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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00256


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com More Ships For MayportARG To Begin Move In 2013From Department of Defense Public AffairsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced June 15 that the first amphibious ready group (ARG) ship scheduled to shift homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., will arrive in the last quarter of calendar year 2013. USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), will shift from their current homeport of Norfolk, Va., to Mayport. The New York will be the first to change homeport, followed by the Iwo Jima and Fort McHenry in 2014. Mabus originally announced Feb. 28 that the ARG would arrive no later than 2015. The accelerated timeline ensures continued viability of the Mayport ship repair industrial base and maintains the capabilities of the Jacksonville fleet con centration area, thereby preserving surge capability and reducing risk to fleet resources in the event of natural or man made contingencies. I am very pleased that the Navy is able to condense the timea horizon for the arrival of the Mayport ARG, stated Mabus. The move underscores just how important Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport are to our national defense, and how committed we are to strategic dis persal on the East Coast. Mabus brought with him other good news for the area. Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport will host the Navy-Marine Corps Classic mens basketball game featuring the University of Florida and Georgetown University on Nov. 9. Both teams have won NCAA National Championships in mens basketball. The Navy is excited to work with the city of Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport to bring the Navy-Marine Corps Classic to the First Coast, Mabus said. The Navy is Americas Away Team; when we are on the job, we operate for ward around the globe and often out of sight of the American people. This is a unique opportunity to showcase the Navy and to join together to honor our veterans and active duty military. USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7)Named after the famous World War II battle in which three divisions of the U.S. Marine Corps took control of the tiny island of Iwo Jima from the 22,000 Japanese defenders. Crew Size: 1,082 Keel laid: Dec. 12, 1997 Commissioned: June 30, 2001 -Photo by MC2(SW) Jacob Sippel Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) the Honorable Ray Mabus shakes hands with Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Amanda Brown after reenlisting in the Navy. Mabus was on base to announce the first amphibious ready group (ARG) ship scheduled to shift homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., will arrive in the last quarter of calendar year 2013. The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) will be the first to change homeport, followed by the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) in 2014. USS New York (LPD 21) USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43)USS New York (LPD 21)Named after New York City, the ship was built after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and forged from the steel of the World Trade Center. Crew Size: 360 Keel laid: Sept. 10, 2004 Commissioned: Nov. 7, 2009USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43)Named after the fort located in Baltimore, Maryland whose bombardment during the War of 1812 was made famous in the poem The Star Spangled Banner. Crew Size: 413 Keel laid: June 10, 1983 Commissioned: Aug. 8, 1987 USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7)

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Your teen has declared he wants to work at the neighbor hood Publix. I need the money for an upgraded I Phone, and a car, he says. Whoa! Is this a step to maturity or a slip toward lower grades, inadequate sleep, and a cramped social life? How do you help him make the right choice about taking a job? Jobs in the summer are great with no homework to juggle. But when school starts back in the fall, how do you help him to manage the job, school, and social time? First, make sure you know the rules. Check out federal law to make sure that the employ er is following it to the letter. Also check out state laws as well since some states impose stiffer restrictions than the fed eral government. Once youve examined the laws in your area, make sure you and your teen discuss the benefits and the dis advantages. The Pros dence, a sense of responsibility and independence. who work a moderate amount, no more than 10 to 15 hours a week, tend to earn higher grades than those who dont work at all. tunity to learn responsible money management. outside the home, a job during the summer can give your child adult supervision when no adults are home during the day. expose your teen to new work possibilities and set him on the path to a life-time career. The Cons hours a week is associated with lower grades. So if this job con tinues in the fall, watch those grades! hours may find it hard to keep up with responsibilities around the house, faith-based activi ties, or social relationships. that teens who work long hours are more likely to engage in activities such as drug or alco hol use, in part because they are exposed to older co-workers who lead them into these activi ties. Since most teens dont like to be told what to do, offer sub tle guidance. Ask them what they want to get out of the job. Career preparation? Fun? Money? Discuss whether this is a job they would like to keep once school starts back. Talk about preparing a bud get which will include saving as well as spending. Consider making your teen responsible for gas when he drives the car or a portion of the auto insur ance or some entertainment expenses that youve paid in the past. If your teen does take a job, make sure he is getting his breaks and that he doesnt work more hours for his age than allowed by law. If the job con tinues on into the school year, continue to monitor how many hours a week he works. You may have to reduce those hours if he cant keep up his grades. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. The Five Worst Jobs For Teens The National Consumers League has pegged these jobs as the most dangerous for stu dents. including operating or riding on forklifts and other motorized equipment. based business: including con venience store, gas station, and fast-food establishments. ing candy, magazine subscrip tions and other consumer goods on street corners, in unfamiliar neighborhoods, in distant cities, and across state lines. oil and grease, hot water and steam, and hot cooking surfac es. work at heights and contact with electrical power.Navigating Summer Jobs For TeensJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingPerhaps there have been times when you have experienced an event, a chance meeting, or just chain of events that makes you say to yourself That was strange? Sometimes we shrug this off or chalk it up to coincidence. But occasionally, the events seem to reveal Gods finger prints on our lives and leave a sense of peace or joy. In 2006, Squire Rushnell, who had served as a television execu tive credited with creat ing Schoolhouse Rock, several ABC After-School Specials and guiding Good Morning America, ABCs national morning news show; published a collection of stories titled When God Winks at You: How God Speaks Directly to You through the Power of Coincidence. Some of these stories are amazing. The daughter of Emmitt Kelly, the famous frown ing clown, is notified by phone of her fathers passing. Aboard a plane she retrieves a yellowed newspaper article, the only known photograph of her father smiling from ear to ear. Amazingly, seated next to her looking at the faded picture is the photographer who had taken the photograph! He explains that the reason for her fathers smile, He had just received a phone call during the interview informing him of his daughters birth. Another story tells of a women living in Orange County, California who after years of driving by the Crystal Cathedral decides one day that she will attend a service there. She arrives early and finds a seat as 3,000 people gather for the weekly ser vice. After the service she has a chance conversation with one young woman who was also visiting the church for the very first time. She had traveled to Orange County to search for her birth mother. The woman feels a great sense of compassion for her and shares that she had her self given up her child for adoption. Miraculously, the stranger asks the date of her daughters birth you guessed it, mother and daughter are reunited in chance meeting. Ive had my own per sonal God winks. While stationed in Diego Garcia, all personnel would stop by the Chaplains Office as a part of their Command Check-in. A young MA3 checking aboard, just as the skies opened and released a deluge of tropi cal rain. Well shipmate, it looks like youll be here awhile, why dont you tell me about yourself. Over the course that conversation, we dis cover that I was stationed with her parents at Naval Hospital Bethesda from 1983 to 1985! Its another God wink! Last month, as I was traveling along the basin to visit USS Farragut and USS Halyburton, I was stopped in my tracks by a banner strung across the brow of a ship, the NOAA SHIP NANCY FOSTER. The name Nancy Foster may not sound bells and whistles in the minds of most people, but was extremely meaningful for me. While chaplains have different paths to ordina tion, my ordination jour ney traveled through the Piedmont area of South Carolina, in the city of Spartanburg. One of the individuals who would leave a lasting impression on my ministry was named Nancy Foster. Now this Nancy Foster is not the namesake of the NOAA Research ves sel. But 18 years ago, when I began serving my internship congregation, this diminutive Southern Lady, modeled a conta gious Christianity, mixed with humor, humility, and grace. Before the day was over, I found myself knee-deep in warm mem ories, reminiscing about the past. I quickly phoned my wife, who immedi ately asked if I had called to check on Nancy and make sure that she was Ok. Another quick call to South Carolina to hear a familiar voice on the line; yes this Nancy Foster was fine. Like most God winks, the conversation ended with a blessing for both of us, This call has truly made my day! So be on the lookout for these occasional break throughs of joy. You will never know when God will throw a wink your way. God Winks... There May Be More To Coincidence Than CoincidenceLt. Tom Bingol Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINS Everyone has a right to dignity and respect.1-800-919-9338A CFC participant. Provided as a public serviceCatholic Charities USAwww.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org -Photo submittedLt. Tom Bingol stands on the brow of NOAA ship Nancy Foster. The name, Nancy Foster, has special meaning to the chaplain.Clinic Recruits Junior VolunteersFrom NBHC MayportThe American Red Cross at Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health care careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurs es, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a positive experience for NBHC Mayport patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the clinic. Application packet can be picked up and turned in at the American Red Cross Mayport Branch office in Building 1358 behind the bowling alley at Naval Station Mayport. The program is six weeks long and kicks off with an orientation on Monday, June 25 from 8:30 a.m. and CPR training on Wednesday, June 27 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the clinics second deck staff and education training room. Selected volunteers will be required to get a TB test. For more information on this opportunity, call the NBHC Mayport American Red Cross volunteer office at 904-270-4365 (open limited hours) or the Red Cross Branch office on NS Mayport at 904-246-1395. 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Frockees EN3(SW) Moses K. Asomaning, USS Halyburton OS3(SW) Quintrel R. Brown, USS Halyburton QM3(SW) Jason J. Carchio, USS Halyburton BM3 Steven M. Clark, USS Halyburton PS3 Steven D. Dodson, USS Halyburton OS3 Colin S. Doty, USS Halyburton BM3 Daniel J. Dunn, USS Halyburton BM3 Matthew H. Fanning, USS Halyburton OS3 Jarell Hyatt, USS Halyburton BM3 Sherman T. Jenkins, USS Halyburton OS3 Trevor M. Kinsella, USS Halyburton GM3 Dayron L. Mas, USS Halyburton DC3 David F. Morgan, USS Halyburton EN3 Joel E. Palilla, USS Halyburton BM3 Armando Perez, USS Halyburton BM3 Joshua D. Sandoz, USS Halyburton GSM3 Matthew E. Suarez, USS Halyburton BM3 Mark J. Zajac, USS Halyburton OS3 Matthew D. Zandi, USS Halyburton QM2(SW) Patrick J. Cherry, USS Halyburton EN2(SW) Dustin B. Fort, USS Halyburton STG2 Justin W. Gladstone, USS Halyburton OS2(SW) Brandon M. Hardy, USS Halyburton OS2 Matthew B. Love, USS Halyburton DC2 Kyle E. Manion, USS Halyburton IT2(SW) Chase L. Rudsinski, USS Halyburton STG2 Joshua E. Schroeder, USS Halyburton ET2(SW) Samuel J. Whisman, USS Halyburton BM1(SW) Juan P. Naranjo, USS Halyburton QM1(SS) Angel L. Rivera, USS Halyburton IT1(AW) Roger C. Williams, USS Halyburton GSM3 Matthew Aguilartorres, USS Philippine Sea BM2 Khiry Allen, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Ryan Arce, USS Philippine Sea OS2 Mary Bailey, USS Philippine Sea OS3 Owen Benons, USS Philippine Sea SH2 Jorge Beteta, USS Philippine Sea OS1 Benjamin Brascomb, USS Philippine Sea ET1 Douglas Brewer, USS Philippine Sea SH3 Patrick Burns, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Benjamin Clark, USS Philippine Sea EN2 Thomas Collins, USS Philippine Sea CS2 James Daniels, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Nicholas Galloway, USS Philippine Sea DC3 Luis Garciaclavijo, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Matthew Griffiths, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Melissa Grooms, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Robert Harper, USS Philippine Sea FC2 Douglas Ives, USS Philippine Sea PS3 Imari Jenkins, USS Philippine Sea AZ3 Edward Johnson, USS Philippine Sea IT1 Tracy Johnson, USS Philippine Sea GSM3 Sergey Khakhaev, USS Philippine Sea STG2 Jason Kinton, USS Philippine Sea LS3 Raeann Landrybatts, USS Philippine Sea EN3 Samuel McNeil, USS Philippine Sea OS3 Steven Mestresjunque, USS Philippine Sea STG2 Mark Moles, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Jeffery Nelson, USS Philippine Sea CS3 Alex Ottusch, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Marc Peterson, USS Philippine Sea OS2 Evan Pinkney, USS Philippine Sea LS3 Clarissa Ross, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Derrick Rumsey, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Adrian Smith, USS Philippine Sea CTR2 Mark Spurling, USS Philippine Sea OS1 Alexis Strother, USS Philippine Sea CS2 Gerald Taylor, USS Philippine Sea EM2 Joshua Watson, USS Philippine Sea OS2 Timothy Weier, USS Philippine Sea QM3 Brandon Wells, USS Philippine Sea QM3 Camron Whelan, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Shawn Wigley, USS Philippine Sea EM3 Devin Williams, USS Philippine Sea CS3 Ontario Williams, USS Philippine Sea GM1 Ivan Wilson, USS Philippine Sea GM2 Brandon Yates, USS Philippine Sea GM3 Derrick Young, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Jon Young, USS Philippine Sea MAYPORT Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org CNRMC Pilots First ITE CourseCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) Public AffairsCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) will pilot its first Integrated Test Engineers (ITE) course on June 18 in Norfolk, Va. The 3-day course is intended to provide ITEs with the basic knowl edge and skills required to become a functional member of the availability project team. The course will pro vide ITEs with a thorough review of the current position responsibilities and requirements associated with their jobs, and will also offer an overview of job-specific scenarios that address the more com plicated aspects of their work, said CNRMC Rear Adm. David Gale. The ITE course is aimed at new and seasoned ITEs alike, and will cover avail ability project team com position, project management practices, and policies/strategies relat ed to the development and management of an Integrated Test Plan. The course also pro vides a review of current instructions that govern the day-to-day work decisions made by ITEs, and emphasizes the need for ITEs to establish and maintain on-thejob compliance through their proper evaluation of objective quality evidence for completed work. Once the ITE pilot course is completed, CNRMC anticipates they will offer one course monthly in San Diego and one in Norfolk. For more information about ITE and other Workforce Development courses for the sur face ship maintenance Enterprise, contact CNRMCs Mr. Lloyd Jones at lloyd.h.jones@navy.mil For more information about CNRMC, visit: http://www.navsea.navy. mil/CNRMC/default.aspx THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 USO Brings Families Together For FunThe Mirror editorMore than 2,000 service members and their families from NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville, NSB Kings Bay, Coast Guard and local recruiting districts were able to escape the Florida heat at Adventure Landing and Shipwreck Island Waterpark on June 13 during the sixth annual Military Appreciation Night, sponsored by USO. For only a couple of dollars per person, families were able to enjoy both the wet and dry parks on Beach Boulevard in Jacksonville Beach. Normally, just a ticket to the water park would cost around $25 per person so the savings are substantial. Its wonderful, said John Shockley, executive direc tor for Greater Jacksonville USO. We start getting calls two to three months in advance asking about this event. [Its become so popular] that we cant meet the demand of everyone who wants to come. There is a certain capacity for the safety and fun of our guests. For the early birds that do get a pass however, $2 to the USO allowed participants full access to both the dry and water park activities. Karen Klefman also used the opportunity to pay it forward from last years event after she was given a set of passes for her family after missing out on the sale at USO. When a family showed up last Wednesday with out passes, she was able to give them an extra set that her husband had purchased by mistake. Service members and their families spent the eve --Photo by Paige GnannLeft, Families take advantage of the Shipwreck Island Play Village geared towards all ages of kids, including their par ents. The village features slides, water cannons and waterfalls. Above, children slide down a slide at the kiddie pool area. Kenny Bradford, 9, gets ready to take on The Rage with his mom. Electronics Technician 1st Class (EXW/SW) Nathan Hurst of NCTS Jacksonville plays with his children, Kailyn, 4, and Wyatt, 2, as well as family friends Leilana, 2, and Chris Loregnard in the half million gallon wave pool, Typhoon Lagoon.See USO, Page 5Its a race to the finish through the slides at the Pirates Play Village, a three-story interac tive water play area with 12 slides. Guests keep cool and do a little sight-seeing down the Lil St. Johns River, a 720-foot lazy river moving around the water park at 5 miles per hour.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 5 Land Sharks Have Fun As Well Its the end of the journey through Adventure Landings uphill water-coaster, The Rage. Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) James Hendricks and his sons, Gavin, 5, and Aidan, 8, bounce around on The Frog Hopper, one of several attractions in the dry park portion of Adventure Landing. Michael Blankenship, 8, makes his way down the course of Super Bikes 2 as his sister Mya, 3, watches him play in the Arcade area of Adventure Landing. Service members and their families get ready to put the pedal to the metal on the quar ter-mile Adventure Speedway Go-Karts track. Karen Klefman laughs at her son Bradys exuberance as he enters Adventure Landing to enjoy Military Appreciation Night sponsored by the Greater Jacksonville USO on June 13. Air Warfare Rescue 3rd Class Ray Skiba of HSL-48 helps his daugher Lainey put her ball into the hole at the putt-putt course. Service members and their families were able to enjoy the wet and dry park at Adventure Landing, including the Wacky Worm Roller Coaster.ning lazing along the Lil St. Johns River lazy river or getting washed ashore with at the Wave Pool. For the little ones, the water park offers the Pirates Play Village, a three-story, interactive water play area with 12 slides, nozzles that squirt and spray water, plus a lot of places to explore. There is also a Kiddie Cove designed for toddlers. For the more daring adventurers, the water park offers the Hydro Half-pipe a 35-foot half pipe, based on a skateboarders trick maker. They could also swirled along in the Eye of the Storm, a 40-foot body slide where riders are challenged to see how many revolutions they can make before drop ping into eight feet of water, according to Adventure Landing web site. Its fun, said Aviation Machinists Mate 1st Class (AW) Elvis Batista of CNATTU Jax. Its definitely a boost to the morale. The fact that they rented the whole park for military is really amazing. It brings you closer to the ones that you serve with, said Satonia Walker. On the other side of Adventure Landing, fam ily members could enjoy Miniature Golf, Laser Tag, the Wacky Worm roller coaster, Batting Cages, the Adventure Speedway gokarts, Frog Hopper bungee ride and arcade area. I think its really great and fun for the kids, added Samantha Blankenship, whos hus band Fire Controlman 2nd Class Michael Blankenship is stationed on USS Hue City.From Page 4USO Cora Acree, 7, braves the Hydro Half-Pipe. Chief Logistics Specialist Jaime Ibarra of Fleet Logistics Command plays in the Wave Pool with his family.

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FFSC Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. June 21, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 June 21, 8 a.m.-noon, Interviewing Skills Building 460 Room A June 25, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 June 25-29, 7:30 a.m.5 p.m., SAPR Advocate Initial Class, Building 1 Room 104 June 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 June 26, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., NS Mayport Job Fair Beachside Community Center June 27, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 June 27, 11 a.m.-noon, Financial Planning For Deployment, FFSC Room 719 June 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. June 28, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.-4p.m., Resume Writing, FFSC TBD Saturday, June 23 Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a presentation and leisurely guided hike through different Florida ecosystems on a quest to characterize tracks left by an assortment of critters. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. June 25-29 The Isle of Faith Church, 1821 San Pablo Road S., will hold its free Vacation Bible School from 6-8:30 p.m. All chil dren welcome. Call 2211700 for more information. SonSurf Beach Blast is the theme for this years free Vacation Bible School from 9 a.m.-noon, at Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. It will be filled with Bible learning experiences that kids can see, hear, touch and even taste! Crafts, team-building games, cool Bible songs and tasty treats are justs a few of the activities that helps faith flow into real life. Sign up now to be a part of the experience you wont want your child to miss. Contact the Church Office at 904-249-5370 to register today. Thursday, June 28 The Jacksonville Public Library, 303 Laura St. N. Room G-4, Conference Center Level, in con junction with the Small Business Administration, presents Resources for Small Business, a free workshop for Spanishspeaking small busi ness owners and those thinking about starting a business from 1-3 p.m. Workshop topics will include planning and business development, acquiring financing and research strategies for locating print and elec tronic business resourc es. Pre-registration is required and seating is limited. To register or learn more, contact Greg Royce or Crystal Chase at (904) 630-2401 or e-mail jaxpubliclibrary_business@coj.net. Saturday, June 30 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an intriguing presentation and gain insight into the spiders world. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Tuesday, July 3 Join one of the larg est fireworks displays in Northeast Florida as the World Golf Village cel ebrates Independence Day on Tuesday, July 3. Bring blankets or lawn chairs and find a spot around the Walk of Champions to take in the grand fireworks show. A minimal parking fee will be required for entry to the event. For event information, visit the events calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame. org. The Renaissance World Golf Village Resort is offering a dinner, show and fireworks package. The ticket includes din ner, a live performance from VoicePlay, and preferred seating to see the World Golf Village Community fireworks. The Stars and Stripes package includes over night accommodations. For more information, please visit www.world golfrenaissance.com or call 904-940-8696. Saturday, July 14 The Duval County Extension Office will offer a program on Organic Gardening from 9 a.m.-noon at the Duval Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville. Topics will include organic soil amendments, com posting, pest manage ment techniques and an introduction to permaculture. Cost is $5 to attend. Call or email Becky at 255-7450 or beckyd@ coj.net to register. Please include contact phone number when emailing.Out in Town Sailors Prohibited Inside Black-Listed BusinessesFrom CNRSEArmed Forces Disciplinary Control Board convened on 13 June 2012 at NAS Jacksonville. The following business es (including all future addresses) continue to be Off-limits: 2003 Blanding Blvd, Jacksonville, Fl. 2840 Mayport Rd, Jacksonville, Fl. Service members are prohibited from entering off-limits establishments. Violation of these prohibitions may subject a mem ber to disciplinary action under the uniform code of military justice. Family members and others associated with the Department of the Navy should be made aware that these establishments are off-limits to military personnel. While he works to protect the country, St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Of cer 2, and his daughter Delilah, a St. Jude patient 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Trooper First Class Greg Healy conducts a mock field sobriety test on Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 1st Class Crystal Duffy of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46 while wearing a training air called "Beer Goggles" during her commands Alcohol Awareness Training. The goggles inhibit Duffy's vision and she has trouble putting her finger to her nose. HSM 46 had multiple speakers at their training to include Assistant District Attorney, Mark Borello, Debbie Jones with Mothers Against Drunk Driving and Capt. Roy Hall from Jacksonville Fire and Rescue. -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsThings Look Different Through Beer GogglesMotorcycle Safety Remains Top Priority American Forces Press ServicePreventing motorcycle accidents and fatalities remains a top priority for Defense Department leaders, a senior defense official said, with training and awareness reducing the number of incidents. We had seen fatalities and accidents increas ing as motorcycle owner ship increased, Joseph Angello, DODs director of operational readiness and safety, told the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service. In 2008, the peak year for fatalities, he added, 124 service members died in motorcycle accidents. Since that time through training, through emphasis, through lead ership [and] through the phenomenal work of our military services weve brought that number down, he said. We lost 92 [service members] last year, and this year our trends look like we will be at that level or less. Every loss is tragic and affects spouses, parents other family members, the service members unit and the Defense Department, Angello said. We dont want any one to lose their life in a motorcycle accident, he said. We want them to drive safe; we want them to wear protective gear helmets, appropriate shoes, appropriate attire, and leathers. ... But some times, the best protection against a motorcycle acci dent is awareness, train ing and control. Thats your best protection. The director noted motorcycle training is mandatory for all DOD personnel. In addition, military personnel are required to wear person al protective equipment, such as long sleeves, eye protection and helmets, even if they are in a nohelmet state. If you are a military member and you want to ride a motorcycle, you must have the training, Angello said. Each of our services a lot of them are common courses -have a basic motorcycle safety course. You must take it or a refresher course, an advanced rider course, or a sports bike course. The Navy and Marine Corps developed the sports bike course in 2008 and shared it through the Defense Safety Oversight Council Private Motor Vehicle Task Force. Sports bikes are phe nomenal pieces of engi neering, with power-toweight ratios like weve never seen before, Angello said. As a result, they are very dangerous. If ridden properly, its enjoyment its fun. But they are unforgiving. Numerous deployments over the last decade have had an impact on the number of service mem bers involved in motor cycle accidents, Angello said. Angello lauded military leaders for their com mitment to addressing motorcycle safety for hav ing offered courses that make a difference in peoples lives, and urged all military members to be ready to ride, just as they are ready for the mission when they serve in uni form. Ready to ride right equipment, right training, right conditions, he said. Keep your awareness up, and youre ready to ride. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 7

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Mayport Holds Happy Hour For Sailors Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East Detachment SoutheastNaval Station Mayport put away the power point presentations for Sexual Assault, Suicide Prevention and Alcohol Awareness Training this year and host ed Comedian Bernie McGrenahan June 14 instead. McGrenahan brought his Happy Hour com edy show to Mayport educating more than 1,000 Sailors on topics such as alcohol, drug abuse, sexu al assault and suicide. McGrenahan is a oneman show that focus es these serious and important topics and has opened for top stars in places like Las Vegas, been on late-night televi sion shows, and he travels to military installations across the world to bring his humor and personal experiences to people of all services. Opening with stand-up comedy, McGrenahan pulled in his audience with 45 minutes of upbeat jokes that captured the attention of military and civilians alike. His approach creates a famil iar stage for the audience that allows him to contin ue with the serious part of his presentation with equal interest. I make it my mission to reduce DUI arrests, cases of sexual assault/rape, encourage Sailors to use Chaplains and counsel ing as a solution to their challenges. Alcohol has ruined more careers than any other one substance, and we need to acknowledge this and respect the drug called alcohol, said McGrenahan. McGrenahan ends his show talking about the mistakes he has made due to alcohol as well as the suicide of his brother. He urges Sailors to get help with the issues they have and to know they are never alone. We get so side tract with our own lives some times and I am here to tell you that the drink is not worth the things that we give up for the drink, said McGrenahan. A Boatswains Mate 1st class who asked to keep his name anony mous sat as he listened to McGrenahan talk about his brother killing himself and tears rolled down his face. My brother killed himself with me in the very next room and I was so drunk I did not even know what was going on, said the Boatswains Mate. He cut his wrist and had I not been passed out wasted I could have saved his life. That Boatswains Mate, like McGrenahan, spends his days sober and reach ing out to others to help them make better choices. I just want people to make better choices than I did, said McGrenahan. Comedian Bernie McGrenahan puts on a comedy show geared towards alcohol, drug and suicide prevention and sexu al assault awareness for Sailors aboard Naval Station Mayport, Fla. McGrenahans Happy Hour tour was sponsored by U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF). -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsComedian Bernie McGrenahan talks with Sailors after his comedy show geared towards alcohol, drug and sui cide prevention and sexual assault awareness. Fleet Forces Launches Breathalyzer Beta TestFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) launched a beta test to obtain Fleet feedback that will help determine the most effective approach for implementation of a Navy-wide alcohol breathalyzer program. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive, announced by the Secretary of the Navy in March, outlined the Navywide breathalyzer pro gram as a way to increase Fleet alcohol educa tion and awareness and to provide command ers with another tool to ensure the health and safety of Sailors by iden tifying potential alcohol abuse. USFF has selected 13 sea and shore com mands to participate in the beta test, which runs from May 24 through Sept. 30. All data collect ed will be consolidated under a summary recom mendation and forwarded to the office of the Navys Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) to be consid ered for implementation into the final policy. This beta test will be used to identify, devel op and make recom mendations on specific processes, procedures, and policies to effec tively implement the use of alcohol breathalyzers in the Navy, said USFF Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens, whos work ing in coordination with USFFs Breathalyzer Implementation Team on the beta test. By obtain ing feedback from the Fleet, were ensuring the final policy will be fully executable and will serve as a tool that benefits individual organizations and Sailors. USFFs breathalyzer implementation team met with the leader ship of all 13 commands involved in the beta test today to issue equipment, provide training and issue specific guidance. Participating commands will provide detailed feedback to the implementa tion team throughout the test. Under the Navy program, the breathalyzer will be used primarily as an education and preven tion tool. Breathalyzer results alone will not be used as the sole eviden tiary basis for punitive or adverse administrative action. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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The Heat Is On At SWOSLS Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastThe bleachers are full, the teams are suited up and everyone has their game faces on. No its not a football game, but the start of basic fire fighting training course at Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport. Fires dont break out on ships very often, so there are no delegated fire fighters onboard ships. However, when they do happen, fires can be dev astating and they can happen anywhere. For that reason, everyone has to be trained on how to stop fires before they spread. One of the goals of SWOSLS is to give Navy personnel more in-depth training about the differ ent types of fires, oper ating and maintaining equipment along with techniques used to fight fires. The students are all here to learn basic fire fighting skills or to brush up on the skills they already have, said Chief Damage Controlman Scottie Farra, instructor at SWOSLS. The basic, firefighting course is a begin ner level class that starts with the basics like fight ing Bravo and Charley fires, including proper safety and use of PKP, CO2 and Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) fire extinguishers and proper wear of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) gear. After in-class training, students battledress and proceed to the outside training site to receive hands-on hose handling techniques. Its good to get this hands on training, since they dont really give you this kind of training in boot camp, said Seaman Blayne Nation, USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). The fire was hotter than I expected it to be but it was a good experience, Now the heat is on in the training facility as stu dents enter the fire simu lator to fight mock Bravo and Charley fires. Its very important to give these young students the experience of fighting a fire and handling hoses. The training and knowl edge they are getting on the SCBA gear is invalu able as we send them back to their ship, said Damage Controlman 1st Class Lawrence Madison, SWOSLS instructor. For me its very reward ing; being able to do the research that we do and pass on the knowledge we have to the young Sailors that come through. They walk away with knowl edge they didnt come here with. Towards the end of the day, as training is winding down, Hull Maintenance Technician 3rd Class Justin Whipple summed up the day with a few heart-felt words. Theres nothing like getting edu cation from shipmates that will stick with you for life. Sailors prepare to put out a mock Bravo class fire during firefighting training at Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport. -Photos by MCSN Damian BergBoatswains' Mate 2nd Class Tiffany Walker, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) help a Sailor don their self-contained breathing appa ratus during basic firefighting training at Naval Station Mayport as Damage Controlman 1st Class Robert Blessing, Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport instructor observes. SWOSLS pro vides realistic training both on land and at sea to help prepare Sailors for casualties in the fleet. Chief Damage Controlman Mark Torres, Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport instructor, hands out self-contained breathing apparatus gear to students during basic firefighting training at Naval Station Mayport. Chief Damage Controlman Scottie Farra, Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport instructor, provides training on how to properly don a selfcontained breathing apparatus at Naval Station Mayport. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 9

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The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. June 21: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 6:30 p.m. FREE. June 22: Mellow Mushroom Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. June 23: UFC 147: Silva vs. Belfort. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 June 23: Jax Beach. Van departs 11 a.m. Transportation only. FREE June 25: St. Johns Town Center Shopping Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. June 26: Saharas Mediterranean Caf Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. June 27: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door.. For tickets, call (904) 270-5431. June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 2: Teds Montana Grill Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation Only. July 3: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Military Appreciation Game with Fireworks! FREE. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 4: Fireworks at Jacksonville Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation Only. July 6: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. LIBERTYNaval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series This is a 4-week pro gram for CFLs and ACFLs only. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., The After Party Mayport Sandbox Monday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7: 30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Tuesday 6:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 6:30 a.m., HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Wednesday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Weight Training For Warfighters 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Friday 7 a.m., Spinning Water Aerobics These classes meet at the Base Pool weather permitting Monday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Thursday 7 a.m., Command Aqua 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Friday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Therapy MWR -Photo by MCSN Damian BergSandy Schultz, a fitness specialist at Naval Station Mayport MWR, teaches a water aerobic class at the Mayport Swimming Pool. Shallow water aerobics is an exercise, which encompasses a combination of cardio and yoga, using typical body movements which include marching, stretching, circling the arms, bending the knees, and swinging the legs. Getting Fit The Cool Way 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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June 22: Outdoor MoviesBig Miracle (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 23: UFC 147: Silva vs. Belfort. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 June 25: Summer Swim Lesson Session II Begins Registration is June 22-23 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 27: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 or 270-5126 ext. 3072 June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 6: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 6: Red, White & Blue Bash. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Wes Cobb Band. Prizes will be awarded for the most Patriotic Outfit. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided. FREE. 270-7205 July 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rent al, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 July 7: UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 10: Moonlight 5K Run/ 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 10: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 11: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) July 11: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 July 11: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 July 11: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7. 270-5431 MWRJune 22: Outdoor MoviesBig Miracle (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 22: Good, Ole Fashioned Picnic and Games!: 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a Hoe Down at the teen center with classic Western fare and fun! 246-0347 June 25: Summer Swim Lesson Session II Begins Registration is June 22-23 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 29: Mystery Movie: 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Settle in for chills and thrills as we enjoy a movie and snacks! 246-0347 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 KID a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 11

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Underwood Conducts PASSEX With ChileansSouthern Seas 2012 Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with ships from the Chilean navy while en route to Iquique, Chile, June 16. Underwood operated with three Chilean ships: the Piloto Pardo-class patrol ship Comandante Toro (PZM 82) and the Riquelme-class fast attack craft Uribe (LM 39) and Serrano (LM 38) during the daylong exercise. The exercise included a variety of events designed to increase interoperabil ity and enhance friendly relations and mutual cooperation between the navies. Today we conducted a partnership mission with the Chilean navy, said Lt. j.g. Wilson Miles, III, the auxiliaries officer aboard Underwood, and the junior officer of the deck during the operations. We did a helo (helicop ter) cross-deck, where we took their helo on board and did some operations with them. After that we did some maneuvering exercises with them and an aerial photo exercise to display our joint opera tions and the partnership we have with the Chilean navy. Boatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Joshua Singleton, the assistant leading petty officer for the deck division aboard Underwood, was the landing signalman enlist ed (LSE) during the flight operations with a Chilean Dauphin AS-365 that landed on Underwoods flight deck for a passenger transfer. As the LSE, Singletons responsibilities include ensuring the flight deck is free of all debris prior to flight operations, making sure all the Sailors on the flight deck are wearing the proper personnel protec tive gear and to ensure the helicopter is landed safely and is chocked and chained down to the deck. During todays flight operations, one of the unique challenges we had was adapting to a differ ent type of helo landing on our flight deck, said Singleton. The O-rings that we attach the tiedowns to are located in different places on the Chilean helo, so you have to be vigilant and make sure you secure the helo safely to the deck. Operating with other navies who sometimes do things differently can be both a challenge and a rewarding opportunity. At times its stressful, especially with the com munication challenges we have, said Miles. The Chilean navy does some things differently than we do, but its a learning process. Thats why were down here; thats why were doing what were doing, to build that com munication between our navies. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Underwood Honors Sailors Lost During War Of 1812 In ChileSouthern Seas 2012 Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) gathered to honor deceased U.S. Sailors interred at the Dissident Cemetery in Valparaiso, Chile, June 11. A Chilean navy band that performed the Star Spangled Banner and Taps joined the group of 17 Sailors and offi cers. As the Underwood crew members stood in formation, Cmdr. Michael Brasseur, the executive officer, read a brief histor ical account of the naval battle that resulted in the death of 58 Sailors of USS Essex March 28, 1814. Cmdr. Peter Mirisola, the commanding offi cer, then spoke about the War of 1812 and the U.S. Navys commemoration of the bicentennial of that war. We share a bond with the Sailors of 1812 and all Sailors since then, said Mirisola. The per formance of Americas Sailors and Marines in the War of 1812 set the standard upon which our naval forces continue to build today. We contin ue to be warfighters, to operate forward, far from home for extended peri ods of time. We always stand ready to counter any challenge, just as the Sailors during the War of 1812, and each subse quent war in which our navy has fought, stood prepared for anything that came their way. Mirisola and Brasseur then presented a wreath of flowers in the shape of the American flag, and signed the Dissident Cemetery logbook, a tra dition observed by U.S. Sailors who come to pay their respects. Underwood crew members also visited the gravesites of a USS Pensacola apprentice and two Sailors from USS Baltimore, buried in the cemetery in 1882 and 1891, respectively. We remember the selfless sacrifice of each man and we stand ready to carry on their tradition of fighting for freedom, fighting for the future of our families, our country, said Mirisola. The self less sacrifice of those who serve their country and have paid the ultimate sacrifice will forever live on in our memories. We will never forget. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. What does HOPE look like? Hope looks like Kayla and her mother, Sonia They are working together to help accelerate the pace of research to nd better treatments and a cure for type 1 diabetes. To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Chowing Down On Vicksburg -Photos by MC2 Nick ScottThe First Class Petty Officer Association aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) prepares chicken wings for pizza and wings night aboard Vicksburg. Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Damage Controlman 1st Class Gary S. Lee prepares pizza for pizza and wings night aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 13 NRMOs Improve Quality, Enhance Safety, And Increase Surface Ship ReadinessCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) Public AffairsRepresentatives from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) Regional Maintenance Office (NRMO) and Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) visited the USS Thunderbolt (PC12) and the USS Tempest (PC-2) on June 12 in Norfolk, Va. The commands met with the ships project teams to review their safety and fire preven tion practices, as well as the maintenance sched ules and current quality of work. Our NRMO organiza tions are located across almost all Navy water fronts, and are aimed at supporting our unwav ering goal of improv ing first time quality, enhancing safety, reduc ing total operational costs, and more closely adhering to ships main tenance schedules, said Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) Rear Adm. David Gale. NRMOs serve as a pri mary point of contact for critique notification to CNRMC, and provide independent oversight of surface ship main tenance with particu lar focus on critical sys tems identified in Naval Sea Systems Instruction (NAVSEAINST) 5400.108A, the Policy for Quality Management of Work on Non-Nuclear Surface Ships Critical Systems. These maintenance offices are responsible for performing periodic sur veillances of in-process work; conducting audits of areas of particular focus to the fleet such as procedure and work con trol compliance; attend ing Enhanced Process Control Procedures (EPCP) Ready To Start (RTS) events; participa tion in Integrated Project Team development (IPTD) events; as well as docking, undocking, cri tique, certification, pro duction, and progress meetings. The NRMOs sup port the Surface Ship Maintenance commu nity by reviewing mainte nance and repair work to ensure adherence to qual ity, technical, and safety standards at the opera tional, intermediate, and depot levels, said Gale. Since the stand-up of the NRMOs, we have already seen marked improvements in root cause analyses and the critique processes, allow ing us at CNRMC to work with the RMCs to provide clarification of policies and standards for Foreign Material Exclusion (FME). The NRMOs efforts have also led to the identifi cation of problems with machinery layup and planned maintenance systems (PMS), as well as the identification of sev eral safety related prob lems, said Gale. The origins of NRMOs began in May 2011, fol lowing several nega tive trends in surface ship maintenance. As a response to these, Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command (COMNAVSEA) Vice Adm. Kevin McCoy directed NAVSEAs Engineering Field Representatives (EFRs) begin performing third party oversight of nonnuclear surface ship maintenance similar to the role of NAVSEA Shipyard Representatives Office (NSRO) and Naval Reactors Representatives Office (NRRO) at the pub lic shipyards. His estab lishment of NRMOs fol lowed suit. McCoy charged CNRMC to implement the NRMOs on October 2011, and since that time, offices have been estab lished at Norfolk Ship Support Activity (NSSA) Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) in Norfolk, Va.; Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) in Mayport, Fla.; Southwest Regional Maintenance cen ter (SWRMC) in San Diego; and at Northwest Regional Maintenance Center (NWRMC) in Bremerton, Wash. An additional NRMO is slated for stand-up this August at the Hawaii Regional Maintenance Center (HRMC) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. According to Frank Murphy, CNRMCs assis tant director for techni cal oversight who serves as the NRMOs pro gram manager, the other NRMO offices share les sons learned and col laborate several times a week through phone conferences. They regularly confer to discuss the most effective ways to evaluate ship maintenance pro cesses; implement qual ity improvement efforts, lower cost, improve safe ty, and shorten mainte nance schedules. All NRMOs also work closely with ships project teams to continu ally improve surface ship maintenance efforts in the areas of work control, safety and technical rigor oversight and manage ment. Our partnership with the NAVSEA and the NRMOs has been a valu able one, said Gale. To date, we have worked col laboratively to improve the quality and schedules of non-nuclear surface ship maintenance by the enforcement of standards. We will continue to work with NAVSEA and the field offices to advance the goals and initiatives of the surface maintenance community. For more information about NAVSEA Regional Maintenance Offices (NRMOs), contact CNRMCs Frank Murphy at: william.f.murphy@ navy.milDoD Tightens Spending on Travel, ConferencesAmerican Forces Press ServiceIn response to a May 11 call to action from the Office of Management and Budget, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter has directed DOD offi cials and managers to reduce spending on travel, conferences and other agency operations. DOD consistently strives to be an excellent steward of taxpayer dollars and has focused on these issues for a number of years, Carter said in a June 3 memo. Such efforts, he added, include the 2010 Secretarys Efficiency Initiative and implementation of President Barack Obamas June 2011 Campaign to Cut Waste. In his memo, Carter directs the DOD comptroller to reduce travel expenses for fiscal year 2013 by 30 percent from DODs fiscal 2010 baseline, excluding national security exemptions and with out harming agency missions. The deputy secretary also directs the undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness to work with DOD com ponents and services to implement a conference policy that establishes stan dard, tiered approval levels for confer ence spending. Effective immediately, Carter is direct ing a review of upcoming conferences and temporarily suspending new con ference obligations. The deputy secre tary will personally review conferences that will cost more than $500,000. The departments Deputy Chief Management Officer Elizabeth McGrath will review conferences whose costs exceed $100,000. DOD will report back to OMB, the deputy secretary said, on proposed reductions in these areas within 90 days, and in some cases 180 days, of the May 11 memo. Carter said McGrath would coordi nate DOD implementation of OMBs Executive-Branch-wide policies and practices involving travel, conferences, real estate and fleet management. Increased scrutiny is being applied to DOD spending, McGrath told American Forces Press Service, which makes it more important than ever that we con tinue to instill a culture of cost con sciousness and accountability across the Defense enterprise. The department has always taken its duty to be an excellent steward of tax payer dollars very seriously, she added. The appropriate offices for each of the areas discussed in the memorandum -travel, conferences, real estate, and fleet management -will work together to ensure that we are fully complying with the deputy secretarys direction, McGrath said, and that we are making the best use of government funds. The deputy chief management officer added, It is important for us to assess our travel costs and practices to ensure that we maximize alternatives to travel, such as teleconferencing, that we com bine trips when possible to minimize the frequency of travel, and that we send the right people to the right events. McGrath said conferences can serve many important purposes, including training, professional development and continuing education opportunities required for professional accreditation. As the increased spending efficiencies are put in place, he added, we must ensure that these cuts do not lead to degradation of mission effectiveness. Navy Reservist Earns Spot in 2012 Olympics Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Public Affairs A Sailor from Navy Operational Support Center Columbus, Ga., won the USA Shooting National Championship in the womens 25-meter pistol shoot June 5 earn ing her a spot on the 2012 U.S. Olympic shoot ing team. Information Systems Technician 1st Class Sandra Uptagrafft, a Reservist, won the event held at Fort Benning. Less than three points out of more than 2,100 separated top finishing Uptagrafft from second place. I struggled through the whole thing, said Uptagrafft. I did not think I made it... so it was a huge relief when I heard the result. As an informa tion systems techni cian, Uptagrafft has not received applicable weapons training in the Navy that aided her in making the team. She does give credit to her assigned unit, 3rd Naval Construction Regiment, with whom she made a nine-month deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan from 2010-2011, with being a true enabler. They have been super supportive of me and my shooting, she said. Ive received moral support and they were always just really encouraging. Uptagrafft is still com peting for a national championship in wom ens 10-meter air pis tol with the finals being scheduled for June 8. Once completed she will continue to train as much as possible at Fort Benning, which is near her home. She will, how ever, have to tailor her schedule to the bases operational commit ments. Uptagraffts husband Eric, a former Navy Reservist, is a member of the mens 2012 U.S. Olympic shooting team and the two will cele brate their 12th anniver sary during the summer games in London Aug. 5. The shooting events are scheduled to run from July 28 to Aug. 6.



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com More Ships For MayportARG To Begin Move In 2013From Department of Defense Public AffairsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced June 15 that the first amphibious ready group (ARG) ship scheduled to shift homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., will arrive in the last quarter of calendar year 2013. USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), will shift from their current homeport of Norfolk, Va., to Mayport. The New York will be the first to change homeport, followed by the Iwo Jima and Fort McHenry in 2014. Mabus originally announced Feb. 28 that the ARG would arrive no later than 2015. The accelerated timeline ensures continued viability of the Mayport ship repair industrial base and maintains the capabilities of the Jacksonville fleet concentration area, thereby preserving surge capability and reducing risk to fleet resources in the event of natural or manmade contingencies. I am very pleased that the Navy is able to condense the timea horizon for the arrival of the Mayport ARG, stated Mabus. The move underscores just how important Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport are to our national defense, and how committed we are to strategic dis persal on the East Coast. Mabus brought with him other good news for the area. Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport will host the Navy-Marine Corps Classic mens basketball game featuring the University of Florida and Georgetown University on Nov. 9. Both teams have won NCAA National Championships in mens basketball. The Navy is excited to work with the city of Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport to bring the Navy-Marine Corps Classic to the First Coast, Mabus said. The Navy is Americas Away Team; when we are on the job, we operate forward around the globe and often out of sight of the American people. This is a unique opportunity to showcase the Navy and to join together to honor our veterans and active duty military. USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7)Named after the famous World War II battle in which three divisions of the U.S. Marine Corps took control of the tiny island of Iwo Jima from the 22,000 Japanese defenders. Crew Size: 1,082 Keel laid: Dec. 12, 1997 Commissioned: June 30, 2001 -Photo by MC2(SW) Jacob Sippel Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) the Honorable Ray Mabus shakes hands with Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Amanda Brown after reenlisting in the Navy. Mabus was on base to announce the first amphibious ready group (ARG) ship scheduled to shift homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., will arrive in the last quarter of calendar year 2013. The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) will be the first to change homeport, followed by the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) in 2014. USS New York (LPD 21) USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43)USS New York (LPD 21)Named after New York City, the ship was built after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and forged from the steel of the World Trade Center. Crew Size: 360 Keel laid: Sept. 10, 2004 Commissioned: Nov. 7, 2009USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43)Named after the fort located in Baltimore, Maryland whose bombardment during the War of 1812 was made famous in the poem The Star Spangled Banner. Crew Size: 413 Keel laid: June 10, 1983 Commissioned: Aug. 8, 1987 USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7)

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Your teen has declared he wants to work at the neighbor hood Publix. I need the money for an upgraded I Phone, and a car, he says. Whoa! Is this a step to maturity or a slip toward lower grades, inadequate sleep, and a cramped social life? How do you help him make the right choice about taking a job? Jobs in the summer are great with no homework to juggle. But when school starts back in the fall, how do you help him to manage the job, school, and social time? First, make sure you know the rules. Check out federal law to make sure that the employ er is following it to the letter. Also check out state laws as well since some states impose stiffer restrictions than the fed eral government. Once youve examined the laws in your area, make sure you and your teen discuss the benefits and the disadvantages. The Pros dence, a sense of responsibility and independence. who work a moderate amount, no more than 10 to 15 hours a week, tend to earn higher grades than those who dont work at all. tunity to learn responsible money management. outside the home, a job during the summer can give your child adult supervision when no adults are home during the day. expose your teen to new work possibilities and set him on the path to a life-time career. The Cons hours a week is associated with lower grades. So if this job continues in the fall, watch those grades! hours may find it hard to keep up with responsibilities around the house, faith-based activi ties, or social relationships. that teens who work long hours are more likely to engage in activities such as drug or alco hol use, in part because they are exposed to older co-workers who lead them into these activities. Since most teens dont like to be told what to do, offer sub tle guidance. Ask them what they want to get out of the job. Career preparation? Fun? Money? Discuss whether this is a job they would like to keep once school starts back. Talk about preparing a bud get which will include saving as well as spending. Consider making your teen responsible for gas when he drives the car or a portion of the auto insur ance or some entertainment expenses that youve paid in the past. If your teen does take a job, make sure he is getting his breaks and that he doesnt work more hours for his age than allowed by law. If the job con tinues on into the school year, continue to monitor how many hours a week he works. You may have to reduce those hours if he cant keep up his grades. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. The Five Worst Jobs For Teens The National Consumers League has pegged these jobs as the most dangerous for stu dents. including operating or riding on forklifts and other motorized equipment. based business: including con venience store, gas station, and fast-food establishments. ing candy, magazine subscrip tions and other consumer goods on street corners, in unfamiliar neighborhoods, in distant cities, and across state lines. oil and grease, hot water and steam, and hot cooking surfac es. work at heights and contact with electrical power.Navigating Summer Jobs For TeensJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingPerhaps there have been times when you have experienced an event, a chance meeting, or just chain of events that makes you say to yourself That was strange? Sometimes we shrug this off or chalk it up to coincidence. But occasionally, the events seem to reveal Gods finger prints on our lives and leave a sense of peace or joy. In 2006, Squire Rushnell, who had served as a television execu tive credited with creat ing Schoolhouse Rock, several ABC After-School Specials and guiding Good Morning America, ABCs national morning news show; published a collection of stories titled When God Winks at You: How God Speaks Directly to You through the Power of Coincidence. Some of these stories are amazing. The daughter of Emmitt Kelly, the famous frown ing clown, is notified by phone of her fathers passing. Aboard a plane she retrieves a yellowed newspaper article, the only known photograph of her father smiling from ear to ear. Amazingly, seated next to her looking at the faded picture is the photographer who had taken the photograph! He explains that the reason for her fathers smile, He had just received a phone call during the interview informing him of his daughters birth. Another story tells of a women living in Orange County, California who after years of driving by the Crystal Cathedral decides one day that she will attend a service there. She arrives early and finds a seat as 3,000 people gather for the weekly ser vice. After the service she has a chance conversation with one young woman who was also visiting the church for the very first time. She had traveled to Orange County to search for her birth mother. The woman feels a great sense of compassion for her and shares that she had her self given up her child for adoption. Miraculously, the stranger asks the date of her daughters birth you guessed it, mother and daughter are reunited in chance meeting. Ive had my own per sonal God winks. While stationed in Diego Garcia, all personnel would stop by the Chaplains Office as a part of their Command Check-in. A young MA3 checking aboard, just as the skies opened and released a deluge of tropical rain. Well shipmate, it looks like youll be here awhile, why dont you tell me about yourself. Over the course that conversation, we dis cover that I was stationed with her parents at Naval Hospital Bethesda from 1983 to 1985! Its another God wink! Last month, as I was traveling along the basin to visit USS Farragut and USS Halyburton, I was stopped in my tracks by a banner strung across the brow of a ship, the NOAA SHIP NANCY FOSTER. The name Nancy Foster may not sound bells and whistles in the minds of most people, but was extremely meaningful for me. While chaplains have different paths to ordina tion, my ordination jour ney traveled through the Piedmont area of South Carolina, in the city of Spartanburg. One of the individuals who would leave a lasting impression on my ministry was named Nancy Foster. Now this Nancy Foster is not the namesake of the NOAA Research ves sel. But 18 years ago, when I began serving my internship congregation, this diminutive Southern Lady, modeled a conta gious Christianity, mixed with humor, humility, and grace. Before the day was over, I found myself knee-deep in warm memories, reminiscing about the past. I quickly phoned my wife, who immediately asked if I had called to check on Nancy and make sure that she was Ok. Another quick call to South Carolina to hear a familiar voice on the line; yes this Nancy Foster was fine. Like most God winks, the conversation ended with a blessing for both of us, This call has truly made my day! So be on the lookout for these occasional break throughs of joy. You will never know when God will throw a wink your way. God Winks... There May Be More To Coincidence Than CoincidenceLt. Tom Bingol Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINS Everyone has a right to dignity and respect.1-800-919-9338A CFC participant. Provided as a public serviceCatholic Charities USAwww.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org -Photo submittedLt. Tom Bingol stands on the brow of NOAA ship Nancy Foster. The name, Nancy Foster, has special meaning to the chaplain.Clinic Recruits Junior VolunteersFrom NBHC MayportThe American Red Cross at Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health care careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a positive experience for NBHC Mayport patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the clinic. Application packet can be picked up and turned in at the American Red Cross Mayport Branch office in Building 1358 behind the bowling alley at Naval Station Mayport. The program is six weeks long and kicks off with an orientation on Monday, June 25 from 8:30 a.m. and CPR training on Wednesday, June 27 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the clinics second deck staff and education training room. Selected volunteers will be required to get a TB test. For more information on this opportunity, call the NBHC Mayport American Red Cross volunteer office at 904-270-4365 (open limited hours) or the Red Cross Branch office on NS Mayport at 904-246-1395. 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Frockees EN3(SW) Moses K. Asomaning, USS Halyburton OS3(SW) Quintrel R. Brown, USS Halyburton QM3(SW) Jason J. Carchio, USS Halyburton BM3 Steven M. Clark, USS Halyburton PS3 Steven D. Dodson, USS Halyburton OS3 Colin S. Doty, USS Halyburton BM3 Daniel J. Dunn, USS Halyburton BM3 Matthew H. Fanning, USS Halyburton OS3 Jarell Hyatt, USS Halyburton BM3 Sherman T. Jenkins, USS Halyburton OS3 Trevor M. Kinsella, USS Halyburton GM3 Dayron L. Mas, USS Halyburton DC3 David F. Morgan, USS Halyburton EN3 Joel E. Palilla, USS Halyburton BM3 Armando Perez, USS Halyburton BM3 Joshua D. Sandoz, USS Halyburton GSM3 Matthew E. Suarez, USS Halyburton BM3 Mark J. Zajac, USS Halyburton OS3 Matthew D. Zandi, USS Halyburton QM2(SW) Patrick J. Cherry, USS Halyburton EN2(SW) Dustin B. Fort, USS Halyburton STG2 Justin W. Gladstone, USS Halyburton OS2(SW) Brandon M. Hardy, USS Halyburton OS2 Matthew B. Love, USS Halyburton DC2 Kyle E. Manion, USS Halyburton IT2(SW) Chase L. Rudsinski, USS Halyburton STG2 Joshua E. Schroeder, USS Halyburton ET2(SW) Samuel J. Whisman, USS Halyburton BM1(SW) Juan P. Naranjo, USS Halyburton QM1(SS) Angel L. Rivera, USS Halyburton IT1(AW) Roger C. Williams, USS Halyburton GSM3 Matthew Aguilartorres, USS Philippine Sea BM2 Khiry Allen, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Ryan Arce, USS Philippine Sea OS2 Mary Bailey, USS Philippine Sea OS3 Owen Benons, USS Philippine Sea SH2 Jorge Beteta, USS Philippine Sea OS1 Benjamin Brascomb, USS Philippine Sea ET1 Douglas Brewer, USS Philippine Sea SH3 Patrick Burns, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Benjamin Clark, USS Philippine Sea EN2 Thomas Collins, USS Philippine Sea CS2 James Daniels, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Nicholas Galloway, USS Philippine Sea DC3 Luis Garciaclavijo, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Matthew Griffiths, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Melissa Grooms, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Robert Harper, USS Philippine Sea FC2 Douglas Ives, USS Philippine Sea PS3 Imari Jenkins, USS Philippine Sea AZ3 Edward Johnson, USS Philippine Sea IT1 Tracy Johnson, USS Philippine Sea GSM3 Sergey Khakhaev, USS Philippine Sea STG2 Jason Kinton, USS Philippine Sea LS3 Raeann Landrybatts, USS Philippine Sea EN3 Samuel McNeil, USS Philippine Sea OS3 Steven Mestresjunque, USS Philippine Sea STG2 Mark Moles, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Jeffery Nelson, USS Philippine Sea CS3 Alex Ottusch, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Marc Peterson, USS Philippine Sea OS2 Evan Pinkney, USS Philippine Sea LS3 Clarissa Ross, USS Philippine Sea ET2 Derrick Rumsey, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Adrian Smith, USS Philippine Sea CTR2 Mark Spurling, USS Philippine Sea OS1 Alexis Strother, USS Philippine Sea CS2 Gerald Taylor, USS Philippine Sea EM2 Joshua Watson, USS Philippine Sea OS2 Timothy Weier, USS Philippine Sea QM3 Brandon Wells, USS Philippine Sea QM3 Camron Whelan, USS Philippine Sea GSE2 Shawn Wigley, USS Philippine Sea EM3 Devin Williams, USS Philippine Sea CS3 Ontario Williams, USS Philippine Sea GM1 Ivan Wilson, USS Philippine Sea GM2 Brandon Yates, USS Philippine Sea GM3 Derrick Young, USS Philippine Sea BM3 Jon Young, USS Philippine Sea MAYPORT Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org CNRMC Pilots First ITE CourseCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) Public AffairsCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) will pilot its first Integrated Test Engineers (ITE) course on June 18 in Norfolk, Va. The 3-day course is intended to provide ITEs with the basic knowl edge and skills required to become a functional member of the availability project team. The course will pro vide ITEs with a thorough review of the current position responsibilities and requirements associated with their jobs, and will also offer an overview of job-specific scenarios that address the more com plicated aspects of their work, said CNRMC Rear Adm. David Gale. The ITE course is aimed at new and seasoned ITEs alike, and will cover availability project team com position, project management practices, and policies/strategies relat ed to the development and management of an Integrated Test Plan. The course also pro vides a review of current instructions that govern the day-to-day work decisions made by ITEs, and emphasizes the need for ITEs to establish and maintain on-thejob compliance through their proper evaluation of objective quality evidence for completed work. Once the ITE pilot course is completed, CNRMC anticipates they will offer one course monthly in San Diego and one in Norfolk. For more information about ITE and other Workforce Development courses for the sur face ship maintenance Enterprise, contact CNRMCs Mr. Lloyd Jones at lloyd.h.jones@navy.mil For more information about CNRMC, visit: http://www.navsea.navy. mil/CNRMC/default.aspx THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 USO Brings Families Together For FunThe Mirror editorMore than 2,000 service members and their families from NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville, NSB Kings Bay, Coast Guard and local recruiting districts were able to escape the Florida heat at Adventure Landing and Shipwreck Island Waterpark on June 13 during the sixth annual Military Appreciation Night, sponsored by USO. For only a couple of dollars per person, families were able to enjoy both the wet and dry parks on Beach Boulevard in Jacksonville Beach. Normally, just a ticket to the water park would cost around $25 per person so the savings are substantial. Its wonderful, said John Shockley, executive director for Greater Jacksonville USO. We start getting calls two to three months in advance asking about this event. [Its become so popular] that we cant meet the demand of everyone who wants to come. There is a certain capacity for the safety and fun of our guests. For the early birds that do get a pass however, $2 to the USO allowed participants full access to both the dry and water park activities. Karen Klefman also used the opportunity to pay it forward from last years event after she was given a set of passes for her family after missing out on the sale at USO. When a family showed up last Wednesday without passes, she was able to give them an extra set that her husband had purchased by mistake. Service members and their families spent the eve --Photo by Paige GnannLeft, Families take advantage of the Shipwreck Island Play Village geared towards all ages of kids, including their parents. The village features slides, water cannons and waterfalls. Above, children slide down a slide at the kiddie pool area. Kenny Bradford, 9, gets ready to take on The Rage with his mom. Electronics Technician 1st Class (EXW/SW) Nathan Hurst of NCTS Jacksonville plays with his children, Kailyn, 4, and Wyatt, 2, as well as family friends Leilana, 2, and Chris Loregnard in the half million gallon wave pool, Typhoon Lagoon.See USO, Page 5Its a race to the finish through the slides at the Pirates Play Village, a three-story interactive water play area with 12 slides. Guests keep cool and do a little sight-seeing down the Lil St. Johns River, a 720-foot lazy river moving around the water park at 5 miles per hour.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 5 Land Sharks Have Fun As Well Its the end of the journey through Adventure Landings uphill water-coaster, The Rage. Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) James Hendricks and his sons, Gavin, 5, and Aidan, 8, bounce around on The Frog Hopper, one of several attractions in the dry park portion of Adventure Landing. Michael Blankenship, 8, makes his way down the course of Super Bikes 2 as his sister Mya, 3, watches him play in the Arcade area of Adventure Landing. Service members and their families get ready to put the pedal to the metal on the quarter-mile Adventure Speedway Go-Karts track. Karen Klefman laughs at her son Bradys exuberance as he enters Adventure Landing to enjoy Military Appreciation Night sponsored by the Greater Jacksonville USO on June 13. Air Warfare Rescue 3rd Class Ray Skiba of HSL-48 helps his daugher Lainey put her ball into the hole at the putt-putt course. Service members and their families were able to enjoy the wet and dry park at Adventure Landing, including the Wacky Worm Roller Coaster.ning lazing along the Lil St. Johns River lazy river or getting washed ashore with at the Wave Pool. For the little ones, the water park offers the Pirates Play Village, a three-story, interactive water play area with 12 slides, nozzles that squirt and spray water, plus a lot of places to explore. There is also a Kiddie Cove designed for toddlers. For the more daring adventurers, the water park offers the Hydro Half-pipe a 35-foot halfpipe, based on a skateboarders trick maker. They could also swirled along in the Eye of the Storm, a 40-foot body slide where riders are challenged to see how many revolutions they can make before drop ping into eight feet of water, according to Adventure Landing web site. Its fun, said Aviation Machinists Mate 1st Class (AW) Elvis Batista of CNATTU Jax. Its definitely a boost to the morale. The fact that they rented the whole park for military is really amazing. It brings you closer to the ones that you serve with, said Satonia Walker. On the other side of Adventure Landing, fam ily members could enjoy Miniature Golf, Laser Tag, the Wacky Worm roller coaster, Batting Cages, the Adventure Speedway gokarts, Frog Hopper bungee ride and arcade area. I think its really great and fun for the kids, added Samantha Blankenship, whos hus band Fire Controlman 2nd Class Michael Blankenship is stationed on USS Hue City.From Page 4USO Cora Acree, 7, braves the Hydro Half-Pipe. Chief Logistics Specialist Jaime Ibarra of Fleet Logistics Command plays in the Wave Pool with his family.

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FFSC Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. June 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. June 21, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 June 21, 8 a.m.-noon, Interviewing Skills Building 460 Room A June 25, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 June 25-29, 7:30 a.m.5 p.m., SAPR Advocate Initial Class, Building 1 Room 104 June 26, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building 1, Room 104 June 26, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., NS Mayport Job Fair Beachside Community Center June 27, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 June 27, 11 a.m.-noon, Financial Planning For Deployment, FFSC Room 719 June 28, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. June 28, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FFSC Room 702 BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.-4p.m., Resume Writing, FFSC TBD Saturday, June 23 Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a presentation and leisurely guided hike through different Florida ecosystems on a quest to characterize tracks left by an assortment of critters. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. June 25-29 The Isle of Faith Church, 1821 San Pablo Road S., will hold its free Vacation Bible School from 6-8:30 p.m. All chil dren welcome. Call 2211700 for more information. SonSurf Beach Blast is the theme for this years free Vacation Bible School from 9 a.m.-noon, at Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. It will be filled with Bible learning experiences that kids can see, hear, touch and even taste! Crafts, team-building games, cool Bible songs and tasty treats are justs a few of the activities that helps faith flow into real life. Sign up now to be a part of the experience you wont want your child to miss. Contact the Church Office at 904-249-5370 to register today. Thursday, June 28 The Jacksonville Public Library, 303 Laura St. N. Room G-4, Conference Center Level, in con junction with the Small Business Administration, presents Resources for Small Business, a free workshop for Spanishspeaking small busi ness owners and those thinking about starting a business from 1-3 p.m. Workshop topics will include planning and business development, acquiring financing and research strategies for locating print and elec tronic business resourc es. Pre-registration is required and seating is limited. To register or learn more, contact Greg Royce or Crystal Chase at (904) 630-2401 or e-mail jaxpubliclibrary_business@coj.net. Saturday, June 30 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for an intriguing presentation and gain insight into the spiders world. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Tuesday, July 3 Join one of the larg est fireworks displays in Northeast Florida as the World Golf Village cel ebrates Independence Day on Tuesday, July 3. Bring blankets or lawn chairs and find a spot around the Walk of Champions to take in the grand fireworks show. A minimal parking fee will be required for entry to the event. For event information, visit the events calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame. org. The Renaissance World Golf Village Resort is offering a dinner, show and fireworks package. The ticket includes din ner, a live performance from VoicePlay, and preferred seating to see the World Golf Village Community fireworks. The Stars and Stripes package includes over night accommodations. For more information, please visit www.world golfrenaissance.com or call 904-940-8696. Saturday, July 14 The Duval County Extension Office will offer a program on Organic Gardening from 9 a.m.-noon at the Duval Extension Office at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville. Topics will include organic soil amendments, composting, pest manage ment techniques and an introduction to permaculture. Cost is $5 to attend. Call or email Becky at 255-7450 or beckyd@ coj.net to register. Please include contact phone number when emailing.Out in Town Sailors Prohibited Inside Black-Listed BusinessesFrom CNRSEArmed Forces Disciplinary Control Board convened on 13 June 2012 at NAS Jacksonville. The following businesses (including all future addresses) continue to be Off-limits: 2003 Blanding Blvd, Jacksonville, Fl. 2840 Mayport Rd, Jacksonville, Fl. Service members are prohibited from entering off-limits establishments. Violation of these prohibitions may subject a member to disciplinary action under the uniform code of military justice. Family members and others associated with the Department of the Navy should be made aware that these establishments are off-limits to military personnel. While he works to protect the country, St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Of cer 2, and his daughter Delilah, a St. Jude patient 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Trooper First Class Greg Healy conducts a mock field sobriety test on Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 1st Class Crystal Duffy of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46 while wearing a training air called "Beer Goggles" during her commands Alcohol Awareness Training. The goggles inhibit Duffy's vision and she has trouble putting her finger to her nose. HSM 46 had multiple speakers at their training to include Assistant District Attorney, Mark Borello, Debbie Jones with Mothers Against Drunk Driving and Capt. Roy Hall from Jacksonville Fire and Rescue. -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsThings Look Different Through Beer GogglesMotorcycle Safety Remains Top Priority American Forces Press ServicePreventing motorcycle accidents and fatalities remains a top priority for Defense Department leaders, a senior defense official said, with training and awareness reducing the number of incidents. We had seen fatalities and accidents increas ing as motorcycle owner ship increased, Joseph Angello, DODs director of operational readiness and safety, told the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service. In 2008, the peak year for fatalities, he added, 124 service members died in motorcycle accidents. Since that time through training, through emphasis, through lead ership [and] through the phenomenal work of our military services weve brought that number down, he said. We lost 92 [service members] last year, and this year our trends look like we will be at that level or less. Every loss is tragic and affects spouses, parents other family members, the service members unit and the Defense Department, Angello said. We dont want any one to lose their life in a motorcycle accident, he said. We want them to drive safe; we want them to wear protective gear helmets, appropriate shoes, appropriate attire, and leathers. ... But sometimes, the best protection against a motorcycle accident is awareness, train ing and control. Thats your best protection. The director noted motorcycle training is mandatory for all DOD personnel. In addition, military personnel are required to wear person al protective equipment, such as long sleeves, eye protection and helmets, even if they are in a nohelmet state. If you are a military member and you want to ride a motorcycle, you must have the training, Angello said. Each of our services a lot of them are common courses -have a basic motorcycle safety course. You must take it or a refresher course, an advanced rider course, or a sports bike course. The Navy and Marine Corps developed the sports bike course in 2008 and shared it through the Defense Safety Oversight Council Private Motor Vehicle Task Force. Sports bikes are phe nomenal pieces of engi neering, with power-toweight ratios like weve never seen before, Angello said. As a result, they are very dangerous. If ridden properly, its enjoyment its fun. But they are unforgiving. Numerous deployments over the last decade have had an impact on the number of service mem bers involved in motor cycle accidents, Angello said. Angello lauded military leaders for their com mitment to addressing motorcycle safety for having offered courses that make a difference in peoples lives, and urged all military members to be ready to ride, just as they are ready for the mission when they serve in uni form. Ready to ride right equipment, right training, right conditions, he said. Keep your awareness up, and youre ready to ride. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 7

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Mayport Holds Happy Hour For Sailors Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastNaval Station Mayport put away the power point presentations for Sexual Assault, Suicide Prevention and Alcohol Awareness Training this year and host ed Comedian Bernie McGrenahan June 14 instead. McGrenahan brought his Happy Hour com edy show to Mayport educating more than 1,000 Sailors on topics such as alcohol, drug abuse, sexual assault and suicide. McGrenahan is a oneman show that focus es these serious and important topics and has opened for top stars in places like Las Vegas, been on late-night televi sion shows, and he travels to military installations across the world to bring his humor and personal experiences to people of all services. Opening with stand-up comedy, McGrenahan pulled in his audience with 45 minutes of upbeat jokes that captured the attention of military and civilians alike. His approach creates a famil iar stage for the audience that allows him to continue with the serious part of his presentation with equal interest. I make it my mission to reduce DUI arrests, cases of sexual assault/rape, encourage Sailors to use Chaplains and counsel ing as a solution to their challenges. Alcohol has ruined more careers than any other one substance, and we need to acknowledge this and respect the drug called alcohol, said McGrenahan. McGrenahan ends his show talking about the mistakes he has made due to alcohol as well as the suicide of his brother. He urges Sailors to get help with the issues they have and to know they are never alone. We get so side tract with our own lives some times and I am here to tell you that the drink is not worth the things that we give up for the drink, said McGrenahan. A Boatswains Mate 1st class who asked to keep his name anony mous sat as he listened to McGrenahan talk about his brother killing himself and tears rolled down his face. My brother killed himself with me in the very next room and I was so drunk I did not even know what was going on, said the Boatswains Mate. He cut his wrist and had I not been passed out wasted I could have saved his life. That Boatswains Mate, like McGrenahan, spends his days sober and reaching out to others to help them make better choices. I just want people to make better choices than I did, said McGrenahan. Comedian Bernie McGrenahan puts on a comedy show geared towards alcohol, drug and suicide prevention and sexual assault awareness for Sailors aboard Naval Station Mayport, Fla. McGrenahans Happy Hour tour was sponsored by U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF). -Photo by MC2 Sunday WilliamsComedian Bernie McGrenahan talks with Sailors after his comedy show geared towards alcohol, drug and sui cide prevention and sexual assault awareness. Fleet Forces Launches Breathalyzer Beta TestFrom U.S. Fleet Forces Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) launched a beta test to obtain Fleet feedback that will help determine the most effective approach for implementation of a Navy-wide alcohol breathalyzer program. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive, announced by the Secretary of the Navy in March, outlined the Navywide breathalyzer pro gram as a way to increase Fleet alcohol educa tion and awareness and to provide command ers with another tool to ensure the health and safety of Sailors by iden tifying potential alcohol abuse. USFF has selected 13 sea and shore com mands to participate in the beta test, which runs from May 24 through Sept. 30. All data collect ed will be consolidated under a summary recom mendation and forwarded to the office of the Navys Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) to be consid ered for implementation into the final policy. This beta test will be used to identify, devel op and make recom mendations on specific processes, procedures, and policies to effec tively implement the use of alcohol breathalyzers in the Navy, said USFF Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens, whos work ing in coordination with USFFs Breathalyzer Implementation Team on the beta test. By obtain ing feedback from the Fleet, were ensuring the final policy will be fully executable and will serve as a tool that benefits individual organizations and Sailors. USFFs breathalyzer implementation team met with the leader ship of all 13 commands involved in the beta test today to issue equipment, provide training and issue specific guidance. Participating commands will provide detailed feedback to the implementa tion team throughout the test. Under the Navy program, the breathalyzer will be used primarily as an education and prevention tool. Breathalyzer results alone will not be used as the sole eviden tiary basis for punitive or adverse administrative action. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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The Heat Is On At SWOSLS Navy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastThe bleachers are full, the teams are suited up and everyone has their game faces on. No its not a football game, but the start of basic fire fighting training course at Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport. Fires dont break out on ships very often, so there are no delegated fire fighters onboard ships. However, when they do happen, fires can be dev astating and they can happen anywhere. For that reason, everyone has to be trained on how to stop fires before they spread. One of the goals of SWOSLS is to give Navy personnel more in-depth training about the differ ent types of fires, oper ating and maintaining equipment along with techniques used to fight fires. The students are all here to learn basic fire fighting skills or to brush up on the skills they already have, said Chief Damage Controlman Scottie Farra, instructor at SWOSLS. The basic, firefighting course is a beginner level class that starts with the basics like fight ing Bravo and Charley fires, including proper safety and use of PKP, CO2 and Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) fire extinguishers and proper wear of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) gear. After in-class training, students battledress and proceed to the outside training site to receive hands-on hose handling techniques. Its good to get this hands on training, since they dont really give you this kind of training in boot camp, said Seaman Blayne Nation, USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). The fire was hotter than I expected it to be but it was a good experience, Now the heat is on in the training facility as students enter the fire simu lator to fight mock Bravo and Charley fires. Its very important to give these young students the experience of fighting a fire and handling hoses. The training and knowl edge they are getting on the SCBA gear is invalu able as we send them back to their ship, said Damage Controlman 1st Class Lawrence Madison, SWOSLS instructor. For me its very reward ing; being able to do the research that we do and pass on the knowledge we have to the young Sailors that come through. They walk away with knowl edge they didnt come here with. Towards the end of the day, as training is winding down, Hull Maintenance Technician 3rd Class Justin Whipple summed up the day with a few heart-felt words. Theres nothing like getting edu cation from shipmates that will stick with you for life. Sailors prepare to put out a mock Bravo class fire during firefighting training at Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport. -Photos by MCSN Damian BergBoatswains' Mate 2nd Class Tiffany Walker, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) help a Sailor don their self-contained breathing appa ratus during basic firefighting training at Naval Station Mayport as Damage Controlman 1st Class Robert Blessing, Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport instructor observes. SWOSLS pro vides realistic training both on land and at sea to help prepare Sailors for casualties in the fleet. Chief Damage Controlman Mark Torres, Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport instructor, hands out self-contained breathing apparatus gear to students during basic firefighting training at Naval Station Mayport. Chief Damage Controlman Scottie Farra, Surface Warfare Officer School Learning Site (SWOSLS) Mayport instructor, provides training on how to properly don a selfcontained breathing apparatus at Naval Station Mayport. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 9

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. June 21: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 6:30 p.m. FREE. June 22: Mellow Mushroom Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. June 23: UFC 147: Silva vs. Belfort. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 June 23: Jax Beach. Van departs 11 a.m. Transportation only. FREE June 25: St. Johns Town Center Shopping Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. June 26: Saharas Mediterranean Caf Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. June 27: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door.. For tickets, call (904) 270-5431. June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 2: Teds Montana Grill Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation Only. July 3: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. Military Appreciation Game with Fireworks! FREE. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 4: Fireworks at Jacksonville Landing. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation Only. July 6: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. LIBERTYNaval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., Cut N Core Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series This is a 4-week pro gram for CFLs and ACFLs only. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga Oceanfront Yoga (weather permitting) will transform your body and your attitude. Start your busy day with stretch, strength and stress relief. 11:30 a.m., Zumba 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., The After Party Mayport Sandbox Monday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7: 30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Tuesday 6:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 6:30 a.m., HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT Wednesday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Thursday 5:30 p.m., HIT 6:30 p.m., Intro to HIT Friday 6:30 a.m., HIT 7 a.m., TRX 7:30 a.m., Intro to HIT 11 a.m., HIT Noon, Intro to HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Weight Training For Warfighters 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 4:30 p.m., Weight Training For Warfighters Thursday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Friday 7 a.m., Spinning Water Aerobics These classes meet at the Base Pool weather permitting Monday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Thursday 7 a.m., Command Aqua 9:30 a.m., Aqua Fitness Friday 9:30 a.m., Aqua Therapy MWR -Photo by MCSN Damian BergSandy Schultz, a fitness specialist at Naval Station Mayport MWR, teaches a water aerobic class at the Mayport Swimming Pool. Shallow water aerobics is an exercise, which encompasses a combination of cardio and yoga, using typical body movements which include marching, stretching, circling the arms, bending the knees, and swinging the legs. Getting Fit The Cool Way 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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June 22: Outdoor MoviesBig Miracle (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 23: UFC 147: Silva vs. Belfort. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 June 25: Summer Swim Lesson Session II Begins Registration is June 22-23 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 27: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 or 270-5126 ext. 3072 June 29: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by June 15. 270-5451 June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 2: Captains Cup 4v4 Beach Volleyball Begins. Season ends Sept. 6. 270-5451. July 3: Mens Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 3 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 July 6: TGIF Extreme Bowling Party. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free for Active Duty; guests $5. Beer & drink specials, half-price wings, awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 6: Red, White & Blue Bash. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Wes Cobb Band. Prizes will be awarded for the most Patriotic Outfit. Food, giveaways, prizes and beverage specials will be provided. FREE. 270-7205 July 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rent al, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 July 7: UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 2707205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 10: Moonlight 5K Run/ 3K Walk 6:30 p.m. in front of the gym. July 10: Captains Cup Intramural Flag Football Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. July 11: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) July 11: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 July 11: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 July 11: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7. 270-5431 MWRJune 22: Outdoor MoviesBig Miracle (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 22: Good, Ole Fashioned Picnic and Games!: 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Its a Hoe Down at the teen center with classic Western fare and fun! 246-0347 June 25: Summer Swim Lesson Session II Begins Registration is June 22-23 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 29: Mystery Movie: 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Settle in for chills and thrills as we enjoy a movie and snacks! 246-0347 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 July 6: Outdoor MoviesDr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 9: Summer Swim Lesson Session III Begins Registration is July 6 & 7 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. July 13: Jaguars Football Tickets on Sale and Cheerleaders Visit 9 am at ITT. Come and meet the Roar and pur chase tickets for the 2012 Jaguars Football Season. Section 149 $58.50. 2705145 July 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Three Stooges (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 July 13: Craig Karges Magic and Mind Reading. 6 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Tables will float, minds will be read and your mind will be blown! Tickets $10 per person; tickets available at ITT. 270-5145 KID a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 11

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Underwood Conducts PASSEX With ChileansSouthern Seas 2012 Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with ships from the Chilean navy while en route to Iquique, Chile, June 16. Underwood operated with three Chilean ships: the Piloto Pardo-class patrol ship Comandante Toro (PZM 82) and the Riquelme-class fast attack craft Uribe (LM 39) and Serrano (LM 38) during the daylong exercise. The exercise included a variety of events designed to increase interoperabil ity and enhance friendly relations and mutual cooperation between the navies. Today we conducted a partnership mission with the Chilean navy, said Lt. j.g. Wilson Miles, III, the auxiliaries officer aboard Underwood, and the junior officer of the deck during the operations. We did a helo (helicop ter) cross-deck, where we took their helo on board and did some operations with them. After that we did some maneuvering exercises with them and an aerial photo exercise to display our joint operations and the partnership we have with the Chilean navy. Boatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Joshua Singleton, the assistant leading petty officer for the deck division aboard Underwood, was the landing signalman enlist ed (LSE) during the flight operations with a Chilean Dauphin AS-365 that landed on Underwoods flight deck for a passenger transfer. As the LSE, Singletons responsibilities include ensuring the flight deck is free of all debris prior to flight operations, making sure all the Sailors on the flight deck are wearing the proper personnel protec tive gear and to ensure the helicopter is landed safely and is chocked and chained down to the deck. During todays flight operations, one of the unique challenges we had was adapting to a differ ent type of helo landing on our flight deck, said Singleton. The O-rings that we attach the tiedowns to are located in different places on the Chilean helo, so you have to be vigilant and make sure you secure the helo safely to the deck. Operating with other navies who sometimes do things differently can be both a challenge and a rewarding opportunity. At times its stressful, especially with the com munication challenges we have, said Miles. The Chilean navy does some things differently than we do, but its a learning process. Thats why were down here; thats why were doing what were doing, to build that com munication between our navies. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Underwood Honors Sailors Lost During War Of 1812 In ChileSouthern Seas 2012 Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) gathered to honor deceased U.S. Sailors interred at the Dissident Cemetery in Valparaiso, Chile, June 11. A Chilean navy band that performed the Star Spangled Banner and Taps joined the group of 17 Sailors and offi cers. As the Underwood crew members stood in formation, Cmdr. Michael Brasseur, the executive officer, read a brief historical account of the naval battle that resulted in the death of 58 Sailors of USS Essex March 28, 1814. Cmdr. Peter Mirisola, the commanding offi cer, then spoke about the War of 1812 and the U.S. Navys commemoration of the bicentennial of that war. We share a bond with the Sailors of 1812 and all Sailors since then, said Mirisola. The per formance of Americas Sailors and Marines in the War of 1812 set the standard upon which our naval forces continue to build today. We contin ue to be warfighters, to operate forward, far from home for extended peri ods of time. We always stand ready to counter any challenge, just as the Sailors during the War of 1812, and each subse quent war in which our navy has fought, stood prepared for anything that came their way. Mirisola and Brasseur then presented a wreath of flowers in the shape of the American flag, and signed the Dissident Cemetery logbook, a tra dition observed by U.S. Sailors who come to pay their respects. Underwood crew members also visited the gravesites of a USS Pensacola apprentice and two Sailors from USS Baltimore, buried in the cemetery in 1882 and 1891, respectively. We remember the selfless sacrifice of each man and we stand ready to carry on their tradition of fighting for freedom, fighting for the future of our families, our country, said Mirisola. The self less sacrifice of those who serve their country and have paid the ultimate sacrifice will forever live on in our memories. We will never forget. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. What does HOPE look like? Hope looks like Kayla and her mother, Sonia They are working together to help accelerate the pace of research to nd better treatments and a cure for type 1 diabetes. To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Chowing Down On Vicksburg -Photos by MC2 Nick ScottThe First Class Petty Officer Association aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) prepares chicken wings for pizza and wings night aboard Vicksburg. Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Damage Controlman 1st Class Gary S. Lee prepares pizza for pizza and wings night aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, June 21, 2012 13 NRMOs Improve Quality, Enhance Safety, And Increase Surface Ship ReadinessCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) Public AffairsRepresentatives from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) Regional Maintenance Office (NRMO) and Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) visited the USS Thunderbolt (PC12) and the USS Tempest (PC-2) on June 12 in Norfolk, Va. The commands met with the ships project teams to review their safety and fire preven tion practices, as well as the maintenance sched ules and current quality of work. Our NRMO organiza tions are located across almost all Navy water fronts, and are aimed at supporting our unwav ering goal of improv ing first time quality, enhancing safety, reduc ing total operational costs, and more closely adhering to ships main tenance schedules, said Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Centers (CNRMC) Rear Adm. David Gale. NRMOs serve as a pri mary point of contact for critique notification to CNRMC, and provide independent oversight of surface ship main tenance with particu lar focus on critical sys tems identified in Naval Sea Systems Instruction (NAVSEAINST) 5400.108A, the Policy for Quality Management of Work on Non-Nuclear Surface Ships Critical Systems. These maintenance offices are responsible for performing periodic sur veillances of in-process work; conducting audits of areas of particular focus to the fleet such as procedure and work con trol compliance; attend ing Enhanced Process Control Procedures (EPCP) Ready To Start (RTS) events; participa tion in Integrated Project Team development (IPTD) events; as well as docking, undocking, cri tique, certification, pro duction, and progress meetings. The NRMOs sup port the Surface Ship Maintenance commu nity by reviewing mainte nance and repair work to ensure adherence to quality, technical, and safety standards at the opera tional, intermediate, and depot levels, said Gale. Since the stand-up of the NRMOs, we have already seen marked improvements in root cause analyses and the critique processes, allow ing us at CNRMC to work with the RMCs to provide clarification of policies and standards for Foreign Material Exclusion (FME). The NRMOs efforts have also led to the identifi cation of problems with machinery layup and planned maintenance systems (PMS), as well as the identification of sev eral safety related prob lems, said Gale. The origins of NRMOs began in May 2011, fol lowing several nega tive trends in surface ship maintenance. As a response to these, Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command (COMNAVSEA) Vice Adm. Kevin McCoy directed NAVSEAs Engineering Field Representatives (EFRs) begin performing third party oversight of nonnuclear surface ship maintenance similar to the role of NAVSEA Shipyard Representatives Office (NSRO) and Naval Reactors Representatives Office (NRRO) at the public shipyards. His estab lishment of NRMOs fol lowed suit. McCoy charged CNRMC to implement the NRMOs on October 2011, and since that time, offices have been estab lished at Norfolk Ship Support Activity (NSSA) Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) in Norfolk, Va.; Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) in Mayport, Fla.; Southwest Regional Maintenance cen ter (SWRMC) in San Diego; and at Northwest Regional Maintenance Center (NWRMC) in Bremerton, Wash. An additional NRMO is slated for stand-up this August at the Hawaii Regional Maintenance Center (HRMC) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. According to Frank Murphy, CNRMCs assis tant director for techni cal oversight who serves as the NRMOs pro gram manager, the other NRMO offices share les sons learned and col laborate several times a week through phone conferences. They regularly confer to discuss the most effective ways to evaluate ship maintenance pro cesses; implement qual ity improvement efforts, lower cost, improve safe ty, and shorten mainte nance schedules. All NRMOs also work closely with ships project teams to continu ally improve surface ship maintenance efforts in the areas of work control, safety and technical rigor oversight and manage ment. Our partnership with the NAVSEA and the NRMOs has been a valu able one, said Gale. To date, we have worked collaboratively to improve the quality and schedules of non-nuclear surface ship maintenance by the enforcement of standards. We will continue to work with NAVSEA and the field offices to advance the goals and initiatives of the surface maintenance community. For more information about NAVSEA Regional Maintenance Offices (NRMOs), contact CNRMCs Frank Murphy at: william.f.murphy@ navy.milDoD Tightens Spending on Travel, ConferencesAmerican Forces Press ServiceIn response to a May 11 call to action from the Office of Management and Budget, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter has directed DOD officials and managers to reduce spending on travel, conferences and other agency operations. DOD consistently strives to be an excellent steward of taxpayer dollars and has focused on these issues for a number of years, Carter said in a June 3 memo. Such efforts, he added, include the 2010 Secretarys Efficiency Initiative and implementation of President Barack Obamas June 2011 Campaign to Cut Waste. In his memo, Carter directs the DOD comptroller to reduce travel expenses for fiscal year 2013 by 30 percent from DODs fiscal 2010 baseline, excluding national security exemptions and with out harming agency missions. The deputy secretary also directs the undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness to work with DOD com ponents and services to implement a conference policy that establishes standard, tiered approval levels for confer ence spending. Effective immediately, Carter is directing a review of upcoming conferences and temporarily suspending new con ference obligations. The deputy secre tary will personally review conferences that will cost more than $500,000. The departments Deputy Chief Management Officer Elizabeth McGrath will review conferences whose costs exceed $100,000. DOD will report back to OMB, the deputy secretary said, on proposed reductions in these areas within 90 days, and in some cases 180 days, of the May 11 memo. Carter said McGrath would coordi nate DOD implementation of OMBs Executive-Branch-wide policies and practices involving travel, conferences, real estate and fleet management. Increased scrutiny is being applied to DOD spending, McGrath told American Forces Press Service, which makes it more important than ever that we con tinue to instill a culture of cost con sciousness and accountability across the Defense enterprise. The department has always taken its duty to be an excellent steward of tax payer dollars very seriously, she added. The appropriate offices for each of the areas discussed in the memorandum -travel, conferences, real estate, and fleet management -will work together to ensure that we are fully complying with the deputy secretarys direction, McGrath said, and that we are making the best use of government funds. The deputy chief management officer added, It is important for us to assess our travel costs and practices to ensure that we maximize alternatives to travel, such as teleconferencing, that we com bine trips when possible to minimize the frequency of travel, and that we send the right people to the right events. McGrath said conferences can serve many important purposes, including training, professional development and continuing education opportunities required for professional accreditation. As the increased spending efficiencies are put in place, he added, we must ensure that these cuts do not lead to degradation of mission effectiveness. Navy Reservist Earns Spot in 2012 Olympics Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Public Affairs A Sailor from Navy Operational Support Center Columbus, Ga., won the USA Shooting National Championship in the womens 25-meter pistol shoot June 5 earn ing her a spot on the 2012 U.S. Olympic shoot ing team. Information Systems Technician 1st Class Sandra Uptagrafft, a Reservist, won the event held at Fort Benning. Less than three points out of more than 2,100 separated top finishing Uptagrafft from second place. I struggled through the whole thing, said Uptagrafft. I did not think I made it... so it was a huge relief when I heard the result. As an informa tion systems techni cian, Uptagrafft has not received applicable weapons training in the Navy that aided her in making the team. She does give credit to her assigned unit, 3rd Naval Construction Regiment, with whom she made a nine-month deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan from 2010-2011, with being a true enabler. They have been super supportive of me and my shooting, she said. Ive received moral support and they were always just really encouraging. Uptagrafft is still com peting for a national championship in wom ens 10-meter air pis tol with the finals being scheduled for June 8. Once completed she will continue to train as much as possible at Fort Benning, which is near her home. She will, how ever, have to tailor her schedule to the bases operational commit ments. Uptagraffts husband Eric, a former Navy Reservist, is a member of the mens 2012 U.S. Olympic shooting team and the two will cele brate their 12th anniver sary during the summer games in London Aug. 5. The shooting events are scheduled to run from July 28 to Aug. 6.