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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00252


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by MCSA Damian BergFlorida State Representative Ronald J. Renuart presents memorial street sign during the 25th annual memorial ceremony for the guided-missile frigate USS Stark (FFG 31) at Naval Station Mayport. Several crewmembers and their families came to honor the 37 Sailors who were killed while on patrol in the Persian Gulf 25 years ago.NS Mayport Honors Fallen ShipmatesThe Mirror editorMore than 200 ship mates, friends and fami lies filled the Mayport Memorial Park on May 17, 2012 to pay their respects to the fallen crew of USS Stark (FFG 31) 25 years after the frigate was struck by an Iraqi missile while deployed in the Arabian Gulf. In the early morn ing hours of May 17, 1987, two Iraqi missiles struck the Naval Station Mayport-based frigate. Despite the severe dam age inflicted, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Thirtyseven Sailors lost their lives during the attack. Stark was decom missioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to pre serve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Guest speaker for this years event was Rear Adm. David M. Thomas Jr., Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic. He was stationed at Mayport aboard Starks sister ship, USS Estocin (FFG 15), and talked about the reputa tion of Stark and its crew in the basin. Stark was the ship to beat, he told the crowd. Stark was awesome. When we watched her sail off on deployment, [we watched the best of the basin go]. As word came of the sacrifice... those tales were told with a sense of pride as we read those words of heroism. Thomas said he was amazed at what a tight See Stark, Page 15 Underwood Prepares For Advanced Phase Of UNITAS Southern Seas 2012 Public AffairsCommanding officers of the Chilean, Colombian, Mexican, Peruvian and U.S. Navy ships par ticipating in UNITAS Pacific (PAC) gathered aboard Peruvian frigate Mariategui (FM 54) for a mid-exercise brief, May 19. The agenda included debriefs of the work-up phase of UNITAS PAC and an exchange of plans for the upcoming exercise scenario phase (ESP). We have worked at the basic level of opera tions with our partner nations such as gunnery exercises and we have worked with each nations helicopters to come to a common procedural understanding, said Cmdr. Peter T. Mirisola, commanding officer of Oliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). During the hot wash debrief, each nation discussed improv ing communication pro cedures and enhancing interoperability. When you bring the different capabilities with different navies, it is dif ficult at first, but we even tually overcame those problems and operated successfully at sea, said Mirisola. The ESP began May 21 and includes maritime interdiction operations, Help Protect Sea TurtlesFrom NS Mayport SecurityNaval Station Mayport beaches are a great place to live and visit for both people and endangered spe cies of sea turtles. It is just a little tougher to find a good place to nest if you are an endangered sea turtle. Turtle nesting takes place May 31 through Oct. 31. However, their safety depends on you. Hatchlings find their way to the sea by light clues, such as brightness. They instinctively crawl towards the brightest light and become disoriented if artificial lights are shining from behind. Artificial light from beachfront homes, streetlights or even flashlights can attract the hatchlings away from the safety of the water and lead them to their deaths. Lights and people disorientate female turtles com ing ashore to nest. If one is sighted coming ashore, contact the base Wildlife officer and remain clear, stay quiet, do not use a light source and dont allow anyone near her to disturb her nesting. How can you help? By simply keeping our beach es as dark and quiet as possible throughout the nest ing period. Consider the following suggestions: flashlights without a red lenses. not visible from the beach. rity purposes. -Photo by MCSN Frank J. PikulSailors aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) fire the 40 mm saluting battery as the ship enters the port of Callao, Peru. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. See Sea Turtle, Page 11 See Underwood, Page 10

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.I had the honor of judging Mayport Middle Schools History Fair again this year. In doing so I met James Stevens who had entered his poem The Doolittle Raid. To celebrate Memorial Day, I want to share this poem with you with the permission of James and his mother. The Doolittle Raid By James Stevens Mayport Middle School A carrier called Hornet It brought the First strike Back Back To the nation That destroyed Our pride Our Navy And Threatened Our Freedom That ship Took the war To them Back to them Across an ocean so wide It spans half the world Those planes Our planes Strapped to the deck 16 Ready to send A message That we Would not give in That we Would fight them For as long as it took To take back Our land Our waters And our pride Those plane Our planes On that ship prepared to Issue the first strike Back Back To a nation Smug That thought itself Un-attackable Impenetrable Safe in its island fortress But those planes would show That nation That we Were not to be trifled with And that they were wrong And we Could and would Attack and bomb them So those 16 planes Our 16 planes Launched off the deck Of that ship While it Rolled And tossed In an ocean so wide It spans half the world And those planes Our planes Skimmed across The waves Flying Low and slow To unsuspecting Tokyo And when we arrived What a sight we were To a nation so Secure in itself They believed those first planes Our first planes Were their own And what a sight it was As their security Was dispelled And The Bombs Began To Drop And the smoke and the fire And the destruction Began And the rest of the 16 planes Of our 16 planes Swept through the Smoke And continued the Destruction Of a nation that Had believed Until now It couldnt be attacked Or bombed Or even touched And we did What they Had done To us The nation Panicked Its defenses down And did almost Nothing And it managed to Miss Every Single Plane And our planes Our 16 shining planes Untouched Soared out Low and slow Away from a burning Tokyo Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Honoring America On Memorial DayJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingWhat does it take to become a modern day hero? I am not sure who your hero is or if you even have one. Many people can honestly say their dad or mom is their hero. I remember growing up watching superheroes like Superman battle evil in the cartoon world. I liked the fact that these superheroes would bat tle against the forces of darkness and overcome them even with the lon gest odds. I also liked the fact that they needed to keep their real identity secret so as not to put their friends and family in harms way. I guess it sort of made me think you never know, anyone could be a superhero. Now, looking back, I realize that people with superpowers dont real ly exist, but that doesnt mean that real heroes dont exist. But how can they be identified so we can prop erly honor them? I would suggest that heroes have several qualities in com mon that make them heroic. The first thing is that heroes struggle against and overcome evil. They consistently are able to think about life from a moral perspective. A hero cannot exist in the realm where there is no such thing as good and evil and all is rela tive. There would be no battles to fight and no temptations to resist. Real life heroes, like superhe roes, also have to do battle against evil. Secondly, real heroes consistently demonstrate heroism by living sacrifi cially. What I mean is that real heroes have no room for selfishness and always are willing to give up what is rightfully theirs so that others might receive a benefit that they couldnt possibly achieve for themselves. This is what it means to be heroic. And this is the hard part, but who said being a hero was easy? The real hero has trained himself to over come these natural ten dencies and is willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice in laying down his life for the sake of others if need be. So, who are our modern day heroes and how can we honor them? Memorial Day is a great day to remember those who have paid the ultimate price for the freedom we have as Americans by giving their lives for our sakes. We should also honor their family members for the sacrifices they have made. Of course, there are also all the other sacrifices that should be honored as well, like being separated from a loved one during long deployments. True heroes would also include all those firefight ers and police officers who daily put their lives on the line for the sake of others. Honoring a life of sacrifice that is what Memorial Day is all about. Of course, from a Christian perspective, this all makes perfect sense because the ultimate hero is Jesus Christ who gave His own life to save those who could not save them selves. But that is another story. Thank and honor a hero today for their sac rifice on our behalf!Honoring True Heroes This Memorial DayLt. Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSOutdoor Grilling Can Turn Deadly Without CareFrom NS Mayport Fire and Emer gency ServicesEvery year barbecue grills on residential properties cause more than 1,500 structural fires and 4,200 outdoor fires. Barbecue grills are designed for outdoor use only. Never barbecue in your trailer, tent, house, garage, or any enclosed area as carbon monoxide may accumulate and kill you. Position the grill in an open area at least 10 feet away from buildings, deck railings and out from under eaves and over hanging branches. Use barbecue utensils with long handles to avoid burns and splatters. Wear short or tight fit ting sleeves and use flame retardant mitts. Have a charged garden hose or bucket of sand available to extinguish any small grill flare-ups. Once lit, never leave a grill unat tended. If you are using a charcoal grill with char coal briquettes or wood chunks, form a pyramid and douse the briquette / chunks with lighter fluid. Wait until the fluid has soaked in before light ing. After use, lighter fluid should be capped imme diately and placed a safe distance from the grill. Never add lighter fluid to hot coals. Never use gasoline or kerosene as a starter. When using instant light briquettes, do not use lighter fluid, electric, solid or metal chimney style starters. If you need more briquettes once the fire is lit, add only regular charcoal briquette. Allow coals to burn out com pletely and let the ashes cool for at least 48 hours before disposing of them. Dispose of cold ashes by wrapping them in heavy duty aluminum foil and putting them in a metal container. If you must dispose of the ashes in less time than it takes for them to completely cool, remove the ashes from the grill keeping them in heavy duty foil and soak them complete ly with water before dis posing of them in a metal container. Check the tubes that lead into the burner for any blockage from insects or food grease. Use a pipe cleaner or wire to clear any blockage and push it through to the main part of the burner. Visually inspect the propane hoses for crack ing, brittleness, holes and leaks. A soap and water solution may be used to test for leaks. Never use a flame to check for gas leaks. Move propane hoses as far as possible from hot surfaces and dripping grease. Visually inspect the propane tank. If it has dents, gouges, bulg es, corrosion, leakage, or excessive rust, return the tank to the propane gas distributor. Do not attempt to repair the propane tank valve or the appliance yourself. Have a qualified repair person make the repairs. Follow the maintenance instructions provided in the grill owners manual. When the propane tank is connected, the grill must be kept outside in a wellventilated space. When not in use, the propane tank valve must be turned to the OFF or CLOSED position. Never store a propane tank indoors or below ground level. The storage of a spare propane cylinder is strongly discouraged. Find a local propane distributor who will exchange an empty tank for a full one on the spot. Precautions should be taken while transporting propane tanks (whether full or empty). Propane tanks should be secured in an upright position in the back seat of your car, or in the pickup bed of your truck, with transportation plugs on the outlet valve connec tion. Avoid having other pas sengers in the car, espe cially children. Never leave a propane tank unattended in your car. If you have any ques tions about reducing the risk of fires, call Fire Prevention at 270-5647.VCNO Guest Speaker At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner onJune 9, at the renaissance resort, world golf village. Guest speak er Vice Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mark E. Ferguson III; Veterans of the Battle of Midway, several widows of Midway Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the mili tary have been invited to attend this years dinner. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and for mer prisoners of war in our area who have hero ically answered the call of duty. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from Navy League Mayport Bob Price, 904-718-2118 or email bpricex4@comcast. net.

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 USO is hosting a family night out at Adventure Landing Park at 1944 Beach Blvd. on June 13. The park will be closing early and will be reopened from 6-11 p.m. exclusively for the military. Wristbands are on sale at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO cen ters for $2. This is for active duty and immediate family members only, including National Guard. Retirees, friends and relatives are not eligible to attend. Space is limited. Wristbands will be sold on a first come, first serve basis. Adventure Landing Season Passes are not valid for this day.Adventure Landing Military Appreciation NightUSO Thanks Sailors, FamiliesFrom StaffHundreds of service members and their families headed to Sea Otter Pavilion on Armed Forces Day, May 19, to enjoy a day in the base pool, free food, entertainment and activities thanks to the Mayport USO and MWR. The day included a inflatables scattered around the Pavilion lawn with everything from bounce houses to slides and boxing rinks. There was even an inflatable that gave participants a chance to surf the waves without getting wet. Volunteers from the USO and American Red Cross were also at the event to hand out free information and goodies, like DVDs. Kids, and parents enjoyed a DJ while chow ing down to free hot dogs and hamburgers, sweets and popcorn To round off the day, MWR officially opened the base pool with a free day of swim. The pool will be open on Saturdays from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays/ holidays from 1-6 p.m. Full summer hours begin on June 8 when local schools dismiss for summer break. It will be open on Memorial Day, Admission fees apply. Season passes go on sale now at ITT for $120 for family or $60 per person. Call 270-5145 for more information.-Photos by Paige GnannLili Chufo, 11, tests out her balance on the surfboard inflatable at the annual USO Military Appreciation Day festival held at the Sea Otter Pavilion on Armed Forces Day, May 19. Hundreds of service members and their families came out to enjoy the festival and official opening of the base pool. Troy Manuel, 2, and mom Holly cool down with an icee prepared by USO volunteer Shelby Graham. Kids amp up their sweet meter with some cotton candy courtesy of USO. Amaya Mooney, 5, gets a tattoo from volunteer Katira Evans during the Military Appreciation Day. Service members and their families pick out a myriad of free items, including books, DVDs, and toys at the event. Kids show off their best air guitar moves during a DJ contest underneath the Sea Otter Pavilion. Eli Brennan, 3, takes a big bite of his hot dog with help from mom Brigit. USO provided free food and drink at the festival.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 5 Gabriel Healy, 3, along with siblings Kaelan, 6, and Julia Sue-Kam-Ling, 8, talk to Sparky the Fire Dog at the USO Military Appreciation Day festival. Sparky spent the day interacting with the children throughout the pavilion. Elyana Nguyen, 23 months, gets a little bounce thanks to the other children in the bounce house, one of several inflatables set up throughout the festival. Devin Jakeway, 12, tries to hit friend Jacob Larson, 12, with a punching bag at one of the inflatable activities set up at the pavilion. Devin Jakeway, 12, tries to hit friend Jacob Larson, 12, with a punching bag at one of the inflatable activities set up at the pavilion. Kids cool down at the monster water slide inflatable set up at the Military Appreciation Day festival. Chief Hospital Corpsman Randy Dierking of USS Robert G. Bradley and family enjoy a free day of swimming at the base pool. The pool is open on weekends. Lt.j.g. Ryan Culbertson of HSL-48 brings his family out to enjoy a day of food and fun at the USO sponsored event. Sophia Delcastillo, 4, and friend Andres Barns, 3, prac tice their swim strokes in preparation for summer weath er. MWR is offering swim lessons starting June 11. Call 270-5101/5425 to register.Play Group At The Mayport USO Fleet and Family Service Center sponsors a playgroup at the Mayport USO every Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon. May 24 will include a craft hour from 10-11 a.m. as well. For more information please contact Lauren Walton, New Parent Support Program at Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center 904-2706600. BJS Wholesale Club Military Appreciation Day $500 will be donated to the Jacksonville USO if 200 members of the Armed Forces attend the Military Appreciation events at BJs Wholesale Club on May 26 at the Orange Park location and May 27 at the Atlantic/ Kernan location in Jacksonville. Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more vet erans you will help. Our mission is to win this con test, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com You Could Win A 1948 Pontiac Torpedo! Do you like old antique cars? The American Legion Riders Chapter 283 has proudly offered a 1948 Pontiac Torpedo car in a raffle drawing to be held on June 1 at 8 pm. NAS Jax USO and Mayport USO now have Donation Tickets available for pur chase! The tickets are only $10. Stop by your USO center today! All sales are cash only at the centers or at Post 283. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information about activities or meeting availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO

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NH Jax Awarded For Fit ForceBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer Jeanne CaseyThe Navy Surgeon General announced this month that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilleits hos pital and five branch health clinicsand Navy Operational Health Support Unit (NR OHSU) Jacksonville received the 2011 Blue H Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Award. This is the synergy of a military treatment facil ity and its medical reserve units working to create a fit fighting force, stat ed Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling, NH Jacksonville. NH Jacksonville including all of its branch health clinics earned the Blue H Award for excel lence in clinical primary prevention, commu nity health promotion and medical staff health. The Silver Eagle went to all six command sites the hospital and Branch Health Clinics Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport. NR OHSU Jacksonville earned nine Gold Stars, two Silver Eagles and seven Bronze Anchors for excellence in workplace primary prevention poli cies, activities and out comes. The Blue H Award assesses areas such as alcohol and drug abuse prevention, injury prevention, nutrition, physical fitness, sexual health, psy chological health, tobac co cessation and weight management. The award criteria provide direction for a well-rounded health promotion program which supports the medi cal readiness of the armed forces, enhances quality of life, and reduces longterm health care costs. To take advantage of its programs, contact NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at 542-5292.NH Jax Awarded Gold For HealthNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment Detachment SoutheastNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville was awarded the First Coast Healthiest Companies Gold Award on May 16 at a ceremony held at the University of North Florida. This was the second straight year that NH Jacksonville received this prestigious award from the First Coast Worksite Wellness Council of Jacksonville, Fla. The fact that Naval Hospital Jacksonville has won this award for the second straight year reflects on the commands commitment to help ing sailors as well as their families, and meeting the commitments of the 21st century Navy, said NH Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. The First Coast Worksite Wellness Council awards busi nesses that go above and beyond in order to take care of employees and their families. The First Coast Worksite Wellness Councils mission is to provide evidence based recourses for business es in order to help their employees and their families stay healthy, said Executive Director of First Coast Worksite Wellness Council Dorrette Nysewander. When you look at all of the depart ments within the hospi tal, its great to see how they integrate and interact with one another in order to keep military personnel healthy. NH Jacksonvilles pri ority since its found ing in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the hospital, located aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. Of its patient popu lation 215,000 active and retired sailors, Marines, soldiers, air men, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. Each and every day, a dedicat ed team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 sameday surgeries, fills 4,700 prescriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and deliv ers two to three babies. Additionally, up to 15 per cent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disas ter care. For more infor mation, visit www.med. navy.mil/sites/navalhos pitaljax, www.facebook/ navalhospitaljacksonville and www.twitter.com/ NHJax. Photo by MC2 Salt CebeNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling and NH Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade (alongside David Meyer of St. Vincents Healthcare and Jon Urbanek of Florida Blue) received the hospitals second consecutive First Coast Healthiest Companies Gold Award. Welcome Back To Tick Season In Florida Naval Hospital Jacksonville director of public health and family medicine physician a problem in Northeast Florida? A woman came to our Family Medicine clinic for care a few weeks ago, complaining of feeling fatigued with sore mus cles and fever. The doctor who saw her had a long list of things that may have caused these prob lems, but after looking at a blood test the doctor decided she might have been bitten by a tick. After a short time on an antibiotic, the patients symptoms went away and she was truly surprised to know that tick bites especially at this time of yearcan cause these kinds of problems. As the weather becomes nicer in spring, many people think about enjoying outdoor activi ties such as walking in wooded areas, hiking, and camping. But as people begin to get out and about, so do animals, insects, and spiders. One animal to be aware of this time of year is the deer tick. Ticks live in wood ed areas, brushy fields, and around your home. They crawl onto grass or leaves and wait for ani mals or people to brush up against them. After hitching a ride, ticks sur vive by crawling onto host animals and humans skin and drawing blood to eat. In contrast to bit ing insects like mosquitoes and flies, ticks take their time to bite--they crawl around looking for a good hiding place to begin feeding. Anywhere you find deer, you can find ticks. Even more unpleas antly, ticks pass infections from one host to the next, including humans. In Florida and the southeast ern U.S., ticks can trans mit about a half-dozen types of illnesses as in the case described above. Most tick-borne diseases are mild and the patient may recover on their own without medications, but others can be more seri ous and even require hos pitalization. Infections from tick bites should be aggres sively managed with antibiotic care and careful follow-up with your pro vider. One local tick species called the Gulf Coast Tick has recently been found to transmit a flu-like ill ness known as rickett sia, which can be treated easily by a medical pro vider. If you or someone you know goes outside between now and football season and later develops flu-like symptoms of fever, fatigue, and muscle aches, this illness could be caused by a tick. A person with these symptoms dur ing the summer months should consider a trip to see their provider. Staff at Naval Hospital Jacksonville are working together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Naval Medical Research Center to monitor for these cases and offer lab testing for patients with possible rickettsial illness. This monitoring study will help describe the level of tick illness in our area and guide prevention and treatment efforts in the future. As with most matters, prevention is the best approach to tick-relat ed diseases. When you hike, camp or enjoy the outdoors where ticks are found, a few precautions will help keep you safe: 1. Dont be afraid to use bug spray with the chemi cal DEET in it. 2. Wear light-colored clothing because this makes it easier to see ticks. 3. Wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. 4. Tuck your pants into your socks or boots and tuck in your shirt. 5. Stay on cleared trails. After outdoor activities, check everyone in your familyincluding out door petsfor ticks. Look hard to find them because ticks can be very tiny, and ask another person to help you check yourself. If you find a tick which has latched onto the skin: 1. Grab the tick close to your skin with a twee zers or tissue and pull it straight out (dont crush the tick in your finger nails). 2. Wash where the tick bit you. 3. Wash your hands. 4. Remember that if you get sick after a tick bite, you should go see your provider. The antibiotics for tick bites are easy to take and are curative! Most experts will tell you that if you can remove the tick from your skin within 24 hours, the risk of infection is very low. Keep these simple mea sures in mind and enjoy Floridas great outdoors safely this year! Welcome back to tick season. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Taylor Participates In Ocean Shield USS Taylor Public AffairsOver the past sev eral weeks, guided-mis sile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and its visit, board, search, and sei zure (VBSS) team, have actively patrolled the Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) and pro vided security assistance to several merchant ves sels transiting through the Gulf of Aden region. Taylor, with embarked Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 Detachment 9, is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508 Operation Ocean Shield. This Operation is NATOs counter-piracy mission in the Gulf of Aden and India Ocean. Ocean Shield is a clear demonstration of the alliances capability in the maritime field, and its flexibility in meeting the variety of challenges posed in todays security environment, said Cmdr. J. R. Hill, Taylors com manding officer. As part of the NATO Task Force Taylor complements the European Union, Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), and inde pendent nations units tackling piracy in the region. Taylors mission is to patrol the waters of the Gulf of Aden, the Arabian Sea and Somali Basin, and investigate suspi cious maritime activ ity. Additionally, the ship supports merchant ves sels requiring assistance while transiting the IRTC and other regional water ways. Taylor also moni tors commercial mer chant shipping and con voys and provides security overwatch. Most vessels we have encountered are legiti mate fishing or trading and are not involved with piracy operations, but the data collected helps provide information for pattern of life analysis and evidence to compare between boardings that may help classify a dhow as a pirate vessel more clearly during a boarding, said Lt. Michael Modeer, Taylors senior VBSS Officer. Piracy and maritime crime are a significant concern to the interna tional community, con tributing nations, nongovernment and commer cial organizations. Taylor has conducted numerous maritime security assist visit (MSAV) boardings in support of NATOs coun ter-piracy efforts. As the deployment continues, Taylor expects to remain vigilant on patrol, providing the maritime presence and security necessary to support counter-piracy efforts throughout the region. Photo by OS1 Travis Krause Lt. Michael Modeer, forward, and Sonar Technician 3rd Class Brett Hansen, assigned to the visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), wait to board the ships rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to before conducting a maritime security assist visit (MSAV) of a dhow operating in the vicinity. Taylor is assigned to commander, NATO Task Force 508 supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interdiction operations and counter-piracy mission in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) haul a fuel probe line during a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204). Taylor is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508, supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interception operations and counter-piracy missions in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Rappahannock is assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 53, providing fuel and supplies to U.S. Navy and coalition ships in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) haul a fuel probe line during a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204). -Photos by MC1 Peter SantiniSailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) move stores during a replenishment at sea. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 9

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anti-submarine warfare scenarios, counter-pira cy operations, and other training scenarios. It is the next level of complexity for us and our partner nation navies to work as a cohesive unit and communicate better with each other in order to accomplish our mis sion, said Mirisola. The crew is well prepared for these exercises and they get more proficient as they complete more oper ations at sea. Underwood is repre senting the U.S. Navy during the 53rd iteration of UNITAS 2012 and is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.From Page 1UnderwoodUnderwood Honors Peruvian Naval HeroSouthern Seas 2012 Public AffairsSailors and officers from Oliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frig ate USS Underwood (FFG 36) attended a wreathlaying ceremony at the Peruvian naval academy in Callao, Peru, May 15. The annual memo rial ceremony was held in honor of Peruvian naval hero Adm. Miguel Grau, who was killed during a naval engagement in the 19th century. Nearly two dozen crew members from Underwood joined with members of the Chilean, Colombian, Ecuadorian, Mexican and Peruvian navies to present wreaths at the monument erected over Graus crypt. It was an honor for us to attend the ceremony and I think its important for us to show respect for our partner nations legacy, said Command Master Chief Michael Bates. As a wreath was brought forward on a dis play stand, Capt. Ace Van Wagoner, commander of Destroyer Squadron 40, the U.S. mission commander of UNITAS Pacific (PAC), Cmdr. Peter Mirisola, Underwoods commanding officer; and Cmdr. Michael Brasseur, Underwoods executive officer rendered hand salutes while an honor guard detachment of six Peruvian sailors piped their boatswains mate pipes. We were not the only navy to show up and I think its important that all of the navies that are participating in UNITAS Pacific showed up in a display of mutual respect for each other, said Bates. Underwood is repre senting the U.S. Navy in support of UNITAS Pacific 53-12 as part of Southern Seas 2012. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsCmdr. Peter Mirisolas, left, commanding officer of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36), Capt. Ace Van Wagoner, commander of Destroyer Squadron 40, the U.S. mission commander of UNITAS Pacific, and Cmdr. Michael Brasseur, executive officer of Underwood, render honors during a wreath-laying ceremony at the memorial for Peruvian naval hero Adm. Miguel Grau at the Peruvian Naval Academy in Callao, Peru. Underwood is representing the U.S. Navy in support of UNITAS and Southern Seas 2012. Quartermaster 1st Class David Ratcliffe examines the ensign before raising it aboard the anchored Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) in the port of Callao, Peru. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Command Finds Comfort In Captains Cookies USS Hu CityThe routine recipe card in a naval ships gal ley typically calls for tra ditional desserts such as chocolate chip, peanut butter or sugar cookies. In recent days, however, par ticular culinary delights have found their way onto the decks of USS Hu City. Chocolate truffle, lemon glazed and frost ed pumpkin spice cook ies are among the favorite deviations from the norm, replacing the crews rou tine dining with piqued curiosity. As it turns out, the newly formulated concoctions come from a certain khaki inspiration. Capt. Dan Uhls, com manding officer of Hu City, has gained noto riety for his affection for cookies. He can be seen offering cookies to sail ors approaching his state room with business, or strolling down a passage way with a plate ready to be hand delivered to some fortunate work detail. Daily briefs held in the wardroom have even been augmented to include a segment on potential cookie options for the days to come. The captain is very serious about his cookies, Food Service Officer Lt.j.g. Jason Yurek said. In the wake of their popular cookies, Hu Citys Culinary Specialists have found a spirit of friendly competition. Each sailor has been given the challenge of creating two new recipes, utilizing the combina tion of training, research and ingenuity. Amidst their newfound motiva tion, these bakers have also displayed the pro found impact of mix ing regulated training with the capability reach beyond the satisfactory standard. With Hu City on the brink of a ninemonth deployment, each Culinary Specialist is learning early on the necessity of keeping things fresh. Training and skill lev els have increased over all due to a friendly com petition that seemed to come out of nowhere, Chief Culinary Specialist Ryan Albrecht said. This is great, my sailors are learning skills they were meant to learn in the Navy. Since passing the Board of Inspection and Survey in late February (INSURV), the command has not only witnessed the arrival of a new Commanding Officer, but also a change of focus. The extensive time once dedicated to preparation for INSURV has now been redirected to operational training. With only weeks remaining before Hu Citys departure, training has not been confined to the galley, but to every functioning facet of ship board life. For Uhls it also means that one sailors culinary work and dedi cation could in fact be another sailors treasure. Cookies are comforting, Uhls said. Theyre one of those things that calm me. When you give some one a cookie, it disarms them. Im of the mindset that when you are able to put someone at ease, you get the best out of them. This is my third com mand. No matter where Ive been, giving someone a cookie has always bro ken through barriers. And as for his favorite cookie? Id have to say the maple shortbread were the best, Uhls said. Followed real quickly by the lemon glazed. The COs prized maple shortbread cookies were courtesy of Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Ryan Ramsey, who was com pelled to reinvent his cookies after seeing what he was up against. I had heard two differ ent Culinary Specialists talking up their cookies, Ramsey said. I didnt want to say anything, but I kept thinking to myself how great it would be to beat two second class [petty officers] with a bet ter cookie. Ramsey wasnt the only artisan to make an impact. Culinary Specialist Seaman Jerry Holcombs batch of pumpkin spice cook ies found a quick fan in Command Master Chief Raymond Charest, who ate 14 in one setting. I couldnt help it, Charest said. I love sweets, but these were incredible. I didnt even realize I ate that many. According to Uhls, the recognition couldnt go to a better division. The Culinary Specialists are one of those divisions that can always get heat for their job, Uhls said. They can do things by the book, get everything right, and eventually there will be someone who still isnt happy. This lets them show what theyre really capable of doing. Its a nice reminder that they put forth quality work everyday. at sunset that face the beach. And Remember conducted on Naval Station Mayport beach areas during nesting season must be cleared through the Wildlife offi cer first. holes and rutting on the beach area. must be on a leash at all times. ing female or emerging hatchlings. These actions are a violation of federal and state laws. Only per mit holders are allowed to touch or move a sea turtle. Never try to push a live sea turtle back into the water. If the turtle is out of the water and on the beach, keep the shell wet with a damp towel or sprinkle water over it. cer, Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol or the Florida Marine Patrol if you find a live or dead sea turtle unless the turtle has a red X on its shell indi cating it has already been checked by the appropri ate authority and is wait ing for burial by beach sanitation units. The turtles have been here for more than 150 million years and are on the endangered species list. Lets all do our part to help protect them and ensure that they remain part of life in Florida. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatchling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS Mayport Wildlife Office immedi ately at 219-2178 for the base beach and Hanna Park. Call the Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol at 613-6081 for all Jacksonville area beaches or the Florida Marine Patrol at 270-2500.From Page 1Sea turtle Working together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com a CFC participant Provided as a public service THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 11

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Mass Casualty Drill Ends Phoenix Express 2Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsService members from Algeria, Greece, Morocco, Turkey and the U.S. teamed up aboard guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) to conduct a mass casu alty drill in support of Exercise Phoenix Express 2012 (PE12) in Souda Bay, Crete, May 18. The exercise gave par ticipants the opportunity to demonstrate medical techniques they learned during earlier PE12 train ing. Participants were required to treat simu lated injuries under the supervision of senior medical officers from each country. This kind of drill allows the participants the opportunity to put into practice skills learned during the classroom phase of training, includ ing patient triage which means sorting casual ties into groups based on their immediate medical needs, said Cmdr. John medical officer. This training provides valuable skills that can be used during an immediate lifethreatening situation. During the drill, multi national medical officers observed and graded par ticipating service mem bers in a variety of areas including procedure and techniques. My job was to make sure the right procedures were followed and that everyone was getting the right prognosis, said Algerian navy Capt. Larbi Boudjada, a drill observer. Maritime partners who participated in the drill felt that the entire expe rience was a valuable learning opportunity that will be beneficial during future operations. Were in this together and each country helps toward a common goal, said Army Staff Sgt. Catie Cejka, a Reservist with the 396th Combat Support Hospital. Its good to know the countries involved have the critical training to keep people alive if the need arises. The mass casualty drill marked the end of PE12s land training, as partici pating ships prepare to begin the next phase. PE12, a multina tional maritime exer cise between Southern European, North African and U.S. naval forces, is designed to improve cooperation among participating nations and help increase safety and security in the Mediterranean Sea. Participating countries in PE12 include Algeria, Croatia, Egypt, Greece, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Spain, Tunisia, Turkey and the United States. -Photo by MC1 Brian A. GoyakOperations Specialist Seaman Alex Dibenedetto, left, a boarding team member assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), practices small-arms tactics under the supervision of U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Joshua Aiken, from the 1st Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team, aboard the training ship Aris at the NATO Maritime Interdiction Operational Training Center during Phoenix Express 2012. Phoenix Express is a multinational maritime exercise between Southern European, North African and U.S. Naval forces intended to improve cooperation among participating nations and help increase safety and security in the Mediterranean Sea.Mayport Ships Complete COMPTUEXFrom USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public AffairsCarrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 successfully completed a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) May 17, off the East Coast of the United States from Virginia to Florida, in preparation for their scheduled combat deployment later this year. The exercise, which started April 24, was con ducted by a training team led by Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTL). COMPTUEX ensured the collective forces of the Carrier Strike Group attained major combat operations certi fication and are ready for deployment. This three weeks of intense at-sea training is hands-down the most effective way to train our team of combatant ships, the carrier, the air wing, and strike group staff for sustained operations while deployed to 5th and 6th Fleet areas of respon sibility, said Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, com mander, Carrier Strike Group 8. The trainers of Strike Force Training Atlantic and their sup porting cast have assem bled a curriculum which stresses ships and their crews to the high-end of warfighting capabilities and refines non-kinetic missions such as mari time interception opera tions and theater security cooperation. After com pleting COMPTUEX, I am more confident than ever in our ability to go any where in the world, any time, and successfully conduct the full range of missions that we may be directed to accomplish. The strike group was assessed on their ability to execute the nations mari time strategy. The task scenarios provided Sailors with experience for deployment as they oper ated together through strike warfare, anti-sur face warfare, anti-sub marine warfare, anti-air warfare, and humanitar ian assistance and disas ter relief missions. The scenario also involved events focused on irregu lar warfare, counter-pira cy, counters proliferation and associated maritime interdiction operations. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group consists of aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), the guidedmissile destroyers USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), USS Farragut (DDG 99), and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), Carrier Air Wing 7, Destroyer Squadron 28, and Spanish Navy frigate Braz de Leso (F 103). Independent deploy ers the guided-missile destroyers USS Laboon (DDG 58), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79), the guided-missile frig ates USS Klakring (FFG 42) and USS Carr (FFG 52), dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), and the Brazilian Navy frigate BNS Independencia (F 44) also participated. Mayport Hosts Diving Safety Class -Photo courtesy of NAVFAC SoutheastNAVFAC Southeast holds its first diving safety class May 7-11 at Naval Station Mayport. Instructors from NAVFAC Southwest, NAVFAC HQ and Lt. Cmdr. Dan Stoddard provided training on EM-385 Diving Safety to designated diving coordinators and safety inspectors to better support the diving safety program that currently supports $65 million in current waterfront projects involving more than 2,100 hours of diving evolutions. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 13

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crew the Stark Sailors were and hoped that his own crew would emulate them. A highlight of this years ceremo ny included the announcement by Florida Rep. Ronald Renuart that a portion of Main Street on base and Mayport Road to Wonderwood Drive will be renamed USS Stark Memorial Drive ..Following Thomas remarks, former Stark crewmembers Tim Martineau read the names of each crewmember as the tolling of USS Starks bell by Peter Weber rang throughout the park followed by the laying of the wreath. The ceremony ended with a 21-gun salute and the playing of taps to honor those that did not come home.From Page 1Stark -Photo by Paige GnannFormer USS Stark crewmembers gather around Florida Rep. Ronald Renuart as he holds a new street sign proclaim ing a portion of Maine Street/Mayport Road as the newly renamed USS Stark Memorial Drive at the 25th anniversary memomrial of the attack on the NS Mayport-based frigate. Above right, Shannon Lozada places a wreath in honor of her late father Steven E. Kendall, a USS Stark Sailor, during the 25th annual memorial ceremony. Peter K. Webber, former USS Stark Sailor, tolls the bell during the 25th annual memorial ceremony for the guided-missile frigate USS Stark (FFG 31) at Naval Station Mayport as names of the fallen Sailors are read. Several crewmembers and their families came to honor the 37 Sailors who were killed while on patrol in the Persian Gulf 25 years ago.-Photo by MCSA Damian Berg THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 15

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Military Get Free Pass To National ParksAmerican Forces Press ServiceService members and their families will be able to enter all of Americas national parks free of charge for a year under an initiative announced May 15. The pass the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Annual Pass, which normally costs $80 will become available to service mem bers and their dependents on Armed Forces Day, May 19. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar made the announcement this morning, along with National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis, at a ceremony at Colonial National Historical Park in Yorktown, Va., the site of the last major battle of the Revolutionary War. The area surrounding the park hosts installa tions from all the military services, including the worlds largest naval base. I think when one goes into Virginia and you see all the sites, the Yorktown battlefield and the whole history of the country, its important that those who have fought in the tradi tion of making sure the nations democracy and freedom are protected also have access to these wonderful sites there, Salazar said yesterday in a conference call with reporters. The passes allow the holder and passengers in a single private vehicle access to some 2,000 sites that charge per vehicle. At sites where entrance fees are charged per person, it covers the pass owner and three adults age 16 and older. The National Park Service estimates that giving away the passes to service members and their families will result in a revenue loss between $2 million and $6 million, but Jarvis said that wont cause a significant impact on the agency, which col lects about $150 million in fees each year. Military personnel can get the passes at any national park or wildlife refuge that charges an entrance fee by showing their military ID. Family members also will be able to obtain their own pass, even if the service mem ber is deployed or if they are traveling separately. The pass will be accepted at National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Army Corps sites that charge entrance or stan dard amenity fees. The free pass will be made available for acti vated members of the National Guard and reserves, but not for mili tary veterans or retirees, whom Jarvis said have other opportunities for free or reduced admis sion, such as the National Patrk Services Access Pass or a seniors pass for those 62 and older. Jarvis, a 40-year Park Service employee, said that while the free passes are a first, they are rep resentative of the parks history with the military, which dates back to the Buffalo Soldiers battles with Native Americans in the mid-1800s and the recruitment of former military members to serve as park rangers under the first NPS director, Stephen T. Mather. The Park Service maintains many military historical sites from Gettysburg to Pearl Harbor, and in World War II even closed some parks, such as Mount Rainier in Washington state, to all but active military mem bers, he said. Right after World War II, the Park Service invested heavily in infrastructure to prepare the parks for returning service mem bers, Jarvis said. Todays generation of warriors also deserves a deep con nection to the parks, he said. From my perspective, it is incredibly impor tant to return this group of returning military members to their nation al parks, Jarvis said. Nothing is more core to the American experi ence than the national parks. These are places for quiet and contempla tion and to reconnect to the American experience. And we dont want there to be any barriers to that. The free pass initia tive is part of the Joining Forces campaign First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, launched last year to rally Americans around sup porting service members and their families. NAVYVisit Capital AttractionsFrom Visit Tallahassee Service members and their fami lies can visit the amazing attractions available in and around Floridas Capital City for free. At the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge families can fish, hike, bird watch, hunt and view the historic St. Marks lighthouse. With more than 300 species of birds recorded, the refuge boasts 98 species nesting onsite including ducks, hawks, falcons, shorebirds bald eagle nests and the red-cockaded woodpecker. Visitors can also see endangered loggerhead sea turtles, manatees, Florida black bears, bobcats, endangered flat woods salamanders and more than 60 species of reptiles. Also offering free admission to military families is Mission San Luis a community that once housed the Apalachee Indians and families from Spain. The mission now serves as an instrument to educate visitors about the past way of life in a community laced together by religion, military and economic purposes. Mission San Luis is Floridas only Spanish colonial mission that has living ancestors The Apalachees and has been meticu lously uncovered and restored.New Web-Based Housing Early Application ToolFrom Commander, Navy Installa tions Command Public AffairsCommander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) announced the phased Navy-wide release of the Housing Early Application Tool (HEAT) beginning in May. This web-based tool will allow Sailors and their fami lies to apply for housing online from any comput er. HEAT makes the Navy house hunting process smoother and less stress ful for our Sailors and their families. By pro viding the early hous ing application online, Sailors and their spouses can use HEAT to review housing and community information, and make an informed decision on a home before receiving their permanent change of station (PCS) orders, said Vice Adm. William French, command er, Navy Installations Command. HEAT utilizes authori tative systems to reduce the amount of personal information and to steam line the online process. HEAT can be securely accessed from any com puter with an internet connection. Service members or their spous es can use HEAT prior to receiving permanent change of station (PCS) orders to request infor mation about community housing or check on their eligibility for military and privatized housing. They may also submit HEAT requests to multiple Installations if they are not sure where they may be stationed next. Our goal with HEAT is to reach out to Sailors early in the PCS process to reduce stress and pro vide proactive support when moving from one duty station to another, said Corky Vazquez, CNIC housing program manager. With HEAT, Sailors and their families are able to make contact with our Navy Housing Service Centers and Privatization Partners to discuss their housing needs and learn about their hous ing options at any time. HEAT makes it easy to connect with our housing professionals and make informed decisions before even having orders. HEAT deployed Navy Region Southeast on May 15 and will be Navy-wide by June 30. To access HEAT and for more information about the program, visit www. cnic.navy.mil/HEAT. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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New Navy Uniform Components, RegulationsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 164/12, released May 18, announced the chief of naval operations (CNO) approval of a number of changes to uniforms and uniform wear policy. These uniform chang es are the direct result of Sailor and leadership feedback, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. Updating Navy uniforms is part of outfitting the 21st Century Sailor, ensuring our Sailors have practical uni forms they want and that represent our proud naval heritage while reflecting advances in clothing technology and design. An improved design of the male E1-E6 Service Dress Blue (SDB) Uniform, incorporating a side zipper on the jumper and a hidden center zip per on the trousers, is approved. The uniform is scheduled to begin distribution in October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, and Fleet availability is expected by October 2018. Specific details regarding fleet availabil ity will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. The E1-E6 mens and womens Service Dress White (SDW) jumper approved design improve ments include incorpo rating a side zipper, front and rear yoke, Navy blue piping on the flap, and sleeve cuffs with Navy blue piping and button fasteners. Introduction of the new E1-E6 SDW will begin October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes. Fleet roll out will begin by October 2018. Specific details regard ing Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. The contemporary design for Service Dress Khaki (SDK) is approved for optional wear. Detailed guidance on the occasion for wear and Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. A number of changes to the Navy flight suit occasion and manner of wear are con tained in the NAVADMIN, including changes to the approved colors for undershirts and aligning the manner of wear of the one-piece flight suit with the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I. Among the changes to NWU policy approved in the NAVADMIN is the option to wear a nam etape on the left shoulder pocket flap of the NWU Type I Parka, beginning July, 17. These nametapes will be purchased at the Sailors expense dur ing the optional period. Nametapes will become mandatory Oct 1, 2013. Sailors will receive a clothing replacement allowance to help pur chase one additional nametape for the parka. Other changes to the NWU policy include the approval to wear as an optional item a nylon webbing rigger belt and NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trou sers. The optional rig ger belt will be a one and three-fourth inch wide, one-piece adjustable nylon webbing, metal or plastic buckle. Belts worn by E-1 through E-6 personnel will be black, while belts worn by E-7 and above will be tan/ khaki. Sailors will be able to buy the NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trousers for wear during inclement weather to and from home and work. Personally purchased trousers will not be worn to perform official or assigned duties. The trousers will be available for purchase at selected Navy Exchange Uniform Centers, on-line and 1-800 call centers begin ning Oct. 1. The NAVADMIN includes a list of addition al commands authorized to wear the NWU Type III (Woodland) for daily and deployment and deploy ment training wear, as well as further guidance on approval authority for the wear of this uniform. Fleet Commanders (USFF and PACFLT) will now be the authorizing author ity for wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment work up/training. When not in a deployment or pre-deployment training status, personnel will wear the NWU Type I or service uniform as appropriate. In June 2013, an optional redesigned khaki maternity blouse with adjustable waist tabs and slightly shorter length will be available in regular and long sizes. The blouse will become a mandatory, as needed, item in 2015. The NAVADMIN also approved several insig nia and badge additions and changes includ ing standardizing the design and reducing the number of Navy Security Forces Identification badges from eight to three badges: U.S. Navy Security Forces, U.S. Navy Corrections Specialist and U.S. Navy Master-at-Arms. A Strategic Sealift Officer Warfare Insignia (SSOWI) for wear by officers who have suc cessfully completed the qualification require ments will be available May 2013. The United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) identi fication badge is autho rized to be worn by offi cers and enlisted assigned to USCYBERCOM begin ning July 17. Also beginning July 17, the Marine Corps Combatant Diver (MCD) breast insignia is autho rized for wear on Navy uniforms by Sailors that successfully meet all qualification require ments stipulated in MILPERSMAN article 1220-101, (U.S. Marine Corps Marine Combatant Diver Breast Insignia and Designation). Illustrations of the new uniform items and insig nia, as well as instructions on how to submit uniform changes to the Uniform Board, can be found on the Navy Uniform Matters Office website at http:// www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/uni forms/pages/default2. aspx. For complete informa tion on the approved uni form policy changes read NAVADMIN 164/12 at www.npc.navy.mil.DoD To Host Vietnam War Commemoration CeremonyFrom DoDSecretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta will host a ceremony on Monday, May 28, 2012, at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to thank and honor Americas Vietnam Veterans on behalf of a grateful nation. This ceremony will serve as a public kickoff of efforts to partner with communities across the United States. Invited guests include thousands of Vietnam Veterans, their loved ones, Gold Star families and leadership from the military servic es, Cabinet and Congress. There will be a limited viewing area open to the general public. The Memorial Day cer emony marks the begin ning of the national commemoration of the Vietnam Wars 50th anni versary program and is a joint effort between the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, the National Park Service and the Department of Defense. The event will include remarks, a moment of silence, music and ceremonial element sthat will begin at 1 p.m. EDT. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, Secretary of Defense and Senator Chuck Hagel, a Vietnam Veteran, and other dignitaries are scheduled to speak. Due to space limitations, the event is open to a limited number of registered correspon dents with pooled TV and still photographers. Correspondents wanting to cover this event must RSVP by email to PA_ vnwar50th@wso.whs.mil by noon Wednesday, May 23 to receive set instruc tions. Registration will be confirmed by e-mail and badges will be issued at the media check-in desk on Monday, May 28, 2012 at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The DoD Vietnam 50th Anniversary Commemoration Program will partner with other federal agencies, veterans groups, state, local government and non-government organi zations to: erans of the Vietnam War, including personnel who were held as prisoners of war or listed as missing in action, for their service and sacrifice on behalf of the United States and to thank and honor the fam ilies of these veterans. the armed forces during the Vietnam War and the contributions of federal agencies and governmental and non-governmental organizations that served with, or in support of, the armed forces. For more information on the Commemoration, please call 877-387-9951 or visit www.vietnam war50th.com. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 19

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Friday, May 25 PRI Productions and The City of Jacksonville Beach are happy to kick off the 11th season of MOONLIGHT MOVIES. The 2012 series runs two consecutive Friday nights this summer: May 25, Men In Black and June 1, Babe the Gallant Pig. Mark your calendar now, and plan to spend these starlit, summer evenings at the Sea Walk Pavilion. Arrive early for the best seats in the house. Shown on a 42-foot wide screen on stage at the Sea Walk Pavilion. Bring your lawn chair or blan ket and a picnic to enjoy before the movie, or visit our food court for movie snacks. You can also dine at one of the many restaurants in the downtown Jacksonville Beach area then catch the movie. Films start at 9 p.m. Admission is free. For more information visit us on Facebook at PRI Productions or www.pri productions.com Saturday, May 26 Have you ever been camping and wondered what that noise was behind you, or what may be watching you from just beyond the fire light? Come see what is creep ing around the Talbot Islands after dark. This program led by a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, June 2 An Eating and Growing Seasonably Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow warm season veg etables. at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost is $10 with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Thursday, June 7 Fresh and saltwater anglers of all types are encouraged to save the date for the Third Annual GATE Jacksonville Fishing Rodeo benefitting The St. Johns River Alliance scheduled for Thursday, June 7 to Sunday, June 10 at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd. Register at select GATE conve nience stores throughout Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia (Store locations: www.jackson villerodeo.com/rodeo/ tickets) and Strike Zone Fishing, 11702 Beach Blvd. Registration will also be available at the tourna ment site Thursday, June 7. The general tourna ment entry fee is $40 (plus tax) per angler Jackpot tickets are $375 per boat (king fish plus tax) and $175 per boat (redfish plus tax) plus the general angler fee. The Renaissance World Golf Village Resort is host ing a Day of Discovery on June 7. The Bar at Villagio will feature An Evening with Wade Tower, per forming all the Sinatra classics with Michael Buble mixed in. For more details, please visit www. worldgolfrenaissance. com. Saturday, June 9 The United Methodist Women of Fort Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Road will hold its Yard Sale at the church from 8 a.m.1 p.m. The United Methodist Men of Fort Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Rd., are cooking up a fish fry 5-7 p.m. Cost is $7. Take out is available. For more information, call 7441311. In conjunction with the Third Annual GATE Jacksonville Fishing Rodeo, Anglers for Conservation, GATE, Coastal Angler Magazine and the Southern Kingfish Association will host a Hook Kids on Fishing event from 9-11 a.m. To be held at Metropolitan Park, kids ages 6 to 16 will participate in clinics on casting, conservation, safety, knot tying, catch and release tactics, and more for free. The first 100 kids to register will win a free rod, reel, and tackle box courtesy of Anglers for Conservation. To reg ister or for more informa tion, call (904) 461-6773. Tuesday, June 12 Come enjoy mak ing Dill Pickles and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center, from 9 a.m. noon or 1 4 p.m. Class space is limited. Cost is $20 per person. Pre-registration and pre payment should be made by Thursday, June 7th. To register call Jeannie at 255-7450. Thursday, June 14 The Duval County Extension Office/UF IFAS will be offering a prep class for people who would like to take the arborist certifica tion test and become a certified Arborist. This four part series will be on June 14, 21, 28, and July 5th. It will be from 5-9 p.m. and cost $50 per person.This course is designed to review some of the important concepts of the Arborist Certification Study Guide. These classes will be held at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville. You can register online at http:www.eventbrite. com/event/3404048601 or make check payable to DCOHAC and mail to Larry Figart, 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl 32254. For questions please call Larry Figart at 904-255-7450. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARPrograms, Activites For Active Duty, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 24, 1-2p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses FFSC room 719 May 24, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC room 702 May 24, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 24, 10-11a.m., Craft Hour (during play group), USO May 29, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting FFSC room 702 May 29, 6-8p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building One Room 104 May 30, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 31, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC room 702 May 31, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.-4p.m., Resume Writing, FFSC TBD The Beaches Veterans Memorial Park Veterans, hosted by VFW Post 3270, will hold a Memorial Day ser vice at the Park May 28 at 2 p.m. The park is located on the North side of Atlantic Blvd and Mayport Road, (under the huge American Flag), Guides will assist in parking. The cer emony will feature Senator Marco Rubios NE Area Director, Adele Griffin, and speaker, Mayor Mike Borno. NS Mayport will also be rep resented. Adding to the ceremony will be the Beaches Honor Guard giving their Rifle Salute and the playing of TAPS to our fallen comrades. Please bring chairs ,or, blankets for your comfort.Veterans Memorial Day Service 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 23 May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. June 1: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tintin (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 1: Mini Biathalon (Swim/Run.) 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. Sign up by May 25. 270-5452 June 1: ABC Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. You can wear aluminum foil, duct tape, boxes, trash bags, wrapping paper, toilet paper or any thing! Featuring live band LIFT. Free food, Best in Show contest, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 June 2: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 June 5 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 June 6: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 June 6: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 June 6: Co-Ed Softball Begins. Season ends Aug. 9. 270-5451. June 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 June 11: Summer Swim Lesson Session I Begins Registration is June 8-9 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 12: Summer Beach 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. June 12: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. June 13: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWRMay 24: School Age Care Talent Show. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Activity Center. Advanced sign up required. 270-5680 May 25: Wet Wild Wacky Water Wars. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Beat the heat with water balloon fights, slip n slide challenges and more. 246-0347 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-537 June 1: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tintin (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 11: Summer Swim Lesson Session I Begins Registration is June 8-9 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 15: Outdoor MoviesWe Bought a Zoo (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 15: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 June 17: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. Dads bowl for free all day from 1-7 p.m. All other games $2, shoe rental $1, hot dog and fries $2.75. At least one child must accompany dad; bowling must be completed by 7 p.m. 270-5377 June 22: Outdoor MoviesBig Miracle (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 25: Summer Swim Lesson Session II Begins. Registration is June 22-23 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 KID The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 24: Beach and Picnic Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. FREE. May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 27: Ichnetucknee Springs Trip. Come tub ing down the river.Van Departs Liberty Center 9 a.m. Cost $10 May 28: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Military Appreciation Game. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. FREE. May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. May 29: Cummer Art Museum Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. FREE May 30: 5 Points Shopping Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. FREE June 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. LIBERTY

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by MCSA Damian BergFlorida State Representative Ronald J. Renuart presents memorial street sign during the 25th annual memorial ceremony for the guided-missile frigate USS Stark (FFG 31) at Naval Station Mayport. Several crewmembers and their families came to honor the 37 Sailors who were killed while on patrol in the Persian Gulf 25 years ago.NS Mayport Honors Fallen ShipmatesThe Mirror editorMore than 200 ship mates, friends and fami lies filled the Mayport Memorial Park on May 17, 2012 to pay their respects to the fallen crew of USS Stark (FFG 31) 25 years after the frigate was struck by an Iraqi missile while deployed in the Arabian Gulf. In the early morn ing hours of May 17, 1987, two Iraqi missiles struck the Naval Station Mayport-based frigate. Despite the severe dam age inflicted, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Thirtyseven Sailors lost their lives during the attack. Stark was decom missioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to pre serve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Guest speaker for this years event was Rear Adm. David M. Thomas Jr., Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic. He was stationed at Mayport aboard Starks sister ship, USS Estocin (FFG 15), and talked about the reputa tion of Stark and its crew in the basin. Stark was the ship to beat, he told the crowd. Stark was awesome. When we watched her sail off on deployment, [we watched the best of the basin go]. As word came of the sacrifice... those tales were told with a sense of pride as we read those words of heroism. Thomas said he was amazed at what a tight See Stark, Page 15 Underwood Prepares For Advanced Phase Of UNITAS Southern Seas 2012 Public AffairsCommanding officers of the Chilean, Colombian, Mexican, Peruvian and U.S. Navy ships par ticipating in UNITAS Pacific (PAC) gathered aboard Peruvian frigate Mariategui (FM 54) for a mid-exercise brief, May 19. The agenda included debriefs of the work-up phase of UNITAS PAC and an exchange of plans for the upcoming exercise scenario phase (ESP). We have worked at the basic level of opera tions with our partner nations such as gunnery exercises and we have worked with each nations helicopters to come to a common procedural understanding, said Cmdr. Peter T. Mirisola, commanding officer of Oliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). During the hot wash debrief, each nation discussed improv ing communication pro cedures and enhancing interoperability. When you bring the different capabilities with different navies, it is dif ficult at first, but we eventually overcame those problems and operated successfully at sea, said Mirisola. The ESP began May 21 and includes maritime interdiction operations, Help Protect Sea TurtlesFrom NS Mayport SecurityNaval Station Mayport beaches are a great place to live and visit for both people and endangered spe cies of sea turtles. It is just a little tougher to find a good place to nest if you are an endangered sea turtle. Turtle nesting takes place May 31 through Oct. 31. However, their safety depends on you. Hatchlings find their way to the sea by light clues, such as brightness. They instinctively crawl towards the brightest light and become disoriented if artificial lights are shining from behind. Artificial light from beachfront homes, streetlights or even flashlights can attract the hatchlings away from the safety of the water and lead them to their deaths. Lights and people disorientate female turtles coming ashore to nest. If one is sighted coming ashore, contact the base Wildlife officer and remain clear, stay quiet, do not use a light source and dont allow anyone near her to disturb her nesting. How can you help? By simply keeping our beaches as dark and quiet as possible throughout the nesting period. Consider the following suggestions: flashlights without a red lenses. not visible from the beach. rity purposes. -Photo by MCSN Frank J. PikulSailors aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) fire the 40 mm saluting battery as the ship enters the port of Callao, Peru. Underwood is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. See Sea Turtle, Page 11 See Underwood, Page 10

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.I had the honor of judging Mayport Middle Schools History Fair again this year. In doing so I met James Stevens who had entered his poem The Doolittle Raid. To celebrate Memorial Day, I want to share this poem with you with the permission of James and his mother. The Doolittle Raid By James Stevens Mayport Middle School A carrier called Hornet It brought the First strike Back Back To the nation That destroyed Our pride Our Navy And Threatened Our Freedom That ship Took the war To them Back to them Across an ocean so wide It spans half the world Those planes Our planes Strapped to the deck 16 Ready to send A message That we Would not give in That we Would fight them For as long as it took To take back Our land Our waters And our pride Those plane Our planes On that ship prepared to Issue the first strike Back Back To a nation Smug That thought itself Un-attackable Impenetrable Safe in its island fortress But those planes would show That nation That we Were not to be trifled with And that they were wrong And we Could and would Attack and bomb them So those 16 planes Our 16 planes Launched off the deck Of that ship While it Rolled And tossed In an ocean so wide It spans half the world And those planes Our planes Skimmed across The waves Flying Low and slow To unsuspecting Tokyo And when we arrived What a sight we were To a nation so Secure in itself They believed those first planes Our first planes Were their own And what a sight it was As their security Was dispelled And The Bombs Began To Drop And the smoke and the fire And the destruction Began And the rest of the 16 planes Of our 16 planes Swept through the Smoke And continued the Destruction Of a nation that Had believed Until now It couldnt be attacked Or bombed Or even touched And we did What they Had done To us The nation Panicked Its defenses down And did almost Nothing And it managed to Miss Every Single Plane And our planes Our 16 shining planes Untouched Soared out Low and slow Away from a burning Tokyo Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Honoring America On Memorial DayJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingWhat does it take to become a modern day hero? I am not sure who your hero is or if you even have one. Many people can honestly say their dad or mom is their hero. I remember growing up watching superheroes like Superman battle evil in the cartoon world. I liked the fact that these superheroes would bat tle against the forces of darkness and overcome them even with the lon gest odds. I also liked the fact that they needed to keep their real identity secret so as not to put their friends and family in harms way. I guess it sort of made me think you never know, anyone could be a superhero. Now, looking back, I realize that people with superpowers dont real ly exist, but that doesnt mean that real heroes dont exist. But how can they be identified so we can properly honor them? I would suggest that heroes have several qualities in com mon that make them heroic. The first thing is that heroes struggle against and overcome evil. They consistently are able to think about life from a moral perspective. A hero cannot exist in the realm where there is no such thing as good and evil and all is rela tive. There would be no battles to fight and no temptations to resist. Real life heroes, like superhe roes, also have to do battle against evil. Secondly, real heroes consistently demonstrate heroism by living sacrifi cially. What I mean is that real heroes have no room for selfishness and always are willing to give up what is rightfully theirs so that others might receive a benefit that they couldnt possibly achieve for themselves. This is what it means to be heroic. And this is the hard part, but who said being a hero was easy? The real hero has trained himself to over come these natural ten dencies and is willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice in laying down his life for the sake of others if need be. So, who are our modern day heroes and how can we honor them? Memorial Day is a great day to remember those who have paid the ultimate price for the freedom we have as Americans by giving their lives for our sakes. We should also honor their family members for the sacrifices they have made. Of course, there are also all the other sacrifices that should be honored as well, like being separated from a loved one during long deployments. True heroes would also include all those firefighters and police officers who daily put their lives on the line for the sake of others. Honoring a life of sacrifice that is what Memorial Day is all about. Of course, from a Christian perspective, this all makes perfect sense because the ultimate hero is Jesus Christ who gave His own life to save those who could not save themselves. But that is another story. Thank and honor a hero today for their sacrifice on our behalf!Honoring True Heroes This Memorial DayLt. Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSOutdoor Grilling Can Turn Deadly Without CareFrom NS Mayport Fire and Emergency ServicesEvery year barbecue grills on residential properties cause more than 1,500 structural fires and 4,200 outdoor fires. Barbecue grills are designed for outdoor use only. Never barbecue in your trailer, tent, house, garage, or any enclosed area as carbon monoxide may accumulate and kill you. Position the grill in an open area at least 10 feet away from buildings, deck railings and out from under eaves and over hanging branches. Use barbecue utensils with long handles to avoid burns and splatters. Wear short or tight fit ting sleeves and use flame retardant mitts. Have a charged garden hose or bucket of sand available to extinguish any small grill flare-ups. Once lit, never leave a grill unat tended. If you are using a charcoal grill with char coal briquettes or wood chunks, form a pyramid and douse the briquette / chunks with lighter fluid. Wait until the fluid has soaked in before light ing. After use, lighter fluid should be capped imme diately and placed a safe distance from the grill. Never add lighter fluid to hot coals. Never use gasoline or kerosene as a starter. When using instant light briquettes, do not use lighter fluid, electric, solid or metal chimney style starters. If you need more briquettes once the fire is lit, add only regular charcoal briquette. Allow coals to burn out com pletely and let the ashes cool for at least 48 hours before disposing of them. Dispose of cold ashes by wrapping them in heavy duty aluminum foil and putting them in a metal container. If you must dispose of the ashes in less time than it takes for them to completely cool, remove the ashes from the grill keeping them in heavy duty foil and soak them complete ly with water before dis posing of them in a metal container. Check the tubes that lead into the burner for any blockage from insects or food grease. Use a pipe cleaner or wire to clear any blockage and push it through to the main part of the burner. Visually inspect the propane hoses for crack ing, brittleness, holes and leaks. A soap and water solution may be used to test for leaks. Never use a flame to check for gas leaks. Move propane hoses as far as possible from hot surfaces and dripping grease. Visually inspect the propane tank. If it has dents, gouges, bulges, corrosion, leakage, or excessive rust, return the tank to the propane gas distributor. Do not attempt to repair the propane tank valve or the appliance yourself. Have a qualified repair person make the repairs. Follow the maintenance instructions provided in the grill owners manual. When the propane tank is connected, the grill must be kept outside in a wellventilated space. When not in use, the propane tank valve must be turned to the OFF or CLOSED position. Never store a propane tank indoors or below ground level. The storage of a spare propane cylinder is strongly discouraged. Find a local propane distributor who will exchange an empty tank for a full one on the spot. Precautions should be taken while transporting propane tanks (whether full or empty). Propane tanks should be secured in an upright position in the back seat of your car, or in the pickup bed of your truck, with transportation plugs on the outlet valve connec tion. Avoid having other passengers in the car, espe cially children. Never leave a propane tank unattended in your car. If you have any ques tions about reducing the risk of fires, call Fire Prevention at 270-5647.VCNO Guest Speaker At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner onJune 9, at the renaissance resort, world golf village. Guest speak er Vice Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mark E. Ferguson III; Veterans of the Battle of Midway, several widows of Midway Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the mili tary have been invited to attend this years dinner. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and for mer prisoners of war in our area who have hero ically answered the call of duty. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from Navy League Mayport Bob Price, 904-718-2118 or email bpricex4@comcast. net.

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 USO is hosting a family night out at Adventure Landing Park at 1944 Beach Blvd. on June 13. The park will be closing early and will be reopened from 6-11 p.m. exclusively for the military. Wristbands are on sale at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO cen ters for $2. This is for active duty and immediate family members only, including National Guard. Retirees, friends and relatives are not eligible to attend. Space is limited. Wristbands will be sold on a first come, first serve basis. Adventure Landing Season Passes are not valid for this day.Adventure Landing Military Appreciation NightUSO Thanks Sailors, FamiliesFrom StaffHundreds of service members and their families headed to Sea Otter Pavilion on Armed Forces Day, May 19, to enjoy a day in the base pool, free food, entertainment and activities thanks to the Mayport USO and MWR. The day included a inflatables scattered around the Pavilion lawn with everything from bounce houses to slides and boxing rinks. There was even an inflatable that gave participants a chance to surf the waves without getting wet. Volunteers from the USO and American Red Cross were also at the event to hand out free information and goodies, like DVDs. Kids, and parents enjoyed a DJ while chow ing down to free hot dogs and hamburgers, sweets and popcorn To round off the day, MWR officially opened the base pool with a free day of swim. The pool will be open on Saturdays from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays/ holidays from 1-6 p.m. Full summer hours begin on June 8 when local schools dismiss for summer break. It will be open on Memorial Day, Admission fees apply. Season passes go on sale now at ITT for $120 for family or $60 per person. Call 270-5145 for more information.-Photos by Paige GnannLili Chufo, 11, tests out her balance on the surfboard inflatable at the annual USO Military Appreciation Day festival held at the Sea Otter Pavilion on Armed Forces Day, May 19. Hundreds of service members and their families came out to enjoy the festival and official opening of the base pool. Troy Manuel, 2, and mom Holly cool down with an icee prepared by USO volunteer Shelby Graham. Kids amp up their sweet meter with some cotton candy courtesy of USO. Amaya Mooney, 5, gets a tattoo from volunteer Katira Evans during the Military Appreciation Day. Service members and their families pick out a myriad of free items, including books, DVDs, and toys at the event. Kids show off their best air guitar moves during a DJ contest underneath the Sea Otter Pavilion. Eli Brennan, 3, takes a big bite of his hot dog with help from mom Brigit. USO provided free food and drink at the festival.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 5 Gabriel Healy, 3, along with siblings Kaelan, 6, and Julia Sue-Kam-Ling, 8, talk to Sparky the Fire Dog at the USO Military Appreciation Day festival. Sparky spent the day interacting with the children throughout the pavilion. Elyana Nguyen, 23 months, gets a little bounce thanks to the other children in the bounce house, one of several inflatables set up throughout the festival. Devin Jakeway, 12, tries to hit friend Jacob Larson, 12, with a punching bag at one of the inflatable activities set up at the pavilion. Devin Jakeway, 12, tries to hit friend Jacob Larson, 12, with a punching bag at one of the inflatable activities set up at the pavilion. Kids cool down at the monster water slide inflatable set up at the Military Appreciation Day festival. Chief Hospital Corpsman Randy Dierking of USS Robert G. Bradley and family enjoy a free day of swimming at the base pool. The pool is open on weekends. Lt.j.g. Ryan Culbertson of HSL-48 brings his family out to enjoy a day of food and fun at the USO sponsored event. Sophia Delcastillo, 4, and friend Andres Barns, 3, prac tice their swim strokes in preparation for summer weather. MWR is offering swim lessons starting June 11. Call 270-5101/5425 to register.Play Group At The Mayport USO Fleet and Family Service Center sponsors a playgroup at the Mayport USO every Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon. May 24 will include a craft hour from 10-11 a.m. as well. For more information please contact Lauren Walton, New Parent Support Program at Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center 904-2706600. BJS Wholesale Club Military Appreciation Day $500 will be donated to the Jacksonville USO if 200 members of the Armed Forces attend the Military Appreciation events at BJs Wholesale Club on May 26 at the Orange Park location and May 27 at the Atlantic/ Kernan location in Jacksonville. Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more veterans you will help. Our mission is to win this contest, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com You Could Win A 1948 Pontiac Torpedo! Do you like old antique cars? The American Legion Riders Chapter 283 has proudly offered a 1948 Pontiac Torpedo car in a raffle drawing to be held on June 1 at 8 pm. NAS Jax USO and Mayport USO now have Donation Tickets available for pur chase! The tickets are only $10. Stop by your USO center today! All sales are cash only at the centers or at Post 283. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. For more information about activities or meeting availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO

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NH Jax Awarded For Fit ForceBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer Jeanne CaseyThe Navy Surgeon General announced this month that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilleits hos pital and five branch health clinicsand Navy Operational Health Support Unit (NR OHSU) Jacksonville received the 2011 Blue H Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Award. This is the synergy of a military treatment facil ity and its medical reserve units working to create a fit fighting force, stat ed Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling, NH Jacksonville. NH Jacksonville including all of its branch health clinics earned the Blue H Award for excel lence in clinical primary prevention, commu nity health promotion and medical staff health. The Silver Eagle went to all six command sites the hospital and Branch Health Clinics Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport. NR OHSU Jacksonville earned nine Gold Stars, two Silver Eagles and seven Bronze Anchors for excellence in workplace primary prevention poli cies, activities and out comes. The Blue H Award assesses areas such as alcohol and drug abuse prevention, injury prevention, nutrition, physical fitness, sexual health, psychological health, tobac co cessation and weight management. The award criteria provide direction for a well-rounded health promotion program which supports the medical readiness of the armed forces, enhances quality of life, and reduces longterm health care costs. To take advantage of its programs, contact NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at 542-5292.NH Jax Awarded Gold For HealthNavy Public Affairs Support Element Detachment SoutheastNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville was awarded the First Coast Healthiest Companies Gold Award on May 16 at a ceremony held at the University of North Florida. This was the second straight year that NH Jacksonville received this prestigious award from the First Coast Worksite Wellness Council of Jacksonville, Fla. The fact that Naval Hospital Jacksonville has won this award for the second straight year reflects on the commands commitment to help ing sailors as well as their families, and meeting the commitments of the 21st century Navy, said NH Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. The First Coast Worksite Wellness Council awards busi nesses that go above and beyond in order to take care of employees and their families. The First Coast Worksite Wellness Councils mission is to provide evidence based recourses for business es in order to help their employees and their families stay healthy, said Executive Director of First Coast Worksite Wellness Council Dorrette Nysewander. When you look at all of the depart ments within the hospi tal, its great to see how they integrate and interact with one another in order to keep military personnel healthy. NH Jacksonvilles pri ority since its found ing in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the hospital, located aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. Of its patient popu lation 215,000 active and retired sailors, Marines, soldiers, air men, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. Each and every day, a dedicat ed team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 sameday surgeries, fills 4,700 prescriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and deliv ers two to three babies. Additionally, up to 15 percent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disas ter care. For more infor mation, visit www.med. navy.mil/sites/navalhos pitaljax, www.facebook/ navalhospitaljacksonville and www.twitter.com/ NHJax. Photo by MC2 Salt CebeNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling and NH Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade (alongside David Meyer of St. Vincents Healthcare and Jon Urbanek of Florida Blue) received the hospitals second consecutive First Coast Healthiest Companies Gold Award. Welcome Back To Tick Season In Florida Naval Hospital Jacksonville director of public health and family medicine physician a problem in Northeast Florida? A woman came to our Family Medicine clinic for care a few weeks ago, complaining of feeling fatigued with sore mus cles and fever. The doctor who saw her had a long list of things that may have caused these prob lems, but after looking at a blood test the doctor decided she might have been bitten by a tick. After a short time on an antibiotic, the patients symptoms went away and she was truly surprised to know that tick bites especially at this time of yearcan cause these kinds of problems. As the weather becomes nicer in spring, many people think about enjoying outdoor activi ties such as walking in wooded areas, hiking, and camping. But as people begin to get out and about, so do animals, insects, and spiders. One animal to be aware of this time of year is the deer tick. Ticks live in wood ed areas, brushy fields, and around your home. They crawl onto grass or leaves and wait for ani mals or people to brush up against them. After hitching a ride, ticks sur vive by crawling onto host animals and humans skin and drawing blood to eat. In contrast to biting insects like mosquitoes and flies, ticks take their time to bite--they crawl around looking for a good hiding place to begin feeding. Anywhere you find deer, you can find ticks. Even more unpleas antly, ticks pass infections from one host to the next, including humans. In Florida and the southeastern U.S., ticks can transmit about a half-dozen types of illnesses as in the case described above. Most tick-borne diseases are mild and the patient may recover on their own without medications, but others can be more seri ous and even require hospitalization. Infections from tick bites should be aggres sively managed with antibiotic care and careful follow-up with your pro vider. One local tick species called the Gulf Coast Tick has recently been found to transmit a flu-like ill ness known as rickett sia, which can be treated easily by a medical pro vider. If you or someone you know goes outside between now and football season and later develops flu-like symptoms of fever, fatigue, and muscle aches, this illness could be caused by a tick. A person with these symptoms during the summer months should consider a trip to see their provider. Staff at Naval Hospital Jacksonville are working together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Naval Medical Research Center to monitor for these cases and offer lab testing for patients with possible rickettsial illness. This monitoring study will help describe the level of tick illness in our area and guide prevention and treatment efforts in the future. As with most matters, prevention is the best approach to tick-relat ed diseases. When you hike, camp or enjoy the outdoors where ticks are found, a few precautions will help keep you safe: 1. Dont be afraid to use bug spray with the chemical DEET in it. 2. Wear light-colored clothing because this makes it easier to see ticks. 3. Wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. 4. Tuck your pants into your socks or boots and tuck in your shirt. 5. Stay on cleared trails. After outdoor activities, check everyone in your familyincluding out door petsfor ticks. Look hard to find them because ticks can be very tiny, and ask another person to help you check yourself. If you find a tick which has latched onto the skin: 1. Grab the tick close to your skin with a twee zers or tissue and pull it straight out (dont crush the tick in your finger nails). 2. Wash where the tick bit you. 3. Wash your hands. 4. Remember that if you get sick after a tick bite, you should go see your provider. The antibiotics for tick bites are easy to take and are curative! Most experts will tell you that if you can remove the tick from your skin within 24 hours, the risk of infection is very low. Keep these simple mea sures in mind and enjoy Floridas great outdoors safely this year! Welcome back to tick season. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Taylor Participates In Ocean Shield USS Taylor Public AffairsOver the past sev eral weeks, guided-mis sile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and its visit, board, search, and sei zure (VBSS) team, have actively patrolled the Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) and pro vided security assistance to several merchant ves sels transiting through the Gulf of Aden region. Taylor, with embarked Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 Detachment 9, is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508 Operation Ocean Shield. This Operation is NATOs counter-piracy mission in the Gulf of Aden and India Ocean. Ocean Shield is a clear demonstration of the alliances capability in the maritime field, and its flexibility in meeting the variety of challenges posed in todays security environment, said Cmdr. J. R. Hill, Taylors com manding officer. As part of the NATO Task Force Taylor complements the European Union, Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), and inde pendent nations units tackling piracy in the region. Taylors mission is to patrol the waters of the Gulf of Aden, the Arabian Sea and Somali Basin, and investigate suspi cious maritime activ ity. Additionally, the ship supports merchant ves sels requiring assistance while transiting the IRTC and other regional water ways. Taylor also moni tors commercial mer chant shipping and con voys and provides security overwatch. Most vessels we have encountered are legiti mate fishing or trading and are not involved with piracy operations, but the data collected helps provide information for pattern of life analysis and evidence to compare between boardings that may help classify a dhow as a pirate vessel more clearly during a boarding, said Lt. Michael Modeer, Taylors senior VBSS Officer. Piracy and maritime crime are a significant concern to the interna tional community, con tributing nations, nongovernment and commercial organizations. Taylor has conducted numerous maritime security assist visit (MSAV) boardings in support of NATOs coun ter-piracy efforts. As the deployment continues, Taylor expects to remain vigilant on patrol, providing the maritime presence and security necessary to support counter-piracy efforts throughout the region. Photo by OS1 Travis Krause Lt. Michael Modeer, forward, and Sonar Technician 3rd Class Brett Hansen, assigned to the visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) team aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), wait to board the ships rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to before conducting a maritime security assist visit (MSAV) of a dhow operating in the vicinity. Taylor is assigned to commander, NATO Task Force 508 supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interdiction operations and counter-piracy mission in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) haul a fuel probe line during a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204). Taylor is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508, supporting Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interception operations and counter-piracy missions in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Rappahannock is assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 53, providing fuel and supplies to U.S. Navy and coalition ships in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) haul a fuel probe line during a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204). -Photos by MC1 Peter SantiniSailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) move stores during a replenishment at sea. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 9

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anti-submarine warfare scenarios, counter-pira cy operations, and other training scenarios. It is the next level of complexity for us and our partner nation navies to work as a cohesive unit and communicate better with each other in order to accomplish our mis sion, said Mirisola. The crew is well prepared for these exercises and they get more proficient as they complete more operations at sea. Underwood is repre senting the U.S. Navy during the 53rd iteration of UNITAS 2012 and is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Southern Seas 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.From Page 1UnderwoodUnderwood Honors Peruvian Naval HeroSouthern Seas 2012 Public AffairsSailors and officers from Oliver Hazard Perryclass guided-missile frig ate USS Underwood (FFG 36) attended a wreathlaying ceremony at the Peruvian naval academy in Callao, Peru, May 15. The annual memo rial ceremony was held in honor of Peruvian naval hero Adm. Miguel Grau, who was killed during a naval engagement in the 19th century. Nearly two dozen crew members from Underwood joined with members of the Chilean, Colombian, Ecuadorian, Mexican and Peruvian navies to present wreaths at the monument erected over Graus crypt. It was an honor for us to attend the ceremony and I think its important for us to show respect for our partner nations legacy, said Command Master Chief Michael Bates. As a wreath was brought forward on a display stand, Capt. Ace Van Wagoner, commander of Destroyer Squadron 40, the U.S. mission commander of UNITAS Pacific (PAC), Cmdr. Peter Mirisola, Underwoods commanding officer; and Cmdr. Michael Brasseur, Underwoods executive officer rendered hand salutes while an honor guard detachment of six Peruvian sailors piped their boatswains mate pipes. We were not the only navy to show up and I think its important that all of the navies that are participating in UNITAS Pacific showed up in a display of mutual respect for each other, said Bates. Underwood is repre senting the U.S. Navy in support of UNITAS Pacific 53-12 as part of Southern Seas 2012. -Photos by MC2 Stuart PhillipsCmdr. Peter Mirisolas, left, commanding officer of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36), Capt. Ace Van Wagoner, commander of Destroyer Squadron 40, the U.S. mission commander of UNITAS Pacific, and Cmdr. Michael Brasseur, executive officer of Underwood, render honors during a wreath-laying ceremony at the memorial for Peruvian naval hero Adm. Miguel Grau at the Peruvian Naval Academy in Callao, Peru. Underwood is representing the U.S. Navy in support of UNITAS and Southern Seas 2012. Quartermaster 1st Class David Ratcliffe examines the ensign before raising it aboard the anchored Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) in the port of Callao, Peru. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Command Finds Comfort In Captains Cookies USS Hu CityThe routine recipe card in a naval ships gal ley typically calls for tra ditional desserts such as chocolate chip, peanut butter or sugar cookies. In recent days, however, particular culinary delights have found their way onto the decks of USS Hu City. Chocolate truffle, lemon glazed and frost ed pumpkin spice cook ies are among the favorite deviations from the norm, replacing the crews rou tine dining with piqued curiosity. As it turns out, the newly formulated concoctions come from a certain khaki inspiration. Capt. Dan Uhls, com manding officer of Hu City, has gained noto riety for his affection for cookies. He can be seen offering cookies to sail ors approaching his state room with business, or strolling down a passage way with a plate ready to be hand delivered to some fortunate work detail. Daily briefs held in the wardroom have even been augmented to include a segment on potential cookie options for the days to come. The captain is very serious about his cookies, Food Service Officer Lt.j.g. Jason Yurek said. In the wake of their popular cookies, Hu Citys Culinary Specialists have found a spirit of friendly competition. Each sailor has been given the challenge of creating two new recipes, utilizing the combina tion of training, research and ingenuity. Amidst their newfound motiva tion, these bakers have also displayed the pro found impact of mix ing regulated training with the capability reach beyond the satisfactory standard. With Hu City on the brink of a ninemonth deployment, each Culinary Specialist is learning early on the necessity of keeping things fresh. Training and skill lev els have increased over all due to a friendly com petition that seemed to come out of nowhere, Chief Culinary Specialist Ryan Albrecht said. This is great, my sailors are learning skills they were meant to learn in the Navy. Since passing the Board of Inspection and Survey in late February (INSURV), the command has not only witnessed the arrival of a new Commanding Officer, but also a change of focus. The extensive time once dedicated to preparation for INSURV has now been redirected to operational training. With only weeks remaining before Hu Citys departure, training has not been confined to the galley, but to every functioning facet of ship board life. For Uhls it also means that one sailors culinary work and dedi cation could in fact be another sailors treasure. Cookies are comforting, Uhls said. Theyre one of those things that calm me. When you give someone a cookie, it disarms them. Im of the mindset that when you are able to put someone at ease, you get the best out of them. This is my third com mand. No matter where Ive been, giving someone a cookie has always bro ken through barriers. And as for his favorite cookie? Id have to say the maple shortbread were the best, Uhls said. Followed real quickly by the lemon glazed. The COs prized maple shortbread cookies were courtesy of Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Ryan Ramsey, who was com pelled to reinvent his cookies after seeing what he was up against. I had heard two different Culinary Specialists talking up their cookies, Ramsey said. I didnt want to say anything, but I kept thinking to myself how great it would be to beat two second class [petty officers] with a better cookie. Ramsey wasnt the only artisan to make an impact. Culinary Specialist Seaman Jerry Holcombs batch of pumpkin spice cook ies found a quick fan in Command Master Chief Raymond Charest, who ate 14 in one setting. I couldnt help it, Charest said. I love sweets, but these were incredible. I didnt even realize I ate that many. According to Uhls, the recognition couldnt go to a better division. The Culinary Specialists are one of those divisions that can always get heat for their job, Uhls said. They can do things by the book, get everything right, and eventually there will be someone who still isnt happy. This lets them show what theyre really capable of doing. Its a nice reminder that they put forth quality work everyday. at sunset that face the beach. And Remember conducted on Naval Station Mayport beach areas during nesting season must be cleared through the Wildlife offi cer first. holes and rutting on the beach area. must be on a leash at all times. ing female or emerging hatchlings. These actions are a violation of federal and state laws. Only per mit holders are allowed to touch or move a sea turtle. Never try to push a live sea turtle back into the water. If the turtle is out of the water and on the beach, keep the shell wet with a damp towel or sprinkle water over it. cer, Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol or the Florida Marine Patrol if you find a live or dead sea turtle unless the turtle has a red X on its shell indi cating it has already been checked by the appropri ate authority and is wait ing for burial by beach sanitation units. The turtles have been here for more than 150 million years and are on the endangered species list. Lets all do our part to help protect them and ensure that they remain part of life in Florida. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatchling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS Mayport Wildlife Office immedi ately at 219-2178 for the base beach and Hanna Park. Call the Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol at 613-6081 for all Jacksonville area beaches or the Florida Marine Patrol at 270-2500.From Page 1Sea turtle Working together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com a CFC participant Provided as a public service THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 11

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Mass Casualty Drill Ends Phoenix Express 2Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsService members from Algeria, Greece, Morocco, Turkey and the U.S. teamed up aboard guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) to conduct a mass casu alty drill in support of Exercise Phoenix Express 2012 (PE12) in Souda Bay, Crete, May 18. The exercise gave par ticipants the opportunity to demonstrate medical techniques they learned during earlier PE12 training. Participants were required to treat simu lated injuries under the supervision of senior medical officers from each country. This kind of drill allows the participants the opportunity to put into practice skills learned during the classroom phase of training, including patient triage which means sorting casual ties into groups based on their immediate medical needs, said Cmdr. John medical officer. This training provides valuable skills that can be used during an immediate lifethreatening situation. During the drill, multi national medical officers observed and graded participating service mem bers in a variety of areas including procedure and techniques. My job was to make sure the right procedures were followed and that everyone was getting the right prognosis, said Algerian navy Capt. Larbi Boudjada, a drill observer. Maritime partners who participated in the drill felt that the entire expe rience was a valuable learning opportunity that will be beneficial during future operations. Were in this together and each country helps toward a common goal, said Army Staff Sgt. Catie Cejka, a Reservist with the 396th Combat Support Hospital. Its good to know the countries involved have the critical training to keep people alive if the need arises. The mass casualty drill marked the end of PE12s land training, as partici pating ships prepare to begin the next phase. PE12, a multina tional maritime exer cise between Southern European, North African and U.S. naval forces, is designed to improve cooperation among participating nations and help increase safety and security in the Mediterranean Sea. Participating countries in PE12 include Algeria, Croatia, Egypt, Greece, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Spain, Tunisia, Turkey and the United States. -Photo by MC1 Brian A. GoyakOperations Specialist Seaman Alex Dibenedetto, left, a boarding team member assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), practices small-arms tactics under the supervision of U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Joshua Aiken, from the 1st Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team, aboard the training ship Aris at the NATO Maritime Interdiction Operational Training Center during Phoenix Express 2012. Phoenix Express is a multinational maritime exercise between Southern European, North African and U.S. Naval forces intended to improve cooperation among participating nations and help increase safety and security in the Mediterranean Sea.Mayport Ships Complete COMPTUEXFrom USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public AffairsCarrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 successfully completed a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) May 17, off the East Coast of the United States from Virginia to Florida, in preparation for their scheduled combat deployment later this year. The exercise, which started April 24, was conducted by a training team led by Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTL). COMPTUEX ensured the collective forces of the Carrier Strike Group attained major combat operations certi fication and are ready for deployment. This three weeks of intense at-sea training is hands-down the most effective way to train our team of combatant ships, the carrier, the air wing, and strike group staff for sustained operations while deployed to 5th and 6th Fleet areas of respon sibility, said Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, com mander, Carrier Strike Group 8. The trainers of Strike Force Training Atlantic and their sup porting cast have assem bled a curriculum which stresses ships and their crews to the high-end of warfighting capabilities and refines non-kinetic missions such as mari time interception opera tions and theater security cooperation. After com pleting COMPTUEX, I am more confident than ever in our ability to go any where in the world, any time, and successfully conduct the full range of missions that we may be directed to accomplish. The strike group was assessed on their ability to execute the nations maritime strategy. The task scenarios provided Sailors with experience for deployment as they oper ated together through strike warfare, anti-sur face warfare, anti-sub marine warfare, anti-air warfare, and humanitar ian assistance and disas ter relief missions. The scenario also involved events focused on irregu lar warfare, counter-pira cy, counters proliferation and associated maritime interdiction operations. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group consists of aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), the guidedmissile destroyers USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), USS Farragut (DDG 99), and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), Carrier Air Wing 7, Destroyer Squadron 28, and Spanish Navy frigate Braz de Leso (F 103). Independent deploy ers the guided-missile destroyers USS Laboon (DDG 58), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79), the guided-missile frig ates USS Klakring (FFG 42) and USS Carr (FFG 52), dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), and the Brazilian Navy frigate BNS Independencia (F 44) also participated. Mayport Hosts Diving Safety Class -Photo courtesy of NAVFAC SoutheastNAVFAC Southeast holds its first diving safety class May 7-11 at Naval Station Mayport. Instructors from NAVFAC Southwest, NAVFAC HQ and Lt. Cmdr. Dan Stoddard provided training on EM-385 Diving Safety to designated diving coordinators and safety inspectors to better support the diving safety program that currently supports $65 million in current waterfront projects involving more than 2,100 hours of diving evolutions. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 13

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crew the Stark Sailors were and hoped that his own crew would emulate them. A highlight of this years ceremony included the announcement by Florida Rep. Ronald Renuart that a portion of Main Street on base and Mayport Road to Wonderwood Drive will be renamed USS Stark Memorial Drive ..Following Thomas remarks, former Stark crewmembers Tim Martineau read the names of each crewmember as the tolling of USS Starks bell by Peter Weber rang throughout the park followed by the laying of the wreath. The ceremony ended with a 21-gun salute and the playing of taps to honor those that did not come home.From Page 1Stark -Photo by Paige GnannFormer USS Stark crewmembers gather around Florida Rep. Ronald Renuart as he holds a new street sign proclaiming a portion of Maine Street/Mayport Road as the newly renamed USS Stark Memorial Drive at the 25th anniversary memomrial of the attack on the NS Mayport-based frigate. Above right, Shannon Lozada places a wreath in honor of her late father Steven E. Kendall, a USS Stark Sailor, during the 25th annual memorial ceremony. Peter K. Webber, former USS Stark Sailor, tolls the bell during the 25th annual memorial ceremony for the guided-missile frigate USS Stark (FFG 31) at Naval Station Mayport as names of the fallen Sailors are read. Several crewmembers and their families came to honor the 37 Sailors who were killed while on patrol in the Persian Gulf 25 years ago.-Photo by MCSA Damian Berg THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 15

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Military Get Free Pass To National ParksAmerican Forces Press ServiceService members and their families will be able to enter all of Americas national parks free of charge for a year under an initiative announced May 15. The pass the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Annual Pass, which normally costs $80 will become available to service members and their dependents on Armed Forces Day, May 19. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar made the announcement this morning, along with National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis, at a ceremony at Colonial National Historical Park in Yorktown, Va., the site of the last major battle of the Revolutionary War. The area surrounding the park hosts installa tions from all the military services, including the worlds largest naval base. I think when one goes into Virginia and you see all the sites, the Yorktown battlefield and the whole history of the country, its important that those who have fought in the tradi tion of making sure the nations democracy and freedom are protected also have access to these wonderful sites there, Salazar said yesterday in a conference call with reporters. The passes allow the holder and passengers in a single private vehicle access to some 2,000 sites that charge per vehicle. At sites where entrance fees are charged per person, it covers the pass owner and three adults age 16 and older. The National Park Service estimates that giving away the passes to service members and their families will result in a revenue loss between $2 million and $6 million, but Jarvis said that wont cause a significant impact on the agency, which collects about $150 million in fees each year. Military personnel can get the passes at any national park or wildlife refuge that charges an entrance fee by showing their military ID. Family members also will be able to obtain their own pass, even if the service mem ber is deployed or if they are traveling separately. The pass will be accepted at National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Army Corps sites that charge entrance or stan dard amenity fees. The free pass will be made available for acti vated members of the National Guard and reserves, but not for military veterans or retirees, whom Jarvis said have other opportunities for free or reduced admis sion, such as the National Patrk Services Access Pass or a seniors pass for those 62 and older. Jarvis, a 40-year Park Service employee, said that while the free passes are a first, they are rep resentative of the parks history with the military, which dates back to the Buffalo Soldiers battles with Native Americans in the mid-1800s and the recruitment of former military members to serve as park rangers under the first NPS director, Stephen T. Mather. The Park Service maintains many military historical sites from Gettysburg to Pearl Harbor, and in World War II even closed some parks, such as Mount Rainier in Washington state, to all but active military mem bers, he said. Right after World War II, the Park Service invested heavily in infrastructure to prepare the parks for returning service mem bers, Jarvis said. Todays generation of warriors also deserves a deep connection to the parks, he said. From my perspective, it is incredibly impor tant to return this group of returning military members to their nation al parks, Jarvis said. Nothing is more core to the American experi ence than the national parks. These are places for quiet and contempla tion and to reconnect to the American experience. And we dont want there to be any barriers to that. The free pass initia tive is part of the Joining Forces campaign First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, launched last year to rally Americans around sup porting service members and their families. NAVYVisit Capital AttractionsFrom Visit Tallahassee Service members and their fami lies can visit the amazing attractions available in and around Floridas Capital City for free. At the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge families can fish, hike, bird watch, hunt and view the historic St. Marks lighthouse. With more than 300 species of birds recorded, the refuge boasts 98 species nesting onsite including ducks, hawks, falcons, shorebirds bald eagle nests and the red-cockaded woodpecker. Visitors can also see endangered loggerhead sea turtles, manatees, Florida black bears, bobcats, endangered flat woods salamanders and more than 60 species of reptiles. Also offering free admission to military families is Mission San Luis a community that once housed the Apalachee Indians and families from Spain. The mission now serves as an instrument to educate visitors about the past way of life in a community laced together by religion, military and economic purposes. Mission San Luis is Floridas only Spanish colonial mission that has living ancestors The Apalachees and has been meticu lously uncovered and restored.New Web-Based Housing Early Application ToolFrom Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsCommander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) announced the phased Navy-wide release of the Housing Early Application Tool (HEAT) beginning in May. This web-based tool will allow Sailors and their fami lies to apply for housing online from any comput er. HEAT makes the Navy house hunting process smoother and less stress ful for our Sailors and their families. By pro viding the early hous ing application online, Sailors and their spouses can use HEAT to review housing and community information, and make an informed decision on a home before receiving their permanent change of station (PCS) orders, said Vice Adm. William French, command er, Navy Installations Command. HEAT utilizes authori tative systems to reduce the amount of personal information and to steam line the online process. HEAT can be securely accessed from any com puter with an internet connection. Service members or their spous es can use HEAT prior to receiving permanent change of station (PCS) orders to request infor mation about community housing or check on their eligibility for military and privatized housing. They may also submit HEAT requests to multiple Installations if they are not sure where they may be stationed next. Our goal with HEAT is to reach out to Sailors early in the PCS process to reduce stress and pro vide proactive support when moving from one duty station to another, said Corky Vazquez, CNIC housing program manager. With HEAT, Sailors and their families are able to make contact with our Navy Housing Service Centers and Privatization Partners to discuss their housing needs and learn about their hous ing options at any time. HEAT makes it easy to connect with our housing professionals and make informed decisions before even having orders. HEAT deployed Navy Region Southeast on May 15 and will be Navy-wide by June 30. To access HEAT and for more information about the program, visit www. cnic.navy.mil/HEAT. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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New Navy Uniform Components, RegulationsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 164/12, released May 18, announced the chief of naval operations (CNO) approval of a number of changes to uniforms and uniform wear policy. These uniform chang es are the direct result of Sailor and leadership feedback, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. Updating Navy uniforms is part of outfitting the 21st Century Sailor, ensuring our Sailors have practical uniforms they want and that represent our proud naval heritage while reflecting advances in clothing technology and design. An improved design of the male E1-E6 Service Dress Blue (SDB) Uniform, incorporating a side zipper on the jumper and a hidden center zip per on the trousers, is approved. The uniform is scheduled to begin distribution in October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, and Fleet availability is expected by October 2018. Specific details regarding fleet availabil ity will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. The E1-E6 mens and womens Service Dress White (SDW) jumper approved design improvements include incorpo rating a side zipper, front and rear yoke, Navy blue piping on the flap, and sleeve cuffs with Navy blue piping and button fasteners. Introduction of the new E1-E6 SDW will begin October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes. Fleet roll out will begin by October 2018. Specific details regard ing Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. The contemporary design for Service Dress Khaki (SDK) is approved for optional wear. Detailed guidance on the occasion for wear and Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. A number of changes to the Navy flight suit occasion and manner of wear are con tained in the NAVADMIN, including changes to the approved colors for undershirts and aligning the manner of wear of the one-piece flight suit with the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I. Among the changes to NWU policy approved in the NAVADMIN is the option to wear a nam etape on the left shoulder pocket flap of the NWU Type I Parka, beginning July, 17. These nametapes will be purchased at the Sailors expense dur ing the optional period. Nametapes will become mandatory Oct 1, 2013. Sailors will receive a clothing replacement allowance to help pur chase one additional nametape for the parka. Other changes to the NWU policy include the approval to wear as an optional item a nylon webbing rigger belt and NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trou sers. The optional rig ger belt will be a one and three-fourth inch wide, one-piece adjustable nylon webbing, metal or plastic buckle. Belts worn by E-1 through E-6 personnel will be black, while belts worn by E-7 and above will be tan/ khaki. Sailors will be able to buy the NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trousers for wear during inclement weather to and from home and work. Personally purchased trousers will not be worn to perform official or assigned duties. The trousers will be available for purchase at selected Navy Exchange Uniform Centers, on-line and 1-800 call centers begin ning Oct. 1. The NAVADMIN includes a list of additional commands authorized to wear the NWU Type III (Woodland) for daily and deployment and deploy ment training wear, as well as further guidance on approval authority for the wear of this uniform. Fleet Commanders (USFF and PACFLT) will now be the authorizing author ity for wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment work up/training. When not in a deployment or pre-deployment training status, personnel will wear the NWU Type I or service uniform as appropriate. In June 2013, an optional redesigned khaki maternity blouse with adjustable waist tabs and slightly shorter length will be available in regular and long sizes. The blouse will become a mandatory, as needed, item in 2015. The NAVADMIN also approved several insig nia and badge additions and changes includ ing standardizing the design and reducing the number of Navy Security Forces Identification badges from eight to three badges: U.S. Navy Security Forces, U.S. Navy Corrections Specialist and U.S. Navy Master-at-Arms. A Strategic Sealift Officer Warfare Insignia (SSOWI) for wear by officers who have suc cessfully completed the qualification require ments will be available May 2013. The United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) identi fication badge is autho rized to be worn by offi cers and enlisted assigned to USCYBERCOM begin ning July 17. Also beginning July 17, the Marine Corps Combatant Diver (MCD) breast insignia is autho rized for wear on Navy uniforms by Sailors that successfully meet all qualification require ments stipulated in MILPERSMAN article 1220-101, (U.S. Marine Corps Marine Combatant Diver Breast Insignia and Designation). Illustrations of the new uniform items and insig nia, as well as instructions on how to submit uniform changes to the Uniform Board, can be found on the Navy Uniform Matters Office website at http:// www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/uni forms/pages/default2. aspx. For complete informa tion on the approved uniform policy changes read NAVADMIN 164/12 at www.npc.navy.mil.DoD To Host Vietnam War Commemoration CeremonyFrom DoDSecretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta will host a ceremony on Monday, May 28, 2012, at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to thank and honor Americas Vietnam Veterans on behalf of a grateful nation. This ceremony will serve as a public kickoff of efforts to partner with communities across the United States. Invited guests include thousands of Vietnam Veterans, their loved ones, Gold Star families and leadership from the military servic es, Cabinet and Congress. There will be a limited viewing area open to the general public. The Memorial Day cer emony marks the begin ning of the national commemoration of the Vietnam Wars 50th anni versary program and is a joint effort between the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, the National Park Service and the Department of Defense. The event will include remarks, a moment of silence, music and ceremonial element sthat will begin at 1 p.m. EDT. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, Secretary of Defense and Senator Chuck Hagel, a Vietnam Veteran, and other dignitaries are scheduled to speak. Due to space limitations, the event is open to a limited number of registered correspon dents with pooled TV and still photographers. Correspondents wanting to cover this event must RSVP by email to PA_ vnwar50th@wso.whs.mil by noon Wednesday, May 23 to receive set instruc tions. Registration will be confirmed by e-mail and badges will be issued at the media check-in desk on Monday, May 28, 2012 at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The DoD Vietnam 50th Anniversary Commemoration Program will partner with other federal agencies, veterans groups, state, local government and non-government organi zations to: erans of the Vietnam War, including personnel who were held as prisoners of war or listed as missing in action, for their service and sacrifice on behalf of the United States and to thank and honor the families of these veterans. the armed forces during the Vietnam War and the contributions of federal agencies and governmental and non-governmental organizations that served with, or in support of, the armed forces. For more information on the Commemoration, please call 877-387-9951 or visit www.vietnam war50th.com. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 19

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Friday, May 25 PRI Productions and The City of Jacksonville Beach are happy to kick off the 11th season of MOONLIGHT MOVIES. The 2012 series runs two consecutive Friday nights this summer: May 25, Men In Black and June 1, Babe the Gallant Pig. Mark your calendar now, and plan to spend these starlit, summer evenings at the Sea Walk Pavilion. Arrive early for the best seats in the house. Shown on a 42-foot wide screen on stage at the Sea Walk Pavilion. Bring your lawn chair or blan ket and a picnic to enjoy before the movie, or visit our food court for movie snacks. You can also dine at one of the many restaurants in the downtown Jacksonville Beach area then catch the movie. Films start at 9 p.m. Admission is free. For more information visit us on Facebook at PRI Productions or www.pri productions.com Saturday, May 26 Have you ever been camping and wondered what that noise was behind you, or what may be watching you from just beyond the fire light? Come see what is creep ing around the Talbot Islands after dark. This program led by a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, June 2 An Eating and Growing Seasonably Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow warm season veg etables. at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost is $10 with pre-registra tion and pre-payment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Thursday, June 7 Fresh and saltwater anglers of all types are encouraged to save the date for the Third Annual GATE Jacksonville Fishing Rodeo benefitting The St. Johns River Alliance scheduled for Thursday, June 7 to Sunday, June 10 at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd. Register at select GATE conve nience stores throughout Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia (Store locations: www.jackson villerodeo.com/rodeo/ tickets) and Strike Zone Fishing, 11702 Beach Blvd. Registration will also be available at the tournament site Thursday, June 7. The general tourna ment entry fee is $40 (plus tax) per angler Jackpot tickets are $375 per boat (king fish plus tax) and $175 per boat (redfish plus tax) plus the general angler fee. The Renaissance World Golf Village Resort is hosting a Day of Discovery on June 7. The Bar at Villagio will feature An Evening with Wade Tower, per forming all the Sinatra classics with Michael Buble mixed in. For more details, please visit www. worldgolfrenaissance. com. Saturday, June 9 The United Methodist Women of Fort Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Road will hold its Yard Sale at the church from 8 a.m.1 p.m. The United Methodist Men of Fort Caroline United Methodist Church, 8510 Ft. Caroline Rd., are cooking up a fish fry 5-7 p.m. Cost is $7. Take out is available. For more information, call 7441311. In conjunction with the Third Annual GATE Jacksonville Fishing Rodeo, Anglers for Conservation, GATE, Coastal Angler Magazine and the Southern Kingfish Association will host a Hook Kids on Fishing event from 9-11 a.m. To be held at Metropolitan Park, kids ages 6 to 16 will participate in clinics on casting, conservation, safety, knot tying, catch and release tactics, and more for free. The first 100 kids to register will win a free rod, reel, and tackle box courtesy of Anglers for Conservation. To reg ister or for more information, call (904) 461-6773. Tuesday, June 12 Come enjoy mak ing Dill Pickles and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center, from 9 a.m. noon or 1 4 p.m. Class space is limited. Cost is $20 per person. Pre-registration and pre payment should be made by Thursday, June 7th. To register call Jeannie at 255-7450. Thursday, June 14 The Duval County Extension Office/UF IFAS will be offering a prep class for people who would like to take the arborist certifica tion test and become a certified Arborist. This four part series will be on June 14, 21, 28, and July 5th. It will be from 5-9 p.m. and cost $50 per person.This course is designed to review some of the important concepts of the Arborist Certification Study Guide. These classes will be held at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville. You can register online at http:www.eventbrite. com/event/3404048601 or make check payable to DCOHAC and mail to Larry Figart, 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl 32254. For questions please call Larry Figart at 904-255-7450. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARPrograms, Activites For Active Duty, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 24, 1-2p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses FFSC room 719 May 24, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC room 702 May 24, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 24, 10-11a.m., Craft Hour (during play group), USO May 29, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting FFSC room 702 May 29, 6-8p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building One Room 104 May 30, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 31, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC room 702 May 31, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.-4p.m., Resume Writing, FFSC TBD The Beaches Veterans Memorial Park Veterans, hosted by VFW Post 3270, will hold a Memorial Day ser vice at the Park May 28 at 2 p.m. The park is located on the North side of Atlantic Blvd and Mayport Road, (under the huge American Flag), Guides will assist in parking. The ceremony will feature Senator Marco Rubios NE Area Director, Adele Griffin, and speaker, Mayor Mike Borno. NS Mayport will also be rep resented. Adding to the ceremony will be the Beaches Honor Guard giving their Rifle Salute and the playing of TAPS to our fallen comrades. Please bring chairs ,or, blankets for your comfort.Veterans Memorial Day Service 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 24, 2012 23 May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. June 1: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tintin (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 1: Mini Biathalon (Swim/Run.) 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. Sign up by May 25. 270-5452 June 1: ABC Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. You can wear aluminum foil, duct tape, boxes, trash bags, wrapping paper, toilet paper or anything! Featuring live band LIFT. Free food, Best in Show contest, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 June 2: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 June 5 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 June 6: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 June 6: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 June 6: Co-Ed Softball Begins. Season ends Aug. 9. 270-5451. June 8: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 June 11: Summer Swim Lesson Session I Begins Registration is June 8-9 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 12: Summer Beach 5K Run/ 3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. June 12: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. June 13: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) MWRMay 24: School Age Care Talent Show. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Activity Center. Advanced sign up required. 270-5680 May 25: Wet Wild Wacky Water Wars. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Beat the heat with water balloon fights, slip n slide challenges and more. 246-0347 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-537 June 1: Outdoor MoviesThe Adventures of Tintin (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 11: Summer Swim Lesson Session I Begins Registration is June 8-9 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 15: Outdoor MoviesWe Bought a Zoo (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 15: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 June 17: Fathers Day Family Bowling Special. Dads bowl for free all day from 1-7 p.m. All other games $2, shoe rental $1, hot dog and fries $2.75. At least one child must accompany dad; bowling must be completed by 7 p.m. 270-5377 June 22: Outdoor MoviesBig Miracle (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 25: Summer Swim Lesson Session II Begins. Registration is June 22-23 at the pool from 8-10 a.m. Cost is $40 per child/adult; $35 if child is enrolled in Youth Summer Camp. 270-5101. June 29: Outdoor MoviesJourney 2: The Mysterious Island (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 30: Freedom Fest 2012 4-11 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, cari cature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 KID The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 24: Beach and Picnic Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. FREE. May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 27: Ichnetucknee Springs Trip. Come tub ing down the river.Van Departs Liberty Center 9 a.m. Cost $10 May 28: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Military Appreciation Game. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. FREE. May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. May 29: Cummer Art Museum Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. FREE May 30: 5 Points Shopping Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. FREE June 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. LIBERTY

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