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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Vicksburg Hits Halfway MarkMore Sea Duty Pays OffFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNavy released additional guidance for the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP) which provides incentives to Sailors who extend at sea or return to sea duty early officials said, July 13. This program allows Sailors and their families to stay in their same duty location or relocate to a duty location of their choice, said Capt. Kent Miller, director, Enlisted Distribution Division, Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Applicants may also be eligible to defer Perform-to-Serve (PTS), providing an opportunity to enhance their record with operational duty. VSDP was announced in January to support the Navys war-fighting mis sion of operating forward and maintain ing readiness. The program encourages highly trained and motivated Sailors to voluntarily extend their enlistment in their current sea duty billet beyond their prescribed sea tour, to terminate shore duty and accept new orders to a sea duty billet or to accept back-to-back sea duty orders beyond their prescribed sea/shore flow. The sea duty assign ment may be on board ships, squad rons, or other qualified sea duty assign ments. NAVADMIN 205/12 clarifies 15 items from the initial message. Among the updates: *Sailors in the PTS eligibility window who wish to apply for VSDP must have their VSDP application submitted for consideration no later than the last day of the month, two months prior to their final PTS application. *VSDP orders will not be cancelled for Sailors who subsequently receive a PTS quota after VSDP orders have been negotiated. *Sailors on shore duty must submit their VSDP request no later than 12 months prior to their projected rotation date. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottU.S. Navy Sailors enjoy a steak cookout held by Cooks from the Valley aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security coopera tion efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) passed their deployments halfway point the first week of July. This marks a significant milestone in the 20-year-old cruisers final deploy ment. Its definitely been an interesting deployment so far, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) Seaman Roger Coleman, who is on his first deploy ment. Ive learned a lot and visited a lot of places Ive never seen before and Im looking forward to visiting more. Vicksburg has visited three ports so far this deployment including Greece, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. Visiting ports is a big part of deploy ment, but Sailors also use deployment as a time to enhance their in-rate and military skills. This deployment has helped me grow as a Sailor, said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Sims, who is on his fourth deployment. I learn new things about my job and about the Navy everyday. No matter how many deployments you go on, you can always learn more and improve your skills. During the first half of deployment, 18 Vicksburg Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist pin and more than 100 are poised to earn it before the end of deployment. This is scheduled to be Vicksburgs final deployment before decommission ing in 2013, but work has not slowed for Sailors aboard. We cant let things like maintenance and upkeep slide just because we are scheduled for decommissioning, said Lt. j.g. Brett Lincoln, Auxiliaries Officer aboard Vicksburg. We need to stay focused on our goals. Just like in a race, you are supposed to sprint at the end. The Vicksburg crew marked the half way point by sending a video made by the crew to Mayport, Fla., for friends and family to view. Vicksburgs crew also celebrated the halfway mark by holding a steak cook out for Sailors July 5. Vicksburg is on her final deployment operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support mis sions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Navy Issues New Shore Energy PolicyFrom Chief of Naval Operations Shore Readiness DivisionThe Navy issued a new energy policy that will drive energy consumption reduction at all Navy installations, transform the shore energy culture and seek new or existing technical solutions for reducing energy, officials announced July 10. The Shore Energy Management Instruction sig nifies a complete revision from the previous ver sion published in 1994. The instruction codifies Navys policy and strategy to ensure energy security as a strategic imperative, meet federal mandates and executive orders, and achieve Department of the Navy (DoN) shore energy goals. Since naval forces require constant support from shore installations, Navy is mitigating its vulnerabili ties related to the electrical grid such as outages -Photo by MC3 A.J. JonesLt. James Gensheimer climbs down a ladder onto a rigid hull inflatable boat during a visit, board, search and sei zure training exercise between the Italian destroyer MM Luigi Durand De La Penne (D 560) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). The training was part of a passing exercise, also involving the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), meant to improve interoperability between U.S. and Italian naval forces. Farragut, part of the Eisenhower Strike Group, is on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. See Pages 4-5 for more USS Farragut stories and pictures. Training Day For USS Farragut Naval Station Mayport will host a blood drive on July 24 from 9 a.m.-2 pm. in Building One Room 104. See Sea Duty, Page 12 See Energy, Page 12New Pass/ID HoursFrom StaffNew Pass and ID hours of operation go into effect this week. The Pass Office, Building 1983, new hours will be Monday-Friday from 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. The office will be closed on weekends. After hours and weekend passes will be issued at the Main Gate. Gate 5A and 48A Commercial Vehicle Station hours of operation are Monday-Friday from 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Massive amounts of drugs are off the streets thanks to Norfolk based USS Nicholas (FFG 47), HSL-42, our Coast Guard counterparts, and a host of other Mayport agencies with the seizure of more than 7,500 pounds of cocaine and 240 pounds of marijuana off loaded here last week. Each gram of the cocaine recovered equals 1 PURE dose (the size of a sweet & low packet). Double that number once it is cut and sold. This seizure kept more than 7.2 mil lion doses of cocaine off the streets of the United States. The seized contraband was a result of counter drug operations throughout the Caribbean Sea, Eastern Atlantic and Western Pacific Oceans sur rounding Central and South America in support of Operation Martillo, Spanish for hammer. During the 175-day deploy ment, Nicholas conducted a combina tion of six disruptions. Welcome back for the crew of USS Simpson (FFG 56) and the Jaguars of HSL-60 with their homecom ing on July 17. During their deploy ment to the African Command Area of Responsibility, the ship participated in several maritime security operations and community service projects in Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal and Cape Verde. Your hard work and dedication will never go unnoticed. Congratulations for a successful deployment. Hard to believe we are already looking ahead to August, and the base itiner ary will be a busy one. On Aug. 4, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) will make a port stop here to pick up tigers, and expect a lot of extra folks out and about so drive safe. Very happy to welcome U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant to our basin on Aug. 4, as they make a permanent home port change here. Valiant is a multimission medium endurance cutter that specializes in search and rescue, maritime law enforcement and national defense operations. They will be a wel comed addition to our operations and the Mayport team. With the recent heat index topping the news, I dont want anyone to lose sight that we are still in hurricane season until Nov. 30. Make sure you have had that conversation with your families about where you may evacuate if directed to do so and make sure your TWIMS infor mation is updated. Think of the little things too like having a supply of water on hand, fresh flashlight batteries and a grab and go box with your important documents in case you do need to head out. Preparedness is key. The Navys focus on sexual assault is still front and center and needs our daily attention. On average two of our shipmates are sexually assaulted daily throughout the fleet...one is too many. Take advantage of all the resources we have at our Fleet and Family Support Center, and sound off if you, or someone else has been sexually assaulted in any way shape or form. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) hotline number is 563-1254. Big thanks to our own Lonnie Kenney and his entire MWR team for putting on a spectacular Freedom Fest marking another year of our nations indepen dence. I know there is a ton of work and coordination involved, and you knocked it out of the ballpark. Well done! CPO selection board results will hit the streets very soon. This milestone is sig nificant, and I look forward to hopefully many selected Chiefs. Your leadership, experience and deck plate mentorship is extremely important to our Sailors and your responsibility will increase tenfold. I know all of you are up for the challenge. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSThis time of year gives a perfect oppor tunity for you and your child to discuss areas in which theres room for improvement and how he can achieve success in those problem areas this next school year. Here are some ideas, along with advice from Adele Brodkin, Ph.D. (a senior child development con sultant for Scholastic), on how to start the new school year with a positive attitude. Getting Started The feeling of start ing a new year could be lost on younger kids, so Dr. Brodkin recommends introducing the concept of goal-setting to upper elementary-age children (say grades 3 and up). Start by talking about your own goals, she says. What are you going to do? Share them with your child and explain why you have decided to make a change. Talk about the school year and how each summer is the perfect opportunity for a fresh start, says Dr. Brodkin. The next step is asking your child if he has any ideas or suggestions for changes that he thinks need to be made to be more successful this year. You may be surprised at the motivation he dis plays, says Dr. Brodkin. Whatever his sugges tion is, let him know that you think its a worth while undertaking and that youll help him see it through. Encourage your child every step of the way. You can even ask other fam ily members to come up with their own ideas for how they are going to make changes this year in school or at work. The possibilities are endless. Your child can decide to... ...be more organized at home and at school! ...figure out how to get his homework done without someones nagging! ...eat a healthy break fast each morning before school! ...get to bed at a reason able time each night! ...not wait to the last minute to study for a test or finish a project! ...spend more time with the family! Making a plan. Is it really hard for your child to get out of bed and then be on time to school? If so, that might be a great place to start. But this plan will have to include the night before. Setting a schedule to include time for dinner, homework, household responsibili ties like doing the dishes! TV time, and bedtime. When constructing your plan, think about the morning barriers. Do these include finding the homework, picking out that special outfit, eating breakfast? If so maybe scheduling a time and place to put the home work and to pick out the clothes will save time and aggravation in the morn ing. Plan B But plans can fall apart. No worries it is natu ral, and more than often happens to adults. So two suggestions: 1) practice before school starts and 2) be ready to go to that Plan B. With a Plan B you can be ready with what to do when, a few weeks into the new year, your child goes back to his old ways. Tell your child that fre quently that plans have to be modified; it doesnt have to be all or nothing. Plan B can include these motivating ideas: inal plan, but try, try it again. and then trying it for a few weeks. Make suggestions but dont be the architect of a new plan. Instead guide and offer assistance, but avoid angry confronta tions! Making a plan can be a great learning experi ence. Following through with the plan or even the modified Plan B is rewarding especially if it results in positive changes for the new school year! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article, want a copy of the Un/Underfunded Mandates for Duval Schools, or have con cerns about an edu cational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. A New School Year Is Just Around CornerJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingLt. Justin TopSurface Force Ministry Center Unfortunately, as chaplain I occasionally have to help individu als or couples deal with the terrible turmoil that happens in a relationship when a person has been unfaithful to their spouse/ partner. Though it is pos sible to work through the pain and salvage the relationship, it involves a long and difficult process that can be emotionally exhausting. If two people are committed to making it work, their relationship can eventually end up much stronger because of the struggle, but such situations are much better to avoid to begin with. Because life in the military brings periods of separation, many worry about whether their part ner will remain faithful. Often I am asked the question, What can I do to help ensure that my partner doesnt cheat on me? I would respond that an equally relevant question they should ask themselves is, What can I do to ensure that I dont cheat on my partner? While every situation is different and there is no one answer that can ensure fidelity, I do believe that in the far majority of cases infidel ity is a gradual process. Almost nobody in a rela tionship wakes up one day and decides that they are going to go cheat. For most it is the result of a series of unwise choices mixed with feel ings of loneliness or inse curity that lead them to gradually lower their defenses and allow them selves to give in to the moment. Most begin cheating emotionally long before they ever become physically involved with someone outside their relationship of trust. The best way to elimi nate the temptation to be unfaithful is to prevent emotional cheating. Here are several suggestions: Establish appropri ate boundaries with the opposite sex. First, when you open yourself up emotionally you begin to share an emotional bond that may result in you turning to that per son with your problems rather than your partner. When somebody else-especially of the opposite sexbecomes your most trusted friend it puts strain on the relationship. When you are married or in a serious relation ship it is not appropriate to spend long periods of time alone with or even talking on the phone, chatting online, or texting somebody of the oppo site sex who is not family, especially late at night. There are some things that you just dont say, pictures you just dont post, and secrets you just dont share with people other than your spouse. You must set up boundar ies for yourself to ensure that you dont even get close to the danger zone. Many people never learn these boundar ies when they get mar ried, and, as a result, find themselves gradually pulled into a compromis ing situation. Be transparent in your interactions with oth CHAPLAINSers. Secrecy is a really bad thing for relation ships. When you begin to hide things from your partner, even if it has nothing to do with cheat ing, you get in the mind set of being emotionally unfaithful. Though you do need some amount of privacy in a relationship, you need to keep the danger areas open to your spouse. For example, you should feel perfectly comfortable with telling him/her the password to your email and Facebook account. You should feel comfortable letting him/ her look at who you have called on your phone and what messages you have sent. This will build trust, but it will also get you to think before you do any thing. That will help pro tect you from doing some thing stupid. You dont need to let them read your diary, but being open about your interactions with others can help your relationship stay healthy. Avoid pornography/ salacious literature. I have heard that some say that pornography can be healthy and normal in relationships. Though I may not carry the title of expert, I have considerable experience with relationships that tells me otherwise. Pornography distorts the reality of sex and love and in the long run will make people unsatisfied in their rela tionship. Romance novels and magazines can have some of the same effects. Preoccupation with these things can lead people to more read ily abandon their rela tionship and chase after the mirage of love that is portrayed in the fantasies they immerse themselves in. Maintain emotional closeness. This is the most important thing you can do! In many cases people cheat because something is not right in their current relationship. Things have gotten stag nant and there is not the same emotional security there once was. People begin to try to soothe their insecurities else where because it feels too exhausting to try to con front the problems in the relationship. Remember that love is a lifestyle, not an emotion. You must keep nurturing your rela tionship with the same attention and care you did when it was forming perhaps even more now because infatuation has worn off and reality is set ting in. If you dont know how to do that, there are countless sources of infor mation on improving relationships and many opportunities for relation ship counseling. I am a strong believer that every relationship needs coun seling. The sooner you learn how to be emotion ally connected in a rela tionship, the happier and more committed you will be to each other.

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C4F Attends Military Power Seminar In ColombiaFrom U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) attended a military power seminar at the Colombian War College in Bogota, Colombia, July 12. During the seminar, Harris spoke to partici pants about interoperability between the U.S. and Colombian forces, and interdiction capabilities within the coastal waters of Colombia. As militaries, we bring certain unique capabili ties to deal with transna tional organized crime, said Harris. We are effective planners, able to deconstruct problems into their component parts and create appro priate campaign plans to deal with each compo nent. The purpose of the seminar was to explore the key elements of the use of military power in the maritime and litto ral environment and its impact on national strat egy, security and defense. The seminar also focused on air power and the growing need for aero space technology and capacity. As Sailors we are well aware of the role played by major trading routes that crisscross our seas and oceans, said Harris. And throughout this region we face the manmade scourge of trans national criminal orga nizations engaged in all manner of lucrative illicit activities, trafficking in drugs, weapons, money, and people. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. Pay Attention To Heat FlagFrom NBHC MayportWith summer here and the temperatures rising please be aware of the need for caution when participating in physical activities outdoors. There is a heat index flag system to help assist you in the decision mak ing process. Flag conditions for NS Mayport are monitored by Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport MondayFriday from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m.noon. Safety Department representatives are noti fied during normal opera tions with flag condition updates. The flags are flown at the flag pole in front of the Gym, Building #1391, with updates pro vided three to four times a day. If you would like to know the most cur rent reading, please con tact the NBHC Mayport Quarter Deck at 270-4444. Flag Conditions And Precautionary Measures White Flag (80 and below) ing recommendations Green Flag (8084.9 Wet Bulb Globe Temperature)Utilize discretion in planning heavy exercise for unac climatized personnel because the environment is at a marginal heat stress limit for all personnel. unacclimatized person nel should be conducted with caution and under responsible supervision. acclimated personnel is unrestricted. water per hour. Use 75 percent work and 25 per cent rest for outdoor work (example: 45 minutes work and 15minutes rest). Heat cramps and heat exhaustion possible with continued exposure. Yellow Flag (85-87.9 WBGT)Strenuous exer cise and activity must be curtailed or marked ly reduced for new and unacclimatized personnel during the first two weeks of heat exposure. Heat stress can occur. limited to those acclimat ed 14 days or longer. cool water per hour. Use a buddy system and have teams monitor each oth ers condition. Use 50 per cent work and 50 percent rest* (example: 30 min utes work and 30 minutes rest). Heat cramps like ly. Heat stroke and heat exhaustion possible with continued exposure Red Flag (88-89.9 WBGT)Strenuous exer cise must be curtailed for all personnel with less than 12 weeks training in hot weather. Heat stress is likely to occur. should be halted for those who have not become thoroughly acclimated by at least 30 days of physical activity at this tempera ture. Those who are acclimated may carry on lim ited activity. water per hour. Use a buddy system and have teams monitor each oth ers condition. Use 25 per cent work and 75 percent rest (example: 15 minutes work with 45 minutes rest). Heat stroke possible with continued exposure. Black Flag (>90 WBGT) Non-Mission essential physical training and strenuous exercise must be suspended for all personnel. Heat stress will occur in most cases. be limited to critical mis sions only (requires Commander approval). Drink 2 quarts of cool water per hour. Use 25 percent work and 75 per cent rest. Use a buddy system and monitor each others condition. Heat stroke likely with contin ued exposure THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 USS Farragut, USS Hu City Conduct PASSEX Exercise With Italian Navy USS Farragut Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) and guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) conducted a series of maneuvers and interoper ability drills in a passing exercise with an Italian frigate and submarine July 9-10. The U.S. ships joined ITS Scire (S527) and ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne (D560) for two days of coalition training events to promote interoperabil ity and partnership for the shared goal of maintain ing safety and security of the regions sea lanes. I have been highly impressed with the pro fessional interactions weve had with [ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne] as fellow mariners and com rades in arms, said Cmdr. Glen Quast, Farragut commanding officer. Operations such as these are critical, because Italy and the United States often work together as part of a multinational force whose purpose is to maintain freedom of the seas and increase peace and prosperity. We proved that during these two days that we can seamlessly work together on a number of levels. Many of the events sta tioned the Italian and American warships in close proximity of each other and required preci sion execution. By keeping strong shipto-ship communications and leveraging expert seamanship, the ships completed all training events safely and suc cessfully. On both days, all of the ships participat ing executed a number of navigational maneu vers, complemented by maritime warfare-specific events such as an antisubmarine warfare exer cise and a maritime inter diction operations exer cise. On day two, Farraguts visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team boarded Luigi Durand de la Penne in an exercise where the latter presented itself as a merchant ves sel potentially smuggling illicit cargo. The boarding of ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne was an excellent way to conclude our training with the Italian navy, said Lt. James Gensheimer, one of Farraguts board ing officers. We share common goals and com mon values, and we will continue to operate with coalition and part ner nations in support of ever greater maritime safety and security. One of the many missions we will accomplish during Farraguts deployment is promoting the free flow of commerce across the worlds oceans, and todays training assist ed us with meeting this objective. Farragut is deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), supporting mari time and theater security cooperation efforts. -Photo by AW2 Brandon NewmanThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), the Italian destroyer MM Luigi Durand De La Penne (D 560) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) conduct a photo exercise as part of a passing exercise meant to increase interoperability between U.S. and Italian navies. The passing exercise features maneuvering and interoperability drills over a two-day period. Farragut Sailors Honor Fallen, Spruce Up Cemetery USS Farragut Public AffairsSailors from guidedmissile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) paid tribute to those who served and contributed to the community by clean ing, weeding and painting at the Anglo-Americano Cemetery in Menorca, Spain, July 4. The cemetery is the resting place of 34 U.S. Sailors who lost their lives while stationed in Mahon Harbor in the 1800s working to deter piracy. Its great to see the U.S. Sailors come out and help in the cemetery, said Ivor White, former presi dent of the Rotary Club in Menorca. Its amazing to see their dedication to the Sailors that are buried here. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Spanish army, but U.S. Navy Sailors have helped maintain the grounds whenever they visit to honor the Sailors who are buried there. It takes your breath away when you see how old some of the monuments and things are here, said Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Scott Richer. It real ly stirs up a sense of pride to care about your heri tage, and be able to give back to the Sailors that came before us. Twenty-one Farragut Sailors cut the grass, cleaned around and painted the exterior walls of the cemetery. A day after the service project, a ceremony was held July 5, to remember the Sailors that are buried there. Farragut is deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. The Eisenhower CSG includes aircraft car rier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), CSG 8, guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guided-missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), as well as the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 7 and Destroyer Squadron 28. Ensign Samuel Macavoy, assistant supply officer aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), paints the exterior walls at the Anglo-American cemetery in Menorca, Spain during a COMREL project. Gas Turbine System (Electrical) (SW) Scott Phillips (left) and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Matt Derden, Sailors assigned to USS Farragut (DDG 99), prepare to paint the exterior walls at the Anglo-American cemetery in Menorca, Spain during a COMREL project. -Photos by MC3(SW) A.J. JonesSailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), take part in maintaining the Anglo-American cemetery in Menorca, Spain during a community relations (COMREL) project. Electronics Technician 2nd Class (PJ) Michael Loftus pulls weeds during a COMREL project. Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Roberto Ramirezgomez cuts large foliage out of the way of a drain age ditch during a COMREL project.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 5 Farragut Honor Heritage Of Ships Namesake USS Farragut Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) celebrated the birthday of the ships namesake, Adm. David Glasgow Farragut, at a ceremony in the town square of Ciutadella, Menorca, Spain, July 5. Farragut, whose father Jordi George Farragut, was a Menorca native, was adopted as a native son of the Spanish island July 12, 1867. A statue of the United States Navys first admiral was erected in Ciutadella in 1970 by the Navy League of the United States Madrid Council, and Farraguts birthday has been cel ebrated ever since. This is the first year that one of his namesake ships has visited the island for the ceremony. It is an honor to have the Farragut here in Menorca today with us as we celebrate in honor of Adm. David Glasgow Farragut, said Nick Hayes, president of the Navy League of the United States Madrid Council, during a speech at the ceremony. The ceremony started with the Farragut color guard parading the colors jointly with Spanish sail ors and Spanish soldiers. Remarks were delivered by Navy League repre sentatives, the Mayor of Ciutadella, the Insular Director of the General Administration of the State, and Cmdr. Glen Quast, Farraguts com manding officer. The cer emony concluded when Quast placed a wreath on a statue of the distin guished admiral in the town square. Today, we are fortu nate to be able to honor [Adm. Farraguts] lega cy with a fifth warship named after him; since the first ship was named in his honor in 1899, only 28 years have passed without an active ship in the U.S. Navy named after Admiral Farragut, said Quast during his speech at the ceremony. Strengthening the rela tionship between our two nations helps us main tain a safe and secure maritime environment. We look forward to build ing stronger friendships and enhancing our long standing friendship with Spain, and particularly Menorca. The days events also included a ceremony at the Anglo-American Cemetery, located in Mahon Harbor. The multinational color guard opened the event, followed by speeches from Hayes and Quast, who together laid a wreath at the Tomb of an Unknown Sailor to con clude the event. Thirtyfour American Sailors are buried in the cemetery, losing their lives while in serving. Culminating the Farragut birthday celebration was a reception held on board USS Farragut to celebrate the admirals birthday and thank more than 60 distinguished guests for welcoming the ship and its Sailors to their home. Farragut is deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. Cmdr. Glen Quast, commanding officer of guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), signs a guestbook at the town hall of Ciutadella, Menorca, Spain after a cer emony to honor Adm. David G. Farragut. Bowling, first lieutenant aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), talks with children after per forming in a ceremony to honor Adm. David G. Farragut in Menorca, Spain. -Photos by MC3 A.J. JonesEnsign Josh Bowling, first lieutenant aboard USS Farragut (DDG 99), leads a color detail, comprised of U.S. Sailors, Spanish navy sailors and members from the Spanish army, during a ceremony to honor Adm. David G. Farragut in Menorca, Spain. Quast, commanding officer of Farragut, and Nick Hayes, president of the Navy League of the United States-Madrid Council, lay a wreath at the tomb of an unknown U.S. Sailor buried at the Anglo-American Cemetery in Menorca, Spain. Sailors from guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) and Spanish sailors come together for a game of soccer during the ships visit to Menorca, Spain. Above, Chief Boatswains Mate (SW) Mitch Inkpen, leading chief petty officer of the deck department aboard guidedmissile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), dribbles the ball down-field while playing soccer with Spanish sailors in Menorca, Spain. Left, Sailors from guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), play soccer with Spanish sailors while visiting Menorca, Spain.

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HSL-60, Elrod Rescue Four In Caribbean SeaUSS Elrod Public AffairsNorfolk, Va.-based frigate USS Elrod (FFG 55) and NS Mayport-based HSL-60 res cued four people from a sink ing small boat June 26 while on patrol in the Caribbean Sea in support of Operation Martillo. Elrod received a call from a maritime patrol aircraft after spotting the submerged ves sel. The ship made best speed to the reported site to inves tigate and located four survi vors in distress. The mariners were clinging onto the bow of the damaged boat when Elrod made its approach. A rigidhulled inflatable boat (RHIB) was lowered to pick up the stranded survivors. One of the four survivors lapsed in and out of consciousness and Chief Hospital Corpsman Cory Perry diagnosed their condition as life-threatening and in desper ate need of immediate medical treatment. We came at the right time, said Cmdr. Jack Killman, Elrod Commanding Officer. I am not sure these people would have lasted much longer. The survivors were flown to a hospital in Colombia via helo from Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60 Detachment Three. It was a huge success and personally rewarding being able to bring them to a medical facil ity where theyll get the proper care they need, said Lt. Justin Collins, air crew commander for the medevac flight. All in all, team Elrod did a remarkable job; from watch standers reacting at a moments notice, to coordinating a mede vac transfer to Colombia, said Killman. The team effort by the crew of Elrod succeeded in saving the lives of the distressed mariners. This particular situation required careful yet nuanced care, to reduce the destructive effects of prolonged exposure to and ingestion of sea water without triggering negative con sequences. These gentlemen were lucky to have an experienced corpsman on scene to care for them, Capt. Christine Dorr, U.S Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet medi cal officer said. Fire Scout Training Facility Unveiled At JaxNAS JacksonvilleNorthrop Grumman and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic (HSMWL) personnel hosted a ribbon-cutting reception July 10 for the new MQ-8B Fire Scout operator training facility at NAS Jacksonville. The facility is equipped with four mission simulators and an instructors sta tion, as well as separate classrooms. After two years of operational testing with squadrons assigned to HSMWL, the MQ-8B Fire Scout u nmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program is seeking to lock in its future with the Navy by providing a leading-edge simulator center. Commander, HSMWL Capt. Doug Ten Hoopen said he was pleased to bring yet another train ing capability to NAS Jacksonville. Our wing of Bravo and Romeo Seahawk helicopters is the only one in naval avia tion to fly the Fire Scout. We began in 2010 with a 4th Fleet drug interdic tion mission aboard the guided-missile frigate USS McInerney (FFG 8), where Fire Scout helped confis cate 60kilos of cocaine from a fast boat. The next MQ-8B suc cess came from the 5th Fleet deployment aboard the frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). From off the coast of Somalia, Fire Scout pro vided an overland ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) platform for special operations forces. Most recently, the frig ate USS Klakring (FFG 42) deployed to the Horn of Africa area of responsibility with a Fire Scout. As the Fire Scout UAV program evolves, it will be part of what we call com posite detachments that deploy with a manned MH-60R Seahawk and an unmanned Fire Scout. Also, with todays shrinking budgets, this new center allows us to train squadron person nel without incurring the travel, food and lodging expenses to send them to NAS Patuxent River, Md. Today, were bridging the Fire Scout simulator capacity gap and improv ing the already robust training environment here at NAS Jax, said Ten Hoopen. He concluded, For the past two years, operator and maintainer training has taken place here in temporary spaces among the H-60 Seahawk crews. In a few minutes, youll see the leading-edge design of our new permanent simulator facility. George Vardoulakis, vice president and pro gram manager of tacti cal unmanned systems for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, wel comed the military and civilian guests. Fire Scout comple ments the Navys manned helicopters by effectively extending the range and area of ship-based intel ligence gathering opera tions, said Vardoulakis. Its modular architec ture accommodates a variety of electro-optical, infrared and communica tions payloads that pro vide groundand shipbased commanders with high levels of situational awareness and preci sion targeting support, he added. The system has been in development for about 10 years and is particularly well suited to support littoral com bat ship missions such as drug interdiction, antipiracy, search and rescue, and reconnaissance oper ations. He said that todays Navy is increasing its mix of manned and unmanned activities and that this Fire Scout training facility will ensure operators are well schooled in executing its multi-mission capabili ties. According to a Northrop Grumman, the MQ-8B Fire Scout is an unmanned helicopter for U.S. Navy situational awareness and precision targeting. The unmanned aircraft is based on the Schweizer Model 333 twoseat manned helicopter. It can autonomously take off and land on any avia tion-capable warship and at unprepared landing zones near battlefields. -Photo by Clark Pierce(From left) Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy DeYoung and AWF1 David Berber, reservists attached to HSL-60, demonstrate the MQ-8 Fire Scout flight simulator to media representatives July 10. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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HSL-60, USS Elrod Disrupts Drug Flow In CaribbeanFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsGuided-missile frig ate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team and NS Mayport-based HSL-60 Detachment Three, recov ered 91 packages of mari juana, weighing approxi mately 4,938 pounds, during an interdiction in support of Operation Martillo, July 3. The estimated whole sale value of the recov ered drugs is more than $2 million. A U.S. Customs and Border Protection P-3 initially detected the gofast vessel. The drug traffickers then began to jettison the contraband as the P-3 turned over tracking of the vessel to Elrod while USCG District 7 assumed control of the interdiction effort. An embarked SH-60 heli copter from Detachment Threewas launched with an airborne use of force (AUF) gunner on board to intercept the vessel and locate the debris field. In an attempt to get the vessel to stop, the gunner fired warning shots aft of the speedboat. When the vessel did not stop, the gunner fired disabling rounds, bringing the gofast to a stop. In a coordinated effort, crews from Elrod and USCG LEDET recovered 91 packages of various sizes from the debris field, and through two narcotics identification kit tests, it was determined that the contraband was marijua na. Since the beginning of their deployment in January, Elrod and the embarked LEDET have seized approximately 9,630 pounds of cocaine and 4,938 pounds of marijuana, with a total whole sale value of more than $120 million. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. USS Gettysburg Gets Engine OverhaulUSS Gettysburg (CG 64)When USS Gettysburg (CG 64) discovered two of her engines had given out, the Sailors of Main Engine Room Number One fer vently prepared for the difficult task of replacing the engine and assisting the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Gas Turbine Shop to rebuild the other. These engines were plankowners of the 21-year-old ship. The suc cess of the engine change out would require a dem onstration of hard work, a commitment to safety, as well as a great deal of patience. The crewmembers working alongside the crane operators ensured the safe removal of the interference from the gas generator section. Simultaneously, brew ing in the Gulf of Mexico was soon to be Tropical Storm Debby. Debby caused crane operations to be unsafe due to the high winds. As a result the Sailors and contrac tors were constantly wait ing for the opportunity to lift the engine out of the ship. When Debby had passed, there were only a few crane lifts left which were quickly completed. While one engine was being replaced the other engine was being rebuilt. Gettysburg now has four operational engines ready for her future mis sions. Thanks to the hard work, patience, and salt of her crewmembers, including Gas Turbine Systems Technician Mechanical (GSM) 1st Class (SW) Adam Dixon, GSM2 (SW) Amanda Black, GSM3 (SW) Hector Rodriguez, GSM3 (SW) Joshua Farias, GSM3 (SW) Cori Johnson, GSM3 (SW) Andrew Schiessl and GSMFN (SW) Juan Rodriguez. Also, the assis tance of SERMC was cru cial to success. -Photo submitted by USS GettysburgOne of the original engines from USS Gettysburg is removed after the ship discovered two of its engines were not working properly. With help from SERMC Mayport and con tractors, the ships engines were able to be rebuilt and become operational again. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 7

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Klakring Begins Deployment On Patriotic NoteUSS Klakring ChaplainUSS Klakring (FFG 42) kicked off their final deployment on June 29, before the ship is scheduled to decommission in March 2013. The ship will be performing antiterrorism operations, with embarked Fire Scout drone helicopters from HSL-42 in the Indian Ocean. Within the first week, the crew of the Klakring had the oppor tunity to participate in events that helped set a tone of honor and patrio tism for their mission. On July 1, the crew assembled on the flight deck in ceremonial whites to perform burials at sea for 20 individuals who had served in the coun trys armed services. It is really great for our crew to be part of such a meaningful Navy tradition, Cmdr. Darrell Canady, commanding officer of USS Klakring explained. We get to be reminded of the honor -Photos courtesy of USS KlakringUSS Klakring Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Barry Parker receives an urn from Yeoman 1st Class Paul Haverfield during a burial at sea held aboard the ship. USS Klakring Commanding Officer Cmdr. Darrell Canady salutes as urn is released. Ensign Sierra Rooney lead honor guard in rendering honors.See USS Klakring, Page 9 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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Above, Lt. John Vasquez and AWSC John Chapman (HSL-42) work the grill during the ships Independence Day celebration.Left, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Todd Cousins and Engineman 2nd Class Mauro Jimenez battle at beanbag toss. Bottom left, Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Matthew Gable soaks CMC Steve Lupton during 4th of July waterfight. Bottom right, Crew of USS Klakring gather on the flight deck for an evening movie.that comes from being a part of the legacy of the US military, and at the same time we have the opportunity to give back to their families and thank them for the for their sac rifices. The ashes of those being honored were released into the Atlantic Ocean with a commit tal prayer and then given full military honors. For many of the crew, the most satisfying part of the ceremony was how much the ceremony meant to the family members. William Hux, whose father was buried at sea during the ceremony, expressed his apprecia tion via email. Thank you, from our entire extended family for the service and hon ors for my father. It is a comfort to know he will be at sea with the US Navy once again and rest with eternal salvation. He was a Navy diver at the end of WW II and through Korea. His spirit lives on and his character is divided over his three sons and eight grandkids. Fair winds and following seas to all on FFG-42 for the voyage. A few days later the crew of the Klakring cele brated Independence Day the American waywith a picnic, food, and fun. They grilled hamburgers and hot dogs on the flight deck, played games, and relaxed and enjoyed their free time. In the evening the crew participated in a huge poker tournament, and then congregated again on the flight deck to watch the movie Act of Valor. The goal was to take a break from the demand ing schedule and reflect on the reasons that we all are out here, and to remember what our forefathers sacrificed to ensure that our indepen dence and freedoms are protected, MWR presi dent Quartermaster 1st Class Danny Felton said.From Page 8USS Klakring Independence Day Celebration THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 9

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July 20: American Heroes Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Ron Perry Experience. Costume contest for the best Historical Hero, Superhero, and couple. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided.270-7205 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small children. 270-7205 July 23: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins. Registration is June 20-21 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 23: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends Sept. 21. 270-5451. July 23-26: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by July 18. 270-5451 July 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. For tick ets, (904) 270-5431 July 26: Bar Olympics. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Patrons can go for the gold in our Karaoke Competition, Wing Eating Contest, Jenga Tournament and more! There will be free food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials. 270-7205 June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 29: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy three hours of bowling and an awesome video laser light show as well as a traditional spaghetti dinner, presents for the kids, and more July 30: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Begins. Season ends Oct. 4. 270-5451. Aug. 1: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Aug. 1: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Aug. 3: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Aug. 3: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tin Tin (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 3: Caribbean Nights Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Reggae Band Sugar Bear. Food, give aways, beverage specials and more. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 7: Mens Summer Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. Aug. 7: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-youcan-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Aug. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 Aug. 8: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aug. 10: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug 3 & 4 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. MWRJuly 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. July 13: Freedom Friday Carnival. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small chil dren. 270-7205 July 23: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins Registration is June 20-21 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. July 29: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. KID 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. July 19: Art Walk Downtown. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. FREE July 20: Classic Car Show & Dinner. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. July 20: American Heroes Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Ron Perry Experience. Costume contest for the best Historical Hero, Superhero, and couple. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided.270-7205 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small chil dren. 270-7205 July 21: Kingfish Tournament. Food, Music & More. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE July 22: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. FREE July 23: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends Sept. 21. 270-5451. July 23-26: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by July 18. 270-5451 July 24: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 25: Blackjack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 July 26: Bar Olympics. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Patrons can go for the gold in our Karaoke Competition, Wing Eating Contest, Jenga Tournament and more! There will be free food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials. 270-7205 July 26: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Gator Country Night! FREE. June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 28: Riverside Arts Market. Food, music & more. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. July 29: Ice Skating. Van departs 1 p.m. Cost $5 July 30: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Begins Season ends Oct. 4. 270-5451. July 31: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 1: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Aug. 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at the Galley for Lunch. Aug. 2: Adventure Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 3: WWE Raw World Tour Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Aug. 3: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Aug. 3: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tin Tin (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 3: Caribbean Nights Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Reggae Band Sugar Bear. Food, giveaways, beverage specials and more. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 4: Riverside Arts Market. Food, music & more. Van departs 10 a.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 5: Buffalo Wild Wings Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug 6: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 7: Mens Summer Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. Aug. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 Aug. 8: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aug. 9: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Sign-up deadline Aug. 8. FREE Aug. 10: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New York Giants Football. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Cost $8. Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 10: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 11: UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 12: Ichnetucknee Tubing Trip. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $10. Aug. 13: Pinewood Derby Registration. All Day at the Liberty Center. Come and pick up your derby car & register for the big race. Aug. 14: Go the Distance 10K Run/ 5K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 11

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FFSC Workshops Support Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. July 19, 8 am.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1, Room 1124 July 19, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 23-26, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 July 24, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 July 25, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying Seminar, FFSC Room 702 July 25, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 26, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 30, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. July 31, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 July 31, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Friday, July 20 Join us for Kids Movie Night at 6 p.m. at Ft. Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Rd. For $5 receive a hot dog, drink, and popcorn while view ing a kid-friendly movie. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to add to your viewing enjoyment. As a special bonus, anyone attending our VBS from July 16-19 will get in free. Call 904-744-1311 for more information. Operation: Military Kids will host a Jewelry Making Day Camp from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. at Hilton Garden Inn, 145 Park Ave, Orange Park. The event is open to children, 8-17 years old, of members of Active, Guard, Reserve, and Retirees of all branch es. Every camper will be able to make a stranded necklace, a springwire bracelet, a pair of dangle and a pair of hoop ear rings, and a beadwoven bookmark. All supplies, tools and beads will be provided for each camper and they will be able to take their creations home. Cost is $10.50 per child, lunch, drinks, a snack and all supplies are included. Adults and youth are wel come to volunteer. For more information and to register online, go to http://omkjewelrymak ing.eventbrite.com/ Sunday, July 22 The Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 located at 390 Mayport Road will host a car and motorcycle wash to raise money for the USO of Mayport. The event begins at 10 a.m. and will feature music, food and drink specials. For more information about the Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 and its events, stop by the local branch or visit their Facebook page at www.facebook. com/FRABranch290. Saturday, July 28 Join all kinds of water craft for the Aquapalooza on-the-water event and concert at Fort George Island on from 10 a.m.3 p.m. Aquapalooza is about boating, great music, fun and togeth erness with family and friends. The event is for all who love life on the water. Aquapalooza is a free event but boaters are encouraged to register at www.aquapalooza.com or http://www.marinemax. com and go to the events page for some free give aways. Out in Town EOQ Lunch July 24From StaffNaval Station Civilian Employee presentation / luncheon will be held on Tuesday, July 24 at 11:30 a.m., at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. All are welcome to attend and support the nominees. Lunch $8. Pay at the door. RSVP to sandra.bar rett1@navy.mil by 3 p.m. on Friday, July 20. Nominees for Employee of the Quarter (2nd Quarter) William Strickland, Fire/Emergency Services Thomas Wheeler, Air Ops/Ground Electronics Patricia Hoffman, MWR Patricia Livingstone, PWD Mark Anderson, IT Dept Susan Rucker, FFSC Percy Williams, Security *VSDP requests for Sailors who have com pleted less than 24 months on their current shore tour will be consid ered on a case-by-case basis based on orders requested and current command manning. *Sailors serving over seas, or in a DoD-area tour, can request to extend their current sea tour, curtail their current shore tour if they remain in the same geographi cal area, or request backto-back sea duty in any area of their choice with a valid billet. Consecutive Overseas Tour require ments may apply. Volunteers will not be required to accept a bil let they do not desire. Detailers will work with volunteers during two Career Management System/Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) cycles to find desirable orders. If no match is found dur ing this time period their VSDP application will expire and Sailors still desiring VSDP must reap ply. This program does not change eligibility or benefits for the Sea Duty Incentive Pay, which pro vides eligible Sailors an additional $500 to $1,000 a month for extending their sea tour or returning to sea duty early. Sailors may take advantage of both programs concur rently. Requests will be accepted until Sep. 30. All 1306/7 requests should be forwarded to NPC via the chain of command. Sailors interested in applying for VSDP should read NAVDMINs 043/12 and 205/12 for complete details and talk with their chain of command. from natural disasters and man-made events by lowering consumption, inte grating renewable energy sources and increasing control of energy supply and distribution. Energy reliability, resiliency and redundancy are essential compo nents of the Navys Critical Infrastructure Protection program. Energy security is critical because warfighters need assured access to reli able supplies of energy to meet oper ational needs afloat or ashore, said Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, Vice Adm. Phil Cullom. This instruction is just one example of how we are driving a spartan energy ethos in our shore operations. We are committed to cost-effectively achiev ing our energy goals by pursuing energy efficiency, transforming our energy cul ture, and integrating renewable energy technologies, where viable. The revised instruction includes spe cific responsibilities and actions that commands and personnel ashore must take in implementing the Navy Shore Energy program. For example, each Navy installation will have a tailored energy consumption reduction goal based on its unique energy situation. By increas ing energy efficiency, Navy can reduce operating costs, multiply the impact of current and future alternative energy sources and achieve DoN renewable energy targets. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus laid out five aggressive energy goals in October 2009 to improve energy secu rity and efficiency afloat and ashore and increase our energy security. To review the instruction, visit http:// greenfleet.dodlive.mil/files/2012/07/ OPNAVINST-4100.5E.pdf. For more information about the Navys Energy Program, visit www.greenfleet.dodlive. mil or www.facebook.com/navalenergy. For more news from Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division, visit www.navy.mil/ local/n45From Page 1EnergyFrom Page 1Sea Duty a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Vicksburg Hits Halfway MarkMore Sea Duty Pays OffFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNavy released additional guidance for the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP) which provides incentives to Sailors who extend at sea or return to sea duty early officials said, July 13. This program allows Sailors and their families to stay in their same duty location or relocate to a duty location of their choice, said Capt. Kent Miller, director, Enlisted Distribution Division, Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Applicants may also be eligible to defer Perform-to-Serve (PTS), providing an opportunity to enhance their record with operational duty. VSDP was announced in January to support the Navys war-fighting mis sion of operating forward and maintaining readiness. The program encourages highly trained and motivated Sailors to voluntarily extend their enlistment in their current sea duty billet beyond their prescribed sea tour, to terminate shore duty and accept new orders to a sea duty billet or to accept back-to-back sea duty orders beyond their prescribed sea/shore flow. The sea duty assign ment may be on board ships, squad rons, or other qualified sea duty assignments. NAVADMIN 205/12 clarifies 15 items from the initial message. Among the updates: *Sailors in the PTS eligibility window who wish to apply for VSDP must have their VSDP application submitted for consideration no later than the last day of the month, two months prior to their final PTS application. *VSDP orders will not be cancelled for Sailors who subsequently receive a PTS quota after VSDP orders have been negotiated. *Sailors on shore duty must submit their VSDP request no later than 12 months prior to their projected rotation date. -Photo by MC2 Nick ScottU.S. Navy Sailors enjoy a steak cookout held by Cooks from the Valley aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) passed their deployments halfway point the first week of July. This marks a significant milestone in the 20-year-old cruisers final deploy ment. Its definitely been an interesting deployment so far, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) Seaman Roger Coleman, who is on his first deploy ment. Ive learned a lot and visited a lot of places Ive never seen before and Im looking forward to visiting more. Vicksburg has visited three ports so far this deployment including Greece, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. Visiting ports is a big part of deploy ment, but Sailors also use deployment as a time to enhance their in-rate and military skills. This deployment has helped me grow as a Sailor, said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Sims, who is on his fourth deployment. I learn new things about my job and about the Navy everyday. No matter how many deployments you go on, you can always learn more and improve your skills. During the first half of deployment, 18 Vicksburg Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist pin and more than 100 are poised to earn it before the end of deployment. This is scheduled to be Vicksburgs final deployment before decommissioning in 2013, but work has not slowed for Sailors aboard. We cant let things like maintenance and upkeep slide just because we are scheduled for decommissioning, said Lt. j.g. Brett Lincoln, Auxiliaries Officer aboard Vicksburg. We need to stay focused on our goals. Just like in a race, you are supposed to sprint at the end. The Vicksburg crew marked the half way point by sending a video made by the crew to Mayport, Fla., for friends and family to view. Vicksburgs crew also celebrated the halfway mark by holding a steak cook out for Sailors July 5. Vicksburg is on her final deployment operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support mis sions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Navy Issues New Shore Energy PolicyFrom Chief of Naval Operations Shore Readiness DivisionThe Navy issued a new energy policy that will drive energy consumption reduction at all Navy installations, transform the shore energy culture and seek new or existing technical solutions for reducing energy, officials announced July 10. The Shore Energy Management Instruction sig nifies a complete revision from the previous ver sion published in 1994. The instruction codifies Navys policy and strategy to ensure energy security as a strategic imperative, meet federal mandates and executive orders, and achieve Department of the Navy (DoN) shore energy goals. Since naval forces require constant support from shore installations, Navy is mitigating its vulnerabilities related to the electrical grid such as outages -Photo by MC3 A.J. JonesLt. James Gensheimer climbs down a ladder onto a rigid hull inflatable boat during a visit, board, search and sei zure training exercise between the Italian destroyer MM Luigi Durand De La Penne (D 560) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99). The training was part of a passing exercise, also involving the guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), meant to improve interoperability between U.S. and Italian naval forces. Farragut, part of the Eisenhower Strike Group, is on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. See Pages 4-5 for more USS Farragut stories and pictures. Training Day For USS Farragut Naval Station Mayport will host a blood drive on July 24 from 9 a.m.-2 pm. in Building One Room 104. See Sea Duty, Page 12 See Energy, Page 12New Pass/ID HoursFrom StaffNew Pass and ID hours of operation go into effect this week. The Pass Office, Building 1983, new hours will be Monday-Friday from 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. The office will be closed on weekends. After hours and weekend passes will be issued at the Main Gate. Gate 5A and 48A Commercial Vehicle Station hours of operation are Monday-Friday from 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Massive amounts of drugs are off the streets thanks to Norfolk based USS Nicholas (FFG 47), HSL-42, our Coast Guard counterparts, and a host of other Mayport agencies with the seizure of more than 7,500 pounds of cocaine and 240 pounds of marijuana off loaded here last week. Each gram of the cocaine recovered equals 1 PURE dose (the size of a sweet & low packet). Double that number once it is cut and sold. This seizure kept more than 7.2 mil lion doses of cocaine off the streets of the United States. The seized contraband was a result of counter drug operations throughout the Caribbean Sea, Eastern Atlantic and Western Pacific Oceans surrounding Central and South America in support of Operation Martillo, Spanish for hammer. During the 175-day deployment, Nicholas conducted a combina tion of six disruptions. Welcome back for the crew of USS Simpson (FFG 56) and the Jaguars of HSL-60 with their homecom ing on July 17. During their deploy ment to the African Command Area of Responsibility, the ship participated in several maritime security operations and community service projects in Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal and Cape Verde. Your hard work and dedication will never go unnoticed. Congratulations for a successful deployment. Hard to believe we are already looking ahead to August, and the base itiner ary will be a busy one. On Aug. 4, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) will make a port stop here to pick up tigers, and expect a lot of extra folks out and about so drive safe. Very happy to welcome U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant to our basin on Aug. 4, as they make a permanent homeport change here. Valiant is a multimission medium endurance cutter that specializes in search and rescue, maritime law enforcement and national defense operations. They will be a wel comed addition to our operations and the Mayport team. With the recent heat index topping the news, I dont want anyone to lose sight that we are still in hurricane season until Nov. 30. Make sure you have had that conversation with your families about where you may evacuate if directed to do so and make sure your TWIMS information is updated. Think of the little things too like having a supply of water on hand, fresh flashlight batteries and a grab and go box with your important documents in case you do need to head out. Preparedness is key. The Navys focus on sexual assault is still front and center and needs our daily attention. On average two of our shipmates are sexually assaulted daily throughout the fleet...one is too many. Take advantage of all the resources we have at our Fleet and Family Support Center, and sound off if you, or someone else has been sexually assaulted in any way shape or form. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) hotline number is 563-1254. Big thanks to our own Lonnie Kenney and his entire MWR team for putting on a spectacular Freedom Fest marking another year of our nations indepen dence. I know there is a ton of work and coordination involved, and you knocked it out of the ballpark. Well done! CPO selection board results will hit the streets very soon. This milestone is sig nificant, and I look forward to hopefully many selected Chiefs. Your leadership, experience and deck plate mentorship is extremely important to our Sailors and your responsibility will increase tenfold. I know all of you are up for the challenge. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSThis time of year gives a perfect oppor tunity for you and your child to discuss areas in which theres room for improvement and how he can achieve success in those problem areas this next school year. Here are some ideas, along with advice from Adele Brodkin, Ph.D. (a senior child development con sultant for Scholastic), on how to start the new school year with a positive attitude. Getting Started The feeling of start ing a new year could be lost on younger kids, so Dr. Brodkin recommends introducing the concept of goal-setting to upper elementary-age children (say grades 3 and up). Start by talking about your own goals, she says. What are you going to do? Share them with your child and explain why you have decided to make a change. Talk about the school year and how each summer is the perfect opportunity for a fresh start, says Dr. Brodkin. The next step is asking your child if he has any ideas or suggestions for changes that he thinks need to be made to be more successful this year. You may be surprised at the motivation he dis plays, says Dr. Brodkin. Whatever his sugges tion is, let him know that you think its a worth while undertaking and that youll help him see it through. Encourage your child every step of the way. You can even ask other fam ily members to come up with their own ideas for how they are going to make changes this year in school or at work. The possibilities are endless. Your child can decide to... ...be more organized at home and at school! ...figure out how to get his homework done without someones nagging! ...eat a healthy break fast each morning before school! ...get to bed at a reasonable time each night! ...not wait to the last minute to study for a test or finish a project! ...spend more time with the family! Making a plan. Is it really hard for your child to get out of bed and then be on time to school? If so, that might be a great place to start. But this plan will have to include the night before. Setting a schedule to include time for dinner, homework, household responsibili ties like doing the dishes! TV time, and bedtime. When constructing your plan, think about the morning barriers. Do these include finding the homework, picking out that special outfit, eating breakfast? If so maybe scheduling a time and place to put the home work and to pick out the clothes will save time and aggravation in the morn ing. Plan B But plans can fall apart. No worries it is natu ral, and more than often happens to adults. So two suggestions: 1) practice before school starts and 2) be ready to go to that Plan B. With a Plan B you can be ready with what to do when, a few weeks into the new year, your child goes back to his old ways. Tell your child that fre quently that plans have to be modified; it doesnt have to be all or nothing. Plan B can include these motivating ideas: inal plan, but try, try it again. and then trying it for a few weeks. Make suggestions but dont be the architect of a new plan. Instead guide and offer assistance, but avoid angry confronta tions! Making a plan can be a great learning experience. Following through with the plan or even the modified Plan B is rewarding especially if it results in positive changes for the new school year! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article, want a copy of the Un/Underfunded Mandates for Duval Schools, or have con cerns about an edu cational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. A New School Year Is Just Around CornerJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingLt. Justin TopSurface Force Ministry Center Unfortunately, as chaplain I occasionally have to help individu als or couples deal with the terrible turmoil that happens in a relationship when a person has been unfaithful to their spouse/ partner. Though it is possible to work through the pain and salvage the relationship, it involves a long and difficult process that can be emotionally exhausting. If two people are committed to making it work, their relationship can eventually end up much stronger because of the struggle, but such situations are much better to avoid to begin with. Because life in the military brings periods of separation, many worry about whether their part ner will remain faithful. Often I am asked the question, What can I do to help ensure that my partner doesnt cheat on me? I would respond that an equally relevant question they should ask themselves is, What can I do to ensure that I dont cheat on my partner? While every situation is different and there is no one answer that can ensure fidelity, I do believe that in the far majority of cases infidel ity is a gradual process. Almost nobody in a rela tionship wakes up one day and decides that they are going to go cheat. For most it is the result of a series of unwise choices mixed with feel ings of loneliness or insecurity that lead them to gradually lower their defenses and allow themselves to give in to the moment. Most begin cheating emotionally long before they ever become physically involved with someone outside their relationship of trust. The best way to elimi nate the temptation to be unfaithful is to prevent emotional cheating. Here are several suggestions: Establish appropri ate boundaries with the opposite sex. First, when you open yourself up emotionally you begin to share an emotional bond that may result in you turning to that per son with your problems rather than your partner. When somebody else-especially of the opposite sexbecomes your most trusted friend it puts strain on the relationship. When you are married or in a serious relation ship it is not appropriate to spend long periods of time alone with or even talking on the phone, chatting online, or texting somebody of the oppo site sex who is not family, especially late at night. There are some things that you just dont say, pictures you just dont post, and secrets you just dont share with people other than your spouse. You must set up boundaries for yourself to ensure that you dont even get close to the danger zone. Many people never learn these boundar ies when they get mar ried, and, as a result, find themselves gradually pulled into a compromis ing situation. Be transparent in your interactions with oth CHAPLAINSers. Secrecy is a really bad thing for relation ships. When you begin to hide things from your partner, even if it has nothing to do with cheating, you get in the mind set of being emotionally unfaithful. Though you do need some amount of privacy in a relationship, you need to keep the danger areas open to your spouse. For example, you should feel perfectly comfortable with telling him/her the password to your email and Facebook account. You should feel comfortable letting him/ her look at who you have called on your phone and what messages you have sent. This will build trust, but it will also get you to think before you do any thing. That will help protect you from doing something stupid. You dont need to let them read your diary, but being open about your interactions with others can help your relationship stay healthy. Avoid pornography/ salacious literature. I have heard that some say that pornography can be healthy and normal in relationships. Though I may not carry the title of expert, I have considerable experience with relationships that tells me otherwise. Pornography distorts the reality of sex and love and in the long run will make people unsatisfied in their rela tionship. Romance novels and magazines can have some of the same effects. Preoccupation with these things can lead people to more readily abandon their rela tionship and chase after the mirage of love that is portrayed in the fantasies they immerse themselves in. Maintain emotional closeness. This is the most important thing you can do! In many cases people cheat because something is not right in their current relationship. Things have gotten stag nant and there is not the same emotional security there once was. People begin to try to soothe their insecurities else where because it feels too exhausting to try to con front the problems in the relationship. Remember that love is a lifestyle, not an emotion. You must keep nurturing your rela tionship with the same attention and care you did when it was forming perhaps even more now because infatuation has worn off and reality is setting in. If you dont know how to do that, there are countless sources of information on improving relationships and many opportunities for relationship counseling. I am a strong believer that every relationship needs coun seling. The sooner you learn how to be emotion ally connected in a rela tionship, the happier and more committed you will be to each other.

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C4F Attends Military Power Seminar In ColombiaFrom U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) attended a military power seminar at the Colombian War College in Bogota, Colombia, July 12. During the seminar, Harris spoke to partici pants about interoperability between the U.S. and Colombian forces, and interdiction capabilities within the coastal waters of Colombia. As militaries, we bring certain unique capabili ties to deal with transna tional organized crime, said Harris. We are effective planners, able to deconstruct problems into their component parts and create appro priate campaign plans to deal with each compo nent. The purpose of the seminar was to explore the key elements of the use of military power in the maritime and litto ral environment and its impact on national strat egy, security and defense. The seminar also focused on air power and the growing need for aero space technology and capacity. As Sailors we are well aware of the role played by major trading routes that crisscross our seas and oceans, said Harris. And throughout this region we face the manmade scourge of trans national criminal orga nizations engaged in all manner of lucrative illicit activities, trafficking in drugs, weapons, money, and people. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. Pay Attention To Heat FlagFrom NBHC MayportWith summer here and the temperatures rising please be aware of the need for caution when participating in physical activities outdoors. There is a heat index flag system to help assist you in the decision mak ing process. Flag conditions for NS Mayport are monitored by Naval Branch Health Clinic, Mayport MondayFriday from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m.noon. Safety Department representatives are noti fied during normal operations with flag condition updates. The flags are flown at the flag pole in front of the Gym, Building #1391, with updates pro vided three to four times a day. If you would like to know the most cur rent reading, please con tact the NBHC Mayport Quarter Deck at 270-4444. Flag Conditions And Precautionary Measures White Flag (80 and below) ing recommendations Green Flag (8084.9 Wet Bulb Globe Temperature)Utilize discretion in planning heavy exercise for unac climatized personnel because the environment is at a marginal heat stress limit for all personnel. unacclimatized person nel should be conducted with caution and under responsible supervision. acclimated personnel is unrestricted. water per hour. Use 75 percent work and 25 per cent rest for outdoor work (example: 45 minutes work and 15minutes rest). Heat cramps and heat exhaustion possible with continued exposure. Yellow Flag (85-87.9 WBGT)Strenuous exer cise and activity must be curtailed or marked ly reduced for new and unacclimatized personnel during the first two weeks of heat exposure. Heat stress can occur. limited to those acclimat ed 14 days or longer. cool water per hour. Use a buddy system and have teams monitor each oth ers condition. Use 50 percent work and 50 percent rest* (example: 30 min utes work and 30 minutes rest). Heat cramps like ly. Heat stroke and heat exhaustion possible with continued exposure Red Flag (88-89.9 WBGT)Strenuous exer cise must be curtailed for all personnel with less than 12 weeks training in hot weather. Heat stress is likely to occur. should be halted for those who have not become thoroughly acclimated by at least 30 days of physical activity at this tempera ture. Those who are acclimated may carry on lim ited activity. water per hour. Use a buddy system and have teams monitor each oth ers condition. Use 25 percent work and 75 percent rest (example: 15 minutes work with 45 minutes rest). Heat stroke possible with continued exposure. Black Flag (>90 WBGT) Non-Mission essential physical training and strenuous exercise must be suspended for all personnel. Heat stress will occur in most cases. be limited to critical mis sions only (requires Commander approval). Drink 2 quarts of cool water per hour. Use 25 percent work and 75 per cent rest. Use a buddy system and monitor each others condition. Heat stroke likely with contin ued exposure THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 USS Farragut, USS Hu City Conduct PASSEX Exercise With Italian Navy USS Farragut Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) and guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) conducted a series of maneuvers and interoperability drills in a passing exercise with an Italian frigate and submarine July 9-10. The U.S. ships joined ITS Scire (S527) and ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne (D560) for two days of coalition training events to promote interoperabil ity and partnership for the shared goal of maintain ing safety and security of the regions sea lanes. I have been highly impressed with the pro fessional interactions weve had with [ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne] as fellow mariners and comrades in arms, said Cmdr. Glen Quast, Farragut commanding officer. Operations such as these are critical, because Italy and the United States often work together as part of a multinational force whose purpose is to maintain freedom of the seas and increase peace and prosperity. We proved that during these two days that we can seamlessly work together on a number of levels. Many of the events stationed the Italian and American warships in close proximity of each other and required preci sion execution. By keeping strong shipto-ship communications and leveraging expert seamanship, the ships completed all training events safely and suc cessfully. On both days, all of the ships participating executed a number of navigational maneu vers, complemented by maritime warfare-specific events such as an antisubmarine warfare exer cise and a maritime interdiction operations exer cise. On day two, Farraguts visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team boarded Luigi Durand de la Penne in an exercise where the latter presented itself as a merchant ves sel potentially smuggling illicit cargo. The boarding of ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne was an excellent way to conclude our training with the Italian navy, said Lt. James Gensheimer, one of Farraguts board ing officers. We share common goals and com mon values, and we will continue to operate with coalition and part ner nations in support of ever greater maritime safety and security. One of the many missions we will accomplish during Farraguts deployment is promoting the free flow of commerce across the worlds oceans, and todays training assist ed us with meeting this objective. Farragut is deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), supporting mari time and theater security cooperation efforts. -Photo by AW2 Brandon NewmanThe guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66), the Italian destroyer MM Luigi Durand De La Penne (D 560) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) conduct a photo exercise as part of a passing exercise meant to increase interoperability between U.S. and Italian navies. The passing exercise features maneuvering and interoperability drills over a two-day period. Farragut Sailors Honor Fallen, Spruce Up Cemetery USS Farragut Public AffairsSailors from guidedmissile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) paid tribute to those who served and contributed to the community by clean ing, weeding and painting at the Anglo-Americano Cemetery in Menorca, Spain, July 4. The cemetery is the resting place of 34 U.S. Sailors who lost their lives while stationed in Mahon Harbor in the 1800s working to deter piracy. Its great to see the U.S. Sailors come out and help in the cemetery, said Ivor White, former presi dent of the Rotary Club in Menorca. Its amazing to see their dedication to the Sailors that are buried here. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Spanish army, but U.S. Navy Sailors have helped maintain the grounds whenever they visit to honor the Sailors who are buried there. It takes your breath away when you see how old some of the monuments and things are here, said Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Scott Richer. It really stirs up a sense of pride to care about your heri tage, and be able to give back to the Sailors that came before us. Twenty-one Farragut Sailors cut the grass, cleaned around and painted the exterior walls of the cemetery. A day after the service project, a ceremony was held July 5, to remember the Sailors that are buried there. Farragut is deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. The Eisenhower CSG includes aircraft car rier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), CSG 8, guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guided-missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), as well as the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 7 and Destroyer Squadron 28. Ensign Samuel Macavoy, assistant supply officer aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), paints the exterior walls at the Anglo-American cemetery in Menorca, Spain during a COMREL project. Gas Turbine System (Electrical) (SW) Scott Phillips (left) and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Matt Derden, Sailors assigned to USS Farragut (DDG 99), prepare to paint the exterior walls at the Anglo-American cemetery in Menorca, Spain during a COMREL project. -Photos by MC3(SW) A.J. JonesSailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), take part in maintaining the Anglo-American cemetery in Menorca, Spain during a community relations (COMREL) project. Electronics Technician 2nd Class (PJ) Michael Loftus pulls weeds during a COMREL project. Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Roberto Ramirezgomez cuts large foliage out of the way of a drainage ditch during a COMREL project.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 5 Farragut Honor Heritage Of Ships Namesake USS Farragut Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) celebrated the birthday of the ships namesake, Adm. David Glasgow Farragut, at a ceremony in the town square of Ciutadella, Menorca, Spain, July 5. Farragut, whose father Jordi George Farragut, was a Menorca native, was adopted as a native son of the Spanish island July 12, 1867. A statue of the United States Navys first admiral was erected in Ciutadella in 1970 by the Navy League of the United States Madrid Council, and Farraguts birthday has been cel ebrated ever since. This is the first year that one of his namesake ships has visited the island for the ceremony. It is an honor to have the Farragut here in Menorca today with us as we celebrate in honor of Adm. David Glasgow Farragut, said Nick Hayes, president of the Navy League of the United States Madrid Council, during a speech at the ceremony. The ceremony started with the Farragut color guard parading the colors jointly with Spanish sail ors and Spanish soldiers. Remarks were delivered by Navy League repre sentatives, the Mayor of Ciutadella, the Insular Director of the General Administration of the State, and Cmdr. Glen Quast, Farraguts com manding officer. The ceremony concluded when Quast placed a wreath on a statue of the distin guished admiral in the town square. Today, we are fortu nate to be able to honor [Adm. Farraguts] lega cy with a fifth warship named after him; since the first ship was named in his honor in 1899, only 28 years have passed without an active ship in the U.S. Navy named after Admiral Farragut, said Quast during his speech at the ceremony. Strengthening the rela tionship between our two nations helps us main tain a safe and secure maritime environment. We look forward to building stronger friendships and enhancing our long standing friendship with Spain, and particularly Menorca. The days events also included a ceremony at the Anglo-American Cemetery, located in Mahon Harbor. The multinational color guard opened the event, followed by speeches from Hayes and Quast, who together laid a wreath at the Tomb of an Unknown Sailor to con clude the event. Thirtyfour American Sailors are buried in the cemetery, losing their lives while in serving. Culminating the Farragut birthday celebration was a reception held on board USS Farragut to celebrate the admirals birthday and thank more than 60 distinguished guests for welcoming the ship and its Sailors to their home. Farragut is deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG), supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. Cmdr. Glen Quast, commanding officer of guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), signs a guestbook at the town hall of Ciutadella, Menorca, Spain after a cer emony to honor Adm. David G. Farragut. Bowling, first lieutenant aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), talks with children after per forming in a ceremony to honor Adm. David G. Farragut in Menorca, Spain. -Photos by MC3 A.J. JonesEnsign Josh Bowling, first lieutenant aboard USS Farragut (DDG 99), leads a color detail, comprised of U.S. Sailors, Spanish navy sailors and members from the Spanish army, during a ceremony to honor Adm. David G. Farragut in Menorca, Spain. Quast, commanding officer of Farragut, and Nick Hayes, president of the Navy League of the United States-Madrid Council, lay a wreath at the tomb of an unknown U.S. Sailor buried at the Anglo-American Cemetery in Menorca, Spain. Sailors from guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) and Spanish sailors come together for a game of soccer during the ships visit to Menorca, Spain. Above, Chief Boatswains Mate (SW) Mitch Inkpen, leading chief petty officer of the deck department aboard guidedmissile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), dribbles the ball down-field while playing soccer with Spanish sailors in Menorca, Spain. Left, Sailors from guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), play soccer with Spanish sailors while visiting Menorca, Spain.

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HSL-60, Elrod Rescue Four In Caribbean SeaUSS Elrod Public AffairsNorfolk, Va.-based frigate USS Elrod (FFG 55) and NS Mayport-based HSL-60 res cued four people from a sink ing small boat June 26 while on patrol in the Caribbean Sea in support of Operation Martillo. Elrod received a call from a maritime patrol aircraft after spotting the submerged ves sel. The ship made best speed to the reported site to inves tigate and located four survi vors in distress. The mariners were clinging onto the bow of the damaged boat when Elrod made its approach. A rigidhulled inflatable boat (RHIB) was lowered to pick up the stranded survivors. One of the four survivors lapsed in and out of consciousness and Chief Hospital Corpsman Cory Perry diagnosed their condition as life-threatening and in desper ate need of immediate medical treatment. We came at the right time, said Cmdr. Jack Killman, Elrod Commanding Officer. I am not sure these people would have lasted much longer. The survivors were flown to a hospital in Colombia via helo from Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60 Detachment Three. It was a huge success and personally rewarding being able to bring them to a medical facility where theyll get the proper care they need, said Lt. Justin Collins, air crew commander for the medevac flight. All in all, team Elrod did a remarkable job; from watch standers reacting at a moments notice, to coordinating a medevac transfer to Colombia, said Killman. The team effort by the crew of Elrod succeeded in saving the lives of the distressed mariners. This particular situation required careful yet nuanced care, to reduce the destructive effects of prolonged exposure to and ingestion of sea water without triggering negative consequences. These gentlemen were lucky to have an experienced corpsman on scene to care for them, Capt. Christine Dorr, U.S Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet medi cal officer said. Fire Scout Training Facility Unveiled At JaxNAS JacksonvilleNorthrop Grumman and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic (HSMWL) personnel hosted a ribbon-cutting reception July 10 for the new MQ-8B Fire Scout operator training facility at NAS Jacksonville. The facility is equipped with four mission simulators and an instructors sta tion, as well as separate classrooms. After two years of operational testing with squadrons assigned to HSMWL, the MQ-8B Fire Scout u nmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program is seeking to lock in its future with the Navy by providing a leading-edge simulator center. Commander, HSMWL Capt. Doug Ten Hoopen said he was pleased to bring yet another train ing capability to NAS Jacksonville. Our wing of Bravo and Romeo Seahawk helicopters is the only one in naval aviation to fly the Fire Scout. We began in 2010 with a 4th Fleet drug interdic tion mission aboard the guided-missile frigate USS McInerney (FFG 8), where Fire Scout helped confis cate 60kilos of cocaine from a fast boat. The next MQ-8B suc cess came from the 5th Fleet deployment aboard the frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). From off the coast of Somalia, Fire Scout pro vided an overland ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) platform for special operations forces. Most recently, the frig ate USS Klakring (FFG 42) deployed to the Horn of Africa area of responsibility with a Fire Scout. As the Fire Scout UAV program evolves, it will be part of what we call composite detachments that deploy with a manned MH-60R Seahawk and an unmanned Fire Scout. Also, with todays shrinking budgets, this new center allows us to train squadron person nel without incurring the travel, food and lodging expenses to send them to NAS Patuxent River, Md. Today, were bridging the Fire Scout simulator capacity gap and improv ing the already robust training environment here at NAS Jax, said Ten Hoopen. He concluded, For the past two years, operator and maintainer training has taken place here in temporary spaces among the H-60 Seahawk crews. In a few minutes, youll see the leading-edge design of our new permanent simulator facility. George Vardoulakis, vice president and pro gram manager of tacti cal unmanned systems for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, wel comed the military and civilian guests. Fire Scout comple ments the Navys manned helicopters by effectively extending the range and area of ship-based intel ligence gathering opera tions, said Vardoulakis. Its modular architec ture accommodates a variety of electro-optical, infrared and communica tions payloads that pro vide groundand shipbased commanders with high levels of situational awareness and preci sion targeting support, he added. The system has been in development for about 10 years and is particularly well suited to support littoral com bat ship missions such as drug interdiction, antipiracy, search and rescue, and reconnaissance operations. He said that todays Navy is increasing its mix of manned and unmanned activities and that this Fire Scout training facility will ensure operators are well schooled in executing its multi-mission capabili ties. According to a Northrop Grumman, the MQ-8B Fire Scout is an unmanned helicopter for U.S. Navy situational awareness and precision targeting. The unmanned aircraft is based on the Schweizer Model 333 twoseat manned helicopter. It can autonomously take off and land on any avia tion-capable warship and at unprepared landing zones near battlefields. -Photo by Clark Pierce(From left) Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy DeYoung and AWF1 David Berber, reservists attached to HSL-60, demonstrate the MQ-8 Fire Scout flight simulator to media representatives July 10. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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HSL-60, USS Elrod Disrupts Drug Flow In CaribbeanFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsGuided-missile frig ate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team and NS Mayport-based HSL-60 Detachment Three, recovered 91 packages of marijuana, weighing approxi mately 4,938 pounds, during an interdiction in support of Operation Martillo, July 3. The estimated whole sale value of the recov ered drugs is more than $2 million. A U.S. Customs and Border Protection P-3 initially detected the gofast vessel. The drug traffickers then began to jettison the contraband as the P-3 turned over tracking of the vessel to Elrod while USCG District 7 assumed control of the interdiction effort. An embarked SH-60 heli copter from Detachment Threewas launched with an airborne use of force (AUF) gunner on board to intercept the vessel and locate the debris field. In an attempt to get the vessel to stop, the gunner fired warning shots aft of the speedboat. When the vessel did not stop, the gunner fired disabling rounds, bringing the gofast to a stop. In a coordinated effort, crews from Elrod and USCG LEDET recovered 91 packages of various sizes from the debris field, and through two narcotics identification kit tests, it was determined that the contraband was marijua na. Since the beginning of their deployment in January, Elrod and the embarked LEDET have seized approximately 9,630 pounds of cocaine and 4,938 pounds of marijuana, with a total wholesale value of more than $120 million. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. USS Gettysburg Gets Engine OverhaulUSS Gettysburg (CG 64)When USS Gettysburg (CG 64) discovered two of her engines had given out, the Sailors of Main Engine Room Number One fer vently prepared for the difficult task of replacing the engine and assisting the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Gas Turbine Shop to rebuild the other. These engines were plankowners of the 21-year-old ship. The success of the engine change out would require a demonstration of hard work, a commitment to safety, as well as a great deal of patience. The crewmembers working alongside the crane operators ensured the safe removal of the interference from the gas generator section. Simultaneously, brew ing in the Gulf of Mexico was soon to be Tropical Storm Debby. Debby caused crane operations to be unsafe due to the high winds. As a result the Sailors and contrac tors were constantly waiting for the opportunity to lift the engine out of the ship. When Debby had passed, there were only a few crane lifts left which were quickly completed. While one engine was being replaced the other engine was being rebuilt. Gettysburg now has four operational engines ready for her future mis sions. Thanks to the hard work, patience, and salt of her crewmembers, including Gas Turbine Systems Technician Mechanical (GSM) 1st Class (SW) Adam Dixon, GSM2 (SW) Amanda Black, GSM3 (SW) Hector Rodriguez, GSM3 (SW) Joshua Farias, GSM3 (SW) Cori Johnson, GSM3 (SW) Andrew Schiessl and GSMFN (SW) Juan Rodriguez. Also, the assistance of SERMC was cru cial to success. -Photo submitted by USS GettysburgOne of the original engines from USS Gettysburg is removed after the ship discovered two of its engines were not working properly. With help from SERMC Mayport and contractors, the ships engines were able to be rebuilt and become operational again. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 7

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Klakring Begins Deployment On Patriotic NoteUSS Klakring ChaplainUSS Klakring (FFG 42) kicked off their final deployment on June 29, before the ship is scheduled to decommission in March 2013. The ship will be performing antiterrorism operations, with embarked Fire Scout drone helicopters from HSL-42 in the Indian Ocean. Within the first week, the crew of the Klakring had the oppor tunity to participate in events that helped set a tone of honor and patriotism for their mission. On July 1, the crew assembled on the flight deck in ceremonial whites to perform burials at sea for 20 individuals who had served in the coun trys armed services. It is really great for our crew to be part of such a meaningful Navy tradition, Cmdr. Darrell Canady, commanding officer of USS Klakring explained. We get to be reminded of the honor -Photos courtesy of USS KlakringUSS Klakring Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Barry Parker receives an urn from Yeoman 1st Class Paul Haverfield during a burial at sea held aboard the ship. USS Klakring Commanding Officer Cmdr. Darrell Canady salutes as urn is released. Ensign Sierra Rooney lead honor guard in rendering honors.See USS Klakring, Page 9 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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Above, Lt. John Vasquez and AWSC John Chapman (HSL-42) work the grill during the ships Independence Day celebration.Left, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Todd Cousins and Engineman 2nd Class Mauro Jimenez battle at beanbag toss. Bottom left, Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Matthew Gable soaks CMC Steve Lupton during 4th of July waterfight. Bottom right, Crew of USS Klakring gather on the flight deck for an evening movie.that comes from being a part of the legacy of the US military, and at the same time we have the opportunity to give back to their families and thank them for the for their sacrifices. The ashes of those being honored were released into the Atlantic Ocean with a commit tal prayer and then given full military honors. For many of the crew, the most satisfying part of the ceremony was how much the ceremony meant to the family members. William Hux, whose father was buried at sea during the ceremony, expressed his apprecia tion via email. Thank you, from our entire extended family for the service and hon ors for my father. It is a comfort to know he will be at sea with the US Navy once again and rest with eternal salvation. He was a Navy diver at the end of WW II and through Korea. His spirit lives on and his character is divided over his three sons and eight grandkids. Fair winds and following seas to all on FFG-42 for the voyage. A few days later the crew of the Klakring celebrated Independence Day the American waywith a picnic, food, and fun. They grilled hamburgers and hot dogs on the flight deck, played games, and relaxed and enjoyed their free time. In the evening the crew participated in a huge poker tournament, and then congregated again on the flight deck to watch the movie Act of Valor. The goal was to take a break from the demand ing schedule and reflect on the reasons that we all are out here, and to remember what our forefathers sacrificed to ensure that our indepen dence and freedoms are protected, MWR presi dent Quartermaster 1st Class Danny Felton said.From Page 8USS Klakring Independence Day Celebration THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 9

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July 20: American Heroes Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Ron Perry Experience. Costume contest for the best Historical Hero, Superhero, and couple. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided.270-7205 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small children. 270-7205 July 23: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins. Registration is June 20-21 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 23: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends Sept. 21. 270-5451. July 23-26: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by July 18. 270-5451 July 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. For tick ets, (904) 270-5431 July 26: Bar Olympics. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Patrons can go for the gold in our Karaoke Competition, Wing Eating Contest, Jenga Tournament and more! There will be free food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials. 270-7205 June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 29: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy three hours of bowling and an awesome video laser light show as well as a traditional spaghetti dinner, presents for the kids, and more July 30: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Begins. Season ends Oct. 4. 270-5451. Aug. 1: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Aug. 1: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Aug. 3: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Aug. 3: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tin Tin (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 3: Caribbean Nights Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Reggae Band Sugar Bear. Food, give aways, beverage specials and more. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 7: Mens Summer Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. Aug. 7: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-youcan-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Aug. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 Aug. 8: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aug. 10: Summer Swim Lesson Session V Begins Registration is Aug 3 & 4 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. MWRJuly 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. July 13: Freedom Friday Carnival. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small children. 270-7205 July 23: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins Registration is June 20-21 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. July 29: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. KID 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. July 19: Art Walk Downtown. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. FREE July 20: Classic Car Show & Dinner. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. July 20: American Heroes Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Featuring Ron Perry Experience. Costume contest for the best Historical Hero, Superhero, and couple. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided.270-7205 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small children. 270-7205 July 21: Kingfish Tournament. Food, Music & More. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE July 22: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. FREE July 23: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends Sept. 21. 270-5451. July 23-26: PreSeason Flag Football Tournament. Sign up by July 18. 270-5451 July 24: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 25: Blackjack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 July 26: Bar Olympics. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Patrons can go for the gold in our Karaoke Competition, Wing Eating Contest, Jenga Tournament and more! There will be free food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials. 270-7205 July 26: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Gator Country Night! FREE. June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 28: Riverside Arts Market. Food, music & more. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. July 29: Ice Skating. Van departs 1 p.m. Cost $5 July 30: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Begins Season ends Oct. 4. 270-5451. July 31: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 1: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Aug. 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at the Galley for Lunch. Aug. 2: Adventure Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 3: WWE Raw World Tour Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. Aug. 3: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Aug. 3: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tin Tin (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 3: Caribbean Nights Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Reggae Band Sugar Bear. Food, giveaways, beverage specials and more. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 4: Riverside Arts Market. Food, music & more. Van departs 10 a.m. Transportation Only. Aug. 5: Buffalo Wild Wings Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Aug 6: Pool Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 7: Mens Summer Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. Aug. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 Aug. 8: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Aug. 9: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Sign-up deadline Aug. 8. FREE Aug. 10: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. New York Giants Football. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Cost $8. Aug. 10: Outdoor MoviesHugo (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 Aug. 10: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Aug. 11: UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Aug. 12: Ichnetucknee Tubing Trip. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $10. Aug. 13: Pinewood Derby Registration. All Day at the Liberty Center. Come and pick up your derby car & register for the big race. Aug. 14: Go the Distance 10K Run/ 5K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012 11

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FFSC Workshops Support Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. July 19, 8 am.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1, Room 1124 July 19, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 23-26, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 July 24, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 July 25, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying Seminar, FFSC Room 702 July 25, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 26, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 30, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. July 31, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 July 31, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting FFSC Room 702 Friday, July 20 Join us for Kids Movie Night at 6 p.m. at Ft. Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Rd. For $5 receive a hot dog, drink, and popcorn while view ing a kid-friendly movie. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to add to your viewing enjoyment. As a special bonus, anyone attending our VBS from July 16-19 will get in free. Call 904-744-1311 for more information. Operation: Military Kids will host a Jewelry Making Day Camp from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. at Hilton Garden Inn, 145 Park Ave, Orange Park. The event is open to children, 8-17 years old, of members of Active, Guard, Reserve, and Retirees of all branches. Every camper will be able to make a stranded necklace, a springwire bracelet, a pair of dangle and a pair of hoop ear rings, and a beadwoven bookmark. All supplies, tools and beads will be provided for each camper and they will be able to take their creations home. Cost is $10.50 per child, lunch, drinks, a snack and all supplies are included. Adults and youth are welcome to volunteer. For more information and to register online, go to http://omkjewelrymak ing.eventbrite.com/ Sunday, July 22 The Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 located at 390 Mayport Road will host a car and motorcycle wash to raise money for the USO of Mayport. The event begins at 10 a.m. and will feature music, food and drink specials. For more information about the Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 and its events, stop by the local branch or visit their Facebook page at www.facebook. com/FRABranch290. Saturday, July 28 Join all kinds of water craft for the Aquapalooza on-the-water event and concert at Fort George Island on from 10 a.m.3 p.m. Aquapalooza is about boating, great music, fun and togeth erness with family and friends. The event is for all who love life on the water. Aquapalooza is a free event but boaters are encouraged to register at www.aquapalooza.com or http://www.marinemax. com and go to the events page for some free give aways. Out in Town EOQ Lunch July 24From StaffNaval Station Civilian Employee presentation / luncheon will be held on Tuesday, July 24 at 11:30 a.m., at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. All are welcome to attend and support the nominees. Lunch $8. Pay at the door. RSVP to sandra.bar rett1@navy.mil by 3 p.m. on Friday, July 20. Nominees for Employee of the Quarter (2nd Quarter) William Strickland, Fire/Emergency Services Thomas Wheeler, Air Ops/Ground Electronics Patricia Hoffman, MWR Patricia Livingstone, PWD Mark Anderson, IT Dept Susan Rucker, FFSC Percy Williams, Security *VSDP requests for Sailors who have com pleted less than 24 months on their current shore tour will be considered on a case-by-case basis based on orders requested and current command manning. *Sailors serving over seas, or in a DoD-area tour, can request to extend their current sea tour, curtail their current shore tour if they remain in the same geographi cal area, or request backto-back sea duty in any area of their choice with a valid billet. Consecutive Overseas Tour require ments may apply. Volunteers will not be required to accept a bil let they do not desire. Detailers will work with volunteers during two Career Management System/Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) cycles to find desirable orders. If no match is found dur ing this time period their VSDP application will expire and Sailors still desiring VSDP must reapply. This program does not change eligibility or benefits for the Sea Duty Incentive Pay, which pro vides eligible Sailors an additional $500 to $1,000 a month for extending their sea tour or returning to sea duty early. Sailors may take advantage of both programs concur rently. Requests will be accepted until Sep. 30. All 1306/7 requests should be forwarded to NPC via the chain of command. Sailors interested in applying for VSDP should read NAVDMINs 043/12 and 205/12 for complete details and talk with their chain of command. from natural disasters and man-made events by lowering consumption, integrating renewable energy sources and increasing control of energy supply and distribution. Energy reliability, resiliency and redundancy are essential compo nents of the Navys Critical Infrastructure Protection program. Energy security is critical because warfighters need assured access to reli able supplies of energy to meet oper ational needs afloat or ashore, said Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, Vice Adm. Phil Cullom. This instruction is just one example of how we are driving a spartan energy ethos in our shore operations. We are committed to cost-effectively achieving our energy goals by pursuing energy efficiency, transforming our energy cul ture, and integrating renewable energy technologies, where viable. The revised instruction includes spe cific responsibilities and actions that commands and personnel ashore must take in implementing the Navy Shore Energy program. For example, each Navy installation will have a tailored energy consumption reduction goal based on its unique energy situation. By increas ing energy efficiency, Navy can reduce operating costs, multiply the impact of current and future alternative energy sources and achieve DoN renewable energy targets. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus laid out five aggressive energy goals in October 2009 to improve energy secu rity and efficiency afloat and ashore and increase our energy security. To review the instruction, visit http:// greenfleet.dodlive.mil/files/2012/07/ OPNAVINST-4100.5E.pdf. For more information about the Navys Energy Program, visit www.greenfleet.dodlive. mil or www.facebook.com/navalenergy. For more news from Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division, visit www.navy.mil/ local/n45From Page 1EnergyFrom Page 1Sea Duty a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, July 19, 2012