman Julian McElroy and Seaman Alexander Houck prep the mooring lines as De Wert enters into Milwaukee. Gunners Mate 3rd Class Maki renders a 21-gun salute to the city of Chicago upon De Werts arrival into the city. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 9

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Mayport Enjoys Command Picnic -Photos by Paige GnannOS2 Stacey Neely sells drinks to benefit the command rec reation fund during the command picnic. Naval Station Mayport families enjoy one of the last days of summer at the Command picnic at Sea Otter Pavilion. MWR provided bounce houses for the kids to enjoy during a command picnic hosted by Naval Station Mayport on Aug. 16. Galley personnel helped prep and cook, while Base Services helped with set up and clean up. Above, Chief Select Master-at-Arms James Watkins flips burgers and chicken to feed Mayport Sailors, families and DoD civilians during the command picnic. Right, Boatswains Mate 1st Class Victor Thomas brings Jenecia Daniels, 5, to the command picnic to enjoy the day. Daniels father is currently deployed. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, bev erage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept. 1: Youth Bowling Program Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Bring the whole family for free bowling and hot dogs. Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 Youth Bowling Program will also be available. 270-5377. Sept. 4: Softball Begins Season ends Nov. 1. 270-5451 Sept. 5: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Sept. 5: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 5: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FY13 CPO Selectees. For tickets, contact ACC Ferrer (904) 270-7211. Sept. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Sept. 8: Military Classic Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 30. 270-5451 Sept. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 9: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. Sept. 10: 7v7 Fall Soccer Begins Season ends Nov. 8. 270-5451. Sept. 11: Freedom 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Aug. 23: Hooter Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, bev erage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 25: Wet n Wild Water Park. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $20. Sign-up deadline Aug. 19. Aug. 29: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Aug. 30: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Atlanta Falcon Football. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Cost $8. Aug 31: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept. 1: Youth Bowling Program Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Bring the whole family for free bowling and hot dogs. Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 Youth Bowling Program will also be available. 270-5377. Sept. 2: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 7:30 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Signup deadline Aug. 16. Sept. 4: Command Break-In. Look for us at the Galley for Lunch. Sept. 4: Softball Begins. Season ends Nov. 1. 270-5451 Sept. 5: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Sept. 5: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 5: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FY13 CPO Selectees. For tickets, contact ACC Ferrer (904) 270-7211. LIBERTYAug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept. 1: Youth Bowling Program Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Bring the whole family for free bowling and hot dogs. Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 Youth Bowling Program will also be available. 270-5377. KID THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 11

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Air Drop Resupply Prompts Drug Interdiction USS Carr Public AffairsNorfolk-based frigate USS Carr (FFG 52), with embarked Mayport-based HSL-48 Detachment Two, retrieved 1,250 pounds of cocaine while being resupplied by an air drop at sea during Operation Martillo, Aug. 15. A long range P-3 patrol aircraft from the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) decreased altitude, passed close to the ship and dropped a single parachute attached to a sealed capsule which contained mission essen tial parts. As the contain er landed in the sea, Carr dispatched its rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to retrieve the container. Seeing our parts being pushed out of an air craft worried me a bit, just thinking what would happen if the parachute didnt open or what if the container sunk. It was great to see Naval Logistics and coordi nation with the CBP in action said Chief Logistics Specialist Jeffery Fries. While Carrs RHIB was retrieving the parts cap sule, the SH-60B heli copter from Detachment Two identified a suspect small boat over the hori zon. The ship was imme diately directed to make best speed to intercept the suspect vessel. Carrs embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) boarded the vessel and seized 1,250 pounds of cocaine with an estimated street value of approximately $17 mil lion. Carrs Sailors have performed brilliantly throughout deployment, demonstrating their abil ity to constantly flex to accomplish the task at hand. I am particularly proud of my First Division they constantly amaze me with their dedica tion, determination, and knowledge, said Cmdr. Patrick Kulakowski. com manding officer. Setting The Fenders -Photo by MC2 Stuart PhillipsSailors remove fenders from the starboard windbreak during a sea and anchor detail as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) prepares to receive a barge alongside in Cartagena, Colombia. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in sup port of Southern Seas 2012. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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New Program Aims To Better Troops TransitionAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is conducting pilot classes of a new pro gram designed to better prepare service members transitioning out of the military to civilian life. Transition Goals Plans Success, known simply as Transition GPS, replaces the 20-year-old Transition Assistance Program, or TAP. In a sweeping over haul of the 20-year-old TAP, as part of the VOW to Hire Heroes Act passed in 2011, Transition GPS takes military members through a week-long class, compared to the original TAPs mandatory two to four hours of sep aration counseling, said Susan Kelly, the Defense Departments deputy director for the newly formed Transition to Veterans Program Office. The Defense Department wants our service members to suc ceed when they become civilians, Kelly said dur ing an American Forces Press Service interview. Separating from the military lifestyle is a major life change, she said, pointing out that there are some things that veterans cant control during the transition process, but there are others that they can. And thats exactly what the Transition GPS helps you do. Its going to walk you through a set of modules, help you build your skills, and takes you through what you need to consider ... [through] deliberate planning that makes you more open to the success you want to be in the civilian work force. Naval Station Norfolk is one of seven installations now conducting pilot classes of the new five-day Transition GPS workshop. Full use of the program is expected to be in place by the end of 2013, according to a White House release. Kelly said senior lead ers from the Defense Department, the military services, Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Labor, the Small Business Administration, the Education Department and the Office of Personnel Management met regularly for a year as the Veterans Employment Initiative Task Force to develop the new program. It was President Obamas mandate to DOD and VA to estab lish the joint Veterans Employment Initiative Task Force, Kelly explained, that brought all the partners together in a very structured and very goal-oriented way. It was the major impetus for bringing all those les sons learned together and helping us develop a very comprehensive curricu lum for our service mem bers. She said representa tives of the agencies con tributed in multiple ways to develop Transition GPS, which, she added we hope will eventually evolve into the military lifecycle transition assis tance program. Transition GPS will be mandatory for service members, Kelly said, including reservists and national guardsmen, with some exceptions. A key part of the weeklong pro gram is a three-day Labor Department Employment Workshop, which is man dated by the VOW to Hire Heroes Act to be in place by Nov. 21. Between the manda tory DOL employment workshop, plus the core curriculum for Transition GPS, there is a holistic view that starts with look ing at the challenges of transition, and preparing military members to meet those challenges, includ ing family considerations. It also helps plan for the financial changes theyll face as they become civil ians, she said. Kelly said the DOL employment workshop introduces challenges a service member might confront, and how to deal with such stressors. Staff members help them determine whats most important to them in a job salary, advancement, stability and other considerations. The workshop takes service members through job searches using upto-date technology, and has them look at whether their skills are in demand in the civilian sector, where the best opportu nities exist, and whether moving is a consideration. The DOL wants military members to develop a second plan if the first one doesnt pan out. They might look at what skills are in demand and how they can fill that gap, Kelly said. There are some very serious questions to look at. There are specific pieces of the new curric ulum that give them the information they need to make very well-thought out decisions as well as skills building to help them succeed in whatever pathway they chose, Kelly added. In the course of five days, about 50 students develop an individual transition plan that maps out financial planning and a budget to follow the first 12 months after separating from the mili tary. It also covers how to write a resume and how to interview for a job, along with exploring how military skills can be car ried over into the civilian work force. In addition to the DOL workshop, a Veterans Affairs represen tative goes over benefits. If certain skills are not transferrable, service members personal goals are identified for the type of employment they want to pursue, the education they want to gain from college or technical train ing schools, or to start their own business, she said. Optional two-day tracks, to be piloted in the coming months, will include help for those who want to pursue a col lege degree, or technical training. We found that military members werent making the best of their post-911 GI Bill, Kelly said. So we are getting them the information to help them choose wisely. The new GI Bill, she said, is a generous benefit. Make it work for you, and choose wisely, Kelly sug gested. The Small Business Administration will also offer an optional two-day curriculum to put new veterans on the path to start up small businesses, Kelly said. The SBA is very passionate about our military members being very innovative, [being] creative, and self-initiat ing ... and theyre going to help them build [busi ness] skills. The SBA also developed an eight-week online course to help new veter ans build a solid business plan, she added. It also assigns a mentor to each military member, who will see them through their small-business startup, sustaining the business, and remain a long-term mentor. Navy Hospital Corpsmannd Class Peter Adams is one such small business candidate. He wants to go into film and video production and start his own company. He said Transition GPS has allowed him to look at reinventing himself. The class has given me ways to take my lead ership and organization skills and [others] I never would have thought of and how to market them for myself, he said. It gives me the confidence on my resume and in an interview to say, This is what I can do for you, Adams said. Navy Machinist Matest Class Jason Christian has worked in cryogenics throughout his military career, and his goal is to stay in his field in the civilian sector. He had previously attended the original TAP, and he says the new pilot program is more interac tive. The technology made everything change sig nificantly, Christian said. Aside from the major companies in his field, he said he found others he didnt know existed. I plan on coming back and bringing my spouse so she can be involved in this. [We need] to look at housing, the cost of liv ing, what traffic is like, the crime rate and what the schools are like for my children things I never took into account. -Photo by Terri Moon Cronk From left: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Dusty Thibodaux, Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kasey Schmidt and Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua Johnston attend a Transition GPS pilot program resume class at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., Aug. 15. Saturday, Aug. 25 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Tijuana Flats is cel ebrating summers end with the 48th annual Summer Beach Run and its unforgettable postrace celebration at 7 p.m. at Jacksonville Beach Seawalk Pavilion, 1st St. N, Jacksonville Beach. This family-friendly event will benefit the res taurants Just In Queso Foundation, which pro vides aid to individu als, communities and organizations in need. Participants will not cross the finish line emptyhanded. Directly after the race, runners will be treat ed to free food provided by Tijuana Flats, beer and live music. This event is the perfect opportunity to bring friends and families together to help the com munity, have fun and stay fit. The event includes both a five mile and a one mile fun run with a por tion of the proceeds from the race benefiting the Just in Queso Foundation. To sign-up or for more information about the event, visit http:// www.1stplacesports. Start Your Own Vegetables from Seed Lecture and Hands-on: Take home your own planted tray at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost is $15. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required, please contact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Operation: Mmilitary Kids will host an end of the summer family event at Adventure Landing, 1944 Beach Blvd, Jacksonville Beach, 32250. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Each ticket includes all day access to Shipwreck Island Water Park, three additional activities and lunch for $31. Sign up, register and pay on-line at http://omkadventure landingday-eorg.event brite.com/ to get this great price. This is NOT a drop-off camp, it is a family event and all youth must be accompanied by adults. Monday, Aug. 20 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. Michael Straley will present Green Screen Photography A tech nique for layering two images together based on color hues. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Tuesday, Aug. 28 Duval County Extension Florida Friendly Landscaping staff will present a Bakers Dozen of landscape tips for the upcoming winter season from 6-8 p.m. at Webb Wesconnett Regional Library, 6887 103rd St. Learn the difference between regular lawn care and organic lawn care and much more. Attendees will also see how to prepare their tools for the off season includ ing a sharpening dem onstration. This is a free class, but registration is requested. Call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net. Thursday, Sept. 6 The Northeast Conservatory of Music, 11363 San Jose Blvd., Bldg. 200, will hold audi tions for the musical vari ety show, The Song Caf at 7 p.m. on Sept. 6-7 and 1 p.m. on Sept. 8. Bring accompaniment CD, MP3 or sheet music your audi tion song with a head shot and bio/resume. Be prepared to tell a little bit about yourself and any previous experience you have had in entertain ment. Singers, dancers, actors, jugglers, magi cians, yodelers, gymnasts, and family oriented enter tainers of all ages. For more information, call (904) 374 8639 or go to www.nfconservatory.org. Saturday, Sept. 8 Join Wounded Warrior ProjectTM(WWP) for the WWP 8K Run in Jacksonville. Activities begin at 7 a.m. and a race start time of 9 a.m. at the Jacksonville Landing to help honor and empow er our nations Wounded Warriors. Race proceeds support the free programs WWP offers wounded service members nation wide. Advance registra tion is $25 (includes race day number, timing, and post-race festivities) and each runner must raise a minimum of $99. Top finisher awards and additional race-day options are available. Visit http:// www.woundedwarrior project.org/wwp-8k-runs. aspx to register.Out in Town FFSC Mayport Workshops, Classes For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 27, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Aug. 28, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Aug. 29, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Raising Financially Fit Kids, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 29, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Annual PANAMAX Military Exercise ConcludesFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) officially concluded the annual 2012 PANAMAX exercise Aug. 16 at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris along with Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho concluded the exercise in which more than 1,000 military personnel from 17 nations, including the United States, participated. Of that number, 269 participants were from partner nations. I would to thank our partners in the Americas and other observers for their critical contribution and outstanding participa tion in key leadership roles of this exercise. Every nation shared unique and invaluable skills and their real-world experiences make Service Assumes Charge Of Mayport ClinicFrom StaffCmdr. Michael Service relieved Capt. Alan Siewertsen as officer in charge of Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport during a change of charge on Aug. 17 at the clinic. Guest speaker was Capt. Michael McGinnis, Director, Branch Health Clinics, Naval Hospital, Jacksonville and presiding offi cer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, com manding officer, Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Service is a native of Guthrie, Kentucky and was commis sioned an Ensign in the Navy Nurse Corps in June 1993. He began his career at Naval Medical Center, San Diego (NMCSD) where he initially served as a staff nurse on the inpatient multi-surgical ward and then as specialty nurse providing intravenous conscious sedation in eight various surgical specialty clinics. Next,he was assigned to Naval Hospital Millington, Tenn., where he served as Department Head of Beneficiary Access and Health Promotion officer for the Mid-South area of operations. In 1999, he was selected for full-time duty under instruc tion at the University of Tennessee earning a Master of Science degree as a Family Nurse Practitioner. His follow-on tour at Naval Hospital Yokosuka, Japan included duties as staff FNP, Department Head of Family Practice, senior nurse for Directorate of Ambulatory Care and inter im Officer in Charge at Naval Branch Clinic Chinhae, Korea. He served on the Executive Committee of Medical Staff (ECOMS), Executive Committee of Nursing Staff (ECONS), Credentials Review Board and the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. In June 2004, Service trans ferred to Naval Hospital Cherry Point, North Carolina. He additionally served as the Command Managed Equal Opportunity (CMEO) offi cer, Advanced Practice Representative for ECOMS and the Clinical Director for the Special Operations Clinical Training (SOCT) program. In 2005, Service deployed with Marine Wing Support Squadron 274 (MWSS-274) to Anbar Province in Iraq where he served as the unit medical -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Alan Siewertsen shakes hands with Cmdr. Michael Service after a change of charge ceremony held at Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport on Aug. 17. Getting In Shape To Be A Chief-Photo by MCCS Eric PowellChief Select Mass Communications Specialist William Townsend performs sit-ups during an early morning PFAN with his fellow Chief Selects. The Selects PT together three times a week, as part of their initiation season at Naval Station Mayport. Mayport Blowing SmokeFrom StaffOver the next couple of months, Public Works Department Mayport will conduct a study to evalu ate the bases sanitary sewer collection system. Workers and residents aboard Naval Station Mayport may notice a haze around some of the bases structures and roadways as contractors from AH Environmental pump smoke throughout the systems underground pipelines. Dont call the fire department, its just part of the testing. According to AH program manager Anthony Gruber, the smoke is harmless no odor, non-toxic and non-staining. It doesnt create a fire hazard and residents should not see smoke in their buildings or homes unless there is defective plumbing or dried up drain traps. Residents and facility managers are advised to pour a gallon of water into any unused drains, show-See PANAMAX, Page 3 HSL-46 Works Day ... And Night-Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonU.S. Navy Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) prepare an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter from Mayport-based HSL-46 Detachment Eight for departure during nighttime flight operations. Nitze is deployed as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.See Clinic, Page 2 See Smoke, Page 6

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.In a report commis sioned by the College Board Advocacy & Policy Center* to highlight the critical importance of teachers, to salute their great work, and to amplify their voices, two practic ing classroom teachers provide an overview of some issues they identi fy as barriers to student learning. Along with their own ideas, they included responses from their col leagues addressing such issues as class size, lack of family support and involvement, absentee ism, plagiarism, and lack of resources. Following is a brief synopsis of their remarks concern ing parental support with very little editing on to maintain their original voices. Tom White, a 3rd grade teacher at a public school in Lynnwood, WA, recently taught a math lesson on the difference between perimeter and area. After the hour lesson about 24 of the 28 students showed a solid understanding, two others had a pretty good grasp, and the other two, well. . they werent quite there, according to White. Later reflecting on how the lesson could have gone better, he identi fied four factors which could have led to greater understanding among his students. These factors included class size, inclass support, curricular mandates, and parental support. With the school year just starting throughout NE Florida, his com ments on parental sup port could provide some keys to students academic success. Twenty-five percent of his colleagues felt that parent support is key to student success with eight percent stating that it is the most important issue which impacts their abil ity to teach their students. He shared a typical class room teacher response which describes what most teachers feel when trying to work with sleepy-eyed students who consistently fail to do their homework: I have learned to teach with minimal parent support. I think if parents were more involved with their chil dren after the school day is over, more of our stu dents would take school seriously and meet stan dards. But White is not very optimistic about improv ing the level of parental support for two reasons. He cites two reasons: First of all no one wants to be told how to raise their child, no matter how crucial the advice may be. Secondly whenever our school has parenting classes or subject-specif ic events, such as math nights designed to help parents better support their children, most of the attendees are parents who least need our advice, which only exacerbates the divide between their children and those who lack critical parental support. Nancy Barile, a 17 year veteran of high school English at Revere High just outside of Boston, provides a more posi tive view about some of the major hurdles she and her colleagues face, including lack of fam ily engagement. While bemoaning this lack of family engagement resulting from strategies which are geared to elementary and middle school years: bake sales, field trip chaperoning, and room moni toring which would mor tify most high schoolers, she is optimistic about the role parents can play. Academic ethos, the dis cipline to study when others are out with friends, socializing, and having fun, can be cultivated in children by their parents and family. In her comments, Barile cites lack of teacher training as a barrier to improving family engagement. She notes that since research shows that par ent from lower economic backgrounds sometimes tend to be less comfort able interacting with authorities, including teachers, she recom mends educators be trained in this research to improve parent-teacher interaction. Barile also believes that teachers need training on how to overcome child care and transportation issues which frequently become obstacles for successful parent-teacher interac tions. She additionally cites lack of understand ing of cultural issues as becoming a barrier to student achievement. If, for example, school informa tion is not disseminated in a language the family understands, the family is left out of the process of helping the student to succeed. The purpose of this report was to spark con versations among edu cation professionals and parents about what we must do to improve stu dent learning. Hopefully this report will cre ate conversations in the home, the workplace, or at the gym about school reform. Until these kinds of exchanges begin, real progress will be elusive. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. The College Board Advocacy & Policy Center was established to help transform education in America. Guided by the College Boards principles of excellence and equity in education, we work to ensure that students from all backgrounds have the opportunity to succeed in college and beyond. We make critical connections between policy, research and real-world practice to develop innovative solu tions to the most pressing challenges in education today.Parent Involvement Is Key To SuccessJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingRecently the airwaves have been bombarded with media coverage of the altercation involving Chad Johnson formerly known as Ocho Cinco and his wife Evelyn Lozada. Johnson was arrested for his actions and is now apparently having to deal with the repercussions of that action. From a public perspective, he has lost the opportunity to play football with the Miami Dolphins. Additionally, a deal he made with VH1 has now fallen through. And, it appears that his wife Evelyn Lozada has decid ed to file for divorce. Without knowing the intricate details regard ing all that took place prior to Johnsons arrest, we are aware that he had to choose some course of action. Unfortunately for Chad and his wife Evelyn, the course of action he chose has caused him some discomfort and creates a financial disruption for him at least momentarily. Its probably easy for many to say that he should not have done what he did. Thats a good assessment. Hopefully, Chad will come to the place where he sees that the action he took recently was not the right action. This is one of those incidents where a high profile individuals action gives us an opportunity to self assess. Given a simi lar situation, how would we handle the ordeal? Its always easier said than done. Naturally, the preferred course of action when addressing controversial issues is to try to remain calm. It is also better to consider consequences before doing something than having to deal with the backlash after an incident has taken place. I dont know Chad Johnson personally. To be honest, I have not even followed his professional football career. What I do know is Chad, his wife Evelyn and many oth ers have been adversely affected by the recent course of action he took. Such is the case with each of us. We should always remember that any time we choose to act from a positive or nega tive perspective, there will be a reaction. Just because we do not know an individual personally does not mean that we cannot empathize with that person. In the case of Chad Johnson and his wife Evelyn, I do empathize with both of them. I am empathetic with them because they are forced to deal with this issue in the public. Although most of us are not high profile individu als, we will also be held to a high standard when it comes to our actions. Every action that we take will result in some type of reaction. It is my hope that each of us remember that our actions not only affect our lives, but the lives of those around us. The action of one shipmate can affect the lives of other ship mates. The action of one partner can affect the life of another partner. Needless to say, all of our actions will cause a reaction. Thus, we should consider all of our actions very carefully! For Every Action, There Is A ReactionLt. Anthony Hodge CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSofficer providing combat medical care to forces in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Service received orders to NMCSD in 2006 where he was assigned to Expeditionary Health Services Pacific (EHSP) providing direct medi cal and consultative support to over 48 ships assigned to Expeditionary Strike Group-3 and other SURFOR Pacific assets. Additionally, he served as primary preceptor for over 30 independent duty corpsmen (IDC) and completed the require ments for designation as an Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) Surgeon. In 2007, he reported aboard NBHC Sasebo, Japan where he served as interim Officer in Charge and Head of Medical Services over seeing the delivery of quality medical care to over 6,800 beneficiaries in support of ESG-7 and CTF-76 assets. During the tour, he deployed as a medical provider to Expeditionary Medical Facility-Kuwait coordinating care for more than 18 transiting combat Army Brigades and two Marine Expeditionary Units in support of CENTCOM operations. In 2010, he reported to the Navy Personnel Command serving as one of the senior Nurse Corps detailers responsible for the distribution, assign ment, and career man agement of more than 900 nurses representing 16 different subspecialties. Service is board-cer tified as a Family Nurse Practitioner. He is a member of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and the University of Tennessee Imhotep Honor Society. Capt. Alan V. Siewertsen, a native of Mason City, Iowa, enlisted in the United States Navy after gradu ating from high school. He reported to Naval Aerospace Medicine School in Pensacola for Aviation Medicine Technician C school. He completed his enlistment as a Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class and returned to Iowa where he enrolled into Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. He later trans ferred to the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, where he graduated with a Bachelors of Science and a Masters of Science in Human Nutrition. In 1988, while work ing at Childrens Hospital, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Siewertsen accept ed a direct commission as a Medical Service Corps Officer. During his first assignment, he was Department Head, Clinical Nutrition, Naval Hospital, Orlando, Florida. He transferred to Naval Hospital, Naples, Italy where he served as Department Head. In 1994, he trans ferred to National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland where he served as Staff Dietitian. After com pleting deployment, he returned to Bethesda to assume the duties as Department Head, Nutrition Management. In 2000, he transferred to Naval Medical Center, San Diego, California, as Assistant Department Head, Nutrition Management. He served as Department Head, Nutrition Management, Naval Hospital, Camp Pendleton. In 2005, he trans ferred to Naval Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida as Department Head, Nutrition Management. He volunteered for an Individual Augmentee deployment in sup port of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He served as the Deputy Director of Health Affairs for the Multi-National Security Transition CommandIraq in Baghdad, Iraq. In 2007, he became the Officer in Charge, Naval Branch Health Clinic, NAS Jax. In May 2008, he deployed as a GSA in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. He was assigned as the Team Leader, Medical Embedded Training Team, Combined Security Transition Command, Kabul, Afghanistan. He completed his deploy ment in August 2009 and served as the Officer in Charge, Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport.From Page 1Clinic 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Contract For Massey Ave Work AwardedFrom NAVFAC SoutheastNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $6.6 million con tract Aug. 15 to TMG Services, Inc., a small business, out of Cleveland, Ohio the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvements at Naval Station (NS) Mayport, Mayport, Fla. NAVFAC Southeast contin ues with its pledge to support small businesses, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast deputy for Small Business. Americas 27 million small businesses employ more that 58 percent of the private work force, generate more than 51 percent of the nations gross domestic product, and are the principal source of new jobs. The work to be performed provides for construction of a boulevard-style roadway with two lanes each way divided with a turfed median along the Massey Avenue corridor. This project award, is once again a tangible demonstration of the strategic value and worldwide relevance of Naval Station Mayport, said NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Douglas Cochrane. As a practical matter, the improved traffic flow will enable the 2,000 new Sailors who will arrive with the USS Iwo Jima ARG, to safely and efficiently transit the Installation. Construction includes turn ing lanes, curb and gutters and pedestrian sidewalks on the north side of Massey Avenue. It includes realignment of inter secting streets and all required signalization and intersection reconstruction and all inciden tal related work. This project also includes improvements at the intersec tion of Maine Street and Moale Avenue and at the intersection of Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue to improve capacities and safety of these intersec tions. A round-about will be constructed at the Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue inter section. Site preparation includes site clearing, excavation and preparation for construction. Paving and site improvements include a storm water drainage, side walks and curbing. Electrical utilities include traffic signals, roadway lights and utility relo cations. The project is expected to be completed by February 2014. NAVFAC is the Systems Command that delivers and maintains quality, sustainable facilities, acquires and man ages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, provides contingency engi neering response, and enables energy security and environ mental stewardship. Additional updates and information about NAVFAC can be found on social media sites Facebook and Twitter. Become a Fan at www. facebook.com/navfac and fol low us at www.twitter.com/navfac this the best exercise ever, Harris said. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 was to exercise a variety of responses, in coordina tion with the governments of Panama and Colombia, to protect and guaran tee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sover eignty. This multina tional exercise strength ens interoperability and builds joint capabilities of the participating nations to plan and execute complex multinational opera tions. PANAMAX is a good opportunity to exchange knowledge and increase interoperability among the many partner nations that have a common interest in the safety and security of the Panama Canal, Lima Filho said. PANAMAX is a U.S.sponsored, multina tional annual exercise that includes partici pants from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States. As we complete this years PANAMAX exer cise I know that each of us will take away many good lessons from each other. I encourage all our partners in the Americas to continue to value the professional and personal bonds that were devel oped here as they will last for many years to come, Harris said. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks to participants of this year's closing ceremony for PANAMAX 2012 at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. PANAMAX is an annual U.S. Southern Command-sponsored exercise series that focuses on ensuring the defense of the Panama Canal. From Page 1PANAMAX While he works to protect the country,St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344www.stjude.orgMatt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2 and his daughter Delilah A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 -Photos by MC3A.J. JonesSailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) clear old paint and rust off of a fence at the Tondi School for Special Needs Children in Tallinn, Estonia. Chief Boatswains Mate (SW) Mitch Inkpen mans the nozzle of a firehose during a freshwater washdown aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Farragut Sailors Strengthen BondsFarragut Public AffairsThe guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) continued to strengthen rela tionships with Baltic nations as it began a four-day port visit in Riga, Latvia, Aug. 4. During the port visit, Sailors played a game of basketball against members of the Latvian National Armed Forces and participated in two community service projects. The city of Riga offered incredible interactions for our Sailors during the community service projects, and the basketball game was a highlight as well, said U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Christopher J. Sill, Defense, Naval and Marine Attach for the U.S. Embassy in Riga. Latvia and the United States have a long standing partner ship, and I know that Farraguts visit helped to strengthen this rela tionship. The community ser vice projects provided Sailors the opportu nity to build and install new birdhouses for the Love Island Ecological Site and visit the Stella Maris Riga City Social Care Centre, a care facility for the elderly run by the government. It was a great opportunity to contribute to the community, meet the people and see what the culture is like, said Chief Electronics Technician Jason Howes. It really gave us a good feeling to come help out and show our support. Farragut concluded its visit with a reception aboard the ship. We would like to thank the Sailors of the Farragut for their visit, said Lt. Col. Sill. Their visit has shown a lot of support toward a close NATO ally, and has gone a long way toward making that relation ship stronger. Farragut is on a scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Prime Minister of Estonia Andrus Ansip receives honors from sideboys as he arrives aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Farragut is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Farragut deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), which includes CSG 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guidedmissile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), as well as the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 and Destroyer Squadron 28. Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) prepare to moor in Riga, Latvia. Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Paul Chism, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), removes a mooring line in preparation to depart Riga, Latvia.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 5 Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) heave a mooring line during a sea and anchor detail in Riga, Latvia. Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) undergo a dress white uniform inspection. Boatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Cedric Taylor gives Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) training aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class (SW) Adam Caldwell tightens chains on an SH-60B Seahawk from the Vipers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Light Squadron (HSL) 48, Detachment 7, on the flight deck of guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Sailors simulate fighting a fire during a general quarters exercise aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) brace for shock during a general quarters exercise.

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NATO TF508 Commander Visits Taylor USS Taylor Public AffairsThe commander of NATO Task Force 508 vis ited guided-missile frig ate USS Taylor (FFG 50) to thank the crew for their service and wish them a safe voyage home, Aug. 9. Royal Netherlands Navy Commodore Ben Bekkering was welcomed by Cmdr. Jeremy R. Hill. Taylors commanding officer. The two discussed Taylors contributions to the counter-piracy effort, and the lessons learned from Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) patrols and intelligence, surveil lance, and reconnaissance missions. Taylor has spent more than 160 days assigned to NATO Task Force 508 supporting Operation Ocean Shield, the maritime interdiction operation and counter-piracy mis sion in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Taylor has worked alongside Turkish Navy frigate TCG Giresun (F-491), Royal Netherlands Navy frigate HLMNS Evertsen (F805), and Royal Netherlands Navy amphibious trans port ship HNLMS Rotterdam (L800), while patrolling the IRTC, the Somali Basin, and the coast of the Horn of Africa. Bekkering toured the ship and met with the crew. We always take the time to prepare for official visits, but we dont always get the opportunity to meet the visitors, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Henry Wells. It was a pleasure to see the commodore in person, espe cially around our work spaces. Following his tour, the commodore spoke to the crew during an all hands call on the mess decks. He thanked the crew for their hard work, which helped ensure the safe transit of more than 4,000 merchant ships through the Horn of Africa region. At the conclusion of his remarks, Bekkering presented Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class Chadwick Anderson with a chal lenge coin in recognition of his outstanding perfor mance as a visit, board, search and seizure team member. Taylor is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508 supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interception operations and counterpiracy missions in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility. Balfour Hosts Back To School Brigade At RBCCBalfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport hosted Operation Homefronts Back to School Brigade to provide military fami lies with backpacks full of donated school supplies. The event took place at the Ribault Bay Community Center on Aug. 12 and provided more than 200 backpacks to Mayports military families. The Back to School Brigade is a nationwide campaign that helps military families with the burden of the expense of school supplies. Operation Homefront has hosted the event for the past five years at the Jacksonville Armory and this is the first time they have been at Naval Station Mayport. In 2011, the Back-ToSchool Brigade program raised more than $2 mil lion in school supplies nationwide through its partnership with Dollar Tree. Through the gener osity of individual and corporate contributors, Operation Homefront provided 33,000 back packs to children of mili tary service members. Operation Homefront provides emergency financial and other assis tance to the families of our service members and Wounded Warriors. A national nonprofit, Operation Homefront leads more than 4,500 volunteers across 25 chapters and has met more than 400,000 needs since 2002. For more information about the organization, visit their website at www. operationhomefront.net. -Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers with Balfour Beatty Communities and Operation Homefront pack back packs with donated school supplies to be distributed to military families during a Back to School Brigade event held at Ribault Bay Community Center.USS Hue City Offers At-Sea College Classes USS Hue City (CG 66) Public AffairsForty-seven Sailors aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) started a second term of classes through the Navy College Program for Afloat College Education (NCPACE), Aug. 13. Hue City Sailors are participating in both instructor-led and CD-ROM selfpaced courses such as Fundamentals of Writing, Academic Skills, English Composition I/II and American Literature I/II. There are usu ally three instructor-led classes per term and 260 courses available via CD-ROM. Those enrolled in courses are appreciative of the opportunity to pursue educa tional goals. Im grateful for the opportunity that I can advance my education while we are at sea, and I dont have to put a stop to going to school because Im gone, said Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Seaman (SW) Juanita Funderburk. The three instructorled classes are taught at various times through out the day in the ships training resource class room. Sailors are afforded time to attend class, but must balance work day requirements with homework. Its hard trying to find the time to study and do my school work, but I find a way to get it done, said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Meagan Bramble. I have a goal set in mind of getting my degree and I wont be stopped until it is com plete. NCPACE professor Joshua Shinn takes pride in seeing Sailors advance toward their educational goals. Having family that served in the military and now an NCPACE profes sor for the past two years, Shinn said he has gotten a sense of the challenges service members face. He is glad he can give back to them in his own way. This program is a great opportunity for Sailors to advance their lives by having the chance to earn a degree while at sea, said Shinn. There are so many opportunities with this program and it should definitely be taken advantage of. Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. ers, or sinks prior to the testing. If smoke enters a building, this could mean sewer gases are also present and should be repaired. If smoke does enter a building, notify Scott McPherson with NS Mayport Public Works at 270-5441. Gruber said teams of inspection crews will allow the base to detect any sewers that have prohibited connections to storm water drainage systems, a practice that was common up until the 1980s. Gruber said the study will allow those connections to be locat ed and repaired, keeping stormwater drainage out of the water treatment plant where it doesnt belong.From Page 1Smoke 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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-Photo by MCSN Darien G. KenneyCulinary Specialist Seaman Mitchell Johnson, from North Augusta, S.C., left, speaks with a crewmember aboard the Iranian-flagged dhow M/V Payam. The guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) provided medical assistance, food, water and fuel to the vessel after it had issued a distress call. Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. USS Hue City Aids Distressed IraniansFrom USS Hue City Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) rendered medical assistance and provided food, water and fuel to an Iranianflagged dhow, M/V Payam, Aug. 15, approxi mately 45 miles southeast of Muscat, Oman. At approximately 2:20 p.m. local time, Hue City responded to a distress call for medical assistance relayed by a U.S. P-3C Orion, operating under Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) conducting a routine maritime patrol. After arriving on scene, Hue City dispatched two rigid-hull inflatable boats, transporting the ships hospital corpsman, and the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team to assess the injured per sonnel. It was discovered that of the 13 dhow crew members six Pakistani and seven Iranian, two required medical assis tance and were subsequently treated by Hue Citys hospital corpsman. The dhows crew mem bers reported that the vessel had been pirated and was lacking food, water and fuel. Hue City then provided four bags of rice, six cans of kidney beans, 70 gallons of water, and 50 gallons of fuel; enough supplies and fuel to allow the dhow to continue on to its next port of call. Providing assistance to our fellow mariners is an essential part of our mis sion here and this was an opportunity to demon strate our commitment to the welfare and safety of those in the region, said Capt. Daniel Uhls, Hue City commanding officer. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 7

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De Wert In Milwaukee For 1812 Commemoration USS De Wert Public AffairsUSS De Wert (FFG 45) continued her cruise throughout the Great Lakes to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 by arriving in her first American port of Milwaukee on Aug. 9. The crews of USS De Wert, USS Hurricane (PC 3), and the Royal Canadian Navys HMCS Ville de Quebec were greeted with a warm welcome from the city of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin upon their arrival. Public offi cials including the Mayor and the Lt. Governor attended the welcoming ceremony. More than 25 Sailors devoted part of their lib erty time to help the citizens of Milwaukee through communi ty relations projects. Some chose to visit the Childrens Hospital of Milwaukee, while others stocked the shelves at the Hunger Task Force Food Pantry or served meals at a local shelter. While on duty, Sailors gave tours of De Wert to more than 7,000 people and hosted another Distinguished Visitors reception. The city of Milwaukee gave all Sailors the chance to fully experience the city while enjoying their liberty by offer ing tours of the Miller Coors Brewery and Harley Davidson Factory along with Navy Night at the Wisconsin State Fair and the Air and Water show. Fifty-two distinguished visitors joined De Wert upon her departure from Milwaukee on Aug. 14 for an eight-hour tran sit to Chicago. The dis tinguished visitors were entertained through demonstrations by the Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure Team, pipe patching scenarios, and an emergency flight quarters drill. The distinguished visitor cruise was capped off as De Wert rendered a 21-gun salute to the city of Chicago and anchored outside the Navy Pier. The War of 1812, also known as Americas sec ond war for indepen dence, is regarded by many as the conflict that started our countrys rise to global influence. From 1812 to 1815, we fought to expand to the north and west, and to assert our rights to trade freely with other countries, without interference from Britains Royal Navy ships on the high seas. -Photos courtesy of USS De WertThe crews of USS De Wert, USS Hurricane, and HMCS Ville de Quebec are greeted by Milwaukee public officials during the Welcoming Ceremony. De Wert hosted 54 Distinguished Visitors onboard during her 8-hour transit from Milwaukee to Chicago. Boatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Raheem Mitchell takes his oath from Lt. Michel during his reenlistment ceremony while import Milwaukee. Seaman Julian McElroy and Seaman Alexander Houck prep the mooring lines as De Wert enters into Milwaukee. Gunners Mate 3rd Class Maki renders a 21-gun salute to the city of Chicago upon De Werts arrival into the city. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 9

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Mayport Enjoys Command Picnic -Photos by Paige GnannOS2 Stacey Neely sells drinks to benefit the command recreation fund during the command picnic. Naval Station Mayport families enjoy one of the last days of summer at the Command picnic at Sea Otter Pavilion. MWR provided bounce houses for the kids to enjoy during a command picnic hosted by Naval Station Mayport on Aug. 16. Galley personnel helped prep and cook, while Base Services helped with set up and clean up. Above, Chief Select Master-at-Arms James Watkins flips burgers and chicken to feed Mayport Sailors, families and DoD civilians during the command picnic. Right, Boatswains Mate 1st Class Victor Thomas brings Jenecia Daniels, 5, to the command picnic to enjoy the day. Daniels father is currently deployed. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, beverage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept. 1: Youth Bowling Program Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Bring the whole family for free bowling and hot dogs. Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 Youth Bowling Program will also be available. 270-5377. Sept. 4: Softball Begins Season ends Nov. 1. 270-5451 Sept. 5: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Sept. 5: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 5: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FY13 CPO Selectees. For tickets, contact ACC Ferrer (904) 270-7211. Sept. 7: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Sept. 8: Military Classic Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 30. 270-5451 Sept. 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sept. 9: NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flatscreens. Drink specials throughout the day. Sept. 10: 7v7 Fall Soccer Begins Season ends Nov. 8. 270-5451. Sept. 11: Freedom 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Aug. 23: Hooter Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, beverage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 25: Wet n Wild Water Park. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $20. Sign-up deadline Aug. 19. Aug. 29: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Aug. 30: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Atlanta Falcon Football. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Cost $8. Aug 31: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept. 1: Youth Bowling Program Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Bring the whole family for free bowling and hot dogs. Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 Youth Bowling Program will also be available. 270-5377. Sept. 2: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 7:30 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Signup deadline Aug. 16. Sept. 4: Command Break-In. Look for us at the Galley for Lunch. Sept. 4: Softball Begins. Season ends Nov. 1. 270-5451 Sept. 5: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Sept. 5: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Sept. 5: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the FY13 CPO Selectees. For tickets, contact ACC Ferrer (904) 270-7211. LIBERTYAug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Sept. 1: Youth Bowling Program Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Bring the whole family for free bowling and hot dogs. Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 Youth Bowling Program will also be available. 270-5377. KID THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 11

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Air Drop Resupply Prompts Drug Interdiction USS Carr Public AffairsNorfolk-based frigate USS Carr (FFG 52), with embarked Mayport-based HSL-48 Detachment Two, retrieved 1,250 pounds of cocaine while being resupplied by an air drop at sea during Operation Martillo, Aug. 15. A long range P-3 patrol aircraft from the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) decreased altitude, passed close to the ship and dropped a single parachute attached to a sealed capsule which contained mission essen tial parts. As the container landed in the sea, Carr dispatched its rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to retrieve the container. Seeing our parts being pushed out of an air craft worried me a bit, just thinking what would happen if the parachute didnt open or what if the container sunk. It was great to see Naval Logistics and coordi nation with the CBP in action said Chief Logistics Specialist Jeffery Fries. While Carrs RHIB was retrieving the parts cap sule, the SH-60B heli copter from Detachment Two identified a suspect small boat over the hori zon. The ship was imme diately directed to make best speed to intercept the suspect vessel. Carrs embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) boarded the vessel and seized 1,250 pounds of cocaine with an estimated street value of approximately $17 million. Carrs Sailors have performed brilliantly throughout deployment, demonstrating their abil ity to constantly flex to accomplish the task at hand. I am particularly proud of my First Division they constantly amaze me with their dedica tion, determination, and knowledge, said Cmdr. Patrick Kulakowski. com manding officer. Setting The Fenders -Photo by MC2 Stuart PhillipsSailors remove fenders from the starboard windbreak during a sea and anchor detail as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) prepares to receive a barge alongside in Cartagena, Colombia. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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New Program Aims To Better Troops TransitionAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is conducting pilot classes of a new program designed to better prepare service members transitioning out of the military to civilian life. Transition Goals Plans Success, known simply as Transition GPS, replaces the 20-year-old Transition Assistance Program, or TAP. In a sweeping over haul of the 20-year-old TAP, as part of the VOW to Hire Heroes Act passed in 2011, Transition GPS takes military members through a week-long class, compared to the original TAPs mandatory two to four hours of sep aration counseling, said Susan Kelly, the Defense Departments deputy director for the newly formed Transition to Veterans Program Office. The Defense Department wants our service members to suc ceed when they become civilians, Kelly said dur ing an American Forces Press Service interview. Separating from the military lifestyle is a major life change, she said, pointing out that there are some things that veterans cant control during the transition process, but there are others that they can. And thats exactly what the Transition GPS helps you do. Its going to walk you through a set of modules, help you build your skills, and takes you through what you need to consider ... [through] deliberate planning that makes you more open to the success you want to be in the civilian work force. Naval Station Norfolk is one of seven installations now conducting pilot classes of the new five-day Transition GPS workshop. Full use of the program is expected to be in place by the end of 2013, according to a White House release. Kelly said senior lead ers from the Defense Department, the military services, Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Labor, the Small Business Administration, the Education Department and the Office of Personnel Management met regularly for a year as the Veterans Employment Initiative Task Force to develop the new program. It was President Obamas mandate to DOD and VA to estab lish the joint Veterans Employment Initiative Task Force, Kelly explained, that brought all the partners together in a very structured and very goal-oriented way. It was the major impetus for bringing all those les sons learned together and helping us develop a very comprehensive curricu lum for our service members. She said representa tives of the agencies con tributed in multiple ways to develop Transition GPS, which, she added we hope will eventually evolve into the military lifecycle transition assis tance program. Transition GPS will be mandatory for service members, Kelly said, including reservists and national guardsmen, with some exceptions. A key part of the weeklong program is a three-day Labor Department Employment Workshop, which is man dated by the VOW to Hire Heroes Act to be in place by Nov. 21. Between the manda tory DOL employment workshop, plus the core curriculum for Transition GPS, there is a holistic view that starts with looking at the challenges of transition, and preparing military members to meet those challenges, includ ing family considerations. It also helps plan for the financial changes theyll face as they become civilians, she said. Kelly said the DOL employment workshop introduces challenges a service member might confront, and how to deal with such stressors. Staff members help them determine whats most important to them in a job salary, advancement, stability and other considerations. The workshop takes service members through job searches using upto-date technology, and has them look at whether their skills are in demand in the civilian sector, where the best opportu nities exist, and whether moving is a consideration. The DOL wants military members to develop a second plan if the first one doesnt pan out. They might look at what skills are in demand and how they can fill that gap, Kelly said. There are some very serious questions to look at. There are specific pieces of the new curric ulum that give them the information they need to make very well-thought out decisions as well as skills building to help them succeed in whatever pathway they chose, Kelly added. In the course of five days, about 50 students develop an individual transition plan that maps out financial planning and a budget to follow the first 12 months after separating from the mili tary. It also covers how to write a resume and how to interview for a job, along with exploring how military skills can be car ried over into the civilian work force. In addition to the DOL workshop, a Veterans Affairs representative goes over benefits. If certain skills are not transferrable, service members personal goals are identified for the type of employment they want to pursue, the education they want to gain from college or technical training schools, or to start their own business, she said. Optional two-day tracks, to be piloted in the coming months, will include help for those who want to pursue a college degree, or technical training. We found that military members werent making the best of their post-911 GI Bill, Kelly said. So we are getting them the information to help them choose wisely. The new GI Bill, she said, is a generous benefit. Make it work for you, and choose wisely, Kelly sug gested. The Small Business Administration will also offer an optional two-day curriculum to put new veterans on the path to start up small businesses, Kelly said. The SBA is very passionate about our military members being very innovative, [being] creative, and self-initiat ing ... and theyre going to help them build [busi ness] skills. The SBA also developed an eight-week online course to help new veterans build a solid business plan, she added. It also assigns a mentor to each military member, who will see them through their small-business startup, sustaining the business, and remain a long-term mentor. Navy Hospital Corpsmannd Class Peter Adams is one such small business candidate. He wants to go into film and video production and start his own company. He said Transition GPS has allowed him to look at reinventing himself. The class has given me ways to take my lead ership and organization skills and [others] I never would have thought of and how to market them for myself, he said. It gives me the confidence on my resume and in an interview to say, This is what I can do for you, Adams said. Navy Machinist Matest Class Jason Christian has worked in cryogenics throughout his military career, and his goal is to stay in his field in the civilian sector. He had previously attended the original TAP, and he says the new pilot program is more interac tive. The technology made everything change sig nificantly, Christian said. Aside from the major companies in his field, he said he found others he didnt know existed. I plan on coming back and bringing my spouse so she can be involved in this. [We need] to look at housing, the cost of liv ing, what traffic is like, the crime rate and what the schools are like for my children things I never took into account. -Photo by Terri Moon Cronk From left: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Dusty Thibodaux, Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kasey Schmidt and Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua Johnston attend a Transition GPS pilot program resume class at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., Aug. 15. Saturday, Aug. 25 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Tijuana Flats is cel ebrating summers end with the 48th annual Summer Beach Run and its unforgettable postrace celebration at 7 p.m. at Jacksonville Beach Seawalk Pavilion, 1st St. N, Jacksonville Beach. This family-friendly event will benefit the restaurants Just In Queso Foundation, which pro vides aid to individu als, communities and organizations in need. Participants will not cross the finish line emptyhanded. Directly after the race, runners will be treated to free food provided by Tijuana Flats, beer and live music. This event is the perfect opportunity to bring friends and families together to help the community, have fun and stay fit. The event includes both a five mile and a one mile fun run with a por tion of the proceeds from the race benefiting the Just in Queso Foundation. To sign-up or for more information about the event, visit http:// www.1stplacesports. Start Your Own Vegetables from Seed Lecture and Hands-on: Take home your own planted tray at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost is $15. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required, please contact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Operation: Mmilitary Kids will host an end of the summer family event at Adventure Landing, 1944 Beach Blvd, Jacksonville Beach, 32250. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Each ticket includes all day access to Shipwreck Island Water Park, three additional activities and lunch for $31. Sign up, register and pay on-line at http://omkadventure landingday-eorg.event brite.com/ to get this great price. This is NOT a drop-off camp, it is a family event and all youth must be accompanied by adults. Monday, Aug. 20 Beaches Photography Club will meet at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. Michael Straley will present Green Screen Photography A tech nique for layering two images together based on color hues. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Tuesday, Aug. 28 Duval County Extension Florida Friendly Landscaping staff will present a Bakers Dozen of landscape tips for the upcoming winter season from 6-8 p.m. at Webb Wesconnett Regional Library, 6887 103rd St. Learn the difference between regular lawn care and organic lawn care and much more. Attendees will also see how to prepare their tools for the off season includ ing a sharpening dem onstration. This is a free class, but registration is requested. Call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net. Thursday, Sept. 6 The Northeast Conservatory of Music, 11363 San Jose Blvd., Bldg. 200, will hold audi tions for the musical variety show, The Song Caf at 7 p.m. on Sept. 6-7 and 1 p.m. on Sept. 8. Bring accompaniment CD, MP3 or sheet music your audition song with a head shot and bio/resume. Be prepared to tell a little bit about yourself and any previous experience you have had in entertain ment. Singers, dancers, actors, jugglers, magi cians, yodelers, gymnasts, and family oriented entertainers of all ages. For more information, call (904) 374 8639 or go to www.nfconservatory.org. Saturday, Sept. 8 Join Wounded Warrior ProjectTM(WWP) for the WWP 8K Run in Jacksonville. Activities begin at 7 a.m. and a race start time of 9 a.m. at the Jacksonville Landing to help honor and empow er our nations Wounded Warriors. Race proceeds support the free programs WWP offers wounded service members nation wide. Advance registra tion is $25 (includes race day number, timing, and post-race festivities) and each runner must raise a minimum of $99. Top finisher awards and additional race-day options are available. Visit http:// www.woundedwarrior project.org/wwp-8k-runs. aspx to register.Out in Town FFSC Mayport Workshops, Classes For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 27, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Aug. 28, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Aug. 29, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Raising Financially Fit Kids, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 29, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 23, 2012 13

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