<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00257


This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Have A Blast At MayportBy StaffRainy day plans are in place, but Naval Station Mayport MWR is remain ing opti mistic that Tropical Storm Debby wont dampen spirits or fun at this years Freedom Fest to celebrate Americas Independence on Saturday (June 30) at Sea Otter Pavilion. The pool is scheduled to open for free swim from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. with games and competitions like the Bell Flop contest and a Swim Relay, according to MWR Athletics and Fitness Director Jon Aimone. On land, MWR is setting up inflat able games and rides, including a 300-foot zip line from 4-8 p.m. There will also be two wet slides and two dry slides, a surf machine, climbing wall and MWRs Spider Mountain. Clowns will entertain with face painting and balloon art. Free personalized custom er leather IDs are available, as well as super hero photos of you or your child. A DJ will be set up to keep the tunes jumping from 4-9 p.m. Country music artist Ryan Kinder will perform from 9-9:30 p.m. and usher in the pyrotech nics. The firework show is expected to light off at 9:30 p.m. Immediately fol lowing the fireworks, country music artist D. Vincent Williams will take the stage to perform and tape a live web broadcast. Everyone in attendance will be a part of this live taping. Food and drinks will be on sale throughout the day. Most items will benefit command family readiness groups, petty officer associations and MWR command funds, Aimone said. In the case of inclement weather, Aimone said the festival will continue inside Beachside Community Center. The pool will close if there is thunder and lightening. For more information about the event, contact MWR at 270-5228. -Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonA U.S. Navy Sailor directs an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter from HSL-46 Detachment Eight as it prepares to shut down after landing aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). The NS Mayport-based detachment is deployed with Nitze as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. HSL-60 Night Ops With Enterprise CSGCOMUSNAVSO/C4F Holds Change Of CommandFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) host ed a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., June 22. Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, COMUSNAVSO/C4F, was relieved by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the former director of Navy Irregular Warfare Office, during the ceremony. The ceremony, presid ed over by Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser, Commander, U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM), served to showcase the numerous accomplishments of the command as a whole while paying tribute to the indi viduals who have maintained the organizations success for more than 60 years. Through his numerous engagements in the region, Admiral Tidd helped deepen and strengthen our partner ships with our naval forces in the region. Not only in Central America but also with our South American partners, Fraser said. Tidd recalled the events of the last year since hed taken command; referring to the staff and all the hard work they accomplished to complete the mission. This has been an exciting, and a humbling experience commanding NAVSO/4th Fleet for the past year, said Tidd. The mission execut ed day in and day out by the men and women of the NAVSO/4th Fleet team is important; we are operat ing on the seas and in the littorals throughout the region every day, building and strengthening partner ships with nations who share a common heritage and a common sense of purpose with us. During Tidds tenure, the operations, deployments and exercises he command ed brought many successes in the efforts to Countering Transnational Organize Crime (CTOC). More impor tantly, Operation Martillo has made a significant impact in illicit drug trafficking opera tions. All of which could not have been accomplished without the contributions of the NAVSO/4th Fleet staff. I would especially like to thank the men and women, active, reserve and civilians, of this terrific NAVSO/4th Fleet Team. They are true professionals, passionate about their work, and they do amazing things every day. Every day, around the clock they work closely with our regional partners to address our common security con cerns across the maritime environment. They are mak ing a difference in the lives and the shared livelihoods of our partners and our fel -Photo by Paige GnannOutgoing Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F), Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, left, and Gen. Douglas Fraser, Commander, U.S. Southern Command, middle, applaud Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, right, as he assumes command of COMUSNAVSO/C4F during a change of command ceremony at NS Mayport on June 22.See COMUSNAVSO, Page 8 D. Vincent Williams will broadcast his NS Mayport performance on live feed from 10-11 p.m. No Paper For July 4Due to the holiday season, The Mirror will be closed on July 4 and will not publish a July 5 edition. Photos and stories should still be submitted through The Mirror email, mayportmirror@comcast.net, no later than July 6 to be included in the July 12 edition of the paper. Free Fleet Market classified ads can be submitted online at www.mayportmirror.com or by fill ing out the free form in the Classified section and submitting by July 6. For more information, call 270-5226 ext. 1011.

PAGE 2

The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, A huge Naval Station Bravo Zulu to everyone who had a hand in welcom ing Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus to Mayport last week, and the wel come news he brought was extremely well received. He officially announced that Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) is indeed coming to Naval Station Mayport and the first ship to arrive in the last quarter of 2013 is USS New York (LPD 21), followed by USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) in 2014. This move, according to Secretary Mabus, underscores just how important Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport are to our national defense, and shows how committed we are to strategic dis persal on the East Coast. In addition to our ARG arrival, USCG Valiant will be a welcomed permanent fixture to our basin beginning Saturday, Aug. 4. I would really like to extend my per sonal thanks to Capt. Steve Shinego, Capt. Bob Hein and Cmdr. J.P. Dunn, and the crews of USS Philippine Sea, USS Gettysburg and the move crew from the World Famous Grandmasters of HSM-46 for their incredible hard work prepping their warships to serve as a key piece for Secretary Mabus announcement. The ships looked like Warships, the crews looked like Warriors, and there is no bet ter way to surround our Secretary of the Navy than with warriors and warships! Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat (hardest working man in show business) Pickard and myself bid a bittersweet fair winds and following seas to USS Farragut (DDG 99) and USS Hue City (CG 66) last Friday, as they join USS Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group for a nine-month deployment. It was awe inspiring to see the ships and crews at their peak of Readiness, ready able and willing to sail in harms way, and our thoughts and prayers are with each one of our shipmates and the families that remain behind. Godspeed Shipmates see you in March! A warm welcome home to Lt. Alicia Salerno from NAVSTA Admin and MA2 Ruben from Security and their IA tours in Afghanistan and Cuba. If you see these shipmates around campus please congratulate and thank them for their service and true grit. Welcome home. Lots of extra folks will be out and about when U.S. Southern Commands (USSOUTHCOM) multinational exer cise, PANAMAX 2012 begins Aug. 6-17, 2012. PANAMAX 2012 is an annual USSOUTHCOM-sponsored exercise series that focuses on ensuring the defense of the Panama Canal. Forces from 17 nations will take part in simu lated training scenarios here and in the waters around the canal and other loca tions. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 is to exercise a variety of responses to any request from the governments of Panama and Colombia to protect and guarantee safe passage of traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sovereignty. Hurricane season is here. Are you pre pared? Talk with your families, dust off your evacuation plans and make sure your TWIMS information is updated. Recent rain and storms should serve as a wakeup call that things can and just might get worse this season. Think of the little things too like having a supply of water on hand, fresh flashlight batter ies and most importantly, an evacuation plan. Also, keep all vital papers you have in a grab and go box in case you do need to beat feet. Preparedness is key. Suicide prevention needs our daily attention. I realize that our Sailors and their families face many pressures in their personal lives while in the service of our country, and we are committed to providing help on multiple levels. Please know that we have expertise in place to help, and all of the counseling at our Fleet and Family Support Center is free and confidential. The same goes for sex ual assault. There is help available so please know that we are standing by to support. Mark your calendars for June 30. Our MWR team is working up the annual base Freedom Fest at the base Sea Otter pavilion, and this year will be amazing. Live bands, food for purchase, inflata bles for the kids, and fireworks starting at 9:30 p.m. Plan to come out and celebrate with us as we observe our nations inde pendence. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. e safe, and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSBullying is back in the spotlight! Just last week in the national media it was reported that mid dle school students bul lied their bus monitor a woman who could have easily been their mother or grandmother. You probably remem ber some bullying that took place at some time during your school days. You may even have expe rienced some level of bul lying or maybe a friend did. Bullying is an all-toocommon human activity that has existed since the beginning of recorded history and is present in most cultures. It is enact ed by both boys and girls. Research suggests that somewhere between 30 percent and 60 percent of American schoolchildren report being bullied. But as some parents today omit teaching their children how to appropriately relate to others, bul lying comes to the fore front. This is especially true when groups of stu dents are together. The bus incident described above is an example of that. One psychologist is quoted as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger or in this case younger on older. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or had your interests and feelings unfairly damaged by someone more pow erful than you. And this power can take different forms. Although girls are sometimes physically violent, it is boys who tend to be more physical. Florida law defines bul lying as systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psycho logical distress on one or more students and may involve teasing, social exclusion, threat, intimi dation, stalking, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious, or racial harass ment, public humiliation, or destruction of prop erty. Harassment is any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture; use of data or computer software; or written, ver bal or physical conduct directed against a student that places the student in reasonable fear of harm to his person or damage to his property; has the effect of substantially interfer ing with a students edu cational performance, opportunities, or benefits; or has the effect of sub stantially disrupting the orderly operation of a school. All parents of schoolage children should know the law. Florida Statute 1006.147, The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act, prohib its bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a Florida public K 12 education al institution. This law requires that each school district in Florida adopt a policy prohibiting bul lying and harassment of any student or employee of a public K 12 school. Bus monitors, for exam ple, cannot be bullied in Florida. The Duval County School Board has adopt ed an anti-bullying poli cy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bul lied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trust ed adult. This report can be done anonymously. An investigation will be conducted by the school principal or his/her des ignee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Now that you know the law, consider the fol lowing tips to deter and diminish bullying at your childs school: the schools designated administrator your con cerns about bullying, such as issues with supervision and monitoring of stu dents. build a social safety net work, and encourage them to travel via the buddy system. wide anti-bullying campaign website at www. stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov to find ideas to prevent bullying to share with your children. What about your chil dren? Are they being bul lied? Possible warning signs include the follow ing: missing belongings, or bruises, excuses to avoid attending school, school, aches, stomachaches, loss of appetite, trouble sleep ing, or bad dreams, and/ or esteem. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the prob lem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school offi cials to find a solution. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Is You Kid Being Bullied? Know The SignsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingMCPON: Its Summertime, Think Safety Office of the Master Chief Petty Officer of the NavySummertime means fun in the sun, vacations and a myriad of outdoor activities, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) wants Sailors and families to think safety first. Benjamin Franklin said, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and in the case of summertime, its worth a pound of safety, said MCPON (SS/SW) Rick D. West. Each year the Navy loses service members to senseless and avoidable mishaps, and the summer season brings the poten tial for increased risk. According to the Naval Safety Center, summer deaths spiked in 2008 then decreased in 2009 and 2010, but unfortu nately increased again last year. In 2011, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, 16 Sailors and 15 Marines lost their lives. One in an ATV wreck; three drowned; three dur ing recreational activities; 11 in motor vehicles; and 13 on motorcycles. Losing even one Sailor or Marine is too many, especially when most of the incidents can be avoided with the proper planning and training, said West. Training is the priority when it comes to motor cycle safety. According to Naval Safety Center, motorcycle fatalities increased from six in 2010 to 13 in 2011, which is more than a 100 per cent increase. Motorcycle training and safety starts with the command hav ing a designated motor cycle safety representative (MSR). Closing the training gap on motorcycle safety needs to be top prior ity for our leaders, said West. Personal motor vehicle accidents are the second highest cause of fatalities in our Navy, and motorcycles are the pri mary casual factor with sports bikes remaining at the top of the list. MSRs play an important role in mitigating this risk by mentoring and educat ing our Sailors, and more importantly, ensuring they are registered and complete all required motorcycle training. The Naval Safety Centers summer cam paign Live to Play, Play to Live, also focuses on alcohol awareness, water and boat safety, sexu al assault, and suicide awareness, and summer sports activities. Fourth of July is just around the corner so start planning safety now, said West. Whether you are on the highways, water ways or in the backyard, safety must come first. And if you drink, dont drive and have a plan to get home. When traveling long distances, remember to use TRiPS, the on-line, automated risk-assess ment tool that helps users recognize and avoid the hazards they face on the highway: fatigue, not buckling up, and driving too far. TRiPS is located at https://wwwa.nko.navy. mil. You and your fami lies are important to the Navy, said West. Use the tools the Navy provides and remember to think safety first. Safety is one of the key areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and exist ing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most com bat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps. 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 3

Billy Lara Military Sick Call Dedication Marks Loss Of Inspirational SailorBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs At the dedication of the Billy Lara Military Sick Call on June 16, Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Eddie Couillard, Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport Senior Enlisted Leader, said: Although given just a few months to live, Billy held on for a full year. In that year, he was an incredible inspira tion to all who were fortunate to be around him. He never lost his attitude for fighting his condition and will always be remem bered that way. At only 22-years-old, Hospitalman Billy Laras life was cut short because of a rare form of brain cancer. He died Dec. 26, 2011. The dedication cer emony, attended by BHC Mayport staff, family members and friends of Hospitalman Billy Lara, included the renaming of the clinics sick call and a permanent plaque to cap ture Laras inspirational contributions he made during his short time on earth as a corpsman and shipmate. While BHC Mayport was Laras first and only assignment after his graduation from Hospital Corps School, his tena cious dedication and commitment to duty and friendship will remain alive forever. -Photo by HM3 Marcus Chapman Aurora Barrera (Pediatric Nurse, civilian) who saw Lara as her own son, left, and Capt. Alan Siewertsen, BHC Mayports officer-in-charge, stand ready to reveal the newly named Billy Lara Military Sick Call at the clinic. Kristopher Corpus (left), Billy Laras brother and Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Eddie Couillard stand next to a permanent plaque recognizing Laras inspirational con tributions made before his life was cut short. A plaque on display at Sick Call to remind patients and staff of their fallen shipmate, Hospitalman Billy Lara. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 3

PAGE 4

Peruvian Frigate Visits NS MayportBy U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th FleetPeruvian Navy frigate BAP Villavisencio (FM 52) pulled into Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a weeklong training evolution on June 15. Fourth year cadets from the Peruvian Naval Academy are on board putting to practice what they have learned from the school. During the training aboard the Peruvian frigate, the crew visited Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico. The frigate also visited Norfolk, Va., where the ship and crew partici pated in Operation Sail 2012, a collaboration of organizations, a fleet of tall ships, and navy and military war ships repre senting the world come together to promote goodwill among nations, inspire patriotism and foster interest in maritime history and heritage. The training ship Villavisencio is an ambas sador for my country, said Peruvian Navy Cmdr. Yuri Bezzubikoff, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Foreign Liaison Officer. The port visit here to Naval Station Mayport is a testament of our strong professional relationship with 4th Fleet and our shared commit ment to maritime security and stability. Commissioned in 1979, it was named after Peruvian Vice Adm. Manuel Villavisencio who fought in the War of the Pacific. It set sail May 6, and will return to its homeport in July. While in port, the crew will tour the local area, enjoy local recreational activities, and visit Disney World. They will also be hosted aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45) for a Steel Beach Picnic barbecue. Villavisencios port visit to Mayport is a unique opportunity for the crew to experience U.S. Navy, and espe cially Jacksonville/First Coast Florida hospital ity and culture first hand, said Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F). It is also a wonder ful chance to make new and lasting friendships with an enduring part ner Navy in our very own hemisphere. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and pros perity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Paige GnannCrewmembers of Peruvian Navy frigate BAP Villavisencio perform a traditional Peruvian dance during a reception held aboard the ship on June 19. The ship is visiting the Jacksonville area as part of a 3-month training deployment. During the port visit Romani will host a V.I.P. reception and the crew will visit local tourist attractions and special events. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeNavy Band Southeast performs as the Peruvian frigate BAP Villavicencio (FM 52) arrives at Naval Station Mayport for a scheduled port visit. Villavicencio and its crew are on an instructional voyage from Peru, training 85 Midshipman while improving for eign relations as liaison for the Peruvian navy. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerLt. Eric Guttmann, Capt. Chuck Nygaart and Peruvian Navy Cmdr. Yuri Bezzubikoff from U.S. FOURTH Fleet welcome the Commanding Officer of the Peruvian training ship BAP Villavisencio (FM 52), Capt. Juan Carlos Romani. 4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 5

DoD Needs More People With More LanguagesDefense Language Institute For eign Language CenterFew people can claim they have been portrayed in a major Hollywood movie as a result of their actions during their gov ernment careers. Even fewer can say they con tributed to the success of two major covert opera tions in U.S. history Michael G. Vickers, a two-time Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center graduate and the cur rent Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence, can take the credit for both, though he is reluc tant to admit it. In the 2007 movie Charlie Wilsons War, Vickers was depicted as a young paramilitary operations officer who contributed with brains and brawn in the mid1980s to the withdrawal of Russian troops from Afghanistan. In more recent history, Vickers has been recognized as a man who was instrumental in the planning, finding, and killing of the worlds most-wanted terrorist, Osama Bin Laden. But Vickers says it was technology and a combi nation of human intelligence that really contrib uted to finding bin Laden. Human intelligence, signals intelligence and geo-spatial intelligence all played very important roles. A major part of the challenge of that operation was locating him in the first place, and that was a long time coming -a very patient intelligence operation, he explained. On whether knowledge of language con tributed to the success of the operation, Vickers said, I cant go into more detail -but, in each of those disciplines, the ability to have officers or translators who were flu ent or very professionally competent in a language made all the difference. A firm believer that for eign language knowledge is critical for our nation al security, Vickers, who graduated from the DLIFLC Czech course in 1977 and the Spanish course in 1979, has a good understanding of how vital this language skills are for the success of military operations in the field. He spent three years in Panama in a Special Operations unit in the 1980s, during a time when insurgency and ter rorism were at an all-time high in Central and South America. I taught classes to Latin American officers in Spanish and I worked with them on operations, so, it [language] not only helped me to communi cate, but it also gave me a real insight into how they think and approach prob lems, he explained. He told a congres sional hearing in May the United States could benefit by having more Defense Department per sonnel proficient in for eign languages. Its an area [foreign language proficiency], frankly, we still need to improve -both as an intelligence community and in the Special Operations field. Its very hard to maintain high levels of proficiency in languages if youre not using it all the time, said Vickers, drawing from his own experience as a linguist in Spanish and Czech. Offering incentives to those willing to maintain high language proficien cy may be the answer, Vickers said. For example, Secretary of Defense [Leon E.] Panetta, when he was director at the CIA, man dated professional fluen cy in a foreign language to get promoted. And, it certainly had an impact on the number of peo ple working harder at it, Vickers said, adding that the key to maintaining a pool of highly proficient linguists depends on the requirements put in place. You just have to insist on the standards or it will never happen, he said. Vickers reiterated that foreign language instruc tion and training is vital to national security. There is an inher ent federal government responsibility, as we learned early in the Cold War with national security education ... Government investment in that is very important, he said. A second point I would make is that early lan guage education is criti cal, to providing candi dates for a pool of sea soned U.S. government linguists.DoD Program Helps Feed FamiliesFrom American Forces Press ServiceFeds Feed Families, now in its fourth year, is under way through August, and the Defense Department encourages military and civilian employ ees to participate by donating nonperishable food. The food drive accepts items for distribution to local food banks. In a memorandum, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton B. Carter said DoD will again expand its collec tion campaign to a nationwide level by donating to food banks across the country. The tremendous success of the 2011 food drive was a credit to the exemplary efforts of all of you and your staffs, Carters memo reads. Running a suc cessful campaign requires a team effort, and leadership support is critical. Feds Feed Families allows us to showcase how caring and giving our peo ple are, and demonstrates our commitment as a department to helping those in need. Defense officials called last years food drive overwhelm ingly successful. Food dona tions across the federal govern ment totaled 5.7 million pounds nearly three times the goal of 2 million pounds. DOD alone exceeded its goal of 733,800 pounds, officials said. DOD this year is striving for 1.5 million pounds of food donations for nationwide distribution, more than twice last years goal. It represents an average of 2 pounds of food per civilian employee. The goals for the service branches are: Army, 562,000 pounds; Navy, 396,000 pounds; Air Force, 348,000 pounds; and Office of the Secretary of Defense and Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff agencies and activities, 194,000 pounds. In his memo, the deputy sec retary encourages support with the following tasks: Military services, Defense agencies and field activities are tasked with arranging logisti cal support for June 26-27, July 24-25, and Aug. 28-29. A component champion will be appointed to represent each component to coordinate with organization representa tives, and lead the call for donations. Employees are asked to encourage others to donate nonperishable food. Contact Aimee Scanlon at fedsfeedfami lies@cpms.osd.mil or 703-6964741 for more information. NS Mayport Joins Food DriveFom StaffNaval Station Mayport is joining the call to action by the Department of Defense to help stock food banks throughout the nation. Donation boxes to benefit Feds Feed Families food drive have been set up around the base through Aug 31. Federal employees, service members and anyone else who wishes to donate can drop off non-perishable goods in the boxes. Mayport Chapel is sponsoring the local drive and can be contacted at 270-5212. Donation box locations include Chapel and the Mayport Commissary on Mayport Road. There are also boxes located at the On base Navy Exchange, Mayport Bowl, Mayport Bachelor Housing, Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport and the USO on Mayport Road. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 5

PAGE 6

6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 Farragut Takes Families On Day CruiseThe Mirror editorFriends and families of USS Farragut (DDG 99) got the opportunity to expe rience a day in the life of their Sailor while underway with the ship during a Friends and Family Day Cruise on June 15. The day of fun was scheduled to help ease the crews departure five days later with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group on an extended deployment to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. The ship sailed approximately 40 miles off the coast of Mayport to give guests a a glimpse into what it takes to operate an Arleigh Burke Class Guided Missile Destroyer. The day was filled with activities such as a tour of the main areas of the ship, including the bridge. There was a Damage Control exhibit and demon stration, and a chance for everyone to relax during a lunch on the mess decks. An SH-60B helicopter from HSL-48 also put on a demonstration for the guests. This is awesome, said Diane Taylor, girlfriend of Electronics Technician 3rd Class Michael Ferrer. Its cool to see how they live and to know how he works. They are not just sitting here watching movies. They work hard. -Photos by Paige GnannSailors aboard the Arleigh Burke Class Guided Missile Destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) fire the MK38 25-mil gun during a fir ing demonstration conducted as part of the ships Friends and Family Day Cruise on June 15. The ship deployed on June 20 with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Logistics Specialist Taunya Demouchette points out a passing foreign ship to her husband, Aviation Electricians Mate 1st Class Jonathan Demouchette as the ship begins to leave the Mayport basin. Lillian Moliani shoots an apple out of a high powered hose with Damage Controlman 2nd Class (SW) David Ricketts during one of the Damage Control demonstrations. Phil and Lynn Hardesty take photos with the ships namesake Adm. David Glasgow Farragut portrayed by Ensign Mike Pellittiere. Farragut roamed the ship to welcome friends and families on board for the day cruise. Sejaida Williams, 12, tries on Damage Control equip ment during one of the activities planned for guests on board USS Farragut for its Friends and Family Day Cruise. Joe Miller tries on an oxygen mask with help from Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW) Zach Leinart during a DC demonstration. Friends and families of USS Farragut enjoy the opportunity to be with their Sailors while deployed for the day on board the ship. Parents Fire Controlman 1st Class Robert Additon, wife Vivian and 14-month-old sister Elyse watch as Lt. Tom Bingol of Surface Force Ministry Center baptizes two-month-old Kimberly in USS Farraguts bell while grandmother Sonja Additon holds the baby. Both children were baptised in the ships bell and will have their names engraved in it to signify the baptism.

PAGE 7

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 7 Frocked SH2 Todd Montgomery Adams, USS Farragut IT2 Cody James Anderson, USS Farragut STG2 Katie Elizabeth Badgett, USS Farragut HT2 Ross Lochlainn Bailey, USS Farragut STG1 Brent Bowden, USS Farragut IT1 Andrew William Bunton IV, USS Farragut YN1 Ricky Carl Burke, USS Farragut DC2 Marcela Rosibel Bustamante, USS Farragut GSM3 Raul A Canales, USS Farragut LS3 Qi Chen, USS Farragut GM2 Ronald Tylor Clark, USS Farragut GSE3 Michael John Copelandclarke, USS Farragut FC2 Jamie A Cutrer, USS Farragut FC2 Christopher Tyler Darnell, USS Farragut FC2 Reid Francisa Desermia, USS Farragut STG3 David Dinh Do, USS Farragut CS1 Avery Terrel Foreman, USS Farragut FC2 Robert Henry Greathouse, USS Farragut LS3 Joshua Richard Grubbs, USS Farragut OS3 Randall Paul Harmon II, USS Farragut LS3 Brandon Donald Highwood, USS Farragut GM3 Stephen Robert Howard, USS Farragut EM3 Joseph Michael Knieriemen, USS Farragut STG1 Keith Jackson Lovett, USS Farragut YN2 Holly Denise Lyons, USS Farragut ET2 Luis Manuel Maldonado Jr, USS Farragut GSE1 Rolando Marquez, USS Farragut OS2 Christopher Michael McAvoy, USS Farragut CS2 Andreya Nicole McGhee, USS Farragut GSM3 Shawn Emmanuel Millan, USS Farragut DC3 Tyler Dennis ODonnell, USS Farragut CTR2 Andrew Ryan Page, USS Farragut EM2 Benjamin Dana Perkins, USS Farragut FC1 Dustin Lynn Perrin, USS Farragut OS3 Brandon Eugene Reed, USS Farragut BM3 Mathew Emmanuel Robinson, USS Farragut YN3 Sergio Armando Romeuvazquez, USS Farragut OS2 Bryant Ray Russo, USS Farragut CTR2 Justin Stephen Sage, USS Farragut BM2 Travis James Silver, USS Farragut OS2 Justin Lawrence Sintal, USS Farragut GM3 Jeffery Dale Smith, USS Farragut STR3 Sonny Smith, USS Farragut PS2 Zinzi Alexandra Spencer, USS Farragut FC2 Robert Gerhard Steers, USS Farragut BM1 Cedric Robert Taylor, USS Farragut IT2 Phillip Michael Thompson, USS Farragut GSM3 Joseph Bradley Watson, USS Farragut STG2 Cameron Lee Webster, USS Farragut MAYPORT Gunners Mate 1st Class (SW) Jeffery Drake and Yoeman 1st Class (SW) Ricky Burke talk with their wives, Shelley Burkey and Christy Drake as the ship transit the basin. A SH-60B Seahawk helicopter from HSL-48 performs flight demonstrations for the families of USS Farragut during its Friends and Family Day Cruise. Members of USS Farraguts crew are frocked in front of friends and family during the ships day cruise. Friends and families of USS Farragut line the rails as the ship waits to leave the basin for a day cruise aboard USS Farragut. The ship deployed on June 20 with HSL-48 Detachment Seven as a part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group. Lt.j.g. Andy Phelan and Lt.j.g. Kevin Mutai enjoy an easy moment with guest Michelle Camaione during the ships return to Mayport. Families enjoy lunch on the mess decks with their Sailors.

PAGE 8

Navy, Coast Guard Seize $13 Mil Of CocaineBy U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsA U.S. Navy frigate, USS Elrod (FFG 55) and embarked U. S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET), interdicted a suspected smuggling vessel, recov ered more than 1,000 pounds of cocaine, worth about $13 million, and detained four suspected smugglers in international waters, June 10, during Operation Martillo. A U.S. Navy maritime P-3 Orion patrol aircraft spotted the go-fast ves sel and the Elrod moved to intercept. The Norfolk, Va.-based frig ate launched a helicopter and rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) with a Coast Guard boarding team to intercept the suspect boat. The level of dedica tion and seamless team work between the crew of Elrod, the embarked U.S. Coast Guard law enforce ment team and our HSL 60 helicopter detachment are all directly responsible for making this interdic tion a success, said Cmdr. Jack Killman, command ing Officer, USS Elrod (FFG 55). Overall coordination of counter-drug patrols and surveillance in the Caribbean Sea is man aged by Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-S) headquartered in Key West, Fla. U.S. mar itime law enforcement and interdiction opera tions in the Caribbean are under the tactical con trol of the Seventh Coast Guard District. Operation Martillo is one component in the USGs whole-of-govern ment approach to com bating the spread of TOC in Central America and the use of the Central American littorals to transshipment routes for illicit drugs, weapons, and cash, said Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F). More than 80 per cent of cocaine docu mented making its initial movement out of South America into Central America and moving toward North American markets moves via non commercial maritime conveyances along littoral routes. LEDETs are an armed deployable special ized force under the U.S. Coast Guards Deployable Operations Group. They were created to support narcotics interdiction operations aboard U.S. Navy and allied warships and are capable of sup porting Department of Defense national defense operations. LEDETs pro vide specialized law enforcement capabil ity and maritime security capabilities to enforce U.S. laws across a full spectrum of maritime response situations, maritime security augmentation and maritime inter diction anti-piracy opera tions. Teamwork is critical to a LEDETs operation al successes, said Cmdr. Robert Landolfi, Tactical Law Enforcement Team Souths commanding offi cer. The Coast Guard and Navy partnership ensures a highly capable presence in the operational theater for sustained periods. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participa tion is being led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coor dinated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to com bat transnational orga nized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. Checking Off DC List -Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonU.S. Navy Sailors examine an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter from HSL-48 Detachment Eight during a damage control exercise aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). Nitze is deployed as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime secu rity operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. HSL-42 Det 7 Begins Final Deployment With SH-60B SeahawkUSS Jason Dunham Public AffairsHelicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42 Detachment 7 Proud Warriors, begin its last deployment while embarked aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), June 22. During the spring of 2013, the HSL-42 Proud Warriors will transition from the SH-60B helicopter to the new MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter and in the pro cess become Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72. The SH-60B has been a workhorse for many years and this will be a bittersweet time for us in many ways, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Chester, officer in charge of HSL-42 Det. 7. However, we are ready for our mission. We intend to accom plish that mission and establish the war rior legacy as we sundown the SH-60B with honor and pride. Dunham and the Proud Warriors, deployed as part of Carrier Strike Group 8, will operate in support of 5th and 6th fleet maritime security objectives. The MH-60R combines the best features of the SH-60B and SH-60F into one multimission platform. The improvements include an updated cockpit, digital mon itors for flight instrumentation and the addition of mission avionics. While this transition will facilitate many advantages for the pilots and crews, Chester said that it will be hard to say good-bye. Even with the upgrades ahead for the squadron, HSL 42 Det. 7 pilots said their current SH-60Bs still have a lot of fight left in them. Our maintenance team does an out standing job of keeping our aircraft fully mission capable and ready to partici pate in all operations, said HSL-42 pilot Lt.j.g. Joal Fischer. As for their part, many members of the Proud Warrior crew said they feel a tremendous pride in being the last crew to maintain the SH-60Bs for their squadron. I think its cool to know we are play ing a role in a little bit of history, said Aviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Torre Reese. After this deployment we wont be named HSL-42 anymore, so we want to send it out on a high note. Jason Dunham and HSL-42 Det. 7 are deployed along with other CSG 8 ships and aircraft to include USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guidedmissile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 7, and Destroyer Squadron 28. low American; especially in the support we pro vide conducting Counter Transnational Organized Crime operations and Operation Martillo. Tidds next assign ment is as the Director for Operations at the Joint Staff in Washington DC. Admiral Tidd, we salute you. For your lead ership, your dedicated service and the service and sacrifices of your family as you move back to the Pentagon. Admiral Harris, you are taking over a superb organization and I look forward watching you take it to further plac es, Fraser said. I am very honored to join the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command team that has been so skill fully led by Admiral Kurt Tidd and the Fourth Fleet staff to ensure the secu rity, increase the stability and further the partner ships in the SOUTHCOM region, said Harris. COMUSNAVSO/ C4F address supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.From Page 1COMUSNAVSO 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 9

Eisenhower CSG Deploys 6,000 SailorsFrom Navy Public Affairs Support Element, NorfolkThe Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKE CSG) and its nearly 6,000 Sailors departed Naval Station Norfolk and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., June 20, to support oper ations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), command ed by Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock, and guided missile destroyers USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) deployed from Naval Station Norfolk. Guidedmissile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) and guid ed-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) deployed from Naval Station Mayport. Hitchcock said the ship and its crew are in great spirits. Even though she is 35 years old, she is at the peak of her game with all the most current technol ogy and the best gear, said Hitchcock. The ship and crew have been out for five months of the past year and they are really excited and ready to go do our job. Commanded by Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, IKE CSG is comprised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, Winston S. Churchill, Jason Dunham, Hue City and Farragut. Manazir said that the striking power of the air craft carrier is usually the main focus. We see the airplanes coming off and on the front end, but the DDG 51 Arleigh Burke class of destroyers is so flexible that we can send them in to do any mission, said Manazir. The full power of the strike group is only demonstrated when we are surrounded by our DDG 51 class destroy ers and our Ticonderoga rover class cruisers like Hue City. The aircraft squad rons of CVW-7 embarked aboard IKE Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 143 Pukin Dogs, VFA131 Wildcats, VFA83 Rampagers, and VFA-103 Jolly Rogers, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron 140 Patriots, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 121 Bluetails, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 Rawhides and Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron 5 Nightdippers. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, the IKE CSG deployment will focus heavily on mari time security operations and theater security coop eration efforts. These operations are designed to set regional stability and economic prosper ity in those regions, said Manazir. IKE CSG has success fully completed a series of complex training events and certifications over the last several months to ensure they operate effec tively and safely together. Our flexibility and power comes from the training of our Sailors, said Manazir. Weve been training since October of last year in complex operations, certifications and training exercises to make sure we are ready for deployment. -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsBoatswain's Mate 2nd Class (SW) Scott Tatum embraces his wife Sarah before embarking the guided-missile cruis er USS Hue City (CG 66) for a 7 month deployment with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKE CSG). IKE CSG will provide support in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operations. -Photo by Michael LegerSailors man the rails as the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) departs Naval Station Mayport to join the USS Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG) for deployment. The IKE CSG deployment will focus heavily on mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 9

PAGE 10

The following are just a sample of volunteer opportunities available through NS Mayport and Volunteer Jacksonville. For more information, call or Dianne Parker at 5425380 or you can immedi ately sign-up online for opportunities using www. volunteer gatewayjack sonville.org. Pet Adoption Event Needs Volunteers First Coast No More Homeless Pets along with shelter and rescue groups from across Northeast Florida are holding a July Mega Pet Adoption event July 13-15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Volunteers are needed to help sup port this event and to help find homes for more than 600 animals dur ing the three-day event. Volunteers will partici pate in set-up acting as greeters, assist with dog and cat handling tasks, provide overnight safety for the animals and teardown. For more informa tion or to volunteer email mtekin@fcnmhp.org or volunteer@fcnmhp.org or call 674-0665. Guardian ad Litem Be the voice for chil dren abused, neglected, or abandoned. These children have no ability to participate in decisions affecting their lives. When children are removed from their homes, the courts can appoint a spe cial advocate to make sure that the best interests of the child is given appro priate consideration. This advocate is known as a Guardian ad Litem. In the 4th Judicial Circuit, which includes Clay, Duval and Nassau Counties, there are more than 2,000 chil dren who need an advo cate to help them navigate the Dependency system. As we build our volun teer base we are asking members of our commu nity to consider being a Guardian as Litem. These guardians do not pro vide direct care for the children; the guardians ad litem visit the child at least once per month, interview family mem bers, gather information from medical, mental health, and education professionals, and attend court hearings to ensure the best interests of the children are maintained. The work is compelling. To become a Guardian ad Litem, candidates need a compassionate heart, be at least 19 years old, complete 30 hours of ini tial training and under go a background check. The process begins with a screening interview so you can learn more about this opportunity to make a difference in the life of a child. If this kind of volunteer opportunity sounds like something you would like to partic ipate in, please visit the Guardian ad Litem web site, www.guardianadlitem.org, or call 904-6301200 to schedule a screen ing interview. First Coast No More Homeless Pets First Coast No More Homeless Pets brand new high capacity Spay / Neuter Clinic opens this month. The new facility will be able to help thou sands of pets and own ers as well as stray and feral cats -each year, with free or low cost spay/ neuter and low cost vac cinations. We still need lots of volunteers for the clinic at the new location on Norwood Avenue. No medical experience needed. For more information, email Debbie Fields at dlfields@bellsouth.net Jacksonville International Airport Volunteer Ambassador Program We are looking for vol unteer to assist travelers with locating arrival and departure gates, tele phones, baggage claim and ticketing areas. The Ambassadors provide vital customer assis tance and a lot of smiles to ensure a pleasant and memorable experience while traveling through our airport. Benefits of being in the Ambassador program include gratitude of the passengers served each day, invitations, to volunteer appreciation events, free parking at the airport, meal voucher for every four-hour period worked, service recogni tion and the opportunity to meet people from all over the world. Contact Yvonne Pooler at 904-7412006 or email ypooler@ jaa.aero. Jacksonville Zoo The Jacksonville Zoo is asking for volunteers. Volunteers are needed to educate varied audi ences about the natural world, teach conserva tion messages, beautify the grounds, assist guests in various areas of the park, input data, lend a hand in animal care areas, answer questions, drive trains and enhance guests experiences. You provide the interest and enthusiasm, and the zoo will provide the training. Scheduling is flexible. Volunteers receive special discounts, free admission, newsletters and special programs only available to employees and volun teers. Take this opportu nity to meet others who share your interests in the animal kingdom. All interested person nel please CS1 Hopkins or call 270-5373 for more information. YMCA of Jacksonville YMCA of Jacksonville is looking for volunteers for their outreach programs geared towards males. For more information, con tact Terra Herzberger at 265-1820. Students Visit To Learn About Navy CareersStaffHigh school partici pants of Floridas All Things Are Possible Program visited Naval Station Mayport Friday to learn more about Navy life. The ATAPP group seeks to educate, inspire and encourage youth to pur sue their goals despite their challenging pasts. Program Director Jermesa Lee said the ATAPP came to the naval station to demonstrate to students the potential of a military career. [We came to Mayport] to allow them the oppor tunity to see differ ent options-whats out there for them after high school, Lee said. Mass Communications Specialist 1st Class William Townsend and Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Ashley Monroe spoke with the eight stu dents about opportuni ties in the U.S. Navy and conducted a personalized tour of the base. Tonieka Sawyer, a 17-year-old student from Miami, expressed interest in pursuing a career in the Navy. What interests me about the Navy is that they take care of their own, Sawyer said. -Photo by Kaytlyn RibichTeenagers from All Things Are Possible Program stand in front of the static display near the front gate. The group, whose goals are to educate and inspire youth, visited Naval Station Mayport last week to learn more about naval careers. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 11

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 11 Local Culinary Specialists Learn Art Of Cake Decorating Navy Food Management Team MayportThe Navy Food Management Team (NFMT) Mayport hosted cake decorating training at the Naval Station Mayports Oasis Galley recently. A dozen local Culinary Specialists (CS) attended the training. NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Cafs Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW) Adrian Dorsey provided the training to the local Culinary Specialists. Dorsey is a renowned cake decorator, and some say one of the most gifted cake decorators in the U. S. Navy. It was great oppor tunity for our local Culinary Specialists to receive hands-on cake decorating training, said NFMT Mayport Officer in Charge Master Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/ AW) Michael Carter. Ive watched him decorate several cakes for change of commands, reenlist ments, and retirement ceremonies. These were not your ordinary cakes; they were very detailed and some of the most elaborate designed cakes I have ever seen. Naval Station Mayport Oasis Galley Food Service Officer Chief Warrant Officer 4 Wanda Trammell commended Dorsey for his outstand ing training. CS1 Dorsey definitely provided a great founda tion for those Culinary Specialists who are seek ing to become cake dec orators, Trammell said. His professional training and knowledge gave these Sailors some great ideas for decorating cakes now and in the future. Seeing CS1 Dorsey in action was like watching an artist compose one of his best paintings, said Chief CS David Hall of USS Florida. He defi nitely has a lot of talent, and he displayed it this week. We will definitely take back the knowledge and training he provided this week and use it in the future. All and all, it was a great week of training for everyone. I considered myself extremely lucky to have the opportunity show my diversity in the Culinary Specialists rating, said Dorsey. It has always been my goal to learn and share with other Culinary Specialists the things I have learned. I am thank ful to some great leaders who gave me the oppor tunities to expand my knowledge in my rate. That is something I will always remember. -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsCulinary Specialist 1st Class Adrian Dorseys displayed his cake decorating skills at a recent frocking ceremony with a cake that impressed everyone in attendance. -U.S. Navy PhotoPictured from left: After a day of decorating cakes, Master Chief Culinary Specialist (CS) Michael Carter, Cake Decorating Instructor CS1 Adrian Dorsey, CS3 Matthew Pitt, CSC David Hall, CSC Willie Moore, CS1 Juan DeJesus, CS2 Cedric Dickinson, and CSCM Paulette Williams show off their finished products. NS Mayport Water Quality Report ReleasedFrom Mayport EnvironmentalThe Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast, Water Utilities Division, NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is your water utility service provider. Were very pleased to provide you with this years Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excel lent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is three deep wells which draw from the Floridan Aquifer. In 2011, the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system. These assessments were con ducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our wells. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp There are three potential sources of contamination identified for this system with low to mod erate susceptibility levels. Our treatment of your water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination to properly disinfect. For further information or questions con cerning this report or NAVFAC Southeast Water Utility Division that serves you, it is requested: Navy on-base housing residents first contact their Station Housing Office and activity employees should first contact their safety or environmental offices. All questions will be answered through your activity or directly with the customer. In addition, Navy personnel who live in private resi dences can also contact NAVFAC Southeast for general questions on water quality or to understand the information provided in other utility CCRs. To contact your water utility, please call NAVFAC Southeast Water Utilities, at (904) 542-5610. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please make that call. NAVFAC Southeast routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws and regulations. Except where indicated other wise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period January 1st to December 31st 2011. Data obtained before January 1, 2011, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regula tions. In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms weve provided the following defini tions: Action Level (AL) the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a TEST RESULTS TABLE NAVSTA MAYPORT Radiological ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination Radium 226 (pCi/l) 06/11 N 0.3N/A0 5 Erosion of natural deposits Inorganic ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLGMCL Likely Source of Contamination Antimony (ppb) 06/11 N 2.1 N/A 6 6 Discharge from petroleum refiner ies; fire retardants, ceramics; electronics; solder. Barium (ppm) 06/11 N 0.026 N/A N/A 2 Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refiner ies; erosion of natural deposits Fluoride (ppm) 06/11 N 0.69 N/A 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories; water additive which promotes strong teeth when at optimum levels between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm Nitrite (ppm) 06/11 N 0.0610.0611 1 Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits Sodium (ppm) 06/11 N 21N/AN/A 160 Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil Disinfection By-Products (TTHMs/HAA5s/Chlorine residual) Note: The results in the Level Detected column are the annual average of quarterly averages. The Range of Results is the range of results (lowest to highest) at the individual sampling sites for Stage 1 monitoring. Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLG or MRDLG MCL or MRDLLikely Source of Contamination Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) (ppb) Quarterly 2011 N 79.0 53.15128.06 N/A 80 By-product of drinking water chlorination Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (ppb) Quarterly 2011 N 19.5 13.3123.94 N/A 60 By-product of drinking water chlorination Chlorine Residual (ppm) Monthly 2011 N 1.26 0.2-2.2 4 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes Volatile Organic ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo/yr) MCL Violation Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLG or MRDLGMCL or MRDLLikely Source of ContaminationDichloromethane (ppb) 06/11, 12/11 N 0.82 ND 0.82 05Discharge from pharmaceutical and chemical factories Lead and Copper (Tap Water)Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) AL Violation Y/N 90th Percentile Result No. of sites exceeding the AL MCLG AL (Action Level)Likely Source of ContaminationCopper (tap water) (ppm) 7/2010 N 0.0545 1 of 66 sites 1.3 1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives Lead (tap water) (ppb) 7/2010 N 1.35 2 of 66 sites 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural depositsSee Water, Page 20

PAGE 12

12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 13

Mayport K9 Unit Training Keeps Team Ready Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastEars up, tails wagging and tongue out no this is not any ordinary dog wanting to play. Their Naval Station Mayports Security K-9 Unit mili tary working dogs (MWD) ready for daily training. MWD teams are com prised of a dog and their handler, that are trained to provide deterrence, drug or bomb detection and patrol services. Training is very impor tant; we have to be able to depend on our dogs, day in and day out, because they are our partners in the field, said Masterat-Arms 1st Class James Watkins, Naval Station Mayport kennel supervi sor. Training takes place everyday, all day; every job is seen as an opportu nity to train the handlers and animals, as well as to test their abilities. A typical training day starts with an obedience obstacle course to work on control and endur ance. As the day went on handlers and their fourlegged partners moved on to a patrol and scouttraining exercise where the MWD teams chased after an armed suspect. This is great for the MWD teams to get out there and do this training as closed to real as pos sible, said Watkins. We like to train how we fight and fight like we train. Mayport is home to seven dogs, each assigned to a handler that is fully responsible for their welfare to include feed ing, exercising, training, grooming and physical wellness. After working hours, weekends and holidays are no exception. Its an around the clock job that forms a special bond between the dog and handler that allows both of them to depend on one another, said Master-at-Arms Seaman Sharon Berg. The Naval Station Mayport MWD division is assigned to the base, but dog and handler teams are assigned to tempo rarily duties and special details in addition to their duties here. Berg discusses how they go on deployments over sea to place like Afghanistan and Djibouti, or special mission like presidential campaigns and secret service mis sion. We also get to do fun events were there will be a special guess like concerts, fleet weeks and veteran benefits. As the day winds down Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Thomas Bohannon said his ultimate goal for the unit is to achieve Kennel of the Year. This award began as a way to encourage cama raderie as well as promote a keen sense of competi tion among the regions 10 kennels. Receiving this award would mean a lot to the kennel, said Bohannon. It shows our dedication and hard work we put into work every day here. Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Thomas Bohannon, Master-at-Arms Seaman Sharon Berg and military working dog KKowalski contain their 'suspect', Master-at-Arms 1st Class James Walkins, during a patrol and scout training exer cise. The military working dogs are trained to provide deterrence, drug or bomb detection and patrol services.-Photo by MCSN Damian BergMaster-at-Arms Seaman Sharon Berg, a K-9 handler with the military working dog unit at Naval Station Mayport runs her K-9 partner, KKowalski, through an obstacle course at the base kennel. Berg runs the course with KKowalski multiple times a day to promote endurance and motor skills. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 13

PAGE 14

June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 6: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 6: Red, White & Blue Bash. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Wes Cobb Band. Prizes will be awarded for the most Patriotic Outfit. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided. FREE. 270-7205 July 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 July 7: UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 10: Moonlight 5K Run/ 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 10: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 11: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) July 11: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 July 11: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 July 11: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 July 13: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 MWRJune 29: Mystery Movie: 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Settle in for chills and thrills as we enjoy a movie and snacks! 246-0347 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Freedom Friday Carnival. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small chil dren. 270-7205 July 23: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins Registration is June 20-21 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 29: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy three hours of bowling and an awesome video laser light show as well as a traditional spaghetti dinner, presents for the kids, free Santa hats and more. 270-5377 KID a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org Closed For July 4thThe following MWR facilities will be closed on July 4: Admin/Business Office/IT/Personnel; Auto Skills; Bingo; CDCs; CDH program; CPO Club; Mayport Bowling/Fast Lanes Grille; ITT/ Rec Ticket Vehicle; Ocean Breeze Conference Center; Outdoor Adventures; Recycling/Vehicle Scale/ Storage; Repair/Maintenance; Surfside Fitness/ Youth Activities Center/Teen Center 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 15

The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 2: Teds Montana Grill Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation Only. July 3: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Military Appreciation Game with Fireworks! FREE. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 4: Fireworks at Jacksonville Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation Only. July 6: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. July 6: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 6: Red, White & Blue Bash. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Wes Cobb Band. Prizes will be awarded for the most Patriotic Outfit. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided. FREE. 270-7205 July 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 July 7: UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 8: A Day at the Beach: Huguenot Park. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. July 9: Blackjack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 10: Moonlight 5K Run/ 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 10: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 11: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents July 11: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 July 11: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. For tick ets, (904) 270-5431 July 11: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 LIBERTYNaval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series This is a 4-week pro gram for CFLs and ACFLs only. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., The After Party Mayport Sandbox Monday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7: 30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Tuesday 6:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 6:30 a.m., HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Wednesday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Weight Training For Warfighters 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Friday 7 a.m., Spinning Water Aerobics These classes meet at the Base Pool weather permitting Monday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Thursday 7 a.m., Command Aqua 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Friday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Therapy MWR -Photo courtesy of MWRU.S. Coast Guard and COMUSNAVSO soccer teams come together after playing the 2012 Spring Playoff championship game. Coast Guard took the trophy across SRA1A after scoring the winning goal in overtime.Coast Guard, NAVSO Battle It Out In Soccer PlayoffsFrom MWRU.S. Coast Guard and COMUSNAVSO Latinos took the soccer field on last Tuesday to battle it out for the Post Season Playoff Championship. The Latinos were the first to score on a penalty kick in the first half. Coast Guard answered shortly after with a goal of their own. With numerous saves by both goal keepers the teams went into halftime tied at 1. In the second half the Latinos again opened up with a goal to take the lead 2-1. With less than two minutes left in the game the Coast Guard tied it up forc ing an overtime situation. Overtime consisted of a Golden Goal five-minute playoff meaning the first team to score wins. The Coast Guard came out strong bringing the ball to the Latinos goal and in the opening seconds scored the winning goal becoming the 2012 Spring Playoff Champions. Time To Hit The BeachIntramural 4V4 Beach Volleyball season has just begun. Come join us on our new Beach Volleyball courts for some 4V4 action. For more information on how you can get involved contact Rita at the gym 904-2705451-Official Photo -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSwimming Instructor Shane Massey teaches a student how to tread water during an instructional swimming class. The class is meant to teach children about water safety as well as how to swim. Swim Time At Mayport THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 15

PAGE 16

Workshops Available For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. June 28, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women FFSC Room 702 BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.4p.m., Resume Writing FFSC TBD July 5, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women FFSC Room 702 July 5, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 9-12, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 July 10, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 July 10, 6-7 p.m., EFM Support Group Building 1 Room 104 July 11, 9-11 a.m., Financial Leadership Seminar FFSC Room 719 July 11, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be ener gizing and a factor in motivat ing us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This program is designed to provide partici pants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help partici pants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. July 11, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 12, 10:30-11:30 a.m., How To Survive The Holidays, FFSC Room 719 July 12, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women FFSC Room 702 July 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 14, 10 a.m.-until, IA Family Outing Adventure Landing July 16-20, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training, Building 1 Room 1616 July 16, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of disdain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. July 17, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 July 18, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 19, 8 am.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training, Building 1, Room 1124 July 19, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women FFSC Room 702 July 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 23-26, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building 1 Room 1616 July 24, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 July 25, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying Seminar FFSC Room 702 July 25, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 26, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women FFSC Room 702 July 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 30, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to iden tify barriers to effective communication. Class is a one-time 3 hour class. Couples are encour aged but not required to attend class together. July 31, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 17

Thursday, June 28 The Jacksonville Public Library, 303 Laura St. N. Room G-4, Conference Center Level, in con junction with the Small Business Administration, presents Resources for Small Business, a free workshop for Spanishspeaking small busi ness owners and those thinking about starting a business from 1-3 p.m. Workshop topics will include planning and business development, acquiring financing and research strategies for locating print and elec tronic business resourc es. Pre-registration is required and seating is limited. To register or learn more, contact Greg Royce or Crystal Chase at (904) 630-2401 or e-mail jaxpubliclibrary_business@coj.net. Saturday, June 30 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an intriguing presentation and gain insight into the spiders world. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Monday, July 2 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. This months program presented by Karen Stephenson is for Photo Competitions from Composition to Technical, from the Wow Factor to Presentation. This is a freeevent with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Tuesday, July 3 Join one of the larg est fireworks displays in Northeast Florida as the World Golf Village cel ebrates Independence Day on Tuesday, July 3. Bring blankets or lawn chairs and find a spot around the Walk of Champions to take in the grand fireworks show. A minimal parking fee will be required for entry to the event. For event information, visit the events calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame. org. The Renaissance World Golf Village Resort is offering a dinner, show and fireworks package. The ticket includes din ner, a live performance from VoicePlay, and preferred seating to see the World Golf Village Community fireworks. The Stars and Stripes package includes over night accommodations. For more information, please visit www.world golfrenaissance.com or call 904-940-8696. Wednesday, July 4 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is cel ebrating Independence Day with a Garden Concert featuring The RiverTown Band on from 7 to 10 p.m. Put on your red, white and blue, grab a blanket or chair and come celebrate Americas 236th Birthday in The Cummer Gardens. With the St. Johns River as a backdrop and stars above, the sounds of The RiverTown Band will keep you entertained all eve ning. The Cummer will be closed during normal business hours on July 4, but will open at 6 p.m. for the Garden Concert. Guests are welcome to bring blankets, chairs, food and alcoholic bev erages. Food and refresh ments will also be avail able for purchase from the TreeCup Cafe. Tickets are $10 for members, $20 for non-members and $400 for a table, which includes reserved seating and a gourmet picnic basket for 10 people. Children 3 and under enjoy free admis sion. The concert will go on rain or shine. To pur chase tickets, please call (904) 899-6004 or visit http://www.cummer.org/ programs-events/calendar-of-events/fourth-julyconcert. Please note: Fireworks will be presented on the River by the City of Jacksonville and the view from the Gardens is obstructed. Saturday, July 14 The Duval County Extension Office will offer a program on Organic Gardening from 9 a.m.-noon at the Duval Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville. Topics will include organic soil amendments, com posting, pest manage ment techniques and an introduction to permaculture. Cost is $5 to attend. Call or email Becky at 255-7450 or beckyd@ coj.net to register. Please include contact phone number when emailing.Out in Town Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more vet erans you will help. Our mission is to win this con test, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text 4970 to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an indi vidual annual pass and $30 on a family annual pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addi tion, honorably dis charged veterans who have service connected disabilities, and surviv ing spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifications and nec essary forms to receive these discounts, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 17

PAGE 18

18 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 19

Bring Child To Work Day At Public Works-Photos by Paige GnannPublic Works Mayport employees visit Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 6 Mayport with their children during a Bring Your Child to Work Day on June 14. The department planned a day full of events, including a base tour, demonstrations and fitness techniques by explosive ordnance technicians at EODMU. Lt. Mildred Canipe allows children to pet her dog during a K-9 demonstration by Mayport Security during the Bring Your Child to Work Day at Public Works Mayport.SERMC Expands Fleet SupportCommander, Navy Regional Main tenance Center Public AffairsThe Navys Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) in Norfolk, Va. opened an inspection and repair ser vice June 15 for self-con tained breathing appa ratus (SCBA) units that will and reduce costs and shorten the time it takes to restore the units to their full operational condition. SCBA devices are worn over the chest to provide a self-contained source of breathable air in emer gency situations such as firefighting. SERMC now supports our ships with inspecting their (SCBA) equipment, and providing cost-effec tive and more efficient repairs than if they had to send them out in town to repair or replace their units, said Capt. Ron Cook, SERMC command ing officer. Until now, private com panies have conducted SCBA inspections, repairs and certifications with costs that approach $100 per unit. The number of work requests will vary from month to month, depending on the status of the ships equipment and the schedule of the ships. Each ship possesses approx 225 bottles that require periodic testing and hydrostatic certifica tion. When ships sent their SCBA units to pri vate companies, the turnaround time often couldnt support the ships tight timelines for inspections and deploy ments, said Edgar McNulty, SERMCs Engines Product Family Supervisor. Now that we have an in-house capability, were able to manage the inspections and repairs in a way that better supports ships schedules. We expect the shop to be very busy after opening for service to the fleet. Learn more about Naval Sea Systems Commands regional maintenance centers at http://www. navsea.navy.mil/ OnWatch/readiness2. html. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 19

PAGE 20

water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Leve l The Maximum Allowed (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treat ment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal The Goal (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) The high est level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is a convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of a drinking water disinfec tant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. Not Applicable (N/A) No value limit or restric tion has been applied to this particular parameter. Non-Detects (ND) indicates that the sub stance was not found by laboratory analysis. Parts per billion (ppb) one part per billion cor responds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) one part per mil lion corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water trav els over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves natu rally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radio active material, and can pick up substances result ing from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic con taminants such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater dis charges, oil and gas pro duction, mining, or farm ing. (C) Pesticides and her bicides which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of indus trial processes and petro leum production, and can also come from gas sta tions, urban stormwater runoff, and septic sys tems. (E) Radioactive con taminants which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young chil dren. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and compo nents associated with service lines and home plumbing. NAVFAC Southeast is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but can not control the variety of materials used in plumb ing components. When your water has been sit ting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead expo sure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/ safewater/lead. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regula tions which limit the amount of certain con taminants in water pro vided by public water systems. FDA regula tions establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indi cate that the water poses a health risk. More infor mation about contami nants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agencys Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improve ments that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are some times reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for under standing. *Some people may be more vulnerable to con taminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing che motherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disor ders, some elderly, and infants can be particular ly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other micro biological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).From Page 11WaterDoD Supports Proposals For Military, Veteran HomeownersAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department sup ports legislative proposals that would provide increased career support and homeowner protec tions to military members and vet erans, a senior defense official told Congress June 21. Taking care of our military before, during and after their ser vice to our country is one of the Department of Defenses highest priorities, Frederick E. Vollrath, who is performing the duties of the assistant secretary of defense for readiness and force management, told the House Veterans Affairs Committees subcommittee on eco nomic opportunity. He thanked the committee for efforts to address some of the economic challenges service members and their families face during active duty and as they transition into civilian life. Vollrath joined representatives of the Veterans Affairs and Labor departments, as well as veterans organizations representatives, to weigh in on four bills he said would significantly affect service members and veterans. The hearing was cut short so the subcommittee members could get to the House floor for a vote, but Vollrath submitted writ ten testimony outlining the Defense Department positions. Two of the proposed bills, the Hire at Home Act and the Help Veterans Return to Work Act, focus on jobs. DOD supports the Hire at Home Act, which encourages states to consider training when granting civilian credentials, Vollrath said. If passed, the law would require states to consider a veterans military training when processing applica tions to become nursing assistants, registered nurses, emergency medical technicians or commercial driv ers. Vollrath noted the new DODled Credentialing and Licensing Task Force stood up to help service members and veterans apply skills learned in the military to earn cre dentials, certifications and licens es across a broad range of civilian occupations. The task force, Vollrath explained, will identify military specialties that readily transfer to high-demand jobs, initially focusing on the man ufacturing, health care, informa tion technology, logistics and firstresponder sectors. It also will work with civilian credentialing and licensing associations to address any requirements not covered by military training, will and help ser vice members get greater access to certification and licensing exams. The Department of Defense pro vides high-quality training to ser vice members, and this high-quality training is closely linked to many of the high-demand, high-growth occupations in the civilian sector, Vollrath told the panel. Our men and woman have done incredible work, mastered cuttingedge technologies and adapted to unpredictable situations, he continued. Those skills are what America needs for the jobs and industries of the future. Vollrath was less enthusias tic about language in the Help Veterans Return to Work Act, which he said actually would limit use of an undue hardship defense under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. As written, he said, the bill would limit this defense so it could be claimed only by small businesses. The Defense Department shares the goal of ensuring that the undue hardship exception is used in ways that reinforce the laws intent, he said. DOD supports the intent of two other bills that would expand the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to increase mortgage protections to military members, Vollrath report ed. The Military Family Protection Act seeks to improve protections for service members and surviving spouses against mortgage foreclo sures. It seeks to expand protec tions for troops serving in support of contingency operations, veterans who are disabled at retirement, and surviving spouses of service mem bers whose deaths were serviceconnected or occurred while sup porting a contingency operation. The bill also would extend these protections to cover obligations made both before and after military service. The department also supports the Fairness for Military Homeowners Act, Vollrath told the panel. If passed, it would ensure that military members who move away from their principal residences for active duty arent prevented from refinancing the mortgages on those properties. Vollrath said this measure is con sistent with the overall goals of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to ensure the consumer rights of military members are not unfairly limited because they serve in the military. He expressed concern, however, that the legislation could affect loan subsidy costs, and said DOD will continue to review the bill and offer technical help as needed. You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 21

Team USA loaded With Soldiers For OlympicsArmy Installation Management CommandThe U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program will send what it describes as its strongest contingent of athletes and coaches ever to the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Eleven WCAP coaches and athletes have already qualified to participate. Several more are compet ing for spots on Team USA at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team trials here, which began June 21 and conclude July 1. WCAP provides sol dier-athletes the support and training needed to successfully compete in Olympic sports on the national and interna tional levels, including the winter and summer Olympics, Pan American Games, world cham pionships and Conseil International du Sport Militaires Military World Games. The soldier-athletes serve as ambassadors for the Army by promoting it to the world and assisting with recruiting and reten tion efforts. Since 1948, more than 600 soldiers have represented the United States as Olympic athletes and coaches. They have collected more than 140 medals in a variety of sports, including boxing, wrestling, rowing, shooting, bobsled and track and field. WCAP wrestling head coach Shon Lewis, a retired staff sergeant who has led the Army to 11 national team titles in Greco-Roman wres tling, will lead three of his wrestlers to London as an assistant coach for Team USA. As a WCAP athlete, Lewis, 45, of Oakland, Calif., is a 12-time armed forces champion and a 10-time national team member. He was named Greco-Roman Coach of the Year five times by USA Wrestling, the governing body for wrestling in the United States. Two-time Olympian Sgt. 1st Class Dremiel Byers, 37, of Kings Mountain, N.C., will wrestle in the 120-kilogram/264.5pound Greco-Roman division. A world cham pion in 2002, Byers, a 10-time national cham pion, is the only U.S. wres tler who has won gold, silver and bronze medals at the world champion ships. He also is the only American wrestler to win gold at both the open and military world champion ships. Spc. Justin Lester is a strong medal contender in the 66-kilogram/145.5 pound Greco-Roman division. Lester, 28, a native of Akron, Ohio, heads to England as USA Wrestlings reigning Greco-Roman Wrestler of the Year. A two-time bronze medalist at the world championships, Lester has more than ample motivation to suc ceed in London. Ive had two bronze medals, and theyre all right, but I need an Olympic gold medal, he said. Thats eating at me more than anything, that I dont have that gold medal. Two-time Olympian Sgt. Spenser Mango, 25, of St. Louis, will compete in the 55-kilogram/121pound Greco-Roman class. A four-time nation al champion, Mango is eager to return to the Olympics. The first time, Ill admit, I was surprised myself, Mango recalled of his Olympic debut in Beijing. I knew I could do it, but I hadnt done it yet. This time, its all business need to bring home some medals. Ive wrestled almost all the top guys in the world in my weight class. I know what I need to do just get out there and really get after it. Four-time Olympian Sgt. 1st Class Daryl Szarenski, 44, of Saginaw, Mich., will compete in both the 50-meter free pistol and 10-meter air pistol. He struck gold with the air pistol and sil ver with the free pistol at the 2011 Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico. Szarenski finished 13th at the Olympics in Athens, Greece, in 2004 and 13th in Beijing in 2008. Hes aiming for a shot at the podium in London. Im hoping to keep wearing them down and get in there and get a medal out of it, Szarenski said. I think the training regimen that I have now is a lot better than what it was in the past. Ive changed a couple techni cal issues and I think Im heading in the right direc tion. I feel that Im shoot ing the best now that Ive ever shot. Two-time Olympian Sgt. 1st Class Keith Sanderson, 37, of San Antonio, will compete in the 25-meter rapid-fire pistol event. He set an Olympic record during the qualification rounds in Beijing but left China without a medal. He hopes to improve upon that fifth-place result in London. I remember the excitement, Sanderson said. That was more than I was ready for. Its faded a little bit, but I remember it was awesome. It was more than I could con trol. Im looking forward to feeling that again. ... It was something that words cant describe, and to this day, words cant describe it. I didnt sleep for two or three days after I compet ed not a wink from all of the adrenalin. Four-time Olympian Maj. David Johnson, 48, of Hampton, Va., has coached three athletes to Olympic medals and led shooters to 25 medals in World Cup events. He will again coach Team USAs rifle shooters in London. Two-time Olympian Staff Sgt. John Nunn, 34, of Evansville, Ind., already qualified for the 50-meter race walk and might attempt to qualify in the 20-kilometer race walk on June 30 at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team Trials in Eugene, Ore. Nunn competed in the 20-kilometer event at the 2004 Olympics in Athens but did not make Team USA for the 2008 Beijing Games. His personal best in the 20K race walk is 1 hour, 22 minutes, 31 sec onds. Spc. Dennis Bowsher, 29, of Dallas, will compete in modern pentathlon, a five-sport event that includes fencing, swim ming, equestrian show jumping, cross country and laser pistol shoot ing all in the same day. Bowsher finished fourth in both the 2011 Military World Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the 2011 Pan American Games in Guadalajara, where he secured an Olympic berth. Staff Sgt. Charles Leverette, 39, of Brent, Ala., will serve as Team USAs assistant boxing coach in London. A for mer WCAP heavyweight boxer, Leverette was a bronze medalist at the 2004 U.S. Olympic Boxing Team Trials. Staff Sgt. Joe Guzman, 32, of Eloy, Ariz., will serve as the trainer and help work the corners for Team USAs boxers in London. As a WCAP boxer, Guzman was a three-time armed forces champion. Four-time Olympian Basheer Abdullah, a retired staff sergeant and head coach of the WCAP boxing team from St. Louis, will serve as Team USAs head boxing coach in London. He also led the U.S. boxing team in the 2004 Athens Games and served as a technical advisor for Team USA at the Olympics in 2000 and 2008. Several other WCAP soldiers are vying for Olympic berths at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team trials here. WCAP also features a Paralympic program for wounded warriors and expects to qualify at least one soldier for the London Paralympic Games. Sights are set on qualifying several more for the 2014 Paralympic Games in Sochi, Russia, and the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Audie Murphy Honored American Forces Press ServiceThe militarys top enlisted member joined a local chapter of the Sgt. Audie L. Murphy Club on June 20 in Arlington, Va., in honoring the clubs namesake on his birthday. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joined the Military District of Washington Sergeant Audie L. Murphy Club in a wreath-laying cer emony to pay tribute to the American war hero, a Medal of Honor recipient, who is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Eighty-eight years ago today, Battaglia said at the event, we see a young man like Audie Leon Murphy who would become such a great American hero ... through his life especially the life he served protecting our nation. [Its] quite impressive. Battaglia noted that Murphy attained the rank of staff sergeant just a year and a half after joining the Army. He received a battlefield commission in October 1944, and rose to the rank of major. [But] Sergeant Audie Murphy wasnt someone about awards, Battaglia said. He was about tak ing care of his men and women and getting the mission accomplished. And thats why I say ... its befitting of me to ... rec ognize Sergeant Audie Murphy on his birthday, a very monumental date in the history of our ... armed forces. But [Im also here to] thank the members of his club and the loyal and dedicated soldiers that continue to serve honorably and with distinguished contribu tions and volunteerism throughout their com munities and neighbor hoods. Battaglia was joined by Army Sgt. 1st Class Jessica Taylor, president of the local chapter, who serves in the Office of the Secretary of Defense Mess. It is my honor today to honor the leader of our charge in the Sgt. Audie Murphy Club Audie Leon Murphy, she said. Today would be his 88th birthday. We welcome you all. Other club members played prominent roles during the ceremony, including treasurer Army Staff Sgt. Tanner Welch, who recited Murphys biography. Audie Murphy was killed in a plane crash on a mountain top in Roanoke, Va., May 28, 1971, Welch said. Fittingly, his body was recovered two days later on Memorial Day. Audie may have been the last American war hero, he added. He was the best combat soldier in the 200-plus year history of the United States. Battaglia said Audie Murphy is buried next to thousands and thou sands of great American service men and women, but is special in his own right. I think his service in the Army goes beyond just that in the Army, he said after the ceremony, reflecting on what he has read about Murphy. Id like it to resonate throughout all the ser vices. He wasnt worried about awards and decora tions. The man was there to accomplish a mission, he was there to protect his country, and he was there to protect his men and women. And thats all he really cared about. -Photo by Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. An honor guard soldier places a wreath next to the grave of Medal of Honor recipient Army Maj. Audie L. Murphy as Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia, far left, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Military District of Washington chap ter of the Sgt. Audie L. Murphy Club, pay tribute on the World War II heros birthday at Arlington National Cemetery, Va., June 20, 2012. Did you know? Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 21



PAGE 1

Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Have A Blast At MayportBy StaffRainy day plans are in place, but Naval Station Mayport MWR is remain ing opti mistic that Tropical Storm Debby wont dampen spirits or fun at this years Freedom Fest to celebrate Americas Independence on Saturday (June 30) at Sea Otter Pavilion. The pool is scheduled to open for free swim from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. with games and competitions like the Bell Flop contest and a Swim Relay, according to MWR Athletics and Fitness Director Jon Aimone. On land, MWR is setting up inflat able games and rides, including a 300-foot zip line from 4-8 p.m. There will also be two wet slides and two dry slides, a surf machine, climbing wall and MWRs Spider Mountain. Clowns will entertain with face painting and balloon art. Free personalized customer leather IDs are available, as well as super hero photos of you or your child. A DJ will be set up to keep the tunes jumping from 4-9 p.m. Country music artist Ryan Kinder will perform from 9-9:30 p.m. and usher in the pyrotechnics. The firework show is expected to light off at 9:30 p.m. Immediately following the fireworks, country music artist D. Vincent Williams will take the stage to perform and tape a live web broadcast. Everyone in attendance will be a part of this live taping. Food and drinks will be on sale throughout the day. Most items will benefit command family readiness groups, petty officer associations and MWR command funds, Aimone said. In the case of inclement weather, Aimone said the festival will continue inside Beachside Community Center. The pool will close if there is thunder and lightening. For more information about the event, contact MWR at 270-5228. -Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonA U.S. Navy Sailor directs an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter from HSL-46 Detachment Eight as it prepares to shut down after landing aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). The NS Mayport-based detachment is deployed with Nitze as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. HSL-60 Night Ops With Enterprise CSGCOMUSNAVSO/C4F Holds Change Of CommandFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) host ed a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., June 22. Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, COMUSNAVSO/C4F, was relieved by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the former director of Navy Irregular Warfare Office, during the ceremony. The ceremony, presid ed over by Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser, Commander, U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM), served to showcase the numerous accomplishments of the command as a whole while paying tribute to the indi viduals who have maintained the organizations success for more than 60 years. Through his numerous engagements in the region, Admiral Tidd helped deepen and strengthen our partner ships with our naval forces in the region. Not only in Central America but also with our South American partners, Fraser said. Tidd recalled the events of the last year since hed taken command; referring to the staff and all the hard work they accomplished to complete the mission. This has been an exciting, and a humbling experience commanding NAVSO/4th Fleet for the past year, said Tidd. The mission execut ed day in and day out by the men and women of the NAVSO/4th Fleet team is important; we are operat ing on the seas and in the littorals throughout the region every day, building and strengthening partner ships with nations who share a common heritage and a common sense of purpose with us. During Tidds tenure, the operations, deployments and exercises he command ed brought many successes in the efforts to Countering Transnational Organize Crime (CTOC). More impor tantly, Operation Martillo has made a significant impact in illicit drug trafficking opera tions. All of which could not have been accomplished without the contributions of the NAVSO/4th Fleet staff. I would especially like to thank the men and women, active, reserve and civilians, of this terrific NAVSO/4th Fleet Team. They are true professionals, passionate about their work, and they do amazing things every day. Every day, around the clock they work closely with our regional partners to address our common security con cerns across the maritime environment. They are mak ing a difference in the lives and the shared livelihoods of our partners and our fel -Photo by Paige GnannOutgoing Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F), Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, left, and Gen. Douglas Fraser, Commander, U.S. Southern Command, middle, applaud Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, right, as he assumes command of COMUSNAVSO/C4F during a change of command ceremony at NS Mayport on June 22.See COMUSNAVSO, Page 8 D. Vincent Williams will broadcast his NS Mayport performance on live feed from 10-11 p.m. No Paper For July 4Due to the holiday season, The Mirror will be closed on July 4 and will not publish a July 5 edition. Photos and stories should still be submitted through The Mirror email, mayportmirror@comcast.net, no later than July 6 to be included in the July 12 edition of the paper. Free Fleet Market classified ads can be submitted online at www.mayportmirror.com or by fill ing out the free form in the Classified section and submitting by July 6. For more information, call 270-5226 ext. 1011.

PAGE 2

The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, A huge Naval Station Bravo Zulu to everyone who had a hand in welcom ing Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus to Mayport last week, and the wel come news he brought was extremely well received. He officially announced that Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) is indeed coming to Naval Station Mayport and the first ship to arrive in the last quarter of 2013 is USS New York (LPD 21), followed by USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) in 2014. This move, according to Secretary Mabus, underscores just how important Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport are to our national defense, and shows how committed we are to strategic dis persal on the East Coast. In addition to our ARG arrival, USCG Valiant will be a welcomed permanent fixture to our basin beginning Saturday, Aug. 4. I would really like to extend my per sonal thanks to Capt. Steve Shinego, Capt. Bob Hein and Cmdr. J.P. Dunn, and the crews of USS Philippine Sea, USS Gettysburg and the move crew from the World Famous Grandmasters of HSM-46 for their incredible hard work prepping their warships to serve as a key piece for Secretary Mabus announcement. The ships looked like Warships, the crews looked like Warriors, and there is no better way to surround our Secretary of the Navy than with warriors and warships! Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat (hardest working man in show business) Pickard and myself bid a bittersweet fair winds and following seas to USS Farragut (DDG 99) and USS Hue City (CG 66) last Friday, as they join USS Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group for a nine-month deployment. It was awe inspiring to see the ships and crews at their peak of Readiness, ready able and willing to sail in harms way, and our thoughts and prayers are with each one of our shipmates and the families that remain behind. Godspeed Shipmates see you in March! A warm welcome home to Lt. Alicia Salerno from NAVSTA Admin and MA2 Ruben from Security and their IA tours in Afghanistan and Cuba. If you see these shipmates around campus please congratulate and thank them for their service and true grit. Welcome home. Lots of extra folks will be out and about when U.S. Southern Commands (USSOUTHCOM) multinational exer cise, PANAMAX 2012 begins Aug. 6-17, 2012. PANAMAX 2012 is an annual USSOUTHCOM-sponsored exercise series that focuses on ensuring the defense of the Panama Canal. Forces from 17 nations will take part in simu lated training scenarios here and in the waters around the canal and other locations. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 is to exercise a variety of responses to any request from the governments of Panama and Colombia to protect and guarantee safe passage of traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sovereignty. Hurricane season is here. Are you prepared? Talk with your families, dust off your evacuation plans and make sure your TWIMS information is updated. Recent rain and storms should serve as a wakeup call that things can and just might get worse this season. Think of the little things too like having a supply of water on hand, fresh flashlight batteries and most importantly, an evacuation plan. Also, keep all vital papers you have in a grab and go box in case you do need to beat feet. Preparedness is key. Suicide prevention needs our daily attention. I realize that our Sailors and their families face many pressures in their personal lives while in the service of our country, and we are committed to providing help on multiple levels. Please know that we have expertise in place to help, and all of the counseling at our Fleet and Family Support Center is free and confidential. The same goes for sexual assault. There is help available so please know that we are standing by to support. Mark your calendars for June 30. Our MWR team is working up the annual base Freedom Fest at the base Sea Otter pavilion, and this year will be amazing. Live bands, food for purchase, inflata bles for the kids, and fireworks starting at 9:30 p.m. Plan to come out and celebrate with us as we observe our nations independence. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. e safe, and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSBullying is back in the spotlight! Just last week in the national media it was reported that mid dle school students bul lied their bus monitor a woman who could have easily been their mother or grandmother. You probably remem ber some bullying that took place at some time during your school days. You may even have expe rienced some level of bullying or maybe a friend did. Bullying is an all-toocommon human activity that has existed since the beginning of recorded history and is present in most cultures. It is enacted by both boys and girls. Research suggests that somewhere between 30 percent and 60 percent of American schoolchildren report being bullied. But as some parents today omit teaching their children how to appropriately relate to others, bullying comes to the fore front. This is especially true when groups of stu dents are together. The bus incident described above is an example of that. One psychologist is quoted as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger or in this case younger on older. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or had your interests and feelings unfairly damaged by someone more pow erful than you. And this power can take different forms. Although girls are sometimes physically violent, it is boys who tend to be more physical. Florida law defines bul lying as systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psycho logical distress on one or more students and may involve teasing, social exclusion, threat, intimi dation, stalking, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious, or racial harassment, public humiliation, or destruction of prop erty. Harassment is any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture; use of data or computer software; or written, ver bal or physical conduct directed against a student that places the student in reasonable fear of harm to his person or damage to his property; has the effect of substantially interfer ing with a students edu cational performance, opportunities, or benefits; or has the effect of sub stantially disrupting the orderly operation of a school. All parents of schoolage children should know the law. Florida Statute 1006.147, The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act, prohib its bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a Florida public K 12 education al institution. This law requires that each school district in Florida adopt a policy prohibiting bul lying and harassment of any student or employee of a public K 12 school. Bus monitors, for exam ple, cannot be bullied in Florida. The Duval County School Board has adopt ed an anti-bullying poli cy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bullied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trusted adult. This report can be done anonymously. An investigation will be conducted by the school principal or his/her des ignee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Now that you know the law, consider the fol lowing tips to deter and diminish bullying at your childs school: the schools designated administrator your con cerns about bullying, such as issues with supervision and monitoring of stu dents. build a social safety net work, and encourage them to travel via the buddy system. wide anti-bullying campaign website at www. stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov to find ideas to prevent bullying to share with your children. What about your chil dren? Are they being bul lied? Possible warning signs include the follow ing: missing belongings, or bruises, excuses to avoid attending school, school, aches, stomachaches, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping, or bad dreams, and/ or esteem. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the prob lem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school officials to find a solution. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Is You Kid Being Bullied? Know The SignsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingMCPON: Its Summertime, Think Safety Office of the Master Chief Petty Officer of the NavySummertime means fun in the sun, vacations and a myriad of outdoor activities, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) wants Sailors and families to think safety first. Benjamin Franklin said, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and in the case of summertime, its worth a pound of safety, said MCPON (SS/SW) Rick D. West. Each year the Navy loses service members to senseless and avoidable mishaps, and the summer season brings the poten tial for increased risk. According to the Naval Safety Center, summer deaths spiked in 2008 then decreased in 2009 and 2010, but unfortu nately increased again last year. In 2011, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, 16 Sailors and 15 Marines lost their lives. One in an ATV wreck; three drowned; three during recreational activities; 11 in motor vehicles; and 13 on motorcycles. Losing even one Sailor or Marine is too many, especially when most of the incidents can be avoided with the proper planning and training, said West. Training is the priority when it comes to motor cycle safety. According to Naval Safety Center, motorcycle fatalities increased from six in 2010 to 13 in 2011, which is more than a 100 per cent increase. Motorcycle training and safety starts with the command hav ing a designated motor cycle safety representative (MSR). Closing the training gap on motorcycle safety needs to be top prior ity for our leaders, said West. Personal motor vehicle accidents are the second highest cause of fatalities in our Navy, and motorcycles are the pri mary casual factor with sports bikes remaining at the top of the list. MSRs play an important role in mitigating this risk by mentoring and educat ing our Sailors, and more importantly, ensuring they are registered and complete all required motorcycle training. The Naval Safety Centers summer cam paign Live to Play, Play to Live, also focuses on alcohol awareness, water and boat safety, sexu al assault, and suicide awareness, and summer sports activities. Fourth of July is just around the corner so start planning safety now, said West. Whether you are on the highways, water ways or in the backyard, safety must come first. And if you drink, dont drive and have a plan to get home. When traveling long distances, remember to use TRiPS, the on-line, automated risk-assess ment tool that helps users recognize and avoid the hazards they face on the highway: fatigue, not buckling up, and driving too far. TRiPS is located at https://wwwa.nko.navy. mil. You and your fami lies are important to the Navy, said West. Use the tools the Navy provides and remember to think safety first. Safety is one of the key areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and exist ing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most com bat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps. 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 3

Billy Lara Military Sick Call Dedication Marks Loss Of Inspirational SailorBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs At the dedication of the Billy Lara Military Sick Call on June 16, Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Eddie Couillard, Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport Senior Enlisted Leader, said: Although given just a few months to live, Billy held on for a full year. In that year, he was an incredible inspiration to all who were fortunate to be around him. He never lost his attitude for fighting his condition and will always be remem bered that way. At only 22-years-old, Hospitalman Billy Laras life was cut short because of a rare form of brain cancer. He died Dec. 26, 2011. The dedication cer emony, attended by BHC Mayport staff, family members and friends of Hospitalman Billy Lara, included the renaming of the clinics sick call and a permanent plaque to capture Laras inspirational contributions he made during his short time on earth as a corpsman and shipmate. While BHC Mayport was Laras first and only assignment after his graduation from Hospital Corps School, his tena cious dedication and commitment to duty and friendship will remain alive forever. -Photo by HM3 Marcus Chapman Aurora Barrera (Pediatric Nurse, civilian) who saw Lara as her own son, left, and Capt. Alan Siewertsen, BHC Mayports officer-in-charge, stand ready to reveal the newly named Billy Lara Military Sick Call at the clinic. Kristopher Corpus (left), Billy Laras brother and Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Eddie Couillard stand next to a permanent plaque recognizing Laras inspirational contributions made before his life was cut short. A plaque on display at Sick Call to remind patients and staff of their fallen shipmate, Hospitalman Billy Lara. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 3

PAGE 4

Peruvian Frigate Visits NS MayportBy U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th FleetPeruvian Navy frigate BAP Villavisencio (FM 52) pulled into Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a weeklong training evolution on June 15. Fourth year cadets from the Peruvian Naval Academy are on board putting to practice what they have learned from the school. During the training aboard the Peruvian frigate, the crew visited Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico. The frigate also visited Norfolk, Va., where the ship and crew partici pated in Operation Sail 2012, a collaboration of organizations, a fleet of tall ships, and navy and military war ships repre senting the world come together to promote goodwill among nations, inspire patriotism and foster interest in maritime history and heritage. The training ship Villavisencio is an ambassador for my country, said Peruvian Navy Cmdr. Yuri Bezzubikoff, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Foreign Liaison Officer. The port visit here to Naval Station Mayport is a testament of our strong professional relationship with 4th Fleet and our shared commit ment to maritime security and stability. Commissioned in 1979, it was named after Peruvian Vice Adm. Manuel Villavisencio who fought in the War of the Pacific. It set sail May 6, and will return to its homeport in July. While in port, the crew will tour the local area, enjoy local recreational activities, and visit Disney World. They will also be hosted aboard USS De Wert (FFG 45) for a Steel Beach Picnic barbecue. Villavisencios port visit to Mayport is a unique opportunity for the crew to experience U.S. Navy, and espe cially Jacksonville/First Coast Florida hospital ity and culture first hand, said Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F). It is also a wonderful chance to make new and lasting friendships with an enduring part ner Navy in our very own hemisphere. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined fullspectrum military opera tions by providing prin cipally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain coop erative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by Paige GnannCrewmembers of Peruvian Navy frigate BAP Villavisencio perform a traditional Peruvian dance during a reception held aboard the ship on June 19. The ship is visiting the Jacksonville area as part of a 3-month training deployment. During the port visit Romani will host a V.I.P. reception and the crew will visit local tourist attractions and special events. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeNavy Band Southeast performs as the Peruvian frigate BAP Villavicencio (FM 52) arrives at Naval Station Mayport for a scheduled port visit. Villavicencio and its crew are on an instructional voyage from Peru, training 85 Midshipman while improving foreign relations as liaison for the Peruvian navy. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerLt. Eric Guttmann, Capt. Chuck Nygaart and Peruvian Navy Cmdr. Yuri Bezzubikoff from U.S. FOURTH Fleet welcome the Commanding Officer of the Peruvian training ship BAP Villavisencio (FM 52), Capt. Juan Carlos Romani. 4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 5

DoD Needs More People With More LanguagesDefense Language Institute Foreign Language CenterFew people can claim they have been portrayed in a major Hollywood movie as a result of their actions during their gov ernment careers. Even fewer can say they con tributed to the success of two major covert opera tions in U.S. history Michael G. Vickers, a two-time Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center graduate and the cur rent Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence, can take the credit for both, though he is reluc tant to admit it. In the 2007 movie Charlie Wilsons War, Vickers was depicted as a young paramilitary operations officer who contributed with brains and brawn in the mid1980s to the withdrawal of Russian troops from Afghanistan. In more recent history, Vickers has been recognized as a man who was instrumental in the planning, finding, and killing of the worlds most-wanted terrorist, Osama Bin Laden. But Vickers says it was technology and a combi nation of human intelligence that really contrib uted to finding bin Laden. Human intelligence, signals intelligence and geo-spatial intelligence all played very important roles. A major part of the challenge of that operation was locating him in the first place, and that was a long time coming -a very patient intelligence operation, he explained. On whether knowledge of language con tributed to the success of the operation, Vickers said, I cant go into more detail -but, in each of those disciplines, the ability to have officers or translators who were flu ent or very professionally competent in a language made all the difference. A firm believer that foreign language knowledge is critical for our national security, Vickers, who graduated from the DLIFLC Czech course in 1977 and the Spanish course in 1979, has a good understanding of how vital this language skills are for the success of military operations in the field. He spent three years in Panama in a Special Operations unit in the 1980s, during a time when insurgency and ter rorism were at an all-time high in Central and South America. I taught classes to Latin American officers in Spanish and I worked with them on operations, so, it [language] not only helped me to communi cate, but it also gave me a real insight into how they think and approach problems, he explained. He told a congres sional hearing in May the United States could benefit by having more Defense Department per sonnel proficient in for eign languages. Its an area [foreign language proficiency], frankly, we still need to improve -both as an intelligence community and in the Special Operations field. Its very hard to maintain high levels of proficiency in languages if youre not using it all the time, said Vickers, drawing from his own experience as a linguist in Spanish and Czech. Offering incentives to those willing to maintain high language proficien cy may be the answer, Vickers said. For example, Secretary of Defense [Leon E.] Panetta, when he was director at the CIA, man dated professional fluen cy in a foreign language to get promoted. And, it certainly had an impact on the number of peo ple working harder at it, Vickers said, adding that the key to maintaining a pool of highly proficient linguists depends on the requirements put in place. You just have to insist on the standards or it will never happen, he said. Vickers reiterated that foreign language instruc tion and training is vital to national security. There is an inher ent federal government responsibility, as we learned early in the Cold War with national security education ... Government investment in that is very important, he said. A second point I would make is that early lan guage education is criti cal, to providing candi dates for a pool of sea soned U.S. government linguists.DoD Program Helps Feed FamiliesFrom American Forces Press ServiceFeds Feed Families, now in its fourth year, is under way through August, and the Defense Department encourages military and civilian employees to participate by donating nonperishable food. The food drive accepts items for distribution to local food banks. In a memorandum, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton B. Carter said DoD will again expand its collec tion campaign to a nationwide level by donating to food banks across the country. The tremendous success of the 2011 food drive was a credit to the exemplary efforts of all of you and your staffs, Carters memo reads. Running a suc cessful campaign requires a team effort, and leadership support is critical. Feds Feed Families allows us to showcase how caring and giving our people are, and demonstrates our commitment as a department to helping those in need. Defense officials called last years food drive overwhelm ingly successful. Food dona tions across the federal government totaled 5.7 million pounds nearly three times the goal of 2 million pounds. DOD alone exceeded its goal of 733,800 pounds, officials said. DOD this year is striving for 1.5 million pounds of food donations for nationwide distribution, more than twice last years goal. It represents an average of 2 pounds of food per civilian employee. The goals for the service branches are: Army, 562,000 pounds; Navy, 396,000 pounds; Air Force, 348,000 pounds; and Office of the Secretary of Defense and Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff agencies and activities, 194,000 pounds. In his memo, the deputy secretary encourages support with the following tasks: Military services, Defense agencies and field activities are tasked with arranging logisti cal support for June 26-27, July 24-25, and Aug. 28-29. A component champion will be appointed to represent each component to coordinate with organization representa tives, and lead the call for donations. Employees are asked to encourage others to donate nonperishable food. Contact Aimee Scanlon at fedsfeedfamilies@cpms.osd.mil or 703-6964741 for more information. NS Mayport Joins Food DriveFom StaffNaval Station Mayport is joining the call to action by the Department of Defense to help stock food banks throughout the nation. Donation boxes to benefit Feds Feed Families food drive have been set up around the base through Aug 31. Federal employees, service members and anyone else who wishes to donate can drop off non-perishable goods in the boxes. Mayport Chapel is sponsoring the local drive and can be contacted at 270-5212. Donation box locations include Chapel and the Mayport Commissary on Mayport Road. There are also boxes located at the On base Navy Exchange, Mayport Bowl, Mayport Bachelor Housing, Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport and the USO on Mayport Road. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 5

PAGE 6

6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 Farragut Takes Families On Day CruiseThe Mirror editorFriends and families of USS Farragut (DDG 99) got the opportunity to expe rience a day in the life of their Sailor while underway with the ship during a Friends and Family Day Cruise on June 15. The day of fun was scheduled to help ease the crews departure five days later with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group on an extended deployment to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. The ship sailed approximately 40 miles off the coast of Mayport to give guests a a glimpse into what it takes to operate an Arleigh Burke Class Guided Missile Destroyer. The day was filled with activities such as a tour of the main areas of the ship, including the bridge. There was a Damage Control exhibit and demon stration, and a chance for everyone to relax during a lunch on the mess decks. An SH-60B helicopter from HSL-48 also put on a demonstration for the guests. This is awesome, said Diane Taylor, girlfriend of Electronics Technician 3rd Class Michael Ferrer. Its cool to see how they live and to know how he works. They are not just sitting here watching movies. They work hard. -Photos by Paige GnannSailors aboard the Arleigh Burke Class Guided Missile Destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) fire the MK38 25-mil gun during a firing demonstration conducted as part of the ships Friends and Family Day Cruise on June 15. The ship deployed on June 20 with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Logistics Specialist Taunya Demouchette points out a passing foreign ship to her husband, Aviation Electricians Mate 1st Class Jonathan Demouchette as the ship begins to leave the Mayport basin. Lillian Moliani shoots an apple out of a high powered hose with Damage Controlman 2nd Class (SW) David Ricketts during one of the Damage Control demonstrations. Phil and Lynn Hardesty take photos with the ships namesake Adm. David Glasgow Farragut portrayed by Ensign Mike Pellittiere. Farragut roamed the ship to welcome friends and families on board for the day cruise. Sejaida Williams, 12, tries on Damage Control equip ment during one of the activities planned for guests on board USS Farragut for its Friends and Family Day Cruise. Joe Miller tries on an oxygen mask with help from Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW) Zach Leinart during a DC demonstration. Friends and families of USS Farragut enjoy the opportunity to be with their Sailors while deployed for the day on board the ship. Parents Fire Controlman 1st Class Robert Additon, wife Vivian and 14-month-old sister Elyse watch as Lt. Tom Bingol of Surface Force Ministry Center baptizes two-month-old Kimberly in USS Farraguts bell while grandmother Sonja Additon holds the baby. Both children were baptised in the ships bell and will have their names engraved in it to signify the baptism.

PAGE 7

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 7 Frocked SH2 Todd Montgomery Adams, USS Farragut IT2 Cody James Anderson, USS Farragut STG2 Katie Elizabeth Badgett, USS Farragut HT2 Ross Lochlainn Bailey, USS Farragut STG1 Brent Bowden, USS Farragut IT1 Andrew William Bunton IV, USS Farragut YN1 Ricky Carl Burke, USS Farragut DC2 Marcela Rosibel Bustamante, USS Farragut GSM3 Raul A Canales, USS Farragut LS3 Qi Chen, USS Farragut GM2 Ronald Tylor Clark, USS Farragut GSE3 Michael John Copelandclarke, USS Farragut FC2 Jamie A Cutrer, USS Farragut FC2 Christopher Tyler Darnell, USS Farragut FC2 Reid Francisa Desermia, USS Farragut STG3 David Dinh Do, USS Farragut CS1 Avery Terrel Foreman, USS Farragut FC2 Robert Henry Greathouse, USS Farragut LS3 Joshua Richard Grubbs, USS Farragut OS3 Randall Paul Harmon II, USS Farragut LS3 Brandon Donald Highwood, USS Farragut GM3 Stephen Robert Howard, USS Farragut EM3 Joseph Michael Knieriemen, USS Farragut STG1 Keith Jackson Lovett, USS Farragut YN2 Holly Denise Lyons, USS Farragut ET2 Luis Manuel Maldonado Jr, USS Farragut GSE1 Rolando Marquez, USS Farragut OS2 Christopher Michael McAvoy, USS Farragut CS2 Andreya Nicole McGhee, USS Farragut GSM3 Shawn Emmanuel Millan, USS Farragut DC3 Tyler Dennis ODonnell, USS Farragut CTR2 Andrew Ryan Page, USS Farragut EM2 Benjamin Dana Perkins, USS Farragut FC1 Dustin Lynn Perrin, USS Farragut OS3 Brandon Eugene Reed, USS Farragut BM3 Mathew Emmanuel Robinson, USS Farragut YN3 Sergio Armando Romeuvazquez, USS Farragut OS2 Bryant Ray Russo, USS Farragut CTR2 Justin Stephen Sage, USS Farragut BM2 Travis James Silver, USS Farragut OS2 Justin Lawrence Sintal, USS Farragut GM3 Jeffery Dale Smith, USS Farragut STR3 Sonny Smith, USS Farragut PS2 Zinzi Alexandra Spencer, USS Farragut FC2 Robert Gerhard Steers, USS Farragut BM1 Cedric Robert Taylor, USS Farragut IT2 Phillip Michael Thompson, USS Farragut GSM3 Joseph Bradley Watson, USS Farragut STG2 Cameron Lee Webster, USS Farragut MAYPORT Gunners Mate 1st Class (SW) Jeffery Drake and Yoeman 1st Class (SW) Ricky Burke talk with their wives, Shelley Burkey and Christy Drake as the ship transit the basin. A SH-60B Seahawk helicopter from HSL-48 performs flight demonstrations for the families of USS Farragut during its Friends and Family Day Cruise. Members of USS Farraguts crew are frocked in front of friends and family during the ships day cruise. Friends and families of USS Farragut line the rails as the ship waits to leave the basin for a day cruise aboard USS Farragut. The ship deployed on June 20 with HSL-48 Detachment Seven as a part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group. Lt.j.g. Andy Phelan and Lt.j.g. Kevin Mutai enjoy an easy moment with guest Michelle Camaione during the ships return to Mayport. Families enjoy lunch on the mess decks with their Sailors.

PAGE 8

Navy, Coast Guard Seize $13 Mil Of CocaineBy U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsA U.S. Navy frigate, USS Elrod (FFG 55) and embarked U. S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET), interdicted a suspected smuggling vessel, recov ered more than 1,000 pounds of cocaine, worth about $13 million, and detained four suspected smugglers in international waters, June 10, during Operation Martillo. A U.S. Navy maritime P-3 Orion patrol aircraft spotted the go-fast ves sel and the Elrod moved to intercept. The Norfolk, Va.-based frig ate launched a helicopter and rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) with a Coast Guard boarding team to intercept the suspect boat. The level of dedica tion and seamless team work between the crew of Elrod, the embarked U.S. Coast Guard law enforce ment team and our HSL 60 helicopter detachment are all directly responsible for making this interdic tion a success, said Cmdr. Jack Killman, command ing Officer, USS Elrod (FFG 55). Overall coordination of counter-drug patrols and surveillance in the Caribbean Sea is man aged by Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-S) headquartered in Key West, Fla. U.S. maritime law enforcement and interdiction opera tions in the Caribbean are under the tactical con trol of the Seventh Coast Guard District. Operation Martillo is one component in the USGs whole-of-govern ment approach to com bating the spread of TOC in Central America and the use of the Central American littorals to transshipment routes for illicit drugs, weapons, and cash, said Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F). More than 80 per cent of cocaine docu mented making its initial movement out of South America into Central America and moving toward North American markets moves via non commercial maritime conveyances along littoral routes. LEDETs are an armed deployable special ized force under the U.S. Coast Guards Deployable Operations Group. They were created to support narcotics interdiction operations aboard U.S. Navy and allied warships and are capable of sup porting Department of Defense national defense operations. LEDETs pro vide specialized law enforcement capabil ity and maritime security capabilities to enforce U.S. laws across a full spectrum of maritime response situations, maritime security augmentation and maritime inter diction anti-piracy opera tions. Teamwork is critical to a LEDETs operation al successes, said Cmdr. Robert Landolfi, Tactical Law Enforcement Team Souths commanding offi cer. The Coast Guard and Navy partnership ensures a highly capable presence in the operational theater for sustained periods. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participa tion is being led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coor dinated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to com bat transnational orga nized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. Checking Off DC List -Photo by MC3 Jeff AthertonU.S. Navy Sailors examine an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter from HSL-48 Detachment Eight during a damage control exercise aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). Nitze is deployed as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. HSL-42 Det 7 Begins Final Deployment With SH-60B SeahawkUSS Jason Dunham Public AffairsHelicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42 Detachment 7 Proud Warriors, begin its last deployment while embarked aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), June 22. During the spring of 2013, the HSL-42 Proud Warriors will transition from the SH-60B helicopter to the new MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter and in the pro cess become Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72. The SH-60B has been a workhorse for many years and this will be a bittersweet time for us in many ways, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Chester, officer in charge of HSL-42 Det. 7. However, we are ready for our mission. We intend to accom plish that mission and establish the warrior legacy as we sundown the SH-60B with honor and pride. Dunham and the Proud Warriors, deployed as part of Carrier Strike Group 8, will operate in support of 5th and 6th fleet maritime security objectives. The MH-60R combines the best features of the SH-60B and SH-60F into one multimission platform. The improvements include an updated cockpit, digital monitors for flight instrumentation and the addition of mission avionics. While this transition will facilitate many advantages for the pilots and crews, Chester said that it will be hard to say good-bye. Even with the upgrades ahead for the squadron, HSL 42 Det. 7 pilots said their current SH-60Bs still have a lot of fight left in them. Our maintenance team does an out standing job of keeping our aircraft fully mission capable and ready to partici pate in all operations, said HSL-42 pilot Lt.j.g. Joal Fischer. As for their part, many members of the Proud Warrior crew said they feel a tremendous pride in being the last crew to maintain the SH-60Bs for their squadron. I think its cool to know we are play ing a role in a little bit of history, said Aviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Torre Reese. After this deployment we wont be named HSL-42 anymore, so we want to send it out on a high note. Jason Dunham and HSL-42 Det. 7 are deployed along with other CSG 8 ships and aircraft to include USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guidedmissile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 7, and Destroyer Squadron 28. low American; especially in the support we pro vide conducting Counter Transnational Organized Crime operations and Operation Martillo. Tidds next assign ment is as the Director for Operations at the Joint Staff in Washington DC. Admiral Tidd, we salute you. For your leadership, your dedicated service and the service and sacrifices of your family as you move back to the Pentagon. Admiral Harris, you are taking over a superb organization and I look forward watching you take it to further places, Fraser said. I am very honored to join the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command team that has been so skill fully led by Admiral Kurt Tidd and the Fourth Fleet staff to ensure the secu rity, increase the stability and further the partner ships in the SOUTHCOM region, said Harris. COMUSNAVSO/ C4F address supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.From Page 1COMUSNAVSO 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 9

Eisenhower CSG Deploys 6,000 SailorsFrom Navy Public Affairs Support Element, NorfolkThe Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKE CSG) and its nearly 6,000 Sailors departed Naval Station Norfolk and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., June 20, to support oper ations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), command ed by Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock, and guided missile destroyers USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) deployed from Naval Station Norfolk. Guidedmissile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) and guid ed-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) deployed from Naval Station Mayport. Hitchcock said the ship and its crew are in great spirits. Even though she is 35 years old, she is at the peak of her game with all the most current technology and the best gear, said Hitchcock. The ship and crew have been out for five months of the past year and they are really excited and ready to go do our job. Commanded by Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, IKE CSG is comprised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, Winston S. Churchill, Jason Dunham, Hue City and Farragut. Manazir said that the striking power of the air craft carrier is usually the main focus. We see the airplanes coming off and on the front end, but the DDG 51 Arleigh Burke class of destroyers is so flexible that we can send them in to do any mission, said Manazir. The full power of the strike group is only demonstrated when we are surrounded by our DDG 51 class destroy ers and our Ticonderoga rover class cruisers like Hue City. The aircraft squad rons of CVW-7 embarked aboard IKE Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 143 Pukin Dogs, VFA131 Wildcats, VFA83 Rampagers, and VFA-103 Jolly Rogers, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron 140 Patriots, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 121 Bluetails, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 Rawhides and Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron 5 Nightdippers. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, the IKE CSG deployment will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. These operations are designed to set regional stability and economic prosper ity in those regions, said Manazir. IKE CSG has success fully completed a series of complex training events and certifications over the last several months to ensure they operate effectively and safely together. Our flexibility and power comes from the training of our Sailors, said Manazir. Weve been training since October of last year in complex operations, certifications and training exercises to make sure we are ready for deployment. -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsBoatswain's Mate 2nd Class (SW) Scott Tatum embraces his wife Sarah before embarking the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) for a 7 month deployment with the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKE CSG). IKE CSG will provide support in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operations. -Photo by Michael LegerSailors man the rails as the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) departs Naval Station Mayport to join the USS Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG) for deployment. The IKE CSG deployment will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 9

PAGE 10

The following are just a sample of volunteer opportunities available through NS Mayport and Volunteer Jacksonville. For more information, call or Dianne Parker at 5425380 or you can immedi ately sign-up online for opportunities using www. volunteer gatewayjack sonville.org. Pet Adoption Event Needs Volunteers First Coast No More Homeless Pets along with shelter and rescue groups from across Northeast Florida are holding a July Mega Pet Adoption event July 13-15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Volunteers are needed to help sup port this event and to help find homes for more than 600 animals dur ing the three-day event. Volunteers will partici pate in set-up acting as greeters, assist with dog and cat handling tasks, provide overnight safety for the animals and teardown. For more informa tion or to volunteer email mtekin@fcnmhp.org or volunteer@fcnmhp.org or call 674-0665. Guardian ad Litem Be the voice for chil dren abused, neglected, or abandoned. These children have no ability to participate in decisions affecting their lives. When children are removed from their homes, the courts can appoint a spe cial advocate to make sure that the best interests of the child is given appro priate consideration. This advocate is known as a Guardian ad Litem. In the 4th Judicial Circuit, which includes Clay, Duval and Nassau Counties, there are more than 2,000 chil dren who need an advo cate to help them navigate the Dependency system. As we build our volun teer base we are asking members of our commu nity to consider being a Guardian as Litem. These guardians do not pro vide direct care for the children; the guardians ad litem visit the child at least once per month, interview family mem bers, gather information from medical, mental health, and education professionals, and attend court hearings to ensure the best interests of the children are maintained. The work is compelling. To become a Guardian ad Litem, candidates need a compassionate heart, be at least 19 years old, complete 30 hours of ini tial training and under go a background check. The process begins with a screening interview so you can learn more about this opportunity to make a difference in the life of a child. If this kind of volunteer opportunity sounds like something you would like to partic ipate in, please visit the Guardian ad Litem web site, www.guardianadlitem.org, or call 904-6301200 to schedule a screening interview. First Coast No More Homeless Pets First Coast No More Homeless Pets brand new high capacity Spay / Neuter Clinic opens this month. The new facility will be able to help thou sands of pets and own ers as well as stray and feral cats -each year, with free or low cost spay/ neuter and low cost vac cinations. We still need lots of volunteers for the clinic at the new location on Norwood Avenue. No medical experience needed. For more information, email Debbie Fields at dlfields@bellsouth.net Jacksonville International Airport Volunteer Ambassador Program We are looking for vol unteer to assist travelers with locating arrival and departure gates, tele phones, baggage claim and ticketing areas. The Ambassadors provide vital customer assis tance and a lot of smiles to ensure a pleasant and memorable experience while traveling through our airport. Benefits of being in the Ambassador program include gratitude of the passengers served each day, invitations, to volunteer appreciation events, free parking at the airport, meal voucher for every four-hour period worked, service recogni tion and the opportunity to meet people from all over the world. Contact Yvonne Pooler at 904-7412006 or email ypooler@ jaa.aero. Jacksonville Zoo The Jacksonville Zoo is asking for volunteers. Volunteers are needed to educate varied audi ences about the natural world, teach conserva tion messages, beautify the grounds, assist guests in various areas of the park, input data, lend a hand in animal care areas, answer questions, drive trains and enhance guests experiences. You provide the interest and enthusiasm, and the zoo will provide the training. Scheduling is flexible. Volunteers receive special discounts, free admission, newsletters and special programs only available to employees and volun teers. Take this opportu nity to meet others who share your interests in the animal kingdom. All interested person nel please CS1 Hopkins or call 270-5373 for more information. YMCA of Jacksonville YMCA of Jacksonville is looking for volunteers for their outreach programs geared towards males. For more information, con tact Terra Herzberger at 265-1820. Students Visit To Learn About Navy CareersStaffHigh school partici pants of Floridas All Things Are Possible Program visited Naval Station Mayport Friday to learn more about Navy life. The ATAPP group seeks to educate, inspire and encourage youth to pur sue their goals despite their challenging pasts. Program Director Jermesa Lee said the ATAPP came to the naval station to demonstrate to students the potential of a military career. [We came to Mayport] to allow them the oppor tunity to see differ ent options-whats out there for them after high school, Lee said. Mass Communications Specialist 1st Class William Townsend and Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Ashley Monroe spoke with the eight stu dents about opportuni ties in the U.S. Navy and conducted a personalized tour of the base. Tonieka Sawyer, a 17-year-old student from Miami, expressed interest in pursuing a career in the Navy. What interests me about the Navy is that they take care of their own, Sawyer said. -Photo by Kaytlyn RibichTeenagers from All Things Are Possible Program stand in front of the static display near the front gate. The group, whose goals are to educate and inspire youth, visited Naval Station Mayport last week to learn more about naval careers. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 11

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 11 Local Culinary Specialists Learn Art Of Cake Decorating Navy Food Management Team MayportThe Navy Food Management Team (NFMT) Mayport hosted cake decorating training at the Naval Station Mayports Oasis Galley recently. A dozen local Culinary Specialists (CS) attended the training. NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Cafs Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW) Adrian Dorsey provided the training to the local Culinary Specialists. Dorsey is a renowned cake decorator, and some say one of the most gifted cake decorators in the U. S. Navy. It was great oppor tunity for our local Culinary Specialists to receive hands-on cake decorating training, said NFMT Mayport Officer in Charge Master Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/ AW) Michael Carter. Ive watched him decorate several cakes for change of commands, reenlist ments, and retirement ceremonies. These were not your ordinary cakes; they were very detailed and some of the most elaborate designed cakes I have ever seen. Naval Station Mayport Oasis Galley Food Service Officer Chief Warrant Officer 4 Wanda Trammell commended Dorsey for his outstand ing training. CS1 Dorsey definitely provided a great founda tion for those Culinary Specialists who are seek ing to become cake dec orators, Trammell said. His professional training and knowledge gave these Sailors some great ideas for decorating cakes now and in the future. Seeing CS1 Dorsey in action was like watching an artist compose one of his best paintings, said Chief CS David Hall of USS Florida. He defi nitely has a lot of talent, and he displayed it this week. We will definitely take back the knowledge and training he provided this week and use it in the future. All and all, it was a great week of training for everyone. I considered myself extremely lucky to have the opportunity show my diversity in the Culinary Specialists rating, said Dorsey. It has always been my goal to learn and share with other Culinary Specialists the things I have learned. I am thankful to some great leaders who gave me the oppor tunities to expand my knowledge in my rate. That is something I will always remember. -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsCulinary Specialist 1st Class Adrian Dorseys displayed his cake decorating skills at a recent frocking ceremony with a cake that impressed everyone in attendance. -U.S. Navy PhotoPictured from left: After a day of decorating cakes, Master Chief Culinary Specialist (CS) Michael Carter, Cake Decorating Instructor CS1 Adrian Dorsey, CS3 Matthew Pitt, CSC David Hall, CSC Willie Moore, CS1 Juan DeJesus, CS2 Cedric Dickinson, and CSCM Paulette Williams show off their finished products. NS Mayport Water Quality Report ReleasedFrom Mayport EnvironmentalThe Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast, Water Utilities Division, NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is your water utility service provider. Were very pleased to provide you with this years Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excel lent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is three deep wells which draw from the Floridan Aquifer. In 2011, the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system. These assessments were con ducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our wells. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp. There are three potential sources of contamination identified for this system with low to mod erate susceptibility levels. Our treatment of your water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination to properly disinfect. For further information or questions concerning this report or NAVFAC Southeast Water Utility Division that serves you, it is requested: Navy on-base housing residents first contact their Station Housing Office and activity employees should first contact their safety or environmental offices. All questions will be answered through your activity or directly with the customer. In addition, Navy personnel who live in private resi dences can also contact NAVFAC Southeast for general questions on water quality or to understand the information provided in other utility CCRs. To contact your water utility, please call NAVFAC Southeast Water Utilities, at (904) 542-5610. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please make that call. NAVFAC Southeast routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws and regulations. Except where indicated other wise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period January 1st to December 31st 2011. Data obtained before January 1, 2011, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms weve provided the following defini tions: Action Level (AL) the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a TEST RESULTS TABLE NAVSTA MAYPORT Radiological ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLGMCLLikely Source of Contamination Radium 226 (pCi/l) 06/11N 0.3N/A05Erosion of natural deposits Inorganic ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLGMCL Likely Source of Contamination Antimony (ppb) 06/11N 2.1N/A66 Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants, ceramics; electronics; solder. Barium (ppm)06/11N 0.026N/AN/A2 Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits Fluoride (ppm)06/11N 0.69N/A44 Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories; water additive which promotes strong teeth when at optimum levels between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm Nitrite (ppm)06/11N 0.0610.06111 Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits Sodium (ppm)06/11N 21N/AN/A160Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil Disinfection By-Products (TTHMs/HAA5s/Chlorine residual) Note: The results in the Level Detected column are the annual average of quarterly averages. The Range of Results is the range of results (lowest to highest) at the individual sampling sites for Stage 1 monitoring. Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLG or MRDLG MCL or MRDLLikely Source of Contamination Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) (ppb) Quarterly 2011 N79.053.15128.06 N/A80 By-product of drinking water chlorination Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (ppb) Quarterly 2011N19.513.3123.94 N/A 60 By-product of drinking water chlorination Chlorine Residual (ppm) Monthly 2011 N 1.260.2-2.244.0Water additive used to control microbes Volatile Organic ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo/yr) MCL Violation Level Detected Range of ResultsMCLG or MRDLGMCL or MRDLLikely Source of ContaminationDichloromethane (ppb) 06/11, 12/11 N0.82 ND 0.82 05Discharge from pharmaceutical and chemical factories Lead and Copper (Tap Water)Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) AL Violation Y/N 90th Percentile Result No. of sites exceeding the AL MCLG AL (Action Level)Likely Source of ContaminationCopper (tap water) (ppm) 7/2010N0.05451 of 66 sites 1.31.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives Lead (tap water) (ppb) 7/2010 N1.352 of 66 sites 015Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural depositsSee Water, Page 20

PAGE 12

12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 13

Mayport K9 Unit Training Keeps Team Ready Navy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastEars up, tails wagging and tongue out no this is not any ordinary dog wanting to play. Their Naval Station Mayports Security K-9 Unit mili tary working dogs (MWD) ready for daily training. MWD teams are com prised of a dog and their handler, that are trained to provide deterrence, drug or bomb detection and patrol services. Training is very important; we have to be able to depend on our dogs, day in and day out, because they are our partners in the field, said Masterat-Arms 1st Class James Watkins, Naval Station Mayport kennel supervi sor. Training takes place everyday, all day; every job is seen as an opportunity to train the handlers and animals, as well as to test their abilities. A typical training day starts with an obedience obstacle course to work on control and endur ance. As the day went on handlers and their fourlegged partners moved on to a patrol and scouttraining exercise where the MWD teams chased after an armed suspect. This is great for the MWD teams to get out there and do this training as closed to real as pos sible, said Watkins. We like to train how we fight and fight like we train. Mayport is home to seven dogs, each assigned to a handler that is fully responsible for their welfare to include feed ing, exercising, training, grooming and physical wellness. After working hours, weekends and holidays are no exception. Its an around the clock job that forms a special bond between the dog and handler that allows both of them to depend on one another, said Master-at-Arms Seaman Sharon Berg. The Naval Station Mayport MWD division is assigned to the base, but dog and handler teams are assigned to tempo rarily duties and special details in addition to their duties here. Berg discusses how they go on deployments over sea to place like Afghanistan and Djibouti, or special mission like presidential campaigns and secret service mis sion. We also get to do fun events were there will be a special guess like concerts, fleet weeks and veteran benefits. As the day winds down Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Thomas Bohannon said his ultimate goal for the unit is to achieve Kennel of the Year. This award began as a way to encourage cama raderie as well as promote a keen sense of competi tion among the regions 10 kennels. Receiving this award would mean a lot to the kennel, said Bohannon. It shows our dedication and hard work we put into work every day here. Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Thomas Bohannon, Master-at-Arms Seaman Sharon Berg and military working dog KKowalski contain their 'suspect', Master-at-Arms 1st Class James Walkins, during a patrol and scout training exercise. The military working dogs are trained to provide deterrence, drug or bomb detection and patrol services.-Photo by MCSN Damian BergMaster-at-Arms Seaman Sharon Berg, a K-9 handler with the military working dog unit at Naval Station Mayport runs her K-9 partner, KKowalski, through an obstacle course at the base kennel. Berg runs the course with KKowalski multiple times a day to promote endurance and motor skills. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 13

PAGE 14

June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 6: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 6: Red, White & Blue Bash. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Wes Cobb Band. Prizes will be awarded for the most Patriotic Outfit. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided. FREE. 270-7205 July 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 July 7: UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 10: Moonlight 5K Run/ 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 10: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 11: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) July 11: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 July 11: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 July 11: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 July 13: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 MWRJune 29: Mystery Movie: 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Settle in for chills and thrills as we enjoy a movie and snacks! 246-0347 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Freedom Friday Carnival. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 July 20: Outdoor MoviesThe Hunger Games (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. Please note that this film may not be appropriate for small children. 270-7205 July 23: Summer Swim Lesson Session IV Begins Registration is June 20-21 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 27: Outdoor MoviesMirror Mirror (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 29: Christmas in December Family Fun Bowl. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy three hours of bowling and an awesome video laser light show as well as a traditional spaghetti dinner, presents for the kids, free Santa hats and more. 270-5377 KID a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org Closed For July 4thThe following MWR facilities will be closed on July 4: Admin/Business Office/IT/Personnel; Auto Skills; Bingo; CDCs; CDH program; CPO Club; Mayport Bowling/Fast Lanes Grille; ITT/ Rec Ticket Vehicle; Ocean Breeze Conference Center; Outdoor Adventures; Recycling/Vehicle Scale/ Storage; Repair/Maintenance; Surfside Fitness/ Youth Activities Center/Teen Center 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 15

The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 2: Teds Montana Grill Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation Only. July 3: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Military Appreciation Game with Fireworks! FREE. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 4: Fireworks at Jacksonville Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation Only. July 6: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. July 6: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 6: Red, White & Blue Bash. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Wes Cobb Band. Prizes will be awarded for the most Patriotic Outfit. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided. FREE. 270-7205 July 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 July 7: UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 8: A Day at the Beach: Huguenot Park. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation Only. July 9: Blackjack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. July 10: Moonlight 5K Run/ 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 10: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 11: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents July 11: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 July 11: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. For tick ets, (904) 270-5431 July 11: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 LIBERTYNaval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series This is a 4-week pro gram for CFLs and ACFLs only. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., The After Party Mayport Sandbox Monday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7: 30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Tuesday 6:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 6:30 a.m., HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Wednesday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Weight Training For Warfighters 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Friday 7 a.m., Spinning Water Aerobics These classes meet at the Base Pool weather permitting Monday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Thursday 7 a.m., Command Aqua 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Friday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Therapy MWR -Photo courtesy of MWRU.S. Coast Guard and COMUSNAVSO soccer teams come together after playing the 2012 Spring Playoff championship game. Coast Guard took the trophy across SRA1A after scoring the winning goal in overtime.Coast Guard, NAVSO Battle It Out In Soccer PlayoffsFrom MWRU.S. Coast Guard and COMUSNAVSO Latinos took the soccer field on last Tuesday to battle it out for the Post Season Playoff Championship. The Latinos were the first to score on a penalty kick in the first half. Coast Guard answered shortly after with a goal of their own. With numerous saves by both goal keepers the teams went into halftime tied at 1. In the second half the Latinos again opened up with a goal to take the lead 2-1. With less than two minutes left in the game the Coast Guard tied it up forcing an overtime situation. Overtime consisted of a Golden Goal five-minute playoff meaning the first team to score wins. The Coast Guard came out strong bringing the ball to the Latinos goal and in the opening seconds scored the winning goal becoming the 2012 Spring Playoff Champions. Time To Hit The BeachIntramural 4V4 Beach Volleyball season has just begun. Come join us on our new Beach Volleyball courts for some 4V4 action. For more information on how you can get involved contact Rita at the gym 904-2705451-Official Photo -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeSwimming Instructor Shane Massey teaches a student how to tread water during an instructional swimming class. The class is meant to teach children about water safety as well as how to swim. Swim Time At Mayport THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 15

PAGE 16

Workshops Available For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. June 28, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.4p.m., Resume Writing FFSC TBD July 5, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 5, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 9-12, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop Building 1 Room 1616 July 10, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 July 10, 6-7 p.m., EFM Support Group Building 1 Room 104 July 11, 9-11 a.m., Financial Leadership Seminar FFSC Room 719 July 11, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be ener gizing and a factor in motivat ing us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This program is designed to provide partici pants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help partici pants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. July 11, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 12, 10:30-11:30 a.m., How To Survive The Holidays, FFSC Room 719 July 12, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 14, 10 a.m.-until, IA Family Outing Adventure Landing July 16-20, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training, Building 1 Room 1616 July 16, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of disdain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. July 17, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 July 18, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 19, 8 am.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training, Building 1, Room 1124 July 19, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 23-26, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building 1 Room 1616 July 24, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 July 25, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Home Buying Seminar FFSC Room 702 July 25, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 July 26, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 July 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. July 30, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to iden tify barriers to effective communication. Class is a one-time 3 hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. July 31, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1 Room 104 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 17

Thursday, June 28 The Jacksonville Public Library, 303 Laura St. N. Room G-4, Conference Center Level, in con junction with the Small Business Administration, presents Resources for Small Business, a free workshop for Spanishspeaking small busi ness owners and those thinking about starting a business from 1-3 p.m. Workshop topics will include planning and business development, acquiring financing and research strategies for locating print and elec tronic business resourc es. Pre-registration is required and seating is limited. To register or learn more, contact Greg Royce or Crystal Chase at (904) 630-2401 or e-mail jaxpubliclibrary_business@coj.net. Saturday, June 30 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an intriguing presentation and gain insight into the spiders world. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Monday, July 2 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. This months program presented by Karen Stephenson is for Photo Competitions from Composition to Technical, from the Wow Factor to Presentation. This is a freeevent with people of all ability levels and camera types wel comed and encouraged to come and learn more about photography. Tuesday, July 3 Join one of the larg est fireworks displays in Northeast Florida as the World Golf Village cel ebrates Independence Day on Tuesday, July 3. Bring blankets or lawn chairs and find a spot around the Walk of Champions to take in the grand fireworks show. A minimal parking fee will be required for entry to the event. For event information, visit the events calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame. org. The Renaissance World Golf Village Resort is offering a dinner, show and fireworks package. The ticket includes din ner, a live performance from VoicePlay, and preferred seating to see the World Golf Village Community fireworks. The Stars and Stripes package includes over night accommodations. For more information, please visit www.world golfrenaissance.com or call 904-940-8696. Wednesday, July 4 The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is cel ebrating Independence Day with a Garden Concert featuring The RiverTown Band on from 7 to 10 p.m. Put on your red, white and blue, grab a blanket or chair and come celebrate Americas 236th Birthday in The Cummer Gardens. With the St. Johns River as a backdrop and stars above, the sounds of The RiverTown Band will keep you entertained all eve ning. The Cummer will be closed during normal business hours on July 4, but will open at 6 p.m. for the Garden Concert. Guests are welcome to bring blankets, chairs, food and alcoholic bev erages. Food and refresh ments will also be avail able for purchase from the TreeCup Cafe. Tickets are $10 for members, $20 for non-members and $400 for a table, which includes reserved seating and a gourmet picnic basket for 10 people. Children 3 and under enjoy free admis sion. The concert will go on rain or shine. To pur chase tickets, please call (904) 899-6004 or visit http://www.cummer.org/ programs-events/calendar-of-events/fourth-julyconcert. Please note: Fireworks will be presented on the River by the City of Jacksonville and the view from the Gardens is obstructed. Saturday, July 14 The Duval County Extension Office will offer a program on Organic Gardening from 9 a.m.-noon at the Duval Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville. Topics will include organic soil amendments, composting, pest manage ment techniques and an introduction to permaculture. Cost is $5 to attend. Call or email Becky at 255-7450 or beckyd@ coj.net to register. Please include contact phone number when emailing.Out in Town Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more veterans you will help. Our mission is to win this contest, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text 4970 to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a family annual pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addi tion, honorably dis charged veterans who have service connected disabilities, and surviv ing spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifications and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 17

PAGE 18

18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 19

Bring Child To Work Day At Public Works-Photos by Paige GnannPublic Works Mayport employees visit Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 6 Mayport with their children during a Bring Your Child to Work Day on June 14. The department planned a day full of events, including a base tour, demonstrations and fitness techniques by explosive ordnance technicians at EODMU. Lt. Mildred Canipe allows children to pet her dog during a K-9 demonstration by Mayport Security during the Bring Your Child to Work Day at Public Works Mayport.SERMC Expands Fleet SupportCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center Public AffairsThe Navys Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) in Norfolk, Va. opened an inspection and repair service June 15 for self-con tained breathing appa ratus (SCBA) units that will and reduce costs and shorten the time it takes to restore the units to their full operational condition. SCBA devices are worn over the chest to provide a self-contained source of breathable air in emergency situations such as firefighting. SERMC now supports our ships with inspecting their (SCBA) equipment, and providing cost-effec tive and more efficient repairs than if they had to send them out in town to repair or replace their units, said Capt. Ron Cook, SERMC command ing officer. Until now, private companies have conducted SCBA inspections, repairs and certifications with costs that approach $100 per unit. The number of work requests will vary from month to month, depending on the status of the ships equipment and the schedule of the ships. Each ship possesses approx 225 bottles that require periodic testing and hydrostatic certifica tion. When ships sent their SCBA units to pri vate companies, the turnaround time often couldnt support the ships tight timelines for inspections and deploy ments, said Edgar McNulty, SERMCs Engines Product Family Supervisor. Now that we have an in-house capability, were able to manage the inspections and repairs in a way that better supports ships schedules. We expect the shop to be very busy after opening for service to the fleet. Learn more about Naval Sea Systems Commands regional maintenance centers at http://www. navsea.navy.mil/ OnWatch/readiness2. html. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 19

PAGE 20

water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Leve l The Maximum Allowed (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treat ment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal The Goal (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) The high est level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is a convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of a drinking water disinfec tant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. Not Applicable (N/A) No value limit or restriction has been applied to this particular parameter. Non-Detects (ND) indicates that the sub stance was not found by laboratory analysis. Parts per billion (ppb) one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water trav els over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic con taminants such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater dis charges, oil and gas pro duction, mining, or farm ing. (C) Pesticides and herbicides which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of indus trial processes and petro leum production, and can also come from gas sta tions, urban stormwater runoff, and septic sys tems. (E) Radioactive con taminants which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young chil dren. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and compo nents associated with service lines and home plumbing. NAVFAC Southeast is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but can not control the variety of materials used in plumb ing components. When your water has been sit ting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead expo sure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/ safewater/lead. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regula tions which limit the amount of certain con taminants in water pro vided by public water systems. FDA regula tions establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indi cate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contami nants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agencys Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improve ments that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are some times reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for under standing. *Some people may be more vulnerable to con taminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing che motherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disor ders, some elderly, and infants can be particular ly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other micro biological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).From Page 11WaterDoD Supports Proposals For Military, Veteran HomeownersAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department sup ports legislative proposals that would provide increased career support and homeowner protec tions to military members and vet erans, a senior defense official told Congress June 21. Taking care of our military before, during and after their ser vice to our country is one of the Department of Defenses highest priorities, Frederick E. Vollrath, who is performing the duties of the assistant secretary of defense for readiness and force management, told the House Veterans Affairs Committees subcommittee on economic opportunity. He thanked the committee for efforts to address some of the economic challenges service members and their families face during active duty and as they transition into civilian life. Vollrath joined representatives of the Veterans Affairs and Labor departments, as well as veterans organizations representatives, to weigh in on four bills he said would significantly affect service members and veterans. The hearing was cut short so the subcommittee members could get to the House floor for a vote, but Vollrath submitted written testimony outlining the Defense Department positions. Two of the proposed bills, the Hire at Home Act and the Help Veterans Return to Work Act, focus on jobs. DOD supports the Hire at Home Act, which encourages states to consider training when granting civilian credentials, Vollrath said. If passed, the law would require states to consider a veterans military training when processing applica tions to become nursing assistants, registered nurses, emergency medical technicians or commercial drivers. Vollrath noted the new DODled Credentialing and Licensing Task Force stood up to help service members and veterans apply skills learned in the military to earn cre dentials, certifications and licens es across a broad range of civilian occupations. The task force, Vollrath explained, will identify military specialties that readily transfer to high-demand jobs, initially focusing on the man ufacturing, health care, informa tion technology, logistics and firstresponder sectors. It also will work with civilian credentialing and licensing associations to address any requirements not covered by military training, will and help ser vice members get greater access to certification and licensing exams. The Department of Defense provides high-quality training to ser vice members, and this high-quality training is closely linked to many of the high-demand, high-growth occupations in the civilian sector, Vollrath told the panel. Our men and woman have done incredible work, mastered cuttingedge technologies and adapted to unpredictable situations, he continued. Those skills are what America needs for the jobs and industries of the future. Vollrath was less enthusias tic about language in the Help Veterans Return to Work Act, which he said actually would limit use of an undue hardship defense under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. As written, he said, the bill would limit this defense so it could be claimed only by small businesses. The Defense Department shares the goal of ensuring that the undue hardship exception is used in ways that reinforce the laws intent, he said. DOD supports the intent of two other bills that would expand the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to increase mortgage protections to military members, Vollrath report ed. The Military Family Protection Act seeks to improve protections for service members and surviving spouses against mortgage foreclo sures. It seeks to expand protec tions for troops serving in support of contingency operations, veterans who are disabled at retirement, and surviving spouses of service mem bers whose deaths were serviceconnected or occurred while sup porting a contingency operation. The bill also would extend these protections to cover obligations made both before and after military service. The department also supports the Fairness for Military Homeowners Act, Vollrath told the panel. If passed, it would ensure that military members who move away from their principal residences for active duty arent prevented from refinancing the mortgages on those properties. Vollrath said this measure is consistent with the overall goals of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to ensure the consumer rights of military members are not unfairly limited because they serve in the military. He expressed concern, however, that the legislation could affect loan subsidy costs, and said DOD will continue to review the bill and offer technical help as needed. You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012

PAGE 21

Team USA loaded With Soldiers For OlympicsArmy Installation Management CommandThe U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program will send what it describes as its strongest contingent of athletes and coaches ever to the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Eleven WCAP coaches and athletes have already qualified to participate. Several more are competing for spots on Team USA at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team trials here, which began June 21 and conclude July 1. WCAP provides sol dier-athletes the support and training needed to successfully compete in Olympic sports on the national and interna tional levels, including the winter and summer Olympics, Pan American Games, world cham pionships and Conseil International du Sport Militaires Military World Games. The soldier-athletes serve as ambassadors for the Army by promoting it to the world and assisting with recruiting and retention efforts. Since 1948, more than 600 soldiers have represented the United States as Olympic athletes and coaches. They have collected more than 140 medals in a variety of sports, including boxing, wrestling, rowing, shooting, bobsled and track and field. WCAP wrestling head coach Shon Lewis, a retired staff sergeant who has led the Army to 11 national team titles in Greco-Roman wres tling, will lead three of his wrestlers to London as an assistant coach for Team USA. As a WCAP athlete, Lewis, 45, of Oakland, Calif., is a 12-time armed forces champion and a 10-time national team member. He was named Greco-Roman Coach of the Year five times by USA Wrestling, the governing body for wrestling in the United States. Two-time Olympian Sgt. 1st Class Dremiel Byers, 37, of Kings Mountain, N.C., will wrestle in the 120-kilogram/264.5pound Greco-Roman division. A world cham pion in 2002, Byers, a 10-time national cham pion, is the only U.S. wrestler who has won gold, silver and bronze medals at the world champion ships. He also is the only American wrestler to win gold at both the open and military world championships. Spc. Justin Lester is a strong medal contender in the 66-kilogram/145.5 pound Greco-Roman division. Lester, 28, a native of Akron, Ohio, heads to England as USA Wrestlings reigning Greco-Roman Wrestler of the Year. A two-time bronze medalist at the world championships, Lester has more than ample motivation to suc ceed in London. Ive had two bronze medals, and theyre all right, but I need an Olympic gold medal, he said. Thats eating at me more than anything, that I dont have that gold medal. Two-time Olympian Sgt. Spenser Mango, 25, of St. Louis, will compete in the 55-kilogram/121pound Greco-Roman class. A four-time national champion, Mango is eager to return to the Olympics. The first time, Ill admit, I was surprised myself, Mango recalled of his Olympic debut in Beijing. I knew I could do it, but I hadnt done it yet. This time, its all business need to bring home some medals. Ive wrestled almost all the top guys in the world in my weight class. I know what I need to do just get out there and really get after it. Four-time Olympian Sgt. 1st Class Daryl Szarenski, 44, of Saginaw, Mich., will compete in both the 50-meter free pistol and 10-meter air pistol. He struck gold with the air pistol and silver with the free pistol at the 2011 Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico. Szarenski finished 13th at the Olympics in Athens, Greece, in 2004 and 13th in Beijing in 2008. Hes aiming for a shot at the podium in London. Im hoping to keep wearing them down and get in there and get a medal out of it, Szarenski said. I think the training regimen that I have now is a lot better than what it was in the past. Ive changed a couple techni cal issues and I think Im heading in the right direction. I feel that Im shooting the best now that Ive ever shot. Two-time Olympian Sgt. 1st Class Keith Sanderson, 37, of San Antonio, will compete in the 25-meter rapid-fire pistol event. He set an Olympic record during the qualification rounds in Beijing but left China without a medal. He hopes to improve upon that fifth-place result in London. I remember the excitement, Sanderson said. That was more than I was ready for. Its faded a little bit, but I remember it was awesome. It was more than I could con trol. Im looking forward to feeling that again. ... It was something that words cant describe, and to this day, words cant describe it. I didnt sleep for two or three days after I competed not a wink from all of the adrenalin. Four-time Olympian Maj. David Johnson, 48, of Hampton, Va., has coached three athletes to Olympic medals and led shooters to 25 medals in World Cup events. He will again coach Team USAs rifle shooters in London. Two-time Olympian Staff Sgt. John Nunn, 34, of Evansville, Ind., already qualified for the 50-meter race walk and might attempt to qualify in the 20-kilometer race walk on June 30 at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team Trials in Eugene, Ore. Nunn competed in the 20-kilometer event at the 2004 Olympics in Athens but did not make Team USA for the 2008 Beijing Games. His personal best in the 20K race walk is 1 hour, 22 minutes, 31 sec onds. Spc. Dennis Bowsher, 29, of Dallas, will compete in modern pentathlon, a five-sport event that includes fencing, swim ming, equestrian show jumping, cross country and laser pistol shoot ing all in the same day. Bowsher finished fourth in both the 2011 Military World Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the 2011 Pan American Games in Guadalajara, where he secured an Olympic berth. Staff Sgt. Charles Leverette, 39, of Brent, Ala., will serve as Team USAs assistant boxing coach in London. A for mer WCAP heavyweight boxer, Leverette was a bronze medalist at the 2004 U.S. Olympic Boxing Team Trials. Staff Sgt. Joe Guzman, 32, of Eloy, Ariz., will serve as the trainer and help work the corners for Team USAs boxers in London. As a WCAP boxer, Guzman was a three-time armed forces champion. Four-time Olympian Basheer Abdullah, a retired staff sergeant and head coach of the WCAP boxing team from St. Louis, will serve as Team USAs head boxing coach in London. He also led the U.S. boxing team in the 2004 Athens Games and served as a technical advisor for Team USA at the Olympics in 2000 and 2008. Several other WCAP soldiers are vying for Olympic berths at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team trials here. WCAP also features a Paralympic program for wounded warriors and expects to qualify at least one soldier for the London Paralympic Games. Sights are set on qualifying several more for the 2014 Paralympic Games in Sochi, Russia, and the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Audie Murphy Honored American Forces Press ServiceThe militarys top enlisted member joined a local chapter of the Sgt. Audie L. Murphy Club on June 20 in Arlington, Va., in honoring the clubs namesake on his birthday. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joined the Military District of Washington Sergeant Audie L. Murphy Club in a wreath-laying cer emony to pay tribute to the American war hero, a Medal of Honor recipient, who is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Eighty-eight years ago today, Battaglia said at the event, we see a young man like Audie Leon Murphy who would become such a great American hero ... through his life especially the life he served protecting our nation. [Its] quite impressive. Battaglia noted that Murphy attained the rank of staff sergeant just a year and a half after joining the Army. He received a battlefield commission in October 1944, and rose to the rank of major. [But] Sergeant Audie Murphy wasnt someone about awards, Battaglia said. He was about tak ing care of his men and women and getting the mission accomplished. And thats why I say ... its befitting of me to ... rec ognize Sergeant Audie Murphy on his birthday, a very monumental date in the history of our ... armed forces. But [Im also here to] thank the members of his club and the loyal and dedicated soldiers that continue to serve honorably and with distinguished contribu tions and volunteerism throughout their com munities and neighbor hoods. Battaglia was joined by Army Sgt. 1st Class Jessica Taylor, president of the local chapter, who ser ves in the Office of the Secretary of Defense Mess. It is my honor today to honor the leader of our charge in the Sgt. Audie Murphy Club Audie Leon Murphy, she said. Today would be his 88th birthday. We welcome you all. Other club members played prominent roles during the ceremony, including treasurer Army Staff Sgt. Tanner Welch, who recited Murphys biography. Audie Murphy was killed in a plane crash on a mountain top in Roanoke, Va., May 28, 1971, Welch said. Fittingly, his body was recovered two days later on Memorial Day. Audie may have been the last American war hero, he added. He was the best combat soldier in the 200-plus year history of the United States. Battaglia said Audie Murphy is buried next to thousands and thou sands of great American service men and women, but is special in his own right. I think his service in the Army goes beyond just that in the Army, he said after the ceremony, reflecting on what he has read about Murphy. Id like it to resonate throughout all the ser vices. He wasnt worried about awards and decorations. The man was there to accomplish a mission, he was there to protect his country, and he was there to protect his men and women. And thats all he really cared about. -Photo by Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. An honor guard soldier places a wreath next to the grave of Medal of Honor recipient Army Maj. Audie L. Murphy as Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia, far left, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Military District of Washington chap ter of the Sgt. Audie L. Murphy Club, pay tribute on the World War II heros birthday at Arlington National Cemetery, Va., June 20, 2012. Did you know? Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 28, 2012 21