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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00262


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Valiant Joins Mayport FleetFrom U.S. Coast GuardNaval Station Mayport gained more than 100 new residents when the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant arrived Friday for a permanent homeport change. The 210-foot medium endur ance cutter moved to Mayport from Miami with a crew of 12 officers, 64 enlisted personnel and their fami lies. The Valiant is a multi-mission, medium endurance cutter that operates in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico for the commander of Coast Guard Atlantic Area. The cutters mis sions include search and rescue; maritime law enforcement; marine environmental protection; defense readiness; and ports, waterways and coastal security. Everyone weve worked with to make our move possible the command and personnel at Naval Station Mayport, the St. Augustine chapter of the Navy League and countless members of the commu nity has welcomed us with open arms and gone above and beyond to ensure we have a smooth transi tion, said Cmdr. Stephen Burdian, commanding officer of the Valiant. Were extremely fortunate to call Jacksonville our new home. The Valiants move to Jacksonville opens space in Miami for the Coast Guards new Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutters, which will be homeported there. An extensive review of multiple potential homeports determined Naval Station Mayport is the best location for the Valiant and its crew. We have an outstanding rela tionship with the Coast Guard here, and the Valiants arrival highlights that partnership, said Capt. Doug Cochrane, commanding officer of Naval Station Mayport. Were -Photos by MC1 Toiete JacksonAbove, The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant (WMEC 621) arrives at Naval Station Mayport for a permanent homeport change from Miami with a 76-person crew. Left, Family and friends of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant (WMEC 621) cheer as they arrive at Naval Station Mayport for a permanent homeport change from Miami. The Valiant is a multi-mission, medium endurance cutter whose mission include search and rescue; maritime law enforcement; marine environmental protection; defense readiness; and ports, waterways and coastal security. Boyles Takes Command Of CHSMWLFrom CHSMWLCapt. Daniel E. Boyles relieved Capt. Douglas J. ten Hoopen as Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet on Aug. 3 during a ceremony at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Boyles, a native of Mount Prospect, Ill., was commis sioned through the University of Illinois NROTC program in 1986, where he earned a Bachelors of Science Degree in Mathematics. He was designat ed a Naval Aviator in June 1988. Boyles flew the SH-2F Seasprite during his initial sea assignment in HSL-35 and made two deployments to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean in USS Sides (FFG 14) and USS Reasoner (FF 1063). Boyles then transferred to HSL41 in February 1992, where he transitioned to SH-60B Seahawk and served as an Instructor Pilot in the Fleet Replacement Squadron. In September 1994, Boyles reported to USS Juneau (LPD 10), located at Naval Station San Diego, where he served as Air Boss and deployed to the Central Pacific and Persian Gulf. During this tour Boyles earned his Officer of the Deck (Underway) and Surface Warfare Officer Qualifications. In June 1999, Boyles returned to San Diego, California, and reported to HSL-47 where he served as Safety Officer, Operations Officer and completed a Caribbean Counter Narcotics deploy ment as Officer-in-Charge of Detachment Six in USS Doyle (FFG 39). In September 2004, he returned to HSL-47 as Executive Officer and on Dec. 8, 2006 he took command of the Saberhawks. During this tour the Saberhawks won the coveted Secretary of Defense Maintenance Award, the Lockheed Martin Superior HSL Maintenance Award and the Capt Arnold J. Isbell award for tactical excellence. In addition, the Saberhawks participated in Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina relief efforts while support ing two USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group deployments. His shore assignments included tours to the Director Assessments Division (N81) on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Resources, Requirements, and Assessment) and to NORAD and USNORTHERN Command Interagency Liaison Office in Washington D.C. A Long Island native of Bay Shore, New York, ten Hoopen is a 1987 graduate of the United States Naval Academy. After receiving his aviation wings in 1989, he was assigned to HSL43 in San Diego, Calif., where he completed two deployments to the Arabian Gulf while for ward deployed to Atsugi, Japan. The first was as Detachment Operations Officer in USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The second was as Detachment Maintenance Officer in USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) He finished his tour at HSL43 as the Quality Assurance Officer. Ten Hoopens other sea tours began in 1995, when he report ed as Assistant Navigator in USS Nimitz (CVN 68), home ported in Bremerton, WA. While aboard he deployed for a third time in support of Desert -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Daniel Boyles salutes guest speaker Rear Adm. Ted Branch, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, after relieving Capt. Douglas ten Hoopen as Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet on Aug. 3 during a ceremony at Ocean Breeze Conference Center.See CHSMWL, Page 8 See Valiant, Page 3

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Most children and their families get excited about moving to a new community. It is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore different scenery, and maybe get their own bedroom. But the other side of a move for children is leaving friends and starting in a new school. Who will be my teacher? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common questions, tinged with anxiety, which your chil dren are now asking about this new community Jacksonville, Florida. While you may be con cerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a climate change, your children have honed in on what will have the greatest impact on them: school. Moving is hard for the whole family, but it can be especially hard on kids. One of the keys to mak ing it easier is prepara tion. Psychologist Gary Santavicca says, In gen eral, the more prepara tion you have, the easier a transition is. But if you didnt have time to research this move, now is the time to get online to learn about Hanna Park, the fun things to do throughout the Beaches communi ty, the zoo, and their new schools. If possible, have your children help you with this online research. Santavicca states that by helping, it becomes a family project which creates a positive response to the move for all in the family. By sending a positive message to your children about the good place where they are now liv ing, the good people, and especially, the new school, your excitement will be transferred to your children. This helps them to feel confident about their new surroundings and the new school. If you need help getting more information about the new school than can be found on the schools website, check with me, the School Liaison Officer at N.S. Mayport. Or you can find out school infor mation by going to www. duvalschools.org and click on the tab Parents. Then scroll down to How to Enroll to find enroll ment forms, the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports sched ules, and answers to your transportation questions. As the School Liaison Officer I will also be able to put you in contact with the schools counselor. The counselor can pro vide information about registration dates/times, PE routines (includ ing uniforms for middle and high school stu dents), backpack rules, and other information which may not be posted on the schools website. The school counselor will also be able to answer your questions about your childs IEP or 504 Plan. Check on the indi vidual schools website to find out the date of Orientation. Most schools in Duval will have this on their web site and on the marquee at the front of the school. At Orientation, your child will learn about the schools dress code, find out his schedule for the year, meet his teacher or teachers, and maybe even get his lanyard and school ID. In August, the website will also post the date and time for Open House. As you approach day one, which is Aug. 20 in Duval, establish a regu lar bedtime routine and morning routine. Decide if your child will pack a lunch or buy it. Make sure that he has clothes which are appropriate for the schools dress code. Determine where at home he will keep his school ID, his books, and maybe that lunch so that each morn ing is hassle-free. With a little bit of effort at home, parents can establish a positive tone for this latest move which will result in a great year of learning. Parental involvement and enthusi asm may be all your child needs to have a great move and an outstanding year of academic success! Websites to help make the first days and weeks easier: *websites for area schools: www. duvalschools.org; www. stjohns.k12.fl.us *free tutoring: www. SoarAtHome.com; www. tutor.com *special needs: www. militarystudent.org; www. autism-society.org *Military Youth on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the DoD and avail able at http://apps.mhf. dod.mil/pls/psgprod/ f?p=MYOM:HOME2:0 This website is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to mili tary youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Welcome To NS Mayport, JacksonvilleJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThe Summer Olympics in London has filled our home as we tune in to watch each evening to see who will win a medal. My favorite part of the Olympics is hearing the stories of the athletes and their families who have sacrificed so much to be there. They have been clinging to the dream of Olympic gold, hoping it will become reality. The London 2012 games have indeed been interesting to watch, as some who were thought to be gold medal con tenders failed to place on the medal stand. Their Olympic dream was crushed in a moment. For many of these athletes it has taken most of their life to train for this one day, so it is indeed a great disappointment when they are not able to per form on Olympic game day. Have you ever faced crushing disappointment in your life? Has life sud denly taken a turn you never thought possible? Have you seen a dream you held onto for years come quickly to an end? Can you relate to these athletes who have invest ed their lives for this day, only to walk away empty handed? I am sure we can all relate in some way. Among these Olympic sad endings, there is a great lesson to be learned. The lesson is that sorrow and suffering are times in our life that can be a catalyst for us to truly accept ourselves and find out more of who we are. It is a chance to grow in character as a person as we accept the truth of the circumstances that have enveloped us. Oswald Chambers says it well in My Utmost for His Highest, that the only way to find yourself is in the fires of sorrow. These are indeed shap ing moments in our life. While we all wish life was full of nothing but success and achievements, such a life would actually be to our detriment because success tends to breed pride that goes to our head. Pride breeds com placency and a self-seek ing attitude. A crushed dream or a moment of sorrow is an opportunity for God work in our life to break down pride and increase humility. It is a chance to ask our selves, What really mat ters in life? The character of Christ is seen in John 12:27 where Jesus says, Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, Father, save Me from this hour? But for this purpose I came to this hour. The hour was when Jesus was betrayed by Judas and crucified on a cross. He could have evaded the hour, but rath er He moved towards it in humility. We all strive and work hard to pursue our lifes dreams, but circumstanc es are so many times out side our control. When life takes a turn and dreams are crushed, take that time to stop and take personal inventory and look to God who has a purpose for it all!Olympic Dreams Or Defeats Bring LessonsLt. Stephen Cloer CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSNavy Housing Helping Us Help YouBlog Post by Commander, Navy Installa tions Command Public Affairs As a Navy leader and some one who lives in Navy housing I am committed to ensuring service members and their fam ilies have suitable, affordable and safe housing. Recent events pertaining to mold in Navy bar racks, and government owned and family privatized housing have indicated a need to more clearly communicate assistance available on all issues, but par ticularly when pertaining to health or safety issues. This is a personal issue for me. I am determined to ensure we are providing the very best housing throughout the fleet but I also need your help. If you help me by reporting your housing issues, we can help ensure you maintain a house or barracks room that you can feel proud to say is your home. VADM Bill French Should a health or safety issue arise during a Sailors stay in Navy barracks, govern ment owned, or privatized fam ily housing, well work with the Sailor as an advocate for their needs until we find a solution. If the issue cannot be resolved, we will work with the Sailor to find alternate accommodations. Whether in a barracks room or home, if you live in Navy hous ing and suspect a health or safety condition exists, please report it to the local PrivatePublic Venture (PPV) office, the local Navy Housing Office or your barracks manager. Use your Chain of Command; talk to your LPO, LCPO, Division officer, Ombudsman and even your Commanding Officer until you feel youre getting the right amount of attention on your issue. If you feel you are hav ing health issues that may be related to conditions in your home or barracks room, see your medical provider immedi ately and then report the issue to your command medical offi cer or representative and your chain of command. Taking personal responsibil ity to prevent issues like mold before it gets out of hand is essential. In many environ ments mold can grow no mat ter how well we maintain the home or condition the air quality. Be vigilant and ensure areas of your home or barracks room that tend to have more mois ture, like kitchens and bath rooms, are kept clean on a regu lar basis. Often times, all it takes is a once weekly wipe down with mold/mildew cleaner. As a ready and resilient force, 21st Century Sailors and their families must feel confident they can report personal and housing concerns in order to stay safe and healthy in the places they live so we can all focus on our mission, our duties and those we care about. New Website Honors Service Members ValorAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department unveiled a new website today that honors service members highest acts of valor. The site at http://valor. defense.gov is designed to raise awareness of ser vice members heroism and to help deter those who falsely claim military honors, officials said. Recognizing those who have served so honor ably remains the crux of the DOD effort, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said. One of the most important things we can do for all veterans is to honor the service of those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty, he added. Ultimately, officials said, the intent of the website will be to honor soldiers, sailors, air men and Marines who received the highest valor awards in operations since Sept. 11, 2001. These are the Medal of Honor, service crosses and the Silver Star. The listing covers only awards since Sept. 11, 2001. The site currently lists only those awarded the Medal of Honor, and will expand to include the other awards, officials said. It is essential that we honor and recognize our service members achievements, while maintaining the integrity of our award data, said Erin C. Conaton, under secretary of defense for personnel and readiness.

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NGI&S Bowman Hall Gets FaceliftFrom StaffRepresentatives from Naval Station Mayport, Navy Gateway Inns & Suites, Public Works and construc tion contractors gathered outside of Building 1585 Friday to cut the ribbon on the newly renovated Bowman Hall. Bowman Hall has under gone a total room renova tion project since December 2009, which included the repair and renovation of 114 guest rooms, hallways, lounges and comon areas. The project was completed in July and cost $5.2 million, including furnishings. Closet walls, doors, shelves, bathroom plumb ing, flooring even the ceil ing fans carpeting and room number signs were demol ished and removed during the renovation. The new rooms have a modern look and provide a feeling of home, accord ing to Ada Ferran, NGIS Mayport manager. The furniture, fixture and equipment upgrades also include a new queen size bed, bed and bath linens, night stands, art work, desk and chairs, along with a 32-inch TV. thrilled the Coast Guard chose our base, and we wel come our new shipmates. There are no other Coast Guard cutters perma nently homeported aboard Naval Station Mayport, but the base often hosts visit ing cutters in need of tem porary pier space for port calls, scheduled mainte nance periods and emer gency repairs during patrols through the area.From Page 1Valiant What does HOPE look like? Hope looks like Mary Tyler Moore, International Chairman, JDRFShe has type 1 diabetes, and her hope for better treatments and a cure lies in the progress of research. To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. -Photo by Paige GnannRepresentatives from Naval Station Mayport, Navy Gateway Inns & Suites, Public Works and OTAK construction contractors gather outside of Building 1585 Friday to cut the ribbon on the newly renovated Bowman Hall. The $5.2 million project, including a total renovation of the 114 guest rooms, was completed in July. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 USS De Wert Visits Canada For War Of 1812 Commemoration USS De Wert Public AffairsUSS De Wert (FFG 45) left Jacksonville, Florida on July 16 to begin a 73-day cruise through the Great Lakes to commem orate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. Since her departure, De Wert has visited the Canadian cities of Halifax, Quebec City, and Montreal and is currently en route to her first American port, Milwaukee. At each of the Canadian port visits, De Wert host ed distinguished visitor receptions for the respec tive cities mayors, mili tary officials, and other public figures to further our ties with our sister country. We did a phenomenal job because we func tioned as a team and were dedicated until the end, said Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, commanding officer of USS De Wert. The crew of De Wert has succeeded at fulfilling a demanding schedule of completing ship prepa rations, providing tours, conducting community relations projects, and engaging with the public of the host city. More than 5,000 people visited De Wert in Quebec City and Montreal. I really enjoy the opportunity to meet and mingle with the people and for them to see the finished prod uct of all our hard work, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Nathaniel Pennywell. Currently, De Wert is transiting the St. Lawrence Seaway, which provides a system of locks, channels, and canals for ships to transit from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. De Werts arrival into the Great Lakes is a highly antici pated event, as it is the first Navy frigate to visit the Great Lakes since the -Photo courtesy of USS De WertMembers of the Wendake First Nation greeted Rear Adm. Greg Nosal, Cmdr. Joe Thomas and the crews of USS De Wert, USS Hurricane, and HMCS Ville de Quebec during a traditional aboriginal welcoming ceremony in Quebec.-Photo courtesy of USS De WertUSS De Wert inside the first of fifteen locks during her transit through the St. Lawrence Seaway. -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisSailors man the rails aboard Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG 45) as the ship arrives in Montreal. DeWert, Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) and Canadian Halifax-class frigate HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332) are visiting cities in America and Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisSailors man the rails aboard Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG 45) as the ship departs Quebec City. DeWert, Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) and Canadian Halifax-class frigate HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332) are visit ing cities in America and Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisSailors assigned to Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) watch a con cert featuring Slash from Guns n' Roses. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisOperations Specialist 3rd Class Zach Wood, left, and Electronics Technician 2nd Class John Cochran, both from USS DeWert (FFG 45), answer questions from Ted Bird on TSN Radio 990 Montreal about the ship's visit to the city. -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodCmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, USS DeWert commanding offi cer, signs the guest book with Jocelyn Ann Campell, city councillor of Montreal, at city hall. See De Wert, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 5 -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisQuartermaster Seaman Patrick Riley from USS De Wert (FFG 45) greets a patient during a community relations event at the Sainte-Justine Mother and Child University Hospital Centre. -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodLt. Cmdr. Ron Flesvig explains the navy insignia of Informations Systems Technician 3rd Class Jeremy Wood to a Montreal news crew aboard Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodInterior Communications Electrician 1st Class Michael Klebeck, from Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC3), explains damage control equipment to Montreal locals during ship tour. -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodSonar Technician (surface) 2nd Class Mark Riddell shows a Mk .76 round to Montreal locals during a tour aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). De Wert, Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) and Canadian Halifax-class frigate HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332) are visiting cities in America and Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisFire Controlman 2nd Class Daniel Faiella describes a .50 caliber machine gun to a tour ist aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisGunner's Mate 3rd Class T'Darris Booker describes different weapons to tourists aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisChief Electrician's Mate Gerson Paul from Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) gives toy hockey sticks to a patient during a community relations event. -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisQuartermaster 1st Class Darkemu Canmu operates a GPS on the bridge aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). Navys last Great Lakes Cruise in 1999. The USS Hurricane (PC 3) and the Royal Canadian Navys HMCS Ville de Quebec are also traveling with De Wert throughout the Great Lakes for the com memoration events. Other scheduled port visits include Chicago, Toledo, Detroit, Cleveland, and Buffalo. The War of 1812, also known as Americas sec ond war for indepen dence, is regarded by many as the conflict that started our countrys rise to global influence. From 1812 to 1815, we fought to expand to the north and west, and to assert our rights to trade freely with other coun tries, without interfer ence from Britains Royal Navy ships on the high seas. Our modern Navy and our role as a global maritime power are root ed in the events of 1812 to 1815. More informa tion on the Bicentennial Commemoration of the War of 1812 can be found at www.ourflagwasstill there.orgFrom Page 4De Wert

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Annual Panamax Kicks Off In MayportFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) and Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho welcomed partner nation partici pants and staff officially kicking off this years PANAMAX exercise, Aug. 6. The main focus of PANAMAX is to exercise a variety of responses, in coordination with the governments of Panama and Colombia, in order to protect and guarantee safe passage of commer cial traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sovereignty. Representatives from 17 nations are participat ing in the annual exercise from Aug. 6-17, which has evolved over many years and now includes training for many of the same 21st century threats encountered in todays land, sea, air and cyber environments. More than 600 military per sonnel have traveled to Mayport for the exer cise including 170 guests from partner nations. Military and civilian per sonnel from Mayportbased COMUSNAVSO/ C4F and Destroyer Squadron 40 (including Navy Reservists from the Jacksonville area) are also participating in PANAMAX. PANAMAX is a U.S.sponsored, multina tional annual exercise that includes partici pants from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States. This exercise is designed to execute sta bility operations under the support of United Nations Security Council Resolutions; provide interoperability training for the participating mul tinational staffs; and build participating nation capability to plan and execute complex multinational operations, Harris said. The governments of the countries participating in PANAMAX share com mon interests and this exercise enhances those links by fostering friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating militar ies. This multinational exercise also contributes to interoperability, and builds the capabilities of the participating nations to plan and execute com plex multinational opera tions. One of the most important benefits of multinational exercises like PANAMAX is the fact that all the participants will be able to exchange their experiences, exper tise and will gain new knowledge about each others culture and peo ple, Harris said. These interactions strengthen our bonds across the region and foster longlasting friendships and an understanding among the partner nations, ultimate ly benefiting the security of the region. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet gives PANAMAX military exercise T-shirts to local media during a press conference held on board Naval Station Mayport. The main focus of PANAMAX is to protect and guarantee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal. FFSC Mayport Works To Help Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 9, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Troops to Teachers, FFSC Aug. 9, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 13, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Aug. 13, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 13-17, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., SAPR Initial Victim Advocate Training NAS Jax Chapel Aug. 14, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Aug. 14, 1-3 p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses FFSC Room 719 Aug. 14, 6-7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group Building 1, Room 104 Aug. 15, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 15, 11 a.m.-noon, Money and the Move FFSC Room 702 Aug. 16, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 20-23, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 22, 11-12:40 p.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 702 Aug. 22, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 27, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Aug. 28, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Aug. 29, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Raising Financially Fit Kids, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 29, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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USS Klakring Cleans Up In Sicily USS KlakringSailors from USS Klakring (FFG-42) volun teered their liberty time in Sicily to serve the com munity by participating in two community relations projects. While the ship was in port for a short stop in nearby Augusta Bay, Klakring Sailors Seaman Pedro Diaz, Boatswains Mate 1st Class John Weitzel, Senior Chief Personnel Specialist Dewayne Lynch, Chief Damage Controlman Chase Hampton, and Chaplain Lt. Justin Top participated in a beau tification project at the Commune Di Floridia Open Market. The Sailors were also joined by Lara Aliffi, Miriana Mollica, and Giuseppe Cospitano, who are members of a Sicilian youth group similar to the Boy and Girl Scouts of America. Together, the crew worked in the intense Sicilian summer heat, fighting off thorn bushes and blowing sand to gather a truck-load of trash and debris from the area surrounding the market. After finishing for the day, Scout Lara Allifi described the event as, The Good, Tired and Beautiful experience. Several blocks away, Logistics Specialist Seaman Jonathan Winters, Information Systems Technician Seaman Tommy OSullivan, Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Louie Reyes, Engineman 2nd Class Mauro Jimenez and PACE Instructor Dennis Saliny were simi larly charged with gath ering a large amount of trash and debris from the area within and sur rounding the Commune Di Floridia Public Soccer Stadium. Once finished, the endeavoring group assist ed volunteers from NAS Sigonella in painting the interior of the stadiums facilities. Afterwards, the volunteers from all orga nizations gathered to enjoy a meal comprised of local favorites while watching a friendly soccer competition in the stadi um courtyard. USS Klakring is cur rently deployed on her final cruise before decom missioning in 2013 and conducting Fire Scout operations in support of AFRICOM. -Photos courtesy of USS KlakringSailors from USS Klakring spend time picking up trash during a beautification project at Commune Di Floridia Open Market. Sailors from USS Klakring stands with bags of trash and debris gathered from the Commune Di Floridia Public Soccer Stadium after a dual community relations project while the s hip was in port in Sicily. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 7

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HSL-48 At Work On USS Underwood Storm, and earned his Surface Warfare designation after qualifying as Officer of the Deck (Underway). After three WESTPAC deployments to the Arabian Gulf, Ten Hoopen chose to do his Department Head tour on the East Coast, where he served at HSL-44 in Mayport, from 1998 2000. He first served as Officer-in-Charge (OIC) of Detachment 10 in USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Upon return from that deployment he deployed again ten days later as OIC of Detachment One in USS Vicksburg (CG 69). He finished his tour at HSL-44 as Squadron Operations Officer and was recognized as the 1999 HSLWINGLANT Officer of the Year. He completed sea duty assignment as Commanding Officer of HSL-42 from September 2005 until December 2006, winning the Battle E for calendar year 2006. Ten Hoopens shore duty assignments began in 1993 in Washington, DC, where he served at the Pentagon as Administrative Assistant to the Assistant Vice Chief of Naval Operations (AVCNO), followed by a 13-month tour as Aide to the VCNO. From 2000-2002 he served at the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Millington, TN, first as the HS/HSL Placement Officer and then as Assistant Aviation Captain Detailer.He com pleted studies at the Joint Forces Staff College in March 2004 and served as a branch chief in the Operations Directorate of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from January 2007 until June of 2009. From Page 1CHSMWL-Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsBoatswain's Mate 3rd Class Guanqun Sun (foreground) acts as the landing signalman enlisted (LSE) as Sailors prepare to traverse the flight deck after refueling an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of HSL-48 during a "hot pump" and crew swap aboard USS Underwood (FFG 36). Sailors refuel an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to HSL-48 during a hot pump and crew swap on USS Underwood. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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USS The Sullivans Qualifies 4 SWOs USS The Sullivans There were handshakes and congratulations all around The Sullivans wardroom as two new Surface Warfare Officers received their pins on July 27. Ensign Lauren Raines and Ensign Jonathan Tibbetts successfully completed a rigorous board process Friday, joining Ensign Rachel Howell and Lt.j.g. Rachel Halnon who passed their final board on July 25 as four of the newest Surface Warfare Officers in the fleet. Its such a great feeling to have your SWO pin to have a group of people with years of experience in the Navy decide that you have earned the right to wear a warfare insig nia, said Howell. Its a great feeling, but it also makes you feel even more responsible for your decisions and actions. Halnon is a 2010 gradu ate of the Virginia Military Institute, and Tibbetts is a 2010 graduate of Florida State University. Both Raines and Howell are 2011 graduates of the United States Naval Academy. -Photo courtesy of USS The SullivansUSS The Sullivans congratulates her newly pinned Surface Warfare Officers, Lt.j.g. Rachel Halnon, Ensign Lauren Raines, Ensign Rachel Howell and Ensign Jonathan Tibbetts. The Sullivans Holds DC Olympics-Photos courtesy of USS The SullivansCommand Master Chief Brian Porter looks on as Information Systems Technician Second Class Christopher Curran demonstrates proper hose handling during USS The Sullivans Damage Control Olympics. Damage Controlman First Class Jeremiah Bredeson instructs Sailors from USS The Sullivans in firefighting skills during their Damage Control Olympics at Naval Station Mayport on July 26.Navy Establishes Program Office For CVN 79 ProcurementFrom PEO Aircraft CarriersThe Program Executive Officer (PEO) for Aircraft Carriers, Rear Adm. Thomas Moore, announced the stand up of a new program office, July 27, within PEO Carriers, PMS 379, and the assumption of office by Cmdr. Doug Oglesby. The new program office will manage the planning and procurement of John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) and future aircraft carriers of the Gerald R. Ford class. PMS 379 will join existing PEO Carriers programs PMS 312 for in-service carriers and PMS 378 for Future Carriers. PMS 378 retains responsibility for the construction and delivery of Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Standing up a new program office will allow the Gerald R. Ford-class to begin continuous pro duction while ensuring CVN 78 completes con struction and delivery to the highest standards. As the first new aircraft carrier design in more than 40 years, the Gerald R. Fordclass will move into modi fied repeat production of CVN 79 and 80 through the new program office, said Moore. I am excited to stand up this new program office and manage the procurement of John F. Kennedy and CVN 80 said Oglesby. The team will build on success with Gerald R. Ford and develop best practices and procedures to affordably deliver these warships. Before the ceremony concluded, Oglesby was frocked to the rank of captain by Assistant Secretary of the Navy Research, Development and Acquisition Sean Stackley. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 9

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USS Carney Concludes 3-Month DrydockingUSS Carney (DDG 64)Even the best of war ships with an outstanding crew require some time out of the water for spruc ing up. For guided-mis sile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64), the time came in April when she entered into her third major dry dock period, known as a Docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA). Carney came out of the water on April 19, but preparations for that event began more than six months before that as her crew and her Port Engineer Sean McMurray of South East Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) began planning the logistics of this mile stone event. Work center super visors, lead petty offi cers and division offi cers began to determine what work needed to be accomplished, ranging from simple refinish ing of decks to removal and repairs to the ships propellers. This evolu tion required the crew to be forward-looking and forward-leaning during the second half of a sev en-month-long deploy ment to the 5th fleet area of responsibility. Carney was official ly on the blocks at around 3 p.m. on April 19. Contractors began check ing in at the quarterdeck and fanning out around the ship to remove lag ging, rig hoses, and com plete the assessments that would make for a smooth transition from Naval Station Mayport to BAE Jacksonvilles Shipyard. At the same time, the crew moved onto YRBM 45, a berthing barge that would be their temporary home for the next four months. The deadstick tran sit up the St. Johns River to drydock was a really unique experience for the crew, especially junior officers and Sailors. Being up on the bridge during the transit was pretty cooleven though we werent operating engines or rudder, I still learned a lot about ship handling said Ensign Tim Dover, Conning offi cer for the evolution. Everyone was most excited to observe the ships entrance into the dry dock. I had seen the bal lasting process before, and I was impressed because it was actually a more efficient and less time-consuming evolu tion this time around said Electricians Mate 1st Class (SW) Odely Aime. As Carney approached the entrance to the now ballasted-down drydock, the tugs that had towed her from Mayport handed her over to a team of civilian tugs that would turn her stern towards the mouth of the drydock and carefully guide her, with the help of previouslyplaced centering guides on the flight deck, back into the drydock. Once in place, the dock began to ballast up, with divers constantly check ing to ensure that Carney was properly aligned on the massive blocks that would support her 8,886 tons, or feet of American fighting steel. After nine hours of careful efforts, Carney was finally high and dry and her crew was able to go home for the night. While the crew (with the exception of each days duty section) would go home each night, crews of workers would work around the clock to ensure that the timeline for completion was adhered to every step of the way. Extra Force Protection watches were stood up, and the operational tempo on board Carney remained fast-paced and aggressive. Through the coopera tion of the ships crew, SERMC personnel, the shipyard and drydock, and outside contractors, the work was accom plished in a safe and time ly manner. On the morning of July 28, preparations were made, space inspections and valve verifications completed, and the entire crew aboard, Carney was prepared for undocking. Tugs returned Carney to Mayport basin and brought a newly refitted Destroyer one step closer to returning to full combat ready status. BAE, SERMC and Carney Sailors did an outstanding job conduct ing much needed repairs since her last docking in 2003. However, the suc cess and completion of those jobs and the dock ing evolutions is directly contributed to the ownership maintained by Carney Sailors, of which I am most proud of, said the ships Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Marc D. Boran. USS Carney is inport Mayport completing a maintenance availability, and plans to be under way for Sea Trials in November in preparation for her first deployment as a Ballistic Missile Defense Destroyer in 2013. -Photo courtesy of USS CarneyThe crew of USS Carney stands aft of the ship while it is in dry dock at BAE Jacksonville Shipyard during a three-month Docking Selected Restricted Availability.Redesigned TA Program AnnouncedFrom DoDPresident Obama announced the launch of the redesigned Transition Assistance Program developed by an interagency team from the Departments of Defense, Veterans Affairs, Labor, Education, and Homeland Security as well as the Office of Personnel and Management and the Small Business Administration on July 23. The revamped program, called Transition GPS, is the first major overhaul of the TA program for mili tary members in nearly 20 years. The effort began in response to a call from President Obama in August 2011 to ensure all service members are career ready when they leave the military. I applaud the leader ship of President Obama to bring together govern ment agencies around the goal of enhancing career opportunities for service members, said Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta. Our personnel have developed extraor dinary technical expertise and world-class leader ship skills that are in high demand. Transition GPS will help military mem bers apply their experi ence to additional train ing, formal education, and develop successful civilian careers. One of our funda mental responsibili ties as a government is to properly prepare and support those serving in our military so they are career ready as they tran sition back into civilian life. With this new initia tive, we can better ensure veterans receive the care, benefits and employ ment services they have earned, said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. This col laborative effort will have an impact well beyond this current generation of individuals returning from combat. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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USS Taylor On Task Friday, Aug. 10 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association #290 will host a potluck dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Rd. The group is asking for an $8 donation. Take out orders are wel come. The event is open to the public. For more information, call 2466855. Saturday, Aug. 11 Christ United Methodist Church invites the community to an oldfashioned fish fry, hosted by the United Methodist Men. Dinners will include fish, hush puppies and all the trimmings, all for only $7 for adults and $4 for children. Meet us in Wilson Hall of the church at 4 p.m. at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach to reel yours in! Need info? Call the church at 2495370. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Aug. 18 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This rang er-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The City of Atlantic Beach will show Dolphin Tale as its first sum mer Twilight Movie in the Park. Based on true events, this family film is about Winter, a young dolphin who loses her tail in a crab trap, and Sawyer, the reserved 11-year-old boy who befriends her. Sawyer meets the rescued dolphin at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium, a marine rehabilitation center where she lives. Sawyer rallies friends and family alike to save Winter and enlists a pioneering doctor to create a unique prosthetic appendage to restore the dolphins abil ity to swim. Admission is free and open to the pub lic, so bring your blankets, lawn chairs, and snacks. The film is being shown at Jack Russell Park, 800 Seminole Rd, Atlantic Beach. Adults are asked to accompany children. Free refreshments and fun for kids of all ages begins at 7 p.m. with the movie showing at twilight. Visit the AB website for special events page for upcoming events atwww.coab.us/ events. Sunday, Aug. 19 Christ United Methodist Church will be hosting a back to school celebration for all children of the com munity from 11:30 a.m. Please join us for fun, food, games and give aways as we bid farewell to summer and hello to a new school year. For more information, please contact the church office at 249-5370 or Hanna Thomas, Childrens Ministry Leader, at thom wacky@aol.com. Christ UMC Wilson Hall, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Aug. 25 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the unde veloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Tijuana Flats is cel ebrating summers end with the 48th annual Summer Beach Run and its unforgettable postrace celebration at 7 p.m. at Jacksonville Beach Seawalk Pavilion, 1st St. N, Jacksonville Beach. This family-friendly event will benefit the res taurants Just In Queso Foundation, which pro vides aid to individu als, communities and organizations in need. Participants will not cross the finish line emptyhanded. Directly after the race, runners will be treat ed to free food provided by Tijuana Flats, beer and live music. This event is the perfect opportunity to bring friends and families together to help the com munity, have fun and stay fit. The event includes both a five mile and a one mile fun run with a por tion of the proceeds from the race benefiting the Just in Queso Foundation. To sign-up or for more information about the event, visit http:// www.1stplacesports. Start Your Own Vegetables from Seed Lecture and Hands-on: Take home your own planted tray at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost is $15. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required, please contact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Tuesday, Aug. 28 Duval County Extension Florida Friendly Landscaping staff will present a Bakers Dozen of landscape tips for the upcoming winter season from 6-8 p.m. at Webb Wesconnett Regional Library, 6887 103rd St. Learn the difference between regular lawn care and organic lawn care and much more. Attendees will also see how to prepare their tools for the off season includ ing a sharpening dem onstration. This is a free class, but registration is requested. Call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net Saturday, Sept. 8 Join Wounded Warrior ProjectTM(WWP) for the WWP 8K Run in Jacksonville. Activities begin at 7 a.m. and a race start time of 9 a.m. at the Jacksonville Landing to help honor and empow er our nations Wounded Warriors. Race proceeds support the free programs WWP offers wounded service members nation wide. Advance registra tion is $25 (includes race day number, timing, and post-race festivities) and each runner must raise a minimum of $99. Top finisher awards and addi tional race-day options are available. Visit http:// www.woundedwarrior project.org/wwp-8k-runs. aspx to register.Out in Town -Photo by MC2(EXW) Terrence SirenCmdr. Jeremy Hill, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), guides several defense attache members representing Pakistan, India, Egypt and Great Britain, on a tour of the ship. Taylor is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508, supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interdiction operations and counter-piracy mission in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2(EXW) Terrence SirenAbove, U.S. Navy Sailors assigned to USS Taylor kneel on the flightdeck during the final round of the 9mm gun qualification course of fire. Sailors aboard the USS Taylor (FFG-50) participate in an M9 weap ons qualification. Above right, Seaman Michael Westfall, a member of the visit, board, search and sei zure (VBSS) team aboard guided-missile frigate USS Tayor (FFG-50) (background), stands guard during a routine boarding of a dhow. Right, Sailors aboard the USS Taylor (FFG-50) participate in an M9 weapons qualification. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 11

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Aug. 10: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug 3 & 4 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Aug. 10: Beach Blanket Bingo. 12:15 pm at Beachside Bingo. Wear your sun hats and shades; dig in the sand for priz es, double payouts on all hard cards, free hot dogs and chips and more. 2707204 Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 10: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 11: UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 14: Go the Distance 10K Run/ 5K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 14: Mens Summer Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. Aug. 15: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Aug. 15: 12 Signs Astrology Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring DJ Tom. Food, giveaways, prizes, bev erage specials and more.270-7205 Aug. 17: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2The Mysterious Island (PG13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 20: Mens Summer Basketball Begins Season ends Oct. 18. 270-5451 Aug. 21: 7v7 Fall Soccer Organizational Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. Aug. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the NS Mayport CPO Selectees. For tickets, call (904) 270-5431. Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, bev erage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 MWRAug. 10: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug 3 & 4 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 17: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2The Mysterious Island (PG13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 KIDThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Aug. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 Aug. 8: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aug. 9: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Sign-up deadline Aug. 8. FREE Aug. 10: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New York Giants Football. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Cost $8. Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 10: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 11: UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 12: Ichnetucknee Tubing Trip. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $10. Aug. 13: Pinewood Derby Registration. All Day at the Liberty Center. Come and pick up your derby car & register for the big race. Aug. 14: Go the Distance 10K Run/ 5K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 14: Mens Summer Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. Aug. 15: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Aug. 15: 12 Signs Astrology Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring DJ Tom. Food, giveaways, prizes, bev erage specials and more.270-7205 Aug. 15: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 17: St. Johns Town Center Shopping. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. FREE Aug. 17: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2The Mysterious Island (PG13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 18: Liberty LockIn. Begins at 11:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Come for snacks, games, and more as we stay open all night! Aug. 19: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and trans portation) Sign-up dead line Aug. 16. Aug. 20: Mayport 500 Pinewood Derby. 8 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Put you car to the test in the Mayport 500. Aug. 20: Mens Summer Basketball Begins Season ends Oct. 18. 270-5451 Aug. 21: 7v7 Fall Soccer Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. Aug. 21: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the NS Mayport CPO Selectees. For tickets, call (904) 270-5431. Aug. 23: Hooter Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, bev erage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 25: Wet n Wild Water Park. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $20. Sign-up deadline Aug. 19. LIBERTY 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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DoD Leads Drive Toward Healthier LifestylesAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is taking a leading role in a governmentwide effort to stop the nations obe sity problem,Barbara Thompson, the director of DoDs Office of Family Policy/ Children and Youth, said. DOD is one of 17 federal departments and agencies working together to iden tify opportunities for promot ing healthy living as part of the White Houses National Prevention Council strategy, she explained. One part of that is prevent ing obesity, Thompson told American Forces Press Service and The Pentagon Channel. It has a huge impact on our qual ity of life, both for children and adults. Thompson noted a national increase in Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease, believed caused by increased fat, salt and sugar in Americans diets at the same time that many children are less active than in previous generations. There was a 40 percent rise in childhood obe sity between 1998 and 2008, she said. The shift toward unhealthi er foods and less exercise has developed over the past 30 years or so, and is having a huge impact on health, healthcare costs, and national security, Thompson said. For the first time, were hear ing that this generation will not live longer than their parents. The Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington-based think tank, issued a major report last month, Lots to Lose, written by two former Agriculture sec retaries and two former Health and Human Services secretar ies, that includes a case study of Defense Department ini tiatives to counteract obesity, Thompson noted. DODs spending on health care is rising at twice the rate as the civilian sector and unhealthy lifestyles and obe sity, in particular, are significant contributors to this trend, the report says. It has reached $50 billion annually, taking up 10 percent of the overall defense budget. The trend is wreaking havoc on the services abil ity to recruit, creating a national security imperative, Thompson said, with only 25 percent of 17to 24-year-olds able to meet the militarys weight standards. The majority of applicants rejected for military service today have obesity issues, she said. In 2010, 59 percent of female recruits and 47 percent of male recruits failed the militarys entry-level fitness test, the report says. Of those recruited, the ser vices are seeing large increases in service members with bone fractures, thought to be the result of calcium deficiencies, and so many dental problems that 62 percent of new soldiers were not immediately deploy able, the report says. Preventing Obesity in Children Thompsons office insti tuted a -2-1-0 policy for the departments schools and childcare centers, as well as civilian partners that serve National Guard and Reserve children. The numbers repre sent five servings of fruits and vegetables, restricting screen time TV and computers to two hours each day, ensuring one hour of exercise daily, and allowing no sweetened bever ages. Policy is one of the most powerful tools we have to implement change, Thompson said. Were sharing those les sons learned with civilian com munity. The bottom line is that we have to make healthy options available and affordable. And parents need to know how important fruits and vegetables are -and small serving sizes.Thompsons tips for curbing obesity include: -Eliminate sweetened bever ages, including juices; -Practice portion control; -Advocate for your children; -Ask teachers to reduce sweets in the classroom; -Get the nutritional infor mation for school menus and ensure that they are healthy; -Ask grocery store managers to move sugary foods higher than eye level to young chil dren; -Exercise as a family; -Cook and eat meals as a fam ily; -Breastfeed; -Grow a garden, or encourage your installation to start com munity gardens; -Make fruits and vegetables more appealing to children by offering a variety of color and textures; and -Dont stop serving a healthy food because children refuse to eat it; it can take many times of seeing it on their plate for them to adjust to the taste. Also, Thompson said, limit electronics, not only because they make kids sedentary, but also because of the advertising. The food industry spends $10 billion annually in marketing food most of it high in salt or sugar to children, according to the Lots to Lose report. As part of her Lets Move! campaign to end obesity in a generation, First Lady Michelle Obama has asked food com panies with advertising aimed at children to make their prod ucts healthier. Last month, Walt Disney became the first to introduce new standards for food advertising to kids. All foods marketed on Disneys television and radio chan nels will be required to meet Disneys nutrition guidelines which align with federal stan dards to promote fruit and veg etables and limit calories, sugar, sodium, and saturated fat by 2015, Disney officials said. Preventing Obesity in Service Members and Families The military is working to help service members and their families stay healthy. The Military OneSource website, www.miltaryonesource.mil, offers health coaches for adults and teens to help with weight management and to meet their overall health goals, Thompson said. And, the first ladys Joining Forces campaign recently announced that health clubs that are part of the International Health Racquet & Sportsclub Association are offering free memberships to immediate family members -teens and older -of deployed reservists and National Guard members. Clubs may provide additional benefits such as childcare, chil drens programming, group classes, discounts for veterans, and discounts for active duty families. Participating clubs can be found at www.health clubs.com. Also, the American Council on Exercise is offer ing free training and fitness instruction to family mem bers of deployed reservists and National Guard members. Participating instructors can be found at www.acefitness.org/ joiningforces. If the governmentwide efforts and those in DOD seem like a lot just to make Americans healthier, thats the point, Thompson said. We all have to be in this together, she said. This is going to take a national effort to change these habits that have been ingrained in us for the past 40 years. Shipshape, Base CFL MeetingFrom Healh PromotionThe Navy and Marine Corp Public Health Center directed eight-week Nutrition and Weight Management Course is start ing here at Mayport Health Promotion on Aug. 28. The class runs for 8 consecutive Tuesdays and runs from 9-11 a.m. It is open to active duty, Sailors on the Fitness Enhancement Program, adult dependents, and retirees. Shipshape is an action-oriented weight management pro gram focusing on nutrition education, increasing exercise, and behavior modification skills that support a healthy life style. The quarterly Health Promotion Command Fitness Leader meeting will be held on Aug. 16 at Health Promotion, Building 2050, Marshal Couch Drive from 9-10 a.m. All command Health Promotion Representatives and Command Fitness Leaders are welcome to attend. Call 270-5251 for more information.First Coasts Only Baby Friendly Hospital Celebrates World Breastfeeding WeekNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Pub lic Affairs OfficerAs the only hospital in Northeast Florida or Southeast Georgia certified as Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville kicks off World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1 to 7) with a series of activities for patientsser vice members (active duty and retired) and their families. The weeks events include a Baby Bootcamp class on Aug. 1 and New Mom Orientation on Aug. 3, along with an educational display in the lobby near the pharmacy. We want to do all we can to improve the health of our nations youngest heroesthe children of our military mem bersand encourage the use of mothers milk for the 1,000 babies born in our hospital each year, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And our Baby Friendly certification and ongo ing preand post-natal classes illustrate our commitment to supporting new mothers and reducing the risks of childhood illnesses. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics journal, infant mortality is reduced by 21 percent among breastfed babies in the U.S. And of the two to three babies born each day at NH Jacksonville, about 90 percent are breastfed when they leavecompared to a nation al breastfeeding rate of about 75 percent. Other benefits to baby of mothers milk include less ear infections, diarrhea, respiratory infections, asthma, diabetes, obesity, childhood leukemia and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Benefits for mom include less postpar tum depression, diabetes, and breast and ovarian cancer. Breastfeeding also saves time and money for families in both baby formula and medical care. Baby Friendly certification is all about reducing infant mor tality, said Northeast Florida Breastfeeding Collaborative Chair Heather Huffman. Naval Hospital Jacksonville and other hospitals like it across the nation are doing their part to promote healthier babies. NH Jacksonville is currently one of only 143 Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S. The Baby Friendly designation is awarded after a rigorous on-site survey is com pleted, and maintained by con tinuing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The com prehensive program includes initiating breastfeeding in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breast feeding support groups. Along with the classes offered during World Breastfeeding Week (a World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action effort launched 20 years ago), NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospitalincluding baby boot camp, prenatal exercise, Hypnobirthing, infant mas sage, breastfeeding, prepared childbirth and an orientation program. Plus, the hospitals new, private labor/delivery and maternal/infant suites offer couplet care (with mom and baby rooming together), breast pumps, breastfeeding counsel ing from lactation nurses, sies ta for the fiesta daily quiet time to support feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an edu cational newborn channel on television. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can register for free classes by calling 904-542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (administered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www. babyfriendlyusa.org .Vaccination Can Prevent Cancer-Causing HPV Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences student on Family Medicine rotation at Naval Hospital Jacksonville August is National Immunization Awareness Month. There are 26 vaccinepreventable diseases, including Human Papillomavirus (HPV). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), HPV is the most common sexually transmit ted disease in the United States. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women will be infected in their lifetimes. This article addresses frequently asked questions about HPV, and why its important to get vaccinated against the disease. What is HPV? It is a virus spread through sexual contact. There are approximately 40 different types of geni tal HPV. Some types can cause cervical, anal, penile, vaginal and mouth or throat cancer in women and men. Most people with HPV have no symptoms. Who should get the vaccine? The CDC advises all females and males 9 to 26-years-old receive the full course of HPV vaccination. How is HPV passed from person to person? HPV is passed through skin-toskin contact. Condoms do not fully protect against transmitting this virus. It is possible to get the virus from a sexual partner who does not have any visible signs of infec tion, such as genital warts. Why should children and adults be vaccinated? The vaccination works to prevent the viruses from infecting the body, and can greatly reduce the risk of developing HPV related cancers. Is the vaccine safe? Yes. The United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine is licensed, and they are con tinually monitored for safety and effec tiveness. The actual vaccine contains a chemical protein coating from the virus-no viral genetic material. It is impossible to contract HPV from the vaccine. According to the Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System, over 46 million doses of vaccine have been given in the U.S., and the risks of side effects are very low (less than 0.05 percent). Side effects include redness, swelling, or soreness in the area where the shot was given. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association also found that there is a very small risk of fainting or blood clots right after the shot is given. People who have fainted after receiving shots in the past should alert their doctors before getting the vaccine. Why vaccinate non-sexually active children/adults? The vaccine only pre vents HPV if the person does not already have it. It does not cure an already infected person. So the best time to vac cinate is before sexual activity begins. For individuals who are already sexu ally active or those who have already had genital warts, the vaccine is still recom mended as it can prevent infection from other strains of the HPV virus. What happens after getting the HPV vaccination? The vaccination series consists of three shots. Once the initial HPV vaccine has been administered, a second shot should be given two months later. The final shot is required six months after the first one. Does the vaccine replace the need for a regular Pap test? No, the HPV vac cine only protects against the virus. Its important that all women have Pap test and pelvic exams as part of their routine heath care. Does TRICARE pay for the vaccina tion? Yes. TRICARE does pay for HPV vaccine. Should pregnant women get the vac cine? No. Pregnant women should not get the vaccine. Once the baby is born, they can discuss with their healthcare provider the best time to schedule the vaccination. Protection against cancer-caus ing HPV, as well as the elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S., is pow erful examples of why its important to vaccinate. Patients should talk to their healthcare providers about the right vac cinations for them and their children. To learn more about immunizations, visit CDCs website: http://www.cdc.gov/ vaccines/parents/infants-toddlers.html or call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-2324636). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Valiant Joins Mayport FleetFrom U.S. Coast GuardNaval Station Mayport gained more than 100 new residents when the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant arrived Friday for a permanent homeport change. The 210-foot medium endur ance cutter moved to Mayport from Miami with a crew of 12 officers, 64 enlisted personnel and their fami lies. The Valiant is a multi-mission, medium endurance cutter that operates in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico for the commander of Coast Guard Atlantic Area. The cutters mis sions include search and rescue; maritime law enforcement; marine environmental protection; defense readiness; and ports, waterways and coastal security. Everyone weve worked with to make our move possible the command and personnel at Naval Station Mayport, the St. Augustine chapter of the Navy League and countless members of the community has welcomed us with open arms and gone above and beyond to ensure we have a smooth transition, said Cmdr. Stephen Burdian, commanding officer of the Valiant. Were extremely fortunate to call Jacksonville our new home. The Valiants move to Jacksonville opens space in Miami for the Coast Guards new Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutters, which will be homeported there. An extensive review of multiple potential homeports determined Naval Station Mayport is the best location for the Valiant and its crew. We have an outstanding relationship with the Coast Guard here, and the Valiants arrival highlights that partnership, said Capt. Doug Cochrane, commanding officer of Naval Station Mayport. Were -Photos by MC1 Toiete JacksonAbove, The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant (WMEC 621) arrives at Naval Station Mayport for a permanent homeport change from Miami with a 76-person crew. Left, Family and friends of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant (WMEC 621) cheer as they arrive at Naval Station Mayport for a permanent homeport change from Miami. The Valiant is a multi-mission, medium endurance cutter whose mission include search and rescue; maritime law enforcement; marine environmental protection; defense readiness; and ports, waterways and coastal security. Boyles Takes Command Of CHSMWLFrom CHSMWLCapt. Daniel E. Boyles relieved Capt. Douglas J. ten Hoopen as Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet on Aug. 3 during a ceremony at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Boyles, a native of Mount Prospect, Ill., was commis sioned through the University of Illinois NROTC program in 1986, where he earned a Bachelors of Science Degree in Mathematics. He was designat ed a Naval Aviator in June 1988. Boyles flew the SH-2F Seasprite during his initial sea assignment in HSL-35 and made two deployments to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean in USS Sides (FFG 14) and USS Reasoner (FF 1063). Boyles then transferred to HSL41 in February 1992, where he transitioned to SH-60B Seahawk and served as an Instructor Pilot in the Fleet Replacement Squadron. In September 1994, Boyles reported to USS Juneau (LPD 10), located at Naval Station San Diego, where he served as Air Boss and deployed to the Central Pacific and Persian Gulf. During this tour Boyles earned his Officer of the Deck (Underway) and Surface Warfare Officer Qualifications. In June 1999, Boyles returned to San Diego, California, and reported to HSL-47 where he served as Safety Officer, Operations Officer and completed a Caribbean Counter Narcotics deploy ment as Officer-in-Charge of Detachment Six in USS Doyle (FFG 39). In September 2004, he returned to HSL-47 as Executive Officer and on Dec. 8, 2006 he took command of the Saberhawks. During this tour the Saberhawks won the coveted Secretary of Defense Maintenance Award, the Lockheed Martin Superior HSL Maintenance Award and the Capt Arnold J. Isbell award for tactical excellence. In addition, the Saberhawks participated in Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina relief efforts while support ing two USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group deployments. His shore assignments included tours to the Director Assessments Division (N81) on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Resources, Requirements, and Assessment) and to NORAD and USNORTHERN Command Interagency Liaison Office in Washington D.C. A Long Island native of Bay Shore, New York, ten Hoopen is a 1987 graduate of the United States Naval Academy. After receiving his aviation wings in 1989, he was assigned to HSL43 in San Diego, Calif., where he completed two deployments to the Arabian Gulf while for ward deployed to Atsugi, Japan. The first was as Detachment Operations Officer in USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The second was as Detachment Maintenance Officer in USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) He finished his tour at HSL43 as the Quality Assurance Officer. Ten Hoopens other sea tours began in 1995, when he reported as Assistant Navigator in USS Nimitz (CVN 68), home ported in Bremerton, WA. While aboard he deployed for a third time in support of Desert -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Daniel Boyles salutes guest speaker Rear Adm. Ted Branch, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, after relieving Capt. Douglas ten Hoopen as Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet on Aug. 3 during a ceremony at Ocean Breeze Conference Center.See CHSMWL, Page 8 See Valiant, Page 3

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Most children and their families get excited about moving to a new community. It is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore different scenery, and maybe get their own bedroom. But the other side of a move for children is leaving friends and starting in a new school. Who will be my teacher? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common questions, tinged with anxiety, which your chil dren are now asking about this new community Jacksonville, Florida. While you may be con cerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a climate change, your children have honed in on what will have the greatest impact on them: school. Moving is hard for the whole family, but it can be especially hard on kids. One of the keys to mak ing it easier is prepara tion. Psychologist Gary Santavicca says, In gen eral, the more prepara tion you have, the easier a transition is. But if you didnt have time to research this move, now is the time to get online to learn about Hanna Park, the fun things to do throughout the Beaches communi ty, the zoo, and their new schools. If possible, have your children help you with this online research. Santavicca states that by helping, it becomes a family project which creates a positive response to the move for all in the family. By sending a positive message to your children about the good place where they are now liv ing, the good people, and especially, the new school, your excitement will be transferred to your children. This helps them to feel confident about their new surroundings and the new school. If you need help getting more information about the new school than can be found on the schools website, check with me, the School Liaison Officer at N.S. Mayport. Or you can find out school information by going to www. duvalschools.org and click on the tab Parents. Then scroll down to How to Enroll to find enroll ment forms, the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports sched ules, and answers to your transportation questions. As the School Liaison Officer I will also be able to put you in contact with the schools counselor. The counselor can pro vide information about registration dates/times, PE routines (includ ing uniforms for middle and high school stu dents), backpack rules, and other information which may not be posted on the schools website. The school counselor will also be able to answer your questions about your childs IEP or 504 Plan. Check on the indi vidual schools website to find out the date of Orientation. Most schools in Duval will have this on their web site and on the marquee at the front of the school. At Orientation, your child will learn about the schools dress code, find out his schedule for the year, meet his teacher or teachers, and maybe even get his lanyard and school ID. In August, the website will also post the date and time for Open House. As you approach day one, which is Aug. 20 in Duval, establish a regu lar bedtime routine and morning routine. Decide if your child will pack a lunch or buy it. Make sure that he has clothes which are appropriate for the schools dress code. Determine where at home he will keep his school ID, his books, and maybe that lunch so that each morn ing is hassle-free. With a little bit of effort at home, parents can establish a positive tone for this latest move which will result in a great year of learning. Parental involvement and enthusi asm may be all your child needs to have a great move and an outstanding year of academic success! Websites to help make the first days and weeks easier: *websites for area schools: www. duvalschools.org; www. stjohns.k12.fl.us *free tutoring: www. SoarAtHome.com; www. tutor.com *special needs: www. militarystudent.org; www. autism-society.org *Military Youth on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the DoD and avail able at http://apps.mhf. dod.mil/pls/psgprod/ f?p=MYOM:HOME2:0 This website is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to mili tary youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Welcome To NS Mayport, JacksonvilleJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThe Summer Olympics in London has filled our home as we tune in to watch each evening to see who will win a medal. My favorite part of the Olympics is hearing the stories of the athletes and their families who have sacrificed so much to be there. They have been clinging to the dream of Olympic gold, hoping it will become reality. The London 2012 games have indeed been interesting to watch, as some who were thought to be gold medal con tenders failed to place on the medal stand. Their Olympic dream was crushed in a moment. For many of these athletes it has taken most of their life to train for this one day, so it is indeed a great disappointment when they are not able to per form on Olympic game day. Have you ever faced crushing disappointment in your life? Has life sud denly taken a turn you never thought possible? Have you seen a dream you held onto for years come quickly to an end? Can you relate to these athletes who have invest ed their lives for this day, only to walk away empty handed? I am sure we can all relate in some way. Among these Olympic sad endings, there is a great lesson to be learned. The lesson is that sorrow and suffering are times in our life that can be a catalyst for us to truly accept ourselves and find out more of who we are. It is a chance to grow in character as a person as we accept the truth of the circumstances that have enveloped us. Oswald Chambers says it well in My Utmost for His Highest, that the only way to find yourself is in the fires of sorrow. These are indeed shap ing moments in our life. While we all wish life was full of nothing but success and achievements, such a life would actually be to our detriment because success tends to breed pride that goes to our head. Pride breeds com placency and a self-seek ing attitude. A crushed dream or a moment of sorrow is an opportunity for God work in our life to break down pride and increase humility. It is a chance to ask ourselves, What really mat ters in life? The character of Christ is seen in John 12:27 where Jesus says, Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, Father, save Me from this hour? But for this purpose I came to this hour. The hour was when Jesus was betrayed by Judas and crucified on a cross. He could have evaded the hour, but rather He moved towards it in humility. We all strive and work hard to pursue our lifes dreams, but circumstanc es are so many times outside our control. When life takes a turn and dreams are crushed, take that time to stop and take personal inventory and look to God who has a purpose for it all!Olympic Dreams Or Defeats Bring LessonsLt. Stephen Cloer CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSNavy Housing Helping Us Help YouBlog Post by Commander, Navy Installations Command Public Affairs As a Navy leader and someone who lives in Navy housing I am committed to ensuring service members and their families have suitable, affordable and safe housing. Recent events pertaining to mold in Navy barracks, and government owned and family privatized housing have indicated a need to more clearly communicate assistance available on all issues, but particularly when pertaining to health or safety issues. This is a personal issue for me. I am determined to ensure we are providing the very best housing throughout the fleet but I also need your help. If you help me by reporting your housing issues, we can help ensure you maintain a house or barracks room that you can feel proud to say is your home. VADM Bill French Should a health or safety issue arise during a Sailors stay in Navy barracks, govern ment owned, or privatized family housing, well work with the Sailor as an advocate for their needs until we find a solution. If the issue cannot be resolved, we will work with the Sailor to find alternate accommodations. Whether in a barracks room or home, if you live in Navy housing and suspect a health or safety condition exists, please report it to the local PrivatePublic Venture (PPV) office, the local Navy Housing Office or your barracks manager. Use your Chain of Command; talk to your LPO, LCPO, Division officer, Ombudsman and even your Commanding Officer until you feel youre getting the right amount of attention on your issue. If you feel you are hav ing health issues that may be related to conditions in your home or barracks room, see your medical provider immedi ately and then report the issue to your command medical offi cer or representative and your chain of command. Taking personal responsibil ity to prevent issues like mold before it gets out of hand is essential. In many environ ments mold can grow no mat ter how well we maintain the home or condition the air quality. Be vigilant and ensure areas of your home or barracks room that tend to have more mois ture, like kitchens and bath rooms, are kept clean on a regular basis. Often times, all it takes is a once weekly wipe down with mold/mildew cleaner. As a ready and resilient force, 21st Century Sailors and their families must feel confident they can report personal and housing concerns in order to stay safe and healthy in the places they live so we can all focus on our mission, our duties and those we care about. New Website Honors Service Members ValorAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department unveiled a new website today that honors service members highest acts of valor. The site at http://valor. defense.gov is designed to raise awareness of ser vice members heroism and to help deter those who falsely claim military honors, officials said. Recognizing those who have served so honor ably remains the crux of the DOD effort, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said. One of the most important things we can do for all veterans is to honor the service of those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty, he added. Ultimately, officials said, the intent of the website will be to honor soldiers, sailors, air men and Marines who received the highest valor awards in operations since Sept. 11, 2001. These are the Medal of Honor, service crosses and the Silver Star. The listing covers only awards since Sept. 11, 2001. The site currently lists only those awarded the Medal of Honor, and will expand to include the other awards, officials said. It is essential that we honor and recognize our service members achievements, while maintaining the integrity of our award data, said Erin C. Conaton, under secretary of defense for personnel and readiness.

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NGI&S Bowman Hall Gets FaceliftFrom StaffRepresentatives from Naval Station Mayport, Navy Gateway Inns & Suites, Public Works and construc tion contractors gathered outside of Building 1585 Friday to cut the ribbon on the newly renovated Bowman Hall. Bowman Hall has under gone a total room renova tion project since December 2009, which included the repair and renovation of 114 guest rooms, hallways, lounges and comon areas. The project was completed in July and cost $5.2 million, including furnishings. Closet walls, doors, shelves, bathroom plumb ing, flooring even the ceil ing fans carpeting and room number signs were demol ished and removed during the renovation. The new rooms have a modern look and provide a feeling of home, accord ing to Ada Ferran, NGIS Mayport manager. The furniture, fixture and equipment upgrades also include a new queen size bed, bed and bath linens, night stands, art work, desk and chairs, along with a 32-inch TV. thrilled the Coast Guard chose our base, and we welcome our new shipmates. There are no other Coast Guard cutters perma nently homeported aboard Naval Station Mayport, but the base often hosts visit ing cutters in need of tem porary pier space for port calls, scheduled mainte nance periods and emer gency repairs during patrols through the area.From Page 1Valiant What does HOPE look like? Hope looks like Mary Tyler Moore, International Chairman, JDRFShe has type 1 diabetes, and her hope for better treatments and a cure lies in the progress of research. To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. -Photo by Paige GnannRepresentatives from Naval Station Mayport, Navy Gateway Inns & Suites, Public Works and OTAK construction contractors gather outside of Building 1585 Friday to cut the ribbon on the newly renovated Bowman Hall. The $5.2 million project, including a total renovation of the 114 guest rooms, was completed in July. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 USS De Wert Visits Canada For War Of 1812 Commemoration USS De Wert Public AffairsUSS De Wert (FFG 45) left Jacksonville, Florida on July 16 to begin a 73-day cruise through the Great Lakes to commem orate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. Since her departure, De Wert has visited the Canadian cities of Halifax, Quebec City, and Montreal and is currently en route to her first American port, Milwaukee. At each of the Canadian port visits, De Wert host ed distinguished visitor receptions for the respec tive cities mayors, mili tary officials, and other public figures to further our ties with our sister country. We did a phenomenal job because we func tioned as a team and were dedicated until the end, said Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, commanding officer of USS De Wert. The crew of De Wert has succeeded at fulfilling a demanding schedule of completing ship prepa rations, providing tours, conducting community relations projects, and engaging with the public of the host city. More than 5,000 people visited De Wert in Quebec City and Montreal. I really enjoy the opportunity to meet and mingle with the people and for them to see the finished prod uct of all our hard work, said Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Nathaniel Pennywell. Currently, De Wert is transiting the St. Lawrence Seaway, which provides a system of locks, channels, and canals for ships to transit from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. De Werts arrival into the Great Lakes is a highly antici pated event, as it is the first Navy frigate to visit the Great Lakes since the -Photo courtesy of USS De WertMembers of the Wendake First Nation greeted Rear Adm. Greg Nosal, Cmdr. Joe Thomas and the crews of USS De Wert, USS Hurricane, and HMCS Ville de Quebec during a traditional aboriginal welcoming ceremony in Quebec.-Photo courtesy of USS De WertUSS De Wert inside the first of fifteen locks during her transit through the St. Lawrence Seaway. -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisSailors man the rails aboard Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG 45) as the ship arrives in Montreal. DeWert, Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) and Canadian Halifax-class frigate HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332) are visiting cities in America and Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisSailors man the rails aboard Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS DeWert (FFG 45) as the ship departs Quebec City. DeWert, Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) and Canadian Halifax-class frigate HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332) are visiting cities in America and Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisSailors assigned to Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) watch a concert featuring Slash from Guns n' Roses. -Photo by MC2 Tony D. CurtisOperations Specialist 3rd Class Zach Wood, left, and Electronics Technician 2nd Class John Cochran, both from USS DeWert (FFG 45), answer questions from Ted Bird on TSN Radio 990 Montreal about the ship's visit to the city. -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodCmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, USS DeWert commanding officer, signs the guest book with Jocelyn Ann Campell, city councillor of Montreal, at city hall. See De Wert, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 5 -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisQuartermaster Seaman Patrick Riley from USS De Wert (FFG 45) greets a patient during a community relations event at the Sainte-Justine Mother and Child University Hospital Centre. -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodLt. Cmdr. Ron Flesvig explains the navy insignia of Informations Systems Technician 3rd Class Jeremy Wood to a Montreal news crew aboard Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodInterior Communications Electrician 1st Class Michael Klebeck, from Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC3), explains damage control equipment to Montreal locals during ship tour. -Photo by MC2 Dustin GoodSonar Technician (surface) 2nd Class Mark Riddell shows a Mk .76 round to Montreal locals during a tour aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). De Wert, Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) and Canadian Halifax-class frigate HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332) are visiting cities in America and Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisFire Controlman 2nd Class Daniel Faiella describes a .50 caliber machine gun to a tourist aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisGunner's Mate 3rd Class T'Darris Booker describes different weapons to tourists aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisChief Electrician's Mate Gerson Paul from Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) gives toy hockey sticks to a patient during a community relations event. -Photo by MC2 Anthony CurtisQuartermaster 1st Class Darkemu Canmu operates a GPS on the bridge aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45). Navys last Great Lakes Cruise in 1999. The USS Hurricane (PC 3) and the Royal Canadian Navys HMCS Ville de Quebec are also traveling with De Wert throughout the Great Lakes for the com memoration events. Other scheduled port visits include Chicago, Toledo, Detroit, Cleveland, and Buffalo. The War of 1812, also known as Americas sec ond war for indepen dence, is regarded by many as the conflict that started our countrys rise to global influence. From 1812 to 1815, we fought to expand to the north and west, and to assert our rights to trade freely with other coun tries, without interfer ence from Britains Royal Navy ships on the high seas. Our modern Navy and our role as a global maritime power are root ed in the events of 1812 to 1815. More informa tion on the Bicentennial Commemoration of the War of 1812 can be found at www.ourflagwasstill there.orgFrom Page 4De Wert

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Annual Panamax Kicks Off In MayportFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) and Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho welcomed partner nation partici pants and staff officially kicking off this years PANAMAX exercise, Aug. 6. The main focus of PANAMAX is to exercise a variety of responses, in coordination with the governments of Panama and Colombia, in order to protect and guarantee safe passage of commer cial traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sovereignty. Representatives from 17 nations are participat ing in the annual exercise from Aug. 6-17, which has evolved over many years and now includes training for many of the same 21st century threats encountered in todays land, sea, air and cyber environments. More than 600 military per sonnel have traveled to Mayport for the exer cise including 170 guests from partner nations. Military and civilian personnel from Mayportbased COMUSNAVSO/ C4F and Destroyer Squadron 40 (including Navy Reservists from the Jacksonville area) are also participating in PANAMAX. PANAMAX is a U.S.sponsored, multina tional annual exercise that includes partici pants from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States. This exercise is designed to execute sta bility operations under the support of United Nations Security Council Resolutions; provide interoperability training for the participating mul tinational staffs; and build participating nation capability to plan and execute complex multinational operations, Harris said. The governments of the countries participating in PANAMAX share com mon interests and this exercise enhances those links by fostering friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating militar ies. This multinational exercise also contributes to interoperability, and builds the capabilities of the participating nations to plan and execute complex multinational opera tions. One of the most important benefits of multinational exercises like PANAMAX is the fact that all the participants will be able to exchange their experiences, exper tise and will gain new knowledge about each others culture and peo ple, Harris said. These interactions strengthen our bonds across the region and foster longlasting friendships and an understanding among the partner nations, ultimately benefiting the security of the region. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet gives PANAMAX military exercise T-shirts to local media during a press conference held on board Naval Station Mayport. The main focus of PANAMAX is to protect and guarantee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal. FFSC Mayport Works To Help Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Aug. 9, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Troops to Teachers, FFSC Aug. 9, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 13, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Aug. 13, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 13-17, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., SAPR Initial Victim Advocate Training NAS Jax Chapel Aug. 14, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Aug. 14, 1-3 p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses FFSC Room 719 Aug. 14, 6-7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group Building 1, Room 104 Aug. 15, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 15, 11 a.m.-noon, Money and the Move FFSC Room 702 Aug. 16, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 20-23, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Aug. 22, 11-12:40 p.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 702 Aug. 22, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Aug. 27, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Aug. 28, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 Aug. 29, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Raising Financially Fit Kids, FFSC Room 702 Aug. 29, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Aug. 30, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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USS Klakring Cleans Up In Sicily USS KlakringSailors from USS Klakring (FFG-42) volun teered their liberty time in Sicily to serve the community by participating in two community relations projects. While the ship was in port for a short stop in nearby Augusta Bay, Klakring Sailors Seaman Pedro Diaz, Boatswains Mate 1st Class John Weitzel, Senior Chief Personnel Specialist Dewayne Lynch, Chief Damage Controlman Chase Hampton, and Chaplain Lt. Justin Top participated in a beau tification project at the Commune Di Floridia Open Market. The Sailors were also joined by Lara Aliffi, Miriana Mollica, and Giuseppe Cospitano, who are members of a Sicilian youth group similar to the Boy and Girl Scouts of America. Together, the crew worked in the intense Sicilian summer heat, fighting off thorn bushes and blowing sand to gather a truck-load of trash and debris from the area surrounding the market. After finishing for the day, Scout Lara Allifi described the event as, The Good, Tired and Beautiful experience. Several blocks away, Logistics Specialist Seaman Jonathan Winters, Information Systems Technician Seaman Tommy OSullivan, Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Louie Reyes, Engineman 2nd Class Mauro Jimenez and PACE Instructor Dennis Saliny were simi larly charged with gath ering a large amount of trash and debris from the area within and sur rounding the Commune Di Floridia Public Soccer Stadium. Once finished, the endeavoring group assisted volunteers from NAS Sigonella in painting the interior of the stadiums facilities. Afterwards, the volunteers from all orga nizations gathered to enjoy a meal comprised of local favorites while watching a friendly soccer competition in the stadi um courtyard. USS Klakring is cur rently deployed on her final cruise before decommissioning in 2013 and conducting Fire Scout operations in support of AFRICOM. -Photos courtesy of USS KlakringSailors from USS Klakring spend time picking up trash during a beautification project at Commune Di Floridia Open Market. Sailors from USS Klakring stands with bags of trash and debris gathered from the Commune Di Floridia Public Soccer Stadium after a dual community relations project while the s hip was in port in Sicily. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 7

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HSL-48 At Work On USS Underwood Storm, and earned his Surface Warfare designation after qualifying as Officer of the Deck (Underway). After three WESTPAC deployments to the Arabian Gulf, Ten Hoopen chose to do his Department Head tour on the East Coast, where he served at HSL-44 in Mayport, from 1998 2000. He first served as Officer-in-Charge (OIC) of Detachment 10 in USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Upon return from that deployment he deployed again ten days later as OIC of Detachment One in USS Vicksburg (CG 69). He finished his tour at HSL-44 as Squadron Operations Officer and was recognized as the 1999 HSLWINGLANT Officer of the Year. He completed sea duty assignment as Commanding Officer of HSL-42 from September 2005 until December 2006, winning the Battle E for calendar year 2006. Ten Hoopens shore duty assignments began in 1993 in Washington, DC, where he served at the Pentagon as Administrative Assistant to the Assistant Vice Chief of Naval Operations (AVCNO), followed by a 13-month tour as Aide to the VCNO. From 2000-2002 he served at the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Millington, TN, first as the HS/HSL Placement Officer and then as Assistant Aviation Captain Detailer.He completed studies at the Joint Forces Staff College in March 2004 and served as a branch chief in the Operations Directorate of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from January 2007 until June of 2009. From Page 1CHSMWL-Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsBoatswain's Mate 3rd Class Guanqun Sun (foreground) acts as the landing signalman enlisted (LSE) as Sailors prepare to traverse the flight deck after refueling an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of HSL-48 during a "hot pump" and crew swap aboard USS Underwood (FFG 36). Sailors refuel an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to HSL-48 during a hot pump and crew swap on USS Underwood. a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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USS The Sullivans Qualifies 4 SWOs USS The Sullivans There were handshakes and congratulations all around The Sullivans wardroom as two new Surface Warfare Officers received their pins on July 27. Ensign Lauren Raines and Ensign Jonathan Tibbetts successfully completed a rigorous board process Friday, joining Ensign Rachel Howell and Lt.j.g. Rachel Halnon who passed their final board on July 25 as four of the newest Surface Warfare Officers in the fleet. Its such a great feeling to have your SWO pin to have a group of people with years of experience in the Navy decide that you have earned the right to wear a warfare insig nia, said Howell. Its a great feeling, but it also makes you feel even more responsible for your decisions and actions. Halnon is a 2010 graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, and Tibbetts is a 2010 graduate of Florida State University. Both Raines and Howell are 2011 graduates of the United States Naval Academy. -Photo courtesy of USS The SullivansUSS The Sullivans congratulates her newly pinned Surface Warfare Officers, Lt.j.g. Rachel Halnon, Ensign Lauren Raines, Ensign Rachel Howell and Ensign Jonathan Tibbetts. The Sullivans Holds DC Olympics-Photos courtesy of USS The SullivansCommand Master Chief Brian Porter looks on as Information Systems Technician Second Class Christopher Curran demonstrates proper hose handling during USS The Sullivans Damage Control Olympics. Damage Controlman First Class Jeremiah Bredeson instructs Sailors from USS The Sullivans in firefighting skills during their Damage Control Olympics at Naval Station Mayport on July 26.Navy Establishes Program Office For CVN 79 ProcurementFrom PEO Aircraft CarriersThe Program Executive Officer (PEO) for Aircraft Carriers, Rear Adm. Thomas Moore, announced the stand up of a new program office, July 27, within PEO Carriers, PMS 379, and the assumption of office by Cmdr. Doug Oglesby. The new program office will manage the planning and procurement of John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) and future aircraft carriers of the Gerald R. Ford class. PMS 379 will join existing PEO Carriers programs PMS 312 for in-service carriers and PMS 378 for Future Carriers. PMS 378 retains responsibility for the construction and delivery of Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Standing up a new program office will allow the Gerald R. Ford-class to begin continuous pro duction while ensuring CVN 78 completes con struction and delivery to the highest standards. As the first new aircraft carrier design in more than 40 years, the Gerald R. Fordclass will move into modified repeat production of CVN 79 and 80 through the new program office, said Moore. I am excited to stand up this new program office and manage the procurement of John F. Kennedy and CVN 80 said Oglesby. The team will build on success with Gerald R. Ford and develop best practices and procedures to affordably deliver these warships. Before the ceremony concluded, Oglesby was frocked to the rank of captain by Assistant Secretary of the Navy Research, Development and Acquisition Sean Stackley. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 9

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USS Carney Concludes 3-Month DrydockingUSS Carney (DDG 64)Even the best of war ships with an outstanding crew require some time out of the water for sprucing up. For guided-mis sile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64), the time came in April when she entered into her third major dry dock period, known as a Docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA). Carney came out of the water on April 19, but preparations for that event began more than six months before that as her crew and her Port Engineer Sean McMurray of South East Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) began planning the logistics of this mile stone event. Work center super visors, lead petty offi cers and division offi cers began to determine what work needed to be accomplished, ranging from simple refinish ing of decks to removal and repairs to the ships propellers. This evolu tion required the crew to be forward-looking and forward-leaning during the second half of a sev en-month-long deploy ment to the 5th fleet area of responsibility. Carney was official ly on the blocks at around 3 p.m. on April 19. Contractors began checking in at the quarterdeck and fanning out around the ship to remove lag ging, rig hoses, and com plete the assessments that would make for a smooth transition from Naval Station Mayport to BAE Jacksonvilles Shipyard. At the same time, the crew moved onto YRBM 45, a berthing barge that would be their temporary home for the next four months. The deadstick tran sit up the St. Johns River to drydock was a really unique experience for the crew, especially junior officers and Sailors. Being up on the bridge during the transit was pretty cooleven though we werent operating engines or rudder, I still learned a lot about ship handling said Ensign Tim Dover, Conning officer for the evolution. Everyone was most excited to observe the ships entrance into the dry dock. I had seen the bal lasting process before, and I was impressed because it was actually a more efficient and less time-consuming evolu tion this time around said Electricians Mate 1st Class (SW) Odely Aime. As Carney approached the entrance to the now ballasted-down drydock, the tugs that had towed her from Mayport handed her over to a team of civilian tugs that would turn her stern towards the mouth of the drydock and carefully guide her, with the help of previouslyplaced centering guides on the flight deck, back into the drydock. Once in place, the dock began to ballast up, with divers constantly check ing to ensure that Carney was properly aligned on the massive blocks that would support her 8,886 tons, or feet of American fighting steel. After nine hours of careful efforts, Carney was finally high and dry and her crew was able to go home for the night. While the crew (with the exception of each days duty section) would go home each night, crews of workers would work around the clock to ensure that the timeline for completion was adhered to every step of the way. Extra Force Protection watches were stood up, and the operational tempo on board Carney remained fast-paced and aggressive. Through the coopera tion of the ships crew, SERMC personnel, the shipyard and drydock, and outside contractors, the work was accom plished in a safe and timely manner. On the morning of July 28, preparations were made, space inspections and valve verifications completed, and the entire crew aboard, Carney was prepared for undocking. Tugs returned Carney to Mayport basin and brought a newly refitted Destroyer one step closer to returning to full combat ready status. BAE, SERMC and Carney Sailors did an outstanding job conduct ing much needed repairs since her last docking in 2003. However, the suc cess and completion of those jobs and the dock ing evolutions is directly contributed to the ownership maintained by Carney Sailors, of which I am most proud of, said the ships Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Marc D. Boran. USS Carney is inport Mayport completing a maintenance availability, and plans to be under way for Sea Trials in November in preparation for her first deployment as a Ballistic Missile Defense Destroyer in 2013. -Photo courtesy of USS CarneyThe crew of USS Carney stands aft of the ship while it is in dry dock at BAE Jacksonville Shipyard during a three-month Docking Selected Restricted Availability.Redesigned TA Program AnnouncedFrom DoDPresident Obama announced the launch of the redesigned Transition Assistance Program developed by an interagency team from the Departments of Defense, Veterans Affairs, Labor, Education, and Homeland Security as well as the Office of Personnel and Management and the Small Business Administration on July 23. The revamped program, called Transition GPS, is the first major overhaul of the TA program for mili tary members in nearly 20 years. The effort began in response to a call from President Obama in August 2011 to ensure all service members are career ready when they leave the military. I applaud the leader ship of President Obama to bring together govern ment agencies around the goal of enhancing career opportunities for service members, said Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta. Our personnel have developed extraor dinary technical expertise and world-class leader ship skills that are in high demand. Transition GPS will help military mem bers apply their experi ence to additional train ing, formal education, and develop successful civilian careers. One of our funda mental responsibili ties as a government is to properly prepare and support those serving in our military so they are career ready as they tran sition back into civilian life. With this new initia tive, we can better ensure veterans receive the care, benefits and employ ment services they have earned, said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. This col laborative effort will have an impact well beyond this current generation of individuals returning from combat. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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USS Taylor On Task Friday, Aug. 10 The Ladies Auxillary Fleet Reserve Association #290 will host a potluck dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Rd. The group is asking for an $8 donation. Take out orders are wel come. The event is open to the public. For more information, call 2466855. Saturday, Aug. 11 Christ United Methodist Church invites the community to an oldfashioned fish fry, hosted by the United Methodist Men. Dinners will include fish, hush puppies and all the trimmings, all for only $7 for adults and $4 for children. Meet us in Wilson Hall of the church at 4 p.m. at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach to reel yours in! Need info? Call the church at 2495370. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and learn about the lifecycle of the sea turtle and the importance of these creatures. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Aug. 18 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This ranger-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The City of Atlantic Beach will show Dolphin Tale as its first sum mer Twilight Movie in the Park. Based on true events, this family film is about Winter, a young dolphin who loses her tail in a crab trap, and Sawyer, the reserved 11-year-old boy who befriends her. Sawyer meets the rescued dolphin at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium, a marine rehabilitation center where she lives. Sawyer rallies friends and family alike to save Winter and enlists a pioneering doctor to create a unique prosthetic appendage to restore the dolphins ability to swim. Admission is free and open to the public, so bring your blankets, lawn chairs, and snacks. The film is being shown at Jack Russell Park, 800 Seminole Rd, Atlantic Beach. Adults are asked to accompany children. Free refreshments and fun for kids of all ages begins at 7 p.m. with the movie showing at twilight. Visit the AB website for special events page for upcoming events atwww.coab.us/ events. Sunday, Aug. 19 Christ United Methodist Church will be hosting a back to school celebration for all children of the com munity from 11:30 a.m. Please join us for fun, food, games and give aways as we bid farewell to summer and hello to a new school year. For more information, please contact the church office at 249-5370 or Hanna Thomas, Childrens Ministry Leader, at thom wacky@aol.com. Christ UMC Wilson Hall, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Aug. 25 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Tijuana Flats is cel ebrating summers end with the 48th annual Summer Beach Run and its unforgettable postrace celebration at 7 p.m. at Jacksonville Beach Seawalk Pavilion, 1st St. N, Jacksonville Beach. This family-friendly event will benefit the restaurants Just In Queso Foundation, which pro vides aid to individu als, communities and organizations in need. Participants will not cross the finish line emptyhanded. Directly after the race, runners will be treated to free food provided by Tijuana Flats, beer and live music. This event is the perfect opportunity to bring friends and families together to help the community, have fun and stay fit. The event includes both a five mile and a one mile fun run with a por tion of the proceeds from the race benefiting the Just in Queso Foundation. To sign-up or for more information about the event, visit http:// www.1stplacesports. Start Your Own Vegetables from Seed Lecture and Hands-on: Take home your own planted tray at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost is $15. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required, please contact Jeannie Crosby at 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Tuesday, Aug. 28 Duval County Extension Florida Friendly Landscaping staff will present a Bakers Dozen of landscape tips for the upcoming winter season from 6-8 p.m. at Webb Wesconnett Regional Library, 6887 103rd St. Learn the difference between regular lawn care and organic lawn care and much more. Attendees will also see how to prepare their tools for the off season includ ing a sharpening dem onstration. This is a free class, but registration is requested. Call Becky at 904-255-7450 or email her at beckyd@coj.net. Saturday, Sept. 8 Join Wounded Warrior ProjectTM(WWP) for the WWP 8K Run in Jacksonville. Activities begin at 7 a.m. and a race start time of 9 a.m. at the Jacksonville Landing to help honor and empow er our nations Wounded Warriors. Race proceeds support the free programs WWP offers wounded service members nation wide. Advance registra tion is $25 (includes race day number, timing, and post-race festivities) and each runner must raise a minimum of $99. Top finisher awards and addi tional race-day options are available. Visit http:// www.woundedwarrior project.org/wwp-8k-runs. aspx to register.Out in Town -Photo by MC2(EXW) Terrence SirenCmdr. Jeremy Hill, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), guides several defense attache members representing Pakistan, India, Egypt and Great Britain, on a tour of the ship. Taylor is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508, supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interdiction operations and counter-piracy mission in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2(EXW) Terrence SirenAbove, U.S. Navy Sailors assigned to USS Taylor kneel on the flightdeck during the final round of the 9mm gun qualification course of fire. Sailors aboard the USS Taylor (FFG-50) participate in an M9 weap ons qualification. Above right, Seaman Michael Westfall, a member of the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team aboard guided-missile frigate USS Tayor (FFG-50) (background), stands guard during a routine boarding of a dhow. Right, Sailors aboard the USS Taylor (FFG-50) participate in an M9 weapons qualification. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 11

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Aug. 10: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug 3 & 4 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Aug. 10: Beach Blanket Bingo. 12:15 pm at Beachside Bingo. Wear your sun hats and shades; dig in the sand for priz es, double payouts on all hard cards, free hot dogs and chips and more. 2707204 Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 10: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 11: UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 14: Go the Distance 10K Run/ 5K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 14: Mens Summer Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. Aug. 15: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Aug. 15: 12 Signs Astrology Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring DJ Tom. Food, giveaways, prizes, bev erage specials and more.270-7205 Aug. 17: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2The Mysterious Island (PG13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 20: Mens Summer Basketball Begins Season ends Oct. 18. 270-5451 Aug. 21: 7v7 Fall Soccer Organizational Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. Aug. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the NS Mayport CPO Selectees. For tickets, call (904) 270-5431. Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, beverage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 MWRAug. 10: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug 3 & 4 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 17: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2The Mysterious Island (PG13). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 31: Outdoor MoviesThe Avengers (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 KIDThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Aug. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 Aug. 8: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aug. 9: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Sign-up deadline Aug. 8. FREE Aug. 10: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New York Giants Football. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Cost $8. Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 10: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 11: UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 12: Ichnetucknee Tubing Trip. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $10. Aug. 13: Pinewood Derby Registration. All Day at the Liberty Center. Come and pick up your derby car & register for the big race. Aug. 14: Go the Distance 10K Run/ 5K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Aug. 14: Mens Summer Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. Aug. 15: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Aug. 15: 12 Signs Astrology Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring DJ Tom. Food, giveaways, prizes, bev erage specials and more.270-7205 Aug. 15: Ping-Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 17: St. Johns Town Center Shopping. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation only. FREE Aug. 17: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2The Mysterious Island (PG13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 18: Liberty LockIn. Begins at 11:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Come for snacks, games, and more as we stay open all night! Aug. 19: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Sign-up dead line Aug. 16. Aug. 20: Mayport 500 Pinewood Derby. 8 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Put you car to the test in the Mayport 500. Aug. 20: Mens Summer Basketball Begins Season ends Oct. 18. 270-5451 Aug. 21: 7v7 Fall Soccer Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. Aug. 21: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the NS Mayport CPO Selectees. For tickets, call (904) 270-5431. Aug. 23: Hooter Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 24: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by Aug. 16. 2705451 Aug 24: Shiver Me Timbers Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Rock Band LIFT. Come dressed in your best pirate costume. Prizes for best costume, most original and best couple. Food, giveaways, Open Mic with band, beverage specials and more. 270-7205 Aug. 24: Outdoor MoviesPirates: Band of Misfits (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 25: Wet n Wild Water Park. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $20. Sign-up deadline Aug. 19. LIBERTY 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012

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DoD Leads Drive Toward Healthier LifestylesAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is taking a leading role in a governmentwide effort to stop the nations obe sity problem,Barbara Thompson, the director of DoDs Office of Family Policy/ Children and Youth, said. DOD is one of 17 federal departments and agencies working together to iden tify opportunities for promot ing healthy living as part of the White Houses National Prevention Council strategy, she explained. One part of that is prevent ing obesity, Thompson told American Forces Press Service and The Pentagon Channel. It has a huge impact on our quality of life, both for children and adults. Thompson noted a national increase in Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease, believed caused by increased fat, salt and sugar in Americans diets at the same time that many children are less active than in previous generations. There was a 40 percent rise in childhood obe sity between 1998 and 2008, she said. The shift toward unhealthi er foods and less exercise has developed over the past 30 years or so, and is having a huge impact on health, healthcare costs, and national security, Thompson said. For the first time, were hearing that this generation will not live longer than their parents. The Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington-based think tank, issued a major report last month, Lots to Lose, written by two former Agriculture sec retaries and two former Health and Human Services secretar ies, that includes a case study of Defense Department ini tiatives to counteract obesity, Thompson noted. DODs spending on health care is rising at twice the rate as the civilian sector and unhealthy lifestyles and obe sity, in particular, are significant contributors to this trend, the report says. It has reached $50 billion annually, taking up 10 percent of the overall defense budget. The trend is wreaking havoc on the services abil ity to recruit, creating a national security imperative, Thompson said, with only 25 percent of 17to 24-year-olds able to meet the militarys weight standards. The majority of applicants rejected for military service today have obesity issues, she said. In 2010, 59 percent of female recruits and 47 percent of male recruits failed the militarys entry-level fitness test, the report says. Of those recruited, the ser vices are seeing large increases in service members with bone fractures, thought to be the result of calcium deficiencies, and so many dental problems that 62 percent of new soldiers were not immediately deploy able, the report says. Preventing Obesity in Children Thompsons office insti tuted a -2-1-0 policy for the departments schools and childcare centers, as well as civilian partners that serve National Guard and Reserve children. The numbers repre sent five servings of fruits and vegetables, restricting screen time TV and computers to two hours each day, ensuring one hour of exercise daily, and allowing no sweetened bever ages. Policy is one of the most powerful tools we have to implement change, Thompson said. Were sharing those les sons learned with civilian community. The bottom line is that we have to make healthy options available and affordable. And parents need to know how important fruits and vegetables are -and small serving sizes.Thompsons tips for curbing obesity include: -Eliminate sweetened bever ages, including juices; -Practice portion control; -Advocate for your children; -Ask teachers to reduce sweets in the classroom; -Get the nutritional infor mation for school menus and ensure that they are healthy; -Ask grocery store managers to move sugary foods higher than eye level to young chil dren; -Exercise as a family; -Cook and eat meals as a family; -Breastfeed; -Grow a garden, or encourage your installation to start com munity gardens; -Make fruits and vegetables more appealing to children by offering a variety of color and textures; and -Dont stop serving a healthy food because children refuse to eat it; it can take many times of seeing it on their plate for them to adjust to the taste. Also, Thompson said, limit electronics, not only because they make kids sedentary, but also because of the advertising. The food industry spends $10 billion annually in marketing food most of it high in salt or sugar to children, according to the Lots to Lose report. As part of her Lets Move! campaign to end obesity in a generation, First Lady Michelle Obama has asked food com panies with advertising aimed at children to make their prod ucts healthier. Last month, Walt Disney became the first to introduce new standards for food advertising to kids. All foods marketed on Disneys television and radio chan nels will be required to meet Disneys nutrition guidelines which align with federal stan dards to promote fruit and vegetables and limit calories, sugar, sodium, and saturated fat by 2015, Disney officials said. Preventing Obesity in Service Members and Families The military is working to help service members and their families stay healthy. The Military OneSource website, www.miltaryonesource.mil, offers health coaches for adults and teens to help with weight management and to meet their overall health goals, Thompson said. And, the first ladys Joining Forces campaign recently announced that health clubs that are part of the International Health Racquet & Sportsclub Association are offering free memberships to immediate family members -teens and older -of deployed reservists and National Guard members. Clubs may provide additional benefits such as childcare, childrens programming, group classes, discounts for veterans, and discounts for active duty families. Participating clubs can be found at www.health clubs.com. Also, the American Council on Exercise is offer ing free training and fitness instruction to family mem bers of deployed reservists and National Guard members. Participating instructors can be found at www.acefitness.org/ joiningforces. If the governmentwide efforts and those in DOD seem like a lot just to make Americans healthier, thats the point, Thompson said. We all have to be in this together, she said. This is going to take a national effort to change these habits that have been ingrained in us for the past 40 years. Shipshape, Base CFL MeetingFrom Healh PromotionThe Navy and Marine Corp Public Health Center directed eight-week Nutrition and Weight Management Course is starting here at Mayport Health Promotion on Aug. 28. The class runs for 8 consecutive Tuesdays and runs from 9-11 a.m. It is open to active duty, Sailors on the Fitness Enhancement Program, adult dependents, and retirees. Shipshape is an action-oriented weight management program focusing on nutrition education, increasing exercise, and behavior modification skills that support a healthy life style. The quarterly Health Promotion Command Fitness Leader meeting will be held on Aug. 16 at Health Promotion, Building 2050, Marshal Couch Drive from 9-10 a.m. All command Health Promotion Representatives and Command Fitness Leaders are welcome to attend. Call 270-5251 for more information.First Coasts Only Baby Friendly Hospital Celebrates World Breastfeeding WeekNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs OfficerAs the only hospital in Northeast Florida or Southeast Georgia certified as Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville kicks off World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1 to 7) with a series of activities for patientsser vice members (active duty and retired) and their families. The weeks events include a Baby Bootcamp class on Aug. 1 and New Mom Orientation on Aug. 3, along with an educational display in the lobby near the pharmacy. We want to do all we can to improve the health of our nations youngest heroesthe children of our military mem bersand encourage the use of mothers milk for the 1,000 babies born in our hospital each year, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And our Baby Friendly certification and ongoing preand post-natal classes illustrate our commitment to supporting new mothers and reducing the risks of childhood illnesses. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics journal, infant mortality is reduced by 21 percent among breastfed babies in the U.S. And of the two to three babies born each day at NH Jacksonville, about 90 percent are breastfed when they leavecompared to a nation al breastfeeding rate of about 75 percent. Other benefits to baby of mothers milk include less ear infections, diarrhea, respiratory infections, asthma, diabetes, obesity, childhood leukemia and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Benefits for mom include less postpar tum depression, diabetes, and breast and ovarian cancer. Breastfeeding also saves time and money for families in both baby formula and medical care. Baby Friendly certification is all about reducing infant mor tality, said Northeast Florida Breastfeeding Collaborative Chair Heather Huffman. Naval Hospital Jacksonville and other hospitals like it across the nation are doing their part to promote healthier babies. NH Jacksonville is currently one of only 143 Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S. The Baby Friendly designation is awarded after a rigorous on-site survey is com pleted, and maintained by continuing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The com prehensive program includes initiating breastfeeding in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breast feeding support groups. Along with the classes offered during World Breastfeeding Week (a World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action effort launched 20 years ago), NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospitalincluding baby boot camp, prenatal exercise, Hypnobirthing, infant mas sage, breastfeeding, prepared childbirth and an orientation program. Plus, the hospitals new, private labor/delivery and maternal/infant suites offer couplet care (with mom and baby rooming together), breast pumps, breastfeeding counsel ing from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to support feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an edu cational newborn channel on television. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can register for free classes by calling 904-542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (administered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www. babyfriendlyusa.org.Vaccination Can Prevent Cancer-Causing HPV Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences student on Family Medicine rotation at Naval Hospital Jacksonville August is National Immunization Awareness Month. There are 26 vaccinepreventable diseases, including Human Papillomavirus (HPV). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), HPV is the most common sexually transmit ted disease in the United States. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women will be infected in their lifetimes. This article addresses frequently asked questions about HPV, and why its important to get vaccinated against the disease. What is HPV? It is a virus spread through sexual contact. There are approximately 40 different types of genital HPV. Some types can cause cervical, anal, penile, vaginal and mouth or throat cancer in women and men. Most people with HPV have no symptoms. Who should get the vaccine? The CDC advises all females and males 9 to 26-years-old receive the full course of HPV vaccination. How is HPV passed from person to person? HPV is passed through skin-toskin contact. Condoms do not fully protect against transmitting this virus. It is possible to get the virus from a sexual partner who does not have any visible signs of infection, such as genital warts. Why should children and adults be vaccinated? The vaccination works to prevent the viruses from infecting the body, and can greatly reduce the risk of developing HPV related cancers. Is the vaccine safe? Yes. The United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine is licensed, and they are con tinually monitored for safety and effec tiveness. The actual vaccine contains a chemical protein coating from the virus-no viral genetic material. It is impossible to contract HPV from the vaccine. According to the Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System, over 46 million doses of vaccine have been given in the U.S., and the risks of side effects are very low (less than 0.05 percent). Side effects include redness, swelling, or soreness in the area where the shot was given. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association also found that there is a very small risk of fainting or blood clots right after the shot is given. People who have fainted after receiving shots in the past should alert their doctors before getting the vaccine. Why vaccinate non-sexually active children/adults? The vaccine only prevents HPV if the person does not already have it. It does not cure an already infected person. So the best time to vaccinate is before sexual activity begins. For individuals who are already sexu ally active or those who have already had genital warts, the vaccine is still recom mended as it can prevent infection from other strains of the HPV virus. What happens after getting the HPV vaccination? The vaccination series consists of three shots. Once the initial HPV vaccine has been administered, a second shot should be given two months later. The final shot is required six months after the first one. Does the vaccine replace the need for a regular Pap test? No, the HPV vac cine only protects against the virus. Its important that all women have Pap test and pelvic exams as part of their routine heath care. Does TRICARE pay for the vaccina tion? Yes. TRICARE does pay for HPV vaccine. Should pregnant women get the vaccine? No. Pregnant women should not get the vaccine. Once the baby is born, they can discuss with their healthcare provider the best time to schedule the vaccination. Protection against cancer-caus ing HPV, as well as the elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S., is pow erful examples of why its important to vaccinate. Patients should talk to their healthcare providers about the right vaccinations for them and their children. To learn more about immunizations, visit CDCs website: http://www.cdc.gov/ vaccines/parents/infants-toddlers.html or call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-2324636). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 9, 2012 13

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