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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00249


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com NS Mayport Celebrates Heritage-Photo by Paige GnannElectronics Technician First Class Petty Officer (SW) Claude Trouiller is joined by members of Naval Station Mayports Color Guard Electronics Technician 3rd Classes Taylor Wells and Natasha Greene at the village of Mayport Heritage Festival on Saturday during the blessing of the fleet as Mayport ferry Jean Ribault is blessed. The festival celebrated 450 years since Florida was first visited by French explorer Jean Ribault. Ribault discovered Mayport on the first of May, giving the area its name.More Can Do Jobs On Navy ListFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Department of Defense, assign ment policy changes affecting the assignment of Navy women to formerly closed positions will be implemented May 14. The changes will open an addition al 14,325 positions to women across the Department of Defense. Of those positions, the Navy will open 60 medi cal officer, chaplain, chief hospital corpsman and hospital corpsman first class positions for the assignment of women in Marine Corps ground com bat element battalions. The 60 new Navy positions open to the assignment of women include 18 medical officer positions, 19 chaplain officer positions, and 23 chief and petty officer first class hospital corpsman positions. The changes to the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule, announced Feb. 9 in a report to Congress, could not be implemented without a Congressionally-mandated notifica tion period, which has now expired. A second change adopted in the exception addresses former co-loca tion restrictions. When implemented, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the posi tions are required to be co-located with direct ground combat units. However, elimination of the co-location exclu sion has no impact to the Navy, as cur rent policy does not restrict the assign ment of women based on co-location. Currently, 95 percent of Navy billets are open to women. The five percent of closed billets include submarines for enlisted women, and SEALs, Riverine squadrons and Marine Corps support in compliance with direct ground com bat rule. The secretary of defense has said this is the beginning, not the end, of a process, said Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney. The department intends to continue to remove barriers that prevent service members from serving in any capacity in which they qualify. The Navy has always been com mitted to pursuing the elimination of gender-restricted policies where feasi ble while maintaining force readiness, said Lt. Maura Betts, director of the Office of Womens Policy. For more information about women in the Navy, visit www.npc.navy.mil/ AboutUs/BUPERS/WomensPolicy/.DoD Assignment Policy Changes Open New Billets For Navy Women NS Mayport Gets GreenerThe Mirror editorRevving up energy conser vation efforts at Naval Station Mayport has Sailors seeing green with all the money they are saving. Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuel) 1st Class(AW/SW) Joseph Smith and Personnel Specialist 1st Class Larry Garvin of Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CHSMWL) are saving their command at least $10,000 a month in energy costs just by turning off a machines when not in use. The duo act as the Building Energy Managers (BEM) for Building 1555, which hous es CHSMWL and FRCSE. By coordinating efforts with FRCSE and turning off inactive machines the commands energy price tag dropped by almost 30 percent since October and earned them Navy Achievement Medals from Mayport. They also joined NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane and CHSMWL Commodore, Capt. Doug TenHoopen, for the planting of a new ligus trum outside of Building 460 in honor of Earth Day. Its about getting away from this corporate mental ity that its other peoples money, said TenHoopen. Its about changing behav iors and moving towards the attitude of [conservation.] In support of conserva tion and responsibility, most commands have designated BEMs in charge of conserva tion efforts for their build ings, said Lt. Jason Boatright from Public Works Mayport. Public Works was able to recognize those efforts dur ing an Earth Day luncheon following the planting on -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, second from right, and Capt. Doug TenHoopen, Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CHSMWL), are joined by Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuel) 1st Class(AW/SW) Joseph Smith, far left, and Personnel Specialist 1st Class Larry Garvin in planting a new ligustrum outside of Building 460. The Sailors are the building energy managers for CHSMWL. Their efforts to conserve energy have resulted in their command saving $10,000 a month. The ligustrum was donated by Kira.After 25 Years NS Mayport Still RemembersFrom StaffA ceremony of remem brance, along with a Meet and Greet CPO Steak Night and USS Stark Memorial Dinner will mark the 25th anniver sary of the attack on USS Stark (FFG 31) that cost 37 Sailors their lives. Each year, NS Mayport hosts a memorial ceremo ny on May 17 at Mayports Memorial Park. The cer emony will be at 10 a.m. and guest speaker for this years event is Rear Adm. David M. Thomas Jr., Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic. Preceding the event, HSL-60 CPO Mess is hosting an all-hands Steak Night at the CPO Club on May 15 from 4-7 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door and can be purchased from the CPO Club are by calling 716-1465. COMDESRON 14 CPO Mess is also sponsoring a 25th anniversary memo rial dinner on May 16 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Tickets are $35 for adult and $17.50 for kids 12-18 and $8.75 for chil dren 11 and under. Call Ocean Breeze Conference Center at 270-5313 for tickets. Special commemora tive USS Stark coins may also be purchased from Jeff Lawrence for $10. Proceeds benefit the Stark memorial. On May 17, 1987, while on patrol in the Arabian Gulf, 37 Sailors died when two Iraqi missiles struck USS Stark. Despite the severe damage inflict ed, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Stark was decom missioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to pre serve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Several members of the 1987 crew of Stark will attend the service. The service will feature accounts of some of the events that occurred fol lowing the attack, both aboard ship and here in Mayport, from crew and volunteers who worked to provide information and support services to the families of crew members. Mayports Memorial Park was established Aug. 1, 1987, with the dedica tion of the Stark monu ment. Thomas, a native of Norfolk, graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1981 and is a distinguished graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Assignments at sea included USS Shreveport (LPD 12) as main propul sion assistant and navigator; engineer officer in USS Estocin (FFG 15) and USS Willamette (AO 180); flag lieutenant to commander, 2nd Fleet; executive officer in USS See Earth Day, Page 8 See Stark, Page 8

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Once again I want to congratulate our Sailors of the Quarter, Second Quarter FY 12. As always, competition was espe cially keen during this quarter and each department can be justifiably proud of their candidates. I am incredibly proud of each and every nominee. I am in AWE of your accomplishments as we support the warfighting arm of the Fleet, and continue to grow leaders. Well done to SSOQ MA1 Michael Barthelemy, SOQ MA2 Zachary Mullin, JSOQ ET3 Stacy Hofve and BJOQ MASN Stepanie Ferrara. Huge drug bust last week and our own HSL-60 was all over it! The frigate USS ELROD (FFG 55) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team recovered 89 bales of cocaine in support of Operation MARTILLO. HSL 60 Det. 3 embarked on USS Elrod, responded after receiving a transmission from a P-3 operated by U.S. Customs Border Protection. Elrod joined in pursuit, along with authorities from Panama, as two 40-foot twin-engine vessels tried to evade authorities in the waters of the Western Caribbean, resulting in the drugs being subsequently jettisoned into the sea. The Navy-Coast Guard response team recovered 89 bales of cocaine, weighing 4,840 pounds, worth an estimated value of more than $362 million. Operation MARTILLO (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military partici pation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force-South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Well done to everyone involved...! Last column I wrote about signing the proclamation declaring April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month at Naval Station Mayport and Navy-wide. This is a problem we need to tackle togeth er. I cannot stress enough that we need to combat sexual assault in the Navy. It goes against our very core values and ethos. Never should our brothers and sisters at arms fear each other. This is not just an April awareness...its a 24-7 awareness that we need to keep on the forefront. It is up to all of us to step in when we see a shipmate threaten ing another. It is up to all of us to create a climate that does not tolerate these types of crimes. NS Mayport has a sexual assault hotline that is open 24/7 and is completely confidential. Call 358-7273 to talk with trained staff if you have been assaulted or know of someone who has. Today we say so long to USCGC tall ship Eagle, the only active commis sioned sailing vessel in the U.S. Maritime services. Huge thanks to the crew for hosting local school tours and best of luck. It is truly a remarkable ship and we certainly enjoyed having them in port. This week, we are pleased to welcome the crew of ARC Gloria, a tall ship and official flagship of the Columbian Navy. Changes affecting the assignment of Navy women are coming. The Department of Defense, assign ment policy changes affecting the assignment of Navy women to formerly closed positions will be implemented May 14. The changes will open an additional 14,325 positions to women across the Department of Defense. Of those posi tions, the Navy will open 60 medical offi cer, chaplain, chief hospital corpsman and hospital corpsman first class posi tions for the assignment of women in Marine Corps ground combat element battalions. The 60 new Navy positions open to the assignment of women include 18 medi cal officer positions, 19 chaplain officer positions, and 23 chief and petty officer first class hospital corpsman positions. The changes to the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule, announced Feb. 9 in a report to Congress, could not be implemented without a Congressionallymandated notification period, which has now expired. A second change adopted in the exception addresses former co-loca tion restrictions. When implemented, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-located with direct ground combat units. However, elimi nation of the co-location exclusion has no impact to the Navy, as current pol icy does not restrict the assignment of women based on co-location. Currently, 95 percent of Navy billets are open to women. The five percent of closed billets include submarines for enlisted women, and SEALs, Riverine squadrons and Marine Corps support in compliance with direct ground combat rule. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates, and special thanks for those who gave the gift of life last week during our blood drive. Also, although we came in third, every one who turned out for the sports chal lenge had a ball this year. Congrats to our Coast Guard counterparts who took first place, and HSL-48 took home second. Watch out for next year....we are taking all! Be safe, and keep sending those sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy. mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSNote from the author: This article is a repeat of what I have previously written in The Mirror. Last year, I got an email from a grandparent urging me to print it earlier since once the gift is purchased, it may have to be mailed to another locale. So this year I am printing it earlier than I usually do. Hope it helps those who need to get a gift in the mail or to just decide what to buy for a local graduate. Judy Need gift ideas for a graduat ing senior? Here are some ideas to help you select the best grad uation gift for a son or daughter, a nephew or niece, or a family favorite. Notebook computer. A new computer is a great gift for a col lege-going graduate. The note book offers more convenience, allowing the student to take it to lectures to type notes, to group meetings around campus, or to work on papers or projects if he has a little downtime between classes. If you have some extra money in the gift-giving budget, be sure to include an air card. If money is tight, the desk-top computer is the next best thing. Iphone. Iphones are now pretty standard for keeping up with life. They also have a fab ulous camera which is always with the student. Camera. Cameras are used now for so much more than remembering all the good times at college or starting a new job or joining the military. Learning to use a camera on a new job or in college adds skills which can lead to a promotion or additional skills on a resume. See Iphone above. Money. The most popular high school graduation gift is money. As long as you dont care how it gets spent, feel free to write a check and include it in a graduation card. It may not seem very heartfelt to you, but it is usually the most appreciated gift of graduates whether they are going away to college, stay ing home for college or work, or joining the military. Gift cards. If you worry that your graduate may not make the best financial decisions, you may want to give gift cards instead of cash or a check. Gift cards can range from gas cards to grocery store gift cards to pre paid cell phone cards. These are great gifts because you know that the necessary expenses will be taken care of for the first few months out on their own. The prepaid cell phone card also insures a call home when the money has run out. Housing decorations. Helping furnish a dorm room or apartment as a graduation gift will help save money on the actual move. If you are plan ning to purchase an item for the dorm room or apartment, check first with the graduate to make sure it hasnt already been pur chased and that it is allowed in the housing regulations. Small appliances, a bookcase, a bulle tin board, or even a good read ing light are really needed in either a dorm room or an apart ment. Gift basket. Since most grad uates are on a tight budget, put together a basket of small items that can help get through that first costly month buying new clothes, books, required sup plies, etc. Include items such as laundry detergent, dryer sheets, shampoo/conditioner, body wash, toothpaste, disposable razors, lotion, etc. If you think of anything else that would be beneficial for a graduate to have, dont be afraid to buy it. The graduate will appreciate anything that you give him. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Gift Ideas For Your High School GraduateJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThere is certainly a lot of advice out there for strengthening marriag es. There is not as much good information about how to prepare yourself to find true love. Whether you are in a relationship now and want to strength en it, or you are seeking to develop a meaning ful relationship in the future, what you do now is key to developing love. Here are a few things you can do for yourself now to improve your future relationships, even if you dont know who it will be with yet. BE HAPPY WITH YOURSELF. Many people think that self-esteem comes from having some body to love them. That isnt really self-esteem. By nature, self-esteem cannot be attached to somebody else. However, many people get involved in relationships because they believe they need it to be happy. As long as you need a relationship and feel like you cant live a good happy life with out it, you wont be able to be happy with it either. People who are desper ate to find somebody to be with often make poor decisions about who they pursue, and may pretend to be something they are not to impress that per son. If they cant love you for who you really are, then it isnt love anyway. UNDERSTAND WHAT LOVE REALLY IS. Movies portray love as some incomprehensible and irresistible force of fate that imposes itself on our will. We are led to believe that we cannot control love, but that it controls us. Once we have fall en in love we are often completely consumed by it, to our joy if the love is reciprocated, or to our misery if it is not. This is not love but infatuation. This belief will destroy your relationships faster than just about anything because it implies that you are powerless in the love relationship. The truth is that love is a choice that must be made every day. The responsi bility for love lies squarely on your shoulders. True love comes from hard work and sacrifice. Even if there is such thing as love at first sight (which I doubt), it is nothing in comparison to love after years of sacrifice and ser vice to each other. CHOOSE WHO YOU ARE ATTRACTED TO. If love is a choice, then you can begin now to train yourself to be attracted to the kind of people that you can really love and respect. Sometimes peo ple get in relationships with a person they would never consider marry ing because it is exciting or they are attracted to them. But it doesnt work out the way they expect. Infatuation will overcome reason. In they end they have trained themselves to be attracted to the type of people who they knew wouldnt be good to marry. Mentally program yourself to be attracted to goodness, integrity, and the types of attributes that are most likely to lead to a happy family life. BECOME THE TYPE OF PERSON YOU WOULD WANT TO LOVE. Many people say that opposites attract. While that may be true sometimes on a superficial level, people are attracted on a deeper level to those who hold the same values. For example, women who focus on their appear ance and being sexually attractive will attract and be attracted to the kind of men who seek above all else for a sexy woman. Thus their relationship will be based on that type of physical attraction. Those who place high value on spirituality will be more attracted to those Preparing For True Love Includes Developing YourselfLt. Justin Top Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSSee Chaplain, Page 3

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with the same values. If you are going to bars and clubs to find a relation ship you are more likely to build a relationship on that lifestyle because you and the person you find place more value in it. So, if you have a history of attracting to wrong kind of people, take a look at yourself and ask why. If you want to attract some body who is affection ate, thoughtful, spiritual, intelligent, hardworking, etc. you should seek to develop those character istics within yourself, and go to the places where people share those values.From Page 2ChaplainNavy Celebrates Asian-Pac American Heritage Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy is joining the nation in celebrat ing Asian and Pacific American Heritage Month throughout the month of May as announced NAVADMIN 127/12. Navy commands are encouraged to reflect on the national 2012 theme, Striving for Excellence in Leadership, Diversity, and Inclusion to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contri butions Asians and Pacific Americans have made both to American history and to the Navy. In 1977, then-President Jimmy Carter established the first official Asian and Pacific American Heritage Week during the first 10 days of May. The month of May was chosen to both commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese people to the United States May 7, 1843, and mark the anniversary of the completion of the first transcontinental rail road May 10, 1869. The majority of the individuals who laid the tracks on the first transcontinental rail road were Chinese immi grants. Twelve years later, then-President George H.W. Bush extended the observance through out the entire month of May. In 1992, the month long celebration was officially signed into law and named Asian and Pacific American Heritage Month. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have persevered and flour ished, achieving suc cess in every sector of American life, noted President Barack Obama in his 2010 Presidential Proclamation. They stood shoulder to shoul der with their fellow citi zens during the civil rights movement; they have served proudly in our Armed Forces; and they have prospered as lead ers in business, academia, and public service. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the con tributions of Asian and Pacific Americans to our Navy and nation by cel ebrating Asian and Pacific American Heritage Month through programs, exhib its, publications, and par ticipation in military and community events. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute provides print able posters, presenta tions and educational facts on their website, http://www.deomi.org/ under the section Special Observances. For more information about the history of Asian Americans and their numerous contributions to the Navy, visit http:// www.history.navy.mil/ special%20highlights/ asian/asian-index.htm. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity/.No Zebras Stresses Bystander Intervention NS Mayport Public AffairsThe author of No More Fear visited Naval Station Mayport April 26 and tenant commands to hold bystander interven tion training to Sailors and raise awareness about sexual assault during the Navys Sexual Assault and Awareness Month (SAAM). Steve Thompson gave his No Zebras, No Excuses pre sentation at Ocean Breeze Community Center. The pre sentation is nicknamed No Zebras since Thompson com pares lions to zebras when pointing out the need for inter vention from bystanders. This bystander intervention is a way of reducing poor decisions that can lead to a sexual assault inci dent. This unique training brief is about the realities of sexual aggression. Its main focus is on decreasing bystander mental ity and empowering Sailors to stand up and help keep others safe. According to Thompson, there are three major goals with bystander intervention: raise the awareness of Sailors about behaviors that lead to abuse; challenging Sailors to play an active role in reducing sexual violence and from being pas sive bystanders; and empower ing Navy leaders to mentor and educate their peers and Sailors. Thompson, who also wrote Date/Acquaintance Rape: The Crime and Criminal Profile, described how a lion (an assail ant) single out and target a lone zebra (sexual assault victim). The lion will follow and trail the zebra herd waiting for one zebra to find itself alone. When the zebras become separated from the group they can be coerced away; for humans alcohol or drugs can lure the victim from their friends and end in a sexually assault. Thompson presented his No Zebras training more than 1,200 Sailors and DoD civilian staff. In his message to increase awareness, he also divulged how he came to teaching Sexual Assault and Intervention. In the early 1970s he taught self defense classes to women. He talked about an incident where one of his Martial Arts students was assaulted and how the student felt as she had let him down. Thompson said that this is when he realized that educa tion, awareness and interven tion are the best way to combat sexual assault. It takes discipline and cour age to not be a zebra, said Thompson. This is not just a womens issue, it is everyones. I want Sailors to react and do something. This presentation and training that Mr. Thompson brought here is effective and it is structured for the intended audience. His experience as an investigator coupled with his experience with victims of sexual assault clearly enhanced his ability in delivering his mes sage and creating awareness to this issue. If one person inter venes, then it will be a success, said Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Naval Station Mayports executive officer. The month of April is the Navys Sexual Assault and Awareness and Child Abuse month. The training culminated a month long effort in raising awareness educating on sexual assault. -Photo by MC1(EXW/AW) William TownsendThe author of No More Fear visited Naval Station Mayport and ten ant commands to give a presentation on bystander intervention train ing to Sailors raising awareness about sexual assault during the Navys Sexual Assault and Awareness Month (SAAM) on April 26. Steve Thompson is a sex crimes profiler who specializes in sexual assault, harassment and stalking. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Coast Guard Takes On Challenge Wins From StaffU.S. Coast Guard came out to win the 2012 MWR Spring Sports Challenge for the first time and did just that. The team kicked it into high gear on the last day to defeat 16 other commands. The other commands didnt make it easy for U.S. Coast, the team placed first with only 1050 points, followed closely by HSL-48 with 975 points and NavSta Mayport in third with 825 points. Competing over four days, April 24-27, this seasons Sports Challenge includ ed the new event Laser Tag. The first day opened with a win for CHSMWL in the CO/CMC Canoe Race. HSL-60 won the Experienced Canoe Race and Coast Guard brought home the first of many wins with kickball. Bowling went to FRCSE. On day two, Naval Station Mayport brought home a win with 3 on 3 Basketball and 8-Ball See Challenge, Page 5 -Photos by Paige GnannU.S. Coast Guard powers over NavSta Mayports team during the 2012 MWR Spring Sports Challenge, held last week. Coast Guard would go on to win the entire Challenge. NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, presents first place trophy to U.S. Coast Guard for their win in the 2012 MWR Spring Sports Challenge. Cochrane presents a MVP plaque to Chief Logistics Specialist Jaime Ibarra for his par ticipation, spirit and support in this years Challenge. DESRON 14 CMDCM Dion Beauchamp tips his hat as his canoe is towed back to shore after tipping over during the CO/CMC Canoe Race. Capt. Doug TenHoopen and CMDCM Les Hatfield of CHSMWL hold up the trophy after winning this year CO/ CMC Canoe Race. A Sailor from NBHC plays aggressive and catches a competitors ball during Dodgeball. Teams peddle hard around the course in front of the Beachside Community Center to take the Auto Racing competi tion. Master Chief Boatswains Mate Joe Pancari of U.S. Coast Guard hits hard to his opponent in Tennis. Commands try to rack up points to be the winner in the Ping Pong competition. A diver starts the next lap during the Swim Relay.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 5 Pool, Coast Guard got its next win inTennis. FLC won cricket darts and NBHC got the most hits to win Laser Tag. HSM 40 started off day three with a win at Swim Relay. Coast Guard picked up another win on with 3v3 Soccer. Naval Station Mayport won Dodgeball and FRCSE won Golf. The last day of com petition would see Coast Guard through with a win in Tug o War, Ping Pong and Volleyball. HSL-48 pulled out a win in Corn Hole, and HSM-40 sped into first in Auto Racing. Chief Logistics Specialist Jaime Ibarra of Fleet Logistics Command was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. The Corn Hole competition draws a crowd as the popular tailgating game goes to HSL48. All net as a team wins points, but NavSta Mayport brought home the win for the event. Commands try to see who has the best wrist action during a game of Cricket Darts, held at Mayport Bowl. FLC won the event. Tables were full for the 8-Ball challenge at Mayport Bowl. NavSta won the event. SWOS goes up against NavSta in Laser Tag in the field at Sea Otter Pavilion. This is the first time Laser Tag was added to the Sports Challenge roster. FLC team takes cover behind an upturned table during Laser Tag. A Chief Petty Officer from NBHC uses his head to make a shot as the command takes on U.S. Coast Guard in 3v3 Soccer. HSL-60 pushes hard to round bouys during the Experienced Canoe Race held on Day One of the Sports Challenge competition. SWOS Sailors push their team to pull harder during the Tug o War competition. Coast Guard would end up winning the event. HSL-48 pulls hard to try and overcome Coast Guard for a win during Tug o War.From Page 4Challenge

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May 5: Ole! Run For the Border. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Latin Fusion band Conklave, free food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 May 5: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 8: Armed Forces 10K Run/ 5K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. May 8: Captains Cup Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. May 9: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) May 9: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 May 9: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 May 9: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 2705126 x3115 May 11: Mountain Bike Trail Race (Time Trial). 11 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by May 8. 270-5451 May 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 12: 2012 Mayport Music Fest. 6:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Switchfoot, Fuel & Natalie Stovall. Admission opens at 5 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 May 12: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Full hours begin Monday, Jun. 9. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 May 13: Mothers Day Family Bowling Special. Moms bowl for free all day, including family fun bowl. At least one child must accompany mom; bowling must be complet ed by 7 pm. 270-5377 May 13: Mothers Day Bingo and Buffet. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards,Mother of the Year drawing, 25 players will spin our Prize Wheel for prizes and compli mentary food! Special drawing for 46 Flat Screen TV plus surprises for all Moms!!! 270-7204 May 18: White T-Shirt Graffiti Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Grab a sharpie and get to writ ing! Make new friends, network or maybe meet that special someone. T-shirts will be provid ed. Featuring live band Cupids Alley plus free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by MWR A-Team. For tickets, call (904) 270-5228. May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 3: Motherload of Comedy. Chris Killian & Richie Holliday. Van Departs Liberty Center 6 p.m. FREE. May 4: Rock Climbing. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Cost $15. May 5: World of Nations Celebration Come see the world with us! Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. Cost $5. May 6: Fernadina Beach. Van departs 10 a.m. Transportation only. FREE May 11: San Marco Theatre Dinner and The Avengers. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $9. May 14: Black Jack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 15: Johnny Angels Dinner Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation Only. May 18: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. FREE. May 18: White T-Shirt Graffiti Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Grab a sharpie and get to writ ing! Make new friends, network or maybe meet that special someone. T-shirts will be provid ed. Featuring live band Cupids Alley plus free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 19-20: Daytona Beach Weekend. Come enjoy fun in the sun at the beach. Van departs 9 a.m. Sign-up deadline May 15. Cost $60; cost includes transportation & hotel. May 21: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. May 22: Ice Skating. Van departs 6:30 p.m. Cost $5 May 23: Black Jack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 24: Beach and Picnic Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. FREE. May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 27: Ichnetucknee Springs Trip. Come tub ing down the river.Van Departs Liberty Center 9 a.m. Cost $10 May 28: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Military Appreciation Game. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. FREE. May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. May 29: Cummer Art Museum Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. FREE May 30: 5 Points Shopping Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. FREE LIBERTY 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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May 4: Food Roulette. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Do you have the guts? Test your limits and your stomach with our wacky & wild food wheel. 246-0347 May 11: Twilight Zone Party. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Your about to enter a dimension; a dimension full crazy chal lenges and wacky games. 246-0347 May 12: 2012 Mayport Music Fest. 6:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Switchfoot, Fuel & Natalie Stovall. Admission opens at 5 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 May 12: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Full hours begin Monday, Jun. 9. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 May 13: Mothers Day Family Bowling Special. Moms bowl for free all day, including family fun bowl. At least one child must accompany mom; bowling must be complet ed by 7 pm. 270-5377 May 18: Movie Night Punch & Munch. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. We provide the food and drinks, you sit back and enjoy the film. 246-0347 May 18: Freedom FridayFiesta. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space per mitting. 270-5680 May 19: Teen TripSaturday Night Cosmic Skate. Jacksonville Indoor Sports & Ice Complex 8-10 pm. Meet up at 6:30 p.m. at the Teen Center; return by 11 pm Permission slip required. Ages 13-17; cost $5. Bring your own money for the concession stand. 2460347 May 24: School Age Care Talent Show. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Activity Center. Advanced sign up required. 270-5680 May 25: Wet Wild Wacky Water Wars. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Beat the heat with water balloon fights, slip n slide challenges and more. 2460347 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes. KID CDC Celebrates Anniversary-Photo by MC1(EXW/AW) William TownsendLonnie Kenney presents Dorothy Herndon her 21 year retirement certificate on Apr. 26. Dorothy Herndon retires from civil service one year after the opening of Naval Station Mayports off base Child development Center. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 7

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April 25, along with BEM training. At the luncheon Public Works Officer, Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez discussed the current energy con sumption of the base and how well it is meeting Navy energy goals. Added and replaced meters on the buildings, along with inspections and a change in behavior has put the command on the right track. The biggest thing we are fighting right now is the behavior, said Boatright. People are so used to just coming in and turning on a light and thinking it is just free energy and its not. The money we spend on ener gy, we could buy fuel for the ships or bullets for the guys on the ground. Some of the biggest energy consumers are also some of the big gest energy savers and were recognized for their efforts during the lun cheon. SERMC, Navy Exchange and MWR have been working hard to reduce their energy footprint, saving about $100,000 combined. The Department of the Navy tradition ally supports the obser vance of [Earth Day] to raise awareness among command elements and promote conservation efforts, said Cochrane. An added benefit from conservation and green technology is the ability to operate more efficiently at a reduced cost to the taxpayer and a reduction on dependence of foreign imports which in turn enhances energy security and increases capability to support the deployable units.From Page 1Earth DayLeyte Gulf (CG 55); com mand of USS Ross (DDG 71); and command of Destroyer Squadron 26. Ashore, Thomas served in the Surface Warfare Junior Officer Assignment Branch of the Bureau of Naval Personnel; in the Personnel Plans and Policy Division of the Joint Staff; as flag sec retary to commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; on the staff of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations as executive officer to the director of the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review and executive assistant to the director of Operations, Plans, and Policy (N3/N5); and as chief of staff to command er, 2nd Fleet. Upon selection for flag officer, Thomas has served as the deputy chief of staff for Global Force Management and Joint Operations on the staff of commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command; and commander, Joint Task Force, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; commander, Carrier Strike Group Two; and his current assign ment as commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic.From Page 1StarkUSCG Cutter Barque Eagle Moors At Mayport Navy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastLocal Jacksonville residents were given the opportunity to embark the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Barque Eagle (WIX-321) as she transits to Naval Station Mayport April 27 for a port visit. The Eagle, the largest tall ship flying the Stars and Stripes, arrived at Naval Station Mayport with her minimum active duty crew of 56 Coast Guardsmen. Coast Guard Sector Commander for Jacksonville, Capt. Andy Blomme, explained Eagles primary mission to the fleet. The coast guard cutter Eagle is our tall ship weve had since 1946 and we got it as a war prize following World War II, said Blomme. We do all of our summer sail training with our cadets and officer candidates aboard here because it does such a great job of teaching team work and binding people together like few other training experiences could. Eagles primary mission is training for cadets and officer candidates. However, the Coast Guard accommodates requests for a limited number of port vis its each year, when these do not interfere with the cutters pri mary training mission. Although above deck Eagle is a three mast sailing ship, she still has all the same fittings below deck as any other U.S. Navy combatant ship has and her crew still needs to perform and train just the same as any Navy Sailor would. The crew of the Eagle has to be trained to current fleet stan dards every year, said the com manding officer of Eagle, Capt. Eric Jones. To get the crew ready to train officer candidates they go through the Navys Afloat Training Group drills of damage control, fire fighting, engineering, casualty, naviga tion and seamanship drills. Weve had a team from the ATG on board since New Orleans. Eagle just finished Navy Week New Orleans in conjunction with the War of 1812 bicentennial celebration and is in the middle of Operation Sail 2012. One local Jacksonville resident who embarked on Eagle men tioned how she appreciated the crew visiting the area during her busy schedule. Im absolutely amazed, I think the ship is beautiful, said Katie Ross, regional direc tor office of U.S. Senator Bill Nelson. I am so intrigued by its history and whats shes used for today and were having a great time. Most of the ships tourists were surprised to learn that Eagle began its existence as the Horst Wessel in the German Navy in 1936. Both Adolf Hitler and his deputy of the Nazi Party, Rudolph Hess, were pres ent at the launch and christen ing. At the end of World War II Horst Wessel was taken by the United States and was commis sioned into the United States Coast Guard as the Coast Guard cutter Eagle on May 15, 1946. After Jacksonville, she will head to Savannah, Ga., to pick up cadets for Fleet Week New York City. -Photo by MC2 Class Gary Granger Jr.Local Jacksonville residents prepare to board the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Barque Eagle (WIX-321) before she arrives at Naval Station Mayport. Eagle is used as a training cutter for future officers in the USCG and is one of two active sailing vessels in American military service. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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Roosevelt Awarded Yellow E for SafetyUSS Roosevelt Public Affairs For the third consecu tive year, USS Roosevelt was awarded the TYCOM Ship Safety Excellence Award, also known as the Yellow E. This award recognized Roosevelt for excellence in the maintenance and execution of afloat safety, occupational health related programs and initiatives, and Operational Risk Management (ORM). During the 2011 award period, Roosevelt completed a seven-month independent deployment in support of Commander, Sixth Fleet with objectives in the CENTCOM and AFRICOM areas of respon sibility. The deployment included 205 days underway of 213 days away from the con tinental United States, includ ing a period of 113 consecutive days underway. The mission included 19 replenishments at sea, 16 special sea and anchor details, 11 small arms and crew served weapons shoots, and a swim call in the Indian Ocean, all with zero safety mishaps. The success of these evolutions can be contributed to proper planning with continuous emphasis on training, supervision, safety briefs, personal pro tective equipment, adequate rest, and proper communica tion. Roosevelts excellent safety programs contributed to the ships success, and are each run as collateral duties of crew members from different divi sions throughout the ship. Roosevelts independent duty corpsman, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Jessica Shores, plays a large role in the safety pro gram, successfully managing not only all of medical, but sev eral of the Navy Occupational Heath programs, including heat stress, hearing conservation, sight conservation, and asbes tos protection. Ensign Russel Rawls and Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Blake Sattler lead the respiratory protection program that provided a safe breathing environment for the crews preservation work throughout deployment. Ensign David Ingraham, Chief Electricians Mate Yaphet Whitehead, and Electricians Mate 1st Class Alan Terry are the leadership to the electrical safety and Taggout program and Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class Sarah Jackson manages the Web Enabled Safety System that provides online documentation of any safety issues or mishaps. Other factors in Roosevelts success are the safety stand downs that were conducted at key points of the deployment that re-emphasized safety. Although the crew worked hard the entire deployment, there was a little bit of time for play. Information Systems Technician 1st Class Thomas Brume, Electronics Technician 1st Class Kelly Gneiting, and Cryptologic Technician Collection 1st Class Jimmy Fredrickson gave Roosevelt training on recreation safety in the ships gym explaining how to stay safe on the beaches in Seychelles, climbing a moun tain in Mauritius, or snow boarding on leave when every one returned home. Taking the lead on Home safety, Damage Controlman 1st Class Edward Deleon could often be heard saying, This is stuff that we should all take seriously, especially if we want to protect our loved one. Along with Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Blake Sattler and Machinery Repairman 2nd Class Charles Baylis they stressed the importance of electrical safety at home, fire safety, and cooking meals after returning home. After a long deployment, driving safety pointed out critical statistics and emphasized the dangers of drinking and driving, texting while driving, fatigue, motor cycle safety, and basic traffic awareness. Operations Specialist 2nd Class Desirae Molina, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Jonathan Branch, and Gas Turbine System Technician 2nd Class Frank Davis staged the port helicopter hanger with a large display of what could happen when you dont pay atten tion and led a discussion with each division throughout the day to ensure the entire crew made good choices when they returned home. Just prior to returning home, Logistics Specialist 1st Class Yahaira Bolding, Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Volha Laurentsik, Ships Serviceman 1st Class Isaac Smith conducted a presenta tion on holiday safety and the importance of staying healthy during the holiday period. Safety has been at the fore front of all critical evolutions on board Roosevelt as Roosevelt Sailors continue to accomplish the ships mission of achiev ing and maintaining a level of readiness that will enable them to excel at any assigned task. Roosevelt strives to meet and exceed all standards. In recognition of their achievement, Roosevelt dis plays the Yellow E with two stripes on each of their bridge wings. Roosevelt is assigned to Destroyer Squadron Fourteen and is homeported in Mayport, Florida. Learning To React-Photos by Ensign Aaron SchwarzAbove, Seaman Mark Cruz receives a dose of oleoresin capsicum (OC) resin spray from Chief Master-at-Arms(SW) Danny Moreaux during ships reaction force bravo (SRFB) graduation course. Right, Cruz is taken off to a decontamination station among applause from his shipmates after he submits an opponent in a red man protective suit, completing his SRF-B course. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 9

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SERMC Sailors Develop Critical In-Rate Skills With NAMTS ProgramBy Southeast Regional Mainte nance Center (SERMC) Public AffairsNew Sailors enrolled in the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) pro gram on March 29 at the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) and are devel oping in-rate skills while becoming self-sufficient in shipboard maintenance. Sailors participat ing in the NAMTS pro gram receive hands-on training tied to rate-specific Job Qualification Requirements (JQRs) resulting in either a Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) or a JQR Certificate of Completion. The NAMTS initiative has been implemented at the Regional Maintenance Centers (RMCs) across all waterfronts, and is designed to help pre pare Sailors improve their scores in their rat ing advancement exam, prepare for advancement, and offer career-enhanc ing training, said Capt. Ronald Cook, SERMCs commanding officer. Were very proud of our sailors, and strive to offer them every oppor tunity to develop skill sets that benefit the ships SERMC support, while also providing them with the knowledge, skills and abilities they will need to continue to grow and advance within their rates and in their naval careers, said Cook. During off-duty hours, Rick Smith, a retired machinery repairman and Kurtiss Reinke, a shop master, have volun teered their time to share their tricks of the trade to help SERMCs junior young Sailors. During their mentoring sessions, they have dis cussed various theories, terms, methodologies, and practical applica tions associated with the machinery repairmans rating. Topics include tools and their usage, blueprint reading, preci sion measuring instru ments, and the types of metals with their match ing principles. For math ematics, the mentors described the many for mulas that could be used in the Sailors day-today jobs to solve challenging practical problems. Sailors within each shop at SERMC have demonstrated the skills theyve acquired through their NAMTS training by demonstrating their abili ty to manufacture a proto type fire-pump fan blade, use Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) Technology. Others demonstrated SERMC manufacturing capabilities, including the development of 12 Baxter bolts for a surface com batant Rapid Securing Device (RSD) with 16 RSD roller shafts; fire pump motor shaft; and fire pump motor end bell housing assembly. They also received training on how to review control work packages and formal work packages. Electroplating is yet another SERMC capa bility used to train our Sailors. For example, the Inside Machine Shop has completed train ing in the electroplating process, where SERMC learned about the physi cal properties of nickel, chromium, copper and base metal preparations. As a result, SERMC cer tified seven personnel as Electroplating operators. According to Petty Officer Love, he has learned more here at SERMC in 4 months than he had learned in his eight years working as an independent duty Machinery Repairman (MR). When asked how he felt he had done on his rating exam, he said, I felt more confident and sure of my answers, because of NAMTS train ing he had received. As our Sailors strive for excellence at SERMC, we are making a million dol lar work shop into a mil lion dollar training class room, said Cook. The increase in man ufacturing capabilities, coupled with new tech nologies, have reduced production cost by 10 per cent, and reduced manufacturing time by 15 per cent. Other fleet machin ists have also been invited to NAMTS train ing, and have gained valu able knowledge enabling SERMC to produce more skilled machinists ready for the Fleet, said Cook. For more information about Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC), visit: http:// www.navsea.navy.mil/ CNRMC/SERMC/default. aspx -Photos courtesy of SERMCSERMC Sailors are shown how to select the proper tap and drill sizes for various straight and taper threads. healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com/vfw 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe frigate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team recovered 89 bales of cocaine in support of Operation MARTILLO on April 20. A SH-60B Sea Hawk of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60 Det. 3 embarked on USS Elrod responded after receiving a transmission from a P-3 oper ated by U.S. Customs Border Protection. Elrod joined in pursuit, along with authorities from Panama, as two 40-foot twin-engine ves sels tried to evade authorities in the waters of the Western Caribbean, resulting in the drugs being subsequently jet tisoned into the sea. The Navy-Coast Guard response team recovered 89 bales of cocaine, weighing 4,840 pounds, worth an estimated value of more than $362 mil lion. I am very proud of the teamwork and collaborative effort between the ship, our air detachment and our USCG Law Enforcement Detachment, said Commander Jack Killman, Commanding Officer of USS Elrod. Our mission is clear; to disrupt illicit trafficking that jeopardizes the safety in the region and ultimately our own national security. This seizure is in addition to the 1,000 lbs. recovered by Elrod on March 22. Operation MARTILLO (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force-South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation MARTILLO is a component of the U.S. governments coordi nated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transnational organized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.HSL-60, Elrod Recover 4,840 lbs. Of Drugs Saving Lives, A Pint At A Time-Photo by MC1(EXW/AW) William TownsendCivilians, military spouses and service members donate blood at Naval Station Mayports Blood Drive on April 24, 2012. -Photo by Paige GnannFORCECM Garry McClure of AIRLANT and FORCECM Jon Port of NPC/ BUPERS talk with Navy Counselors during a tri-base command career counselor training session held at the ATG auditorium last week. The FORCE Master Chiefs touched on the importance of the command career counselor and the responsibility the job entails. Port also said that the sea/shore rotation flow will be impacted for several ratings in t he future to correct an imbalance in the rate manning.Looking To FutureFerguson Guest Speaker At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, which will be held Saturday, 9 June 2012, at the renaissance resort, world golf village. Guest speaker Vice Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mark E. Ferguson III; Veterans of the Battle of Midway, several widows of Midway Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the military have been invited to attend this years dinner. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and former prison ers of war in our area who have heroically answered the call of duty. Come meet these national trea surers and hear their adventures first hand. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. The evening includes fine dining and enter tainment. Uniform will be O4 and above din ner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civil ian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1800, dinner at 1900. Reserved seating. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from Navy League Mayport Bob Price, 904-718-2118 or email bpricex4@com cast.net; or Navy League St. Augustine Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-7947814 or email anuday00@ aol.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 11

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USO Military Appreciation Day At Mayport Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host our 10th Annual Military Appreciation Day at NS Mayport Sea Otter Pavilion on Saturday, May 19, 2012. This is a great FREE family event from noon-4 p.m. There will be free food, music, bounce houses, games and much more, including free admission to pool. Play Group At The Mayport USO Fleet and Family Service Center sponsors a playgroup at the Mayport USO every Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon. May 24 will include a craft hour from 10-11 a.m. as well. For more information please contact Lauren Walton, New Parent Support Program at Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center 904-2706600. Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an indi vidual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or emailing me at herb@jaxsignarama. com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned fran chise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more vet erans you will help. Our mission is to win this con test, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text 4970 to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com No Dough Dinner Looking for a great night with the family? Dont want to cook/clean up? Come to the Mayport USO Center April 30 from 5-7 p.m. They will serve Burgers, Dogs, baked beans, potato salad, chips, desserts and drinks. This dinner is free to active duty service members and their immediate families. Come on out and enjoy food and friends. THANK YOU to Miss America Darling Pageant! 2012 Birdies For Charity Program Your Greater Jax Area USO is once again pleased to be participat ing in the 2012 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique, communitybased fundraising initia tive is held in conjunc tion with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 7-13, 2012. If you visit www.birdies forcharity.playerschampi onship.com, you will have the opportunity to make a donation to Greater Jax Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individ ual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2012 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an addition al $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-break er question will be used to determine the winner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 9. We hope you will take this opportunity to support your Greater Jax Area USO and THE PLAYERS by visiting www.birdies forcharity.playerscham pionship.com. Donations can be made online with a credit card. Or, you may donate via personal check made out to Greater Jax Area USO and mail to: Greater Jax Area USO, P.O. Box 108, NAS Jacksonville, FL 32212-0108. Please annotate Birdies For Charityon your person al check. All donations received via this pro gram go directly to sup port your Greater Jax Area USO. You Could Win A 1948 Pontiac Torpedo! Do you like old antique cars? The American Legion Riders Chapter 283 has proudly offered a 1948 Pontiac Torpedo car in a raffle drawing to be held on June 1 at 8 pm. NAS Jax USO and Mayport USO now have Donation Tickets available for pur chase! The tickets are only $10. Stop by your USO center today! All sales are cash only at the centers or at Post 283. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road USOThe Players Free For Military, FamiliesFrom TPCTHE PLAYERS will con tinue its policy of pro viding free or affordable access to the tournament for men and women of the Armed Services. There are two military ticket pol icies: and Reserve military per sonnel along with their dependents receive com plimentary admission to the tournament all day, every day. Free tickets are available online via a link to TicketMaster from THE PLAYERS website www.PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS; these are print-at-home tickets and military personnel and their dependents will be asked to present the paper ticket AND valid military ID at the gate for free admission. proud to partner with Veterans Advantage to distribute discounted tickets to military vet erans and their fami lies. Available to those carrying the Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card, discounted tick ets can be purchased online through a special link, and then redeemed at the admissions gate with proof of a valid Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card. Visit www.PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS (click on 2012 Tickets) for more information. On site parking is free (for all fans) MondayWednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Once again May 7-13, THE PLAYERS will offer hospitality to active, Reserve and retired mili tary and dependents at the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. The Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, pro vides complimentary food, beverages and inter active activities and is open Wednesday-Sunday. Military ID is required for admittance. USO Centers do not have tickets or sell parking passes, which are available online. Military Veterans Job Fair At The Players Championship Veterans are invited to THE PLAYERS cham pionship on Monday of tournament week for a Job Fair featuring local companies actively hir ing. The Military Job Fair at THE PLAYERS will take place in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways, and will be open to veterans who are seeking employ ment. Admission: all veterans who attend the Job Fair will be admit ted to the grounds free of charge on Monday, May 7th. Parking: free parking in tournament lot off of County Road 210. Attire is casual; bring many copies of your resume to pass out. Participating companies: ACOSTA Sales and Marketing, Bank of America, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida, BAE Systems, The Brumos Companies, Citi, City of Jacksonville, CSX, Deutsche Bank, EverBank, Incepture, Interline Brands, Lockheed Martin, PGA Tour, Prudential, Sea Star Line, Troops to Transportation and Logistics and VyStar. Also onsite will be the following education al institutions; FSCJ, Jacksonville University, UNF and Kaplan College Jacksonville. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 13 FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 2, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Family Readiness Group Leadership Training, Building One Room 1616 May 2, 11a.m. 12p.m., Paying for College FFSC Room 719 May 2, 8:30a.m. 3:30p.m., Stress Management wellness center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be ener gizing and a factor in motivat ing us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This program is designed to provide partici pants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help partici pants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. May 2, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC room 702 May 3, 9a.m. 1p.m., Family Readiness Group Leadership Building One Room 1616 May 3, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 3, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 7, 9-11a.m., What About The Kids? FFSC room 702 Children who witness fam ily violence are often forgot ten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjust ment problems has been found to be associated with exposure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, develop ment and socialization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be cre ating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their chil drens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for ending the vio lence and seeking intervention. May 7-10, 8a.m. 4p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop Building One Room 1616 May 8, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 8, 6-7p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group, Building One Room 104 May 9, 11:30a.m. 12:30p.m., Consumer Awareness FFSC room 719 May 9, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC room 702 May 10, 1:303:30p.m., Troops to Teachers, FFSC TBD May 10, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC room 702 May 10, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 11 (rain date 18), 6:309:30p.m., IA Family Outing Swimming Pool Party NS Swimming Pool May 14, 8:30a.m. 3:30p.m., Anger Management Class FFSC room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of disdain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. May 14-18, 7:30a.m. 5:00p.m., SAPR Advocate Refresher Class, FFSC NAS JAX May 15, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 16, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 17, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 17, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 21, 1-4p.m., Relationship communication FFSC room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new tech niques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to iden tify barriers to effective communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. May 21-24, 8a.m.-4p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 May 22, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 23, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 24, 1-2p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses FFSC room 719 May 24, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 24, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 24, 10-11a.m., Craft Hour (during playgroup), USO May 29, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 29, 6-8p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building One Room 104 May 30, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 31, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 31, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.-4p.m., Resume Writing FFSC TBD Thursday, May 3 Whistle Talks return to the Beaches Museum & History Park with a presentation by Dr. Maarten van de Guchte, executive director of the museum. His talk entitled, The King of Florida and the French in 1562. Dr. van de Guchte will tell the story of the Frenchmen Jean Ribaults arrival to the shores of the St. Johns River 450 years ago and contact with the Native American tribes that inhabited Florida. This episode would have been breaking news in the journalistic and media culture that we live in. Whistle Talks are open to the public. Members of the Beaches Museum are free; all others are $5 per person. A recep tion at 5 p.m. is followed by the talk at 5:30 p.m. The Beaches Museum & History Park is locat ed at 381 Beach Blvd. in Jacksonville Beach. For more information please contact the museum at 904-241-5657 or www. beachesmuseum.org. Saturday, May 5 Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural com munities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Come enjoy making Kiwi Pineapple Orange Jam and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center from 9 a.m.-noon or 14 p.m. Class space is lim ited. Cost is $20 per per son. Pre-registration and prepayment should be made by April 30. To reg ister call Jeannie at 2557450. The University Of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a program on Cinco de Mayo for Mothers Day at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 North McDuff Avenue at 10 a.m. Show your mother how much you care by learning to make a memorable meal. Join us for this family-friendly workshop where you will learn to prepare recipes using healthy ingredients, create table decorations and bake tasty breads and desserts. Children are welcome to attend with mom and dad. All ages are encouraged to par ticipate in this workshop! There is a charge of $10 per person or $15 family of four (2 adults and 2 children). Reservations and pre-payment are nec essary by May 2. Call 2557450 or email sandram@ coj.net to schedule your reservation. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Spring Encampment event on May 5-6 from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m.-noon on Sunday. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costume involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life.For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Monday, May 7 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR -Photo by Paige GnannA jean donation bin sits outside of Fleet and Family Support Centers reception area. Started by NS Mayport Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD), the drive will benefit victims of rape. There are several bins located around the base including Building 1, Chapel, CPO Club, Fleet and Family Support Center, Mini Mart, and Housing Office. BVMP PRVFW 3270 Post Commander, retired Army Lt. Col. Douglas Bagdasarian, announces a Memorial Day service will be held at the Beaches Veterans Memorial Park Memorial Day May 28 at 2 p.m. Located at Atlantic Blvd and Mayport Road, the ceremony will be dedicated to all of Americas fallen heroes, past and present. Guest speaker will be Atlantic Beach Mayor and retired Lt. Cmdr. Mike Borno and will also feature the American Legion Riders and the Beaches Color Guard who will offer the Rifle Salute and Taps to the fallen. The American Legion Auxiliary will provide escorts from the Post 316 parking to the seating area. As you walk to the Stage, please notice the engraved Bricks set in the path way honoring honored loved ones. Chaplain Lt. Col. Marty Pfab will offer the Benediction. A station will be available for those wishing to purchase Bricks, con tribute to the Chaplains Memorial Monument, dedicated to these brave clergy who gave their lives serving our uniformed members in combat, or, purchase Poppies All Patriotic Organizations, their families and friends are invited to attend this ceremony to honor our fallen comrades. Please bring blankets or chairs for seating.Beaches Vets Host Memorial Day Service



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com NS Mayport Celebrates Heritage-Photo by Paige GnannElectronics Technician First Class Petty Officer (SW) Claude Trouiller is joined by members of Naval Station Mayports Color Guard Electronics Technician 3rd Classes Taylor Wells and Natasha Greene at the village of Mayport Heritage Festival on Saturday during the blessing of the fleet as Mayport ferry Jean Ribault is blessed. The festival celebrated 450 years since Florida was first visited by French explorer Jean Ribault. Ribault discovered Mayport on the first of May, giving the area its name.More Can Do Jobs On Navy ListFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Department of Defense, assign ment policy changes affecting the assignment of Navy women to formerly closed positions will be implemented May 14. The changes will open an addition al 14,325 positions to women across the Department of Defense. Of those positions, the Navy will open 60 medical officer, chaplain, chief hospital corpsman and hospital corpsman first class positions for the assignment of women in Marine Corps ground com bat element battalions. The 60 new Navy positions open to the assignment of women include 18 medical officer positions, 19 chaplain officer positions, and 23 chief and petty officer first class hospital corpsman positions. The changes to the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule, announced Feb. 9 in a report to Congress, could not be implemented without a Congressionally-mandated notifica tion period, which has now expired. A second change adopted in the exception addresses former co-loca tion restrictions. When implemented, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the posi tions are required to be co-located with direct ground combat units. However, elimination of the co-location exclu sion has no impact to the Navy, as current policy does not restrict the assignment of women based on co-location. Currently, 95 percent of Navy billets are open to women. The five percent of closed billets include submarines for enlisted women, and SEALs, Riverine squadrons and Marine Corps support in compliance with direct ground combat rule. The secretary of defense has said this is the beginning, not the end, of a process, said Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney. The department intends to continue to remove barriers that prevent service members from serving in any capacity in which they qualify. The Navy has always been com mitted to pursuing the elimination of gender-restricted policies where feasi ble while maintaining force readiness, said Lt. Maura Betts, director of the Office of Womens Policy. For more information about women in the Navy, visit www.npc.navy.mil/ AboutUs/BUPERS/WomensPolicy/.DoD Assignment Policy Changes Open New Billets For Navy Women NS Mayport Gets GreenerThe Mirror editorRevving up energy conser vation efforts at Naval Station Mayport has Sailors seeing green with all the money they are saving. Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuel) 1st Class(AW/SW) Joseph Smith and Personnel Specialist 1st Class Larry Garvin of Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CHSMWL) are saving their command at least $10,000 a month in energy costs just by turning off a machines when not in use. The duo act as the Building Energy Managers (BEM) for Building 1555, which hous es CHSMWL and FRCSE. By coordinating efforts with FRCSE and turning off inactive machines the commands energy price tag dropped by almost 30 percent since October and earned them Navy Achievement Medals from Mayport. They also joined NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane and CHSMWL Commodore, Capt. Doug TenHoopen, for the planting of a new ligus trum outside of Building 460 in honor of Earth Day. Its about getting away from this corporate mental ity that its other peoples money, said TenHoopen. Its about changing behav iors and moving towards the attitude of [conservation.] In support of conserva tion and responsibility, most commands have designated BEMs in charge of conserva tion efforts for their build ings, said Lt. Jason Boatright from Public Works Mayport. Public Works was able to recognize those efforts dur ing an Earth Day luncheon following the planting on -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, second from right, and Capt. Doug TenHoopen, Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CHSMWL), are joined by Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuel) 1st Class(AW/SW) Joseph Smith, far left, and Personnel Specialist 1st Class Larry Garvin in planting a new ligustrum outside of Building 460. The Sailors are the building energy managers for CHSMWL. Their efforts to conserve energy have resulted in their command saving $10,000 a month. The ligustrum was donated by Kira.After 25 Years NS Mayport Still RemembersFrom StaffA ceremony of remem brance, along with a Meet and Greet CPO Steak Night and USS Stark Memorial Dinner will mark the 25th anniver sary of the attack on USS Stark (FFG 31) that cost 37 Sailors their lives. Each year, NS Mayport hosts a memorial ceremony on May 17 at Mayports Memorial Park. The cer emony will be at 10 a.m. and guest speaker for this years event is Rear Adm. David M. Thomas Jr., Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic. Preceding the event, HSL-60 CPO Mess is hosting an all-hands Steak Night at the CPO Club on May 15 from 4-7 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door and can be purchased from the CPO Club are by calling 716-1465. COMDESRON 14 CPO Mess is also sponsoring a 25th anniversary memo rial dinner on May 16 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Tickets are $35 for adult and $17.50 for kids 12-18 and $8.75 for chil dren 11 and under. Call Ocean Breeze Conference Center at 270-5313 for tickets. Special commemora tive USS Stark coins may also be purchased from Jeff Lawrence for $10. Proceeds benefit the Stark memorial. On May 17, 1987, while on patrol in the Arabian Gulf, 37 Sailors died when two Iraqi missiles struck USS Stark. Despite the severe damage inflict ed, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Stark was decom missioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to pre serve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Several members of the 1987 crew of Stark will attend the service. The service will feature accounts of some of the events that occurred fol lowing the attack, both aboard ship and here in Mayport, from crew and volunteers who worked to provide information and support services to the families of crew members. Mayports Memorial Park was established Aug. 1, 1987, with the dedica tion of the Stark monu ment. Thomas, a native of Norfolk, graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1981 and is a distinguished graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Assignments at sea included USS Shreveport (LPD 12) as main propulsion assistant and navigator; engineer officer in USS Estocin (FFG 15) and USS Willamette (AO 180); flag lieutenant to commander, 2nd Fleet; executive officer in USS See Earth Day, Page 8 See Stark, Page 8

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Shipmates, Once again I want to congratulate our Sailors of the Quarter, Second Quarter FY 12. As always, competition was especially keen during this quarter and each department can be justifiably proud of their candidates. I am incredibly proud of each and every nominee. I am in AWE of your accomplishments as we support the warfighting arm of the Fleet, and continue to grow leaders. Well done to SSOQ MA1 Michael Barthelemy, SOQ MA2 Zachary Mullin, JSOQ ET3 Stacy Hofve and BJOQ MASN Stepanie Ferrara. Huge drug bust last week and our own HSL-60 was all over it! The frigate USS ELROD (FFG 55) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team recovered 89 bales of cocaine in support of Operation MARTILLO. HSL 60 Det. 3 embarked on USS Elrod, responded after receiving a transmission from a P-3 operated by U.S. Customs Border Protection. Elrod joined in pursuit, along with authorities from Panama, as two 40-foot twin-engine vessels tried to evade authorities in the waters of the Western Caribbean, resulting in the drugs being subsequently jettisoned into the sea. The Navy-Coast Guard response team recovered 89 bales of cocaine, weighing 4,840 pounds, worth an estimated value of more than $362 million. Operation MARTILLO (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military partici pation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force-South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Well done to everyone involved...! Last column I wrote about signing the proclamation declaring April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month at Naval Station Mayport and Navy-wide. This is a problem we need to tackle togeth er. I cannot stress enough that we need to combat sexual assault in the Navy. It goes against our very core values and ethos. Never should our brothers and sisters at arms fear each other. This is not just an April awareness...its a 24-7 awareness that we need to keep on the forefront. It is up to all of us to step in when we see a shipmate threaten ing another. It is up to all of us to create a climate that does not tolerate these types of crimes. NS Mayport has a sexual assault hotline that is open 24/7 and is completely confidential. Call 358-7273 to talk with trained staff if you have been assaulted or know of someone who has. Today we say so long to USCGC tall ship Eagle, the only active commis sioned sailing vessel in the U.S. Maritime services. Huge thanks to the crew for hosting local school tours and best of luck. It is truly a remarkable ship and we certainly enjoyed having them in port. This week, we are pleased to welcome the crew of ARC Gloria, a tall ship and official flagship of the Columbian Navy. Changes affecting the assignment of Navy women are coming. The Department of Defense, assign ment policy changes affecting the assignment of Navy women to formerly closed positions will be implemented May 14. The changes will open an additional 14,325 positions to women across the Department of Defense. Of those posi tions, the Navy will open 60 medical officer, chaplain, chief hospital corpsman and hospital corpsman first class posi tions for the assignment of women in Marine Corps ground combat element battalions. The 60 new Navy positions open to the assignment of women include 18 medical officer positions, 19 chaplain officer positions, and 23 chief and petty officer first class hospital corpsman positions. The changes to the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule, announced Feb. 9 in a report to Congress, could not be implemented without a Congressionallymandated notification period, which has now expired. A second change adopted in the exception addresses former co-loca tion restrictions. When implemented, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-located with direct ground combat units. However, elimi nation of the co-location exclusion has no impact to the Navy, as current pol icy does not restrict the assignment of women based on co-location. Currently, 95 percent of Navy billets are open to women. The five percent of closed billets include submarines for enlisted women, and SEALs, Riverine squadrons and Marine Corps support in compliance with direct ground combat rule. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates, and special thanks for those who gave the gift of life last week during our blood drive. Also, although we came in third, every one who turned out for the sports challenge had a ball this year. Congrats to our Coast Guard counterparts who took first place, and HSL-48 took home second. Watch out for next year....we are taking all! Be safe, and keep sending those sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy. mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSNote from the author: This article is a repeat of what I have previously written in The Mirror. Last year, I got an email from a grandparent urging me to print it earlier since once the gift is purchased, it may have to be mailed to another locale. So this year I am printing it earlier than I usually do. Hope it helps those who need to get a gift in the mail or to just decide what to buy for a local graduate. Judy Need gift ideas for a graduat ing senior? Here are some ideas to help you select the best graduation gift for a son or daughter, a nephew or niece, or a family favorite. Notebook computer. A new computer is a great gift for a college-going graduate. The note book offers more convenience, allowing the student to take it to lectures to type notes, to group meetings around campus, or to work on papers or projects if he has a little downtime between classes. If you have some extra money in the gift-giving budget, be sure to include an air card. If money is tight, the desk-top computer is the next best thing. Iphone. Iphones are now pretty standard for keeping up with life. They also have a fab ulous camera which is always with the student. Camera. Cameras are used now for so much more than remembering all the good times at college or starting a new job or joining the military. Learning to use a camera on a new job or in college adds skills which can lead to a promotion or additional skills on a resume. See Iphone above. Money. The most popular high school graduation gift is money. As long as you dont care how it gets spent, feel free to write a check and include it in a graduation card. It may not seem very heartfelt to you, but it is usually the most appreciated gift of graduates whether they are going away to college, staying home for college or work, or joining the military. Gift cards. If you worry that your graduate may not make the best financial decisions, you may want to give gift cards instead of cash or a check. Gift cards can range from gas cards to grocery store gift cards to prepaid cell phone cards. These are great gifts because you know that the necessary expenses will be taken care of for the first few months out on their own. The prepaid cell phone card also insures a call home when the money has run out. Housing decorations. Helping furnish a dorm room or apartment as a graduation gift will help save money on the actual move. If you are plan ning to purchase an item for the dorm room or apartment, check first with the graduate to make sure it hasnt already been purchased and that it is allowed in the housing regulations. Small appliances, a bookcase, a bulletin board, or even a good reading light are really needed in either a dorm room or an apartment. Gift basket. Since most graduates are on a tight budget, put together a basket of small items that can help get through that first costly month buying new clothes, books, required sup plies, etc. Include items such as laundry detergent, dryer sheets, shampoo/conditioner, body wash, toothpaste, disposable razors, lotion, etc. If you think of anything else that would be beneficial for a graduate to have, dont be afraid to buy it. The graduate will appreciate anything that you give him. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Gift Ideas For Your High School GraduateJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingThere is certainly a lot of advice out there for strengthening marriag es. There is not as much good information about how to prepare yourself to find true love. Whether you are in a relationship now and want to strengthen it, or you are seeking to develop a meaning ful relationship in the future, what you do now is key to developing love. Here are a few things you can do for yourself now to improve your future relationships, even if you dont know who it will be with yet. BE HAPPY WITH YOURSELF. Many people think that self-esteem comes from having somebody to love them. That isnt really self-esteem. By nature, self-esteem cannot be attached to somebody else. However, many people get involved in relationships because they believe they need it to be happy. As long as you need a relationship and feel like you cant live a good happy life with out it, you wont be able to be happy with it either. People who are desper ate to find somebody to be with often make poor decisions about who they pursue, and may pretend to be something they are not to impress that per son. If they cant love you for who you really are, then it isnt love anyway. UNDERSTAND WHAT LOVE REALLY IS. Movies portray love as some incomprehensible and irresistible force of fate that imposes itself on our will. We are led to believe that we cannot control love, but that it controls us. Once we have fall en in love we are often completely consumed by it, to our joy if the love is reciprocated, or to our misery if it is not. This is not love but infatuation. This belief will destroy your relationships faster than just about anything because it implies that you are powerless in the love relationship. The truth is that love is a choice that must be made every day. The responsi bility for love lies squarely on your shoulders. True love comes from hard work and sacrifice. Even if there is such thing as love at first sight (which I doubt), it is nothing in comparison to love after years of sacrifice and ser vice to each other. CHOOSE WHO YOU ARE ATTRACTED TO. If love is a choice, then you can begin now to train yourself to be attracted to the kind of people that you can really love and respect. Sometimes peo ple get in relationships with a person they would never consider marry ing because it is exciting or they are attracted to them. But it doesnt work out the way they expect. Infatuation will overcome reason. In they end they have trained themselves to be attracted to the type of people who they knew wouldnt be good to marry. Mentally program yourself to be attracted to goodness, integrity, and the types of attributes that are most likely to lead to a happy family life. BECOME THE TYPE OF PERSON YOU WOULD WANT TO LOVE. Many people say that opposites attract. While that may be true sometimes on a superficial level, people are attracted on a deeper level to those who hold the same values. For example, women who focus on their appear ance and being sexually attractive will attract and be attracted to the kind of men who seek above all else for a sexy woman. Thus their relationship will be based on that type of physical attraction. Those who place high value on spirituality will be more attracted to those Preparing For True Love Includes Developing YourselfLt. Justin Top Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSSee Chaplain, Page 3

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with the same values. If you are going to bars and clubs to find a relation ship you are more likely to build a relationship on that lifestyle because you and the person you find place more value in it. So, if you have a history of attracting to wrong kind of people, take a look at yourself and ask why. If you want to attract somebody who is affection ate, thoughtful, spiritual, intelligent, hardworking, etc. you should seek to develop those character istics within yourself, and go to the places where people share those values.From Page 2ChaplainNavy Celebrates Asian-Pac American Heritage Diversity and Inclusion Public AffairsThe Navy is joining the nation in celebrat ing Asian and Pacific American Heritage Month throughout the month of May as announced NAVADMIN 127/12. Navy commands are encouraged to reflect on the national 2012 theme, Striving for Excellence in Leadership, Diversity, and Inclusion to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contri butions Asians and Pacific Americans have made both to American history and to the Navy. In 1977, then-President Jimmy Carter established the first official Asian and Pacific American Heritage Week during the first 10 days of May. The month of May was chosen to both commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese people to the United States May 7, 1843, and mark the anniversary of the completion of the first transcontinental rail road May 10, 1869. The majority of the individuals who laid the tracks on the first transcontinental rail road were Chinese immi grants. Twelve years later, then-President George H.W. Bush extended the observance through out the entire month of May. In 1992, the month long celebration was officially signed into law and named Asian and Pacific American Heritage Month. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have persevered and flour ished, achieving suc cess in every sector of American life, noted President Barack Obama in his 2010 Presidential Proclamation. They stood shoulder to shoul der with their fellow citi zens during the civil rights movement; they have served proudly in our Armed Forces; and they have prospered as lead ers in business, academia, and public service. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the con tributions of Asian and Pacific Americans to our Navy and nation by cel ebrating Asian and Pacific American Heritage Month through programs, exhibits, publications, and par ticipation in military and community events. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute provides print able posters, presenta tions and educational facts on their website, http://www.deomi.org/ under the section Special Observances. For more information about the history of Asian Americans and their numerous contributions to the Navy, visit http:// www.history.navy.mil/ special%20highlights/ asian/asian-index.htm. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel Office of Diversity and Inclusion, visit www.navy. mil/local/cnp-diversity/.No Zebras Stresses Bystander Intervention NS Mayport Public AffairsThe author of No More Fear visited Naval Station Mayport April 26 and tenant commands to hold bystander interven tion training to Sailors and raise awareness about sexual assault during the Navys Sexual Assault and Awareness Month (SAAM). Steve Thompson gave his No Zebras, No Excuses pre sentation at Ocean Breeze Community Center. The pre sentation is nicknamed No Zebras since Thompson com pares lions to zebras when pointing out the need for intervention from bystanders. This bystander intervention is a way of reducing poor decisions that can lead to a sexual assault incident. This unique training brief is about the realities of sexual aggression. Its main focus is on decreasing bystander mental ity and empowering Sailors to stand up and help keep others safe. According to Thompson, there are three major goals with bystander intervention: raise the awareness of Sailors about behaviors that lead to abuse; challenging Sailors to play an active role in reducing sexual violence and from being pas sive bystanders; and empower ing Navy leaders to mentor and educate their peers and Sailors. Thompson, who also wrote Date/Acquaintance Rape: The Crime and Criminal Profile, described how a lion (an assailant) single out and target a lone zebra (sexual assault victim). The lion will follow and trail the zebra herd waiting for one zebra to find itself alone. When the zebras become separated from the group they can be coerced away; for humans alcohol or drugs can lure the victim from their friends and end in a sexually assault. Thompson presented his No Zebras training more than 1,200 Sailors and DoD civilian staff. In his message to increase awareness, he also divulged how he came to teaching Sexual Assault and Intervention. In the early 1970s he taught self defense classes to women. He talked about an incident where one of his Martial Arts students was assaulted and how the student felt as she had let him down. Thompson said that this is when he realized that education, awareness and interven tion are the best way to combat sexual assault. It takes discipline and cour age to not be a zebra, said Thompson. This is not just a womens issue, it is everyones. I want Sailors to react and do something. This presentation and training that Mr. Thompson brought here is effective and it is structured for the intended audience. His experience as an investigator coupled with his experience with victims of sexual assault clearly enhanced his ability in delivering his message and creating awareness to this issue. If one person inter venes, then it will be a success, said Cmdr. Pat Pickard, Naval Station Mayports executive officer. The month of April is the Navys Sexual Assault and Awareness and Child Abuse month. The training culminated a month long effort in raising awareness educating on sexual assault. -Photo by MC1(EXW/AW) William TownsendThe author of No More Fear visited Naval Station Mayport and tenant commands to give a presentation on bystander intervention training to Sailors raising awareness about sexual assault during the Navys Sexual Assault and Awareness Month (SAAM) on April 26. Steve Thompson is a sex crimes profiler who specializes in sexual assault, harassment and stalking. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Coast Guard Takes On Challenge Wins From StaffU.S. Coast Guard came out to win the 2012 MWR Spring Sports Challenge for the first time and did just that. The team kicked it into high gear on the last day to defeat 16 other commands. The other commands didnt make it easy for U.S. Coast, the team placed first with only 1050 points, followed closely by HSL-48 with 975 points and NavSta Mayport in third with 825 points. Competing over four days, April 24-27, this seasons Sports Challenge includ ed the new event Laser Tag. The first day opened with a win for CHSMWL in the CO/CMC Canoe Race. HSL-60 won the Experienced Canoe Race and Coast Guard brought home the first of many wins with kickball. Bowling went to FRCSE. On day two, Naval Station Mayport brought home a win with 3 on 3 Basketball and 8-Ball See Challenge, Page 5 -Photos by Paige GnannU.S. Coast Guard powers over NavSta Mayports team during the 2012 MWR Spring Sports Challenge, held last week. Coast Guard would go on to win the entire Challenge. NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, presents first place trophy to U.S. Coast Guard for their win in the 2012 MWR Spring Sports Challenge. Cochrane presents a MVP plaque to Chief Logistics Specialist Jaime Ibarra for his participation, spirit and support in this years Challenge. DESRON 14 CMDCM Dion Beauchamp tips his hat as his canoe is towed back to shore after tipping over during the CO/CMC Canoe Race. Capt. Doug TenHoopen and CMDCM Les Hatfield of CHSMWL hold up the trophy after winning this year CO/ CMC Canoe Race. A Sailor from NBHC plays aggressive and catches a competitors ball during Dodgeball. Teams peddle hard around the course in front of the Beachside Community Center to take the Auto Racing competition. Master Chief Boatswains Mate Joe Pancari of U.S. Coast Guard hits hard to his opponent in Tennis. Commands try to rack up points to be the winner in the Ping Pong competition.A diver starts the next lap during the Swim Relay.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 5 Pool, Coast Guard got its next win inTennis. FLC won cricket darts and NBHC got the most hits to win Laser Tag. HSM 40 started off day three with a win at Swim Relay. Coast Guard picked up another win on with 3v3 Soccer. Naval Station Mayport won Dodgeball and FRCSE won Golf. The last day of com petition would see Coast Guard through with a win in Tug o War, Ping Pong and Volleyball. HSL-48 pulled out a win in Corn Hole, and HSM-40 sped into first in Auto Racing. Chief Logistics Specialist Jaime Ibarra of Fleet Logistics Command was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. The Corn Hole competition draws a crowd as the popular tailgating game goes to HSL48. All net as a team wins points, but NavSta Mayport brought home the win for the event. Commands try to see who has the best wrist action during a game of Cricket Darts, held at Mayport Bowl. FLC won the event. Tables were full for the 8-Ball challenge at Mayport Bowl. NavSta won the event. SWOS goes up against NavSta in Laser Tag in the field at Sea Otter Pavilion. This is the first time Laser Tag was added to the Sports Challenge roster. FLC team takes cover behind an upturned table during Laser Tag. A Chief Petty Officer from NBHC uses his head to make a shot as the command takes on U.S. Coast Guard in 3v3 Soccer. HSL-60 pushes hard to round bouys during the Experienced Canoe Race held on Day One of the Sports Challenge competition. SWOS Sailors push their team to pull harder during the Tug o War competition. Coast Guard would end up winning the event. HSL-48 pulls hard to try and overcome Coast Guard for a win during Tug o War.From Page 4Challenge

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May 5: Ole! Run For the Border. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Latin Fusion band Conklave, free food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 May 5: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 8: Armed Forces 10K Run/ 5K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. May 8: Captains Cup Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. May 9: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) May 9: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 May 9: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 May 9: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 2705126 x3115 May 11: Mountain Bike Trail Race (Time Trial). 11 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by May 8. 270-5451 May 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 12: 2012 Mayport Music Fest. 6:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Switchfoot, Fuel & Natalie Stovall. Admission opens at 5 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 May 12: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Full hours begin Monday, Jun. 9. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 May 13: Mothers Day Family Bowling Special. Moms bowl for free all day, including family fun bowl. At least one child must accompany mom; bowling must be completed by 7 pm. 270-5377 May 13: Mothers Day Bingo and Buffet. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards,Mother of the Year drawing, 25 players will spin our Prize Wheel for prizes and compli mentary food! Special drawing for 46 Flat Screen TV plus surprises for all Moms!!! 270-7204 May 18: White T-Shirt Graffiti Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Grab a sharpie and get to writ ing! Make new friends, network or maybe meet that special someone. T-shirts will be provid ed. Featuring live band Cupids Alley plus free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 23: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by MWR A-Team. For tickets, call (904) 270-5228. May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 3: Motherload of Comedy. Chris Killian & Richie Holliday. Van Departs Liberty Center 6 p.m. FREE. May 4: Rock Climbing. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Cost $15. May 5: World of Nations Celebration Come see the world with us! Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. Cost $5. May 6: Fernadina Beach. Van departs 10 a.m. Transportation only. FREE May 11: San Marco Theatre Dinner and The Avengers. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $9. May 14: Black Jack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 15: Johnny Angels Dinner Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation Only. May 18: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. FREE. May 18: White T-Shirt Graffiti Party. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Grab a sharpie and get to writ ing! Make new friends, network or maybe meet that special someone. T-shirts will be provid ed. Featuring live band Cupids Alley plus free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 19-20: Daytona Beach Weekend. Come enjoy fun in the sun at the beach. Van departs 9 a.m. Sign-up deadline May 15. Cost $60; cost includes transportation & hotel. May 21: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. May 22: Ice Skating. Van departs 6:30 p.m. Cost $5 May 23: Black Jack Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 24: Party like a Pin-Up 40s Night. 9 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Karaoke, costume con test, free food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 May 24: Beach and Picnic Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 4 p.m. FREE. May 25-31: Spin Your Yarn. All day at Castaways lounge. Anyone from the armed forces, young or seasoned, can stop by Castaways and share their story. Sign out poster with your name, branch, com mand and service dates. After signing, pick your booty from Castaways Treasure Chest. 270-7205 May 27: Memorial Day Bingo Specials. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts on all hand cards, computer and paper specials, extra drawings, free hot snack food, and more! Wear red, white & blue and receive a $5 discount. May 27: Showtime Video Rock & Bowl Special. 7-11 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. $12 include 4 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Free T-Shirts, beverage specials, colored headpin bowling, and half-price wings for bowlers. 2705377 May 27: Ichnetucknee Springs Trip. Come tub ing down the river.Van Departs Liberty Center 9 a.m. Cost $10 May 28: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Military Appreciation Game. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:30 p.m. FREE. May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes and make new friends. Lanes left vacant will be turned off. 270-5377 May 29: Captains Cup Kickball Begins Season ends July 26. 270-5451. May 29: Co-Ed Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 2705451. May 29: Cummer Art Museum Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. FREE May 30: 5 Points Shopping Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. FREE LIBERTY 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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May 4: Food Roulette. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Do you have the guts? Test your limits and your stomach with our wacky & wild food wheel. 246-0347 May 11: Twilight Zone Party. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Your about to enter a dimension; a dimension full crazy challenges and wacky games. 246-0347 May 12: 2012 Mayport Music Fest. 6:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Switchfoot, Fuel & Natalie Stovall. Admission opens at 5 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 May 12: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Full hours begin Monday, Jun. 9. Active Duty and chil dren ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 May 13: Mothers Day Family Bowling Special. Moms bowl for free all day, including family fun bowl. At least one child must accompany mom; bowling must be completed by 7 pm. 270-5377 May 18: Movie Night Punch & Munch. 7-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. We provide the food and drinks, you sit back and enjoy the film. 246-0347 May 18: Freedom FridayFiesta. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 May 19: Teen TripSaturday Night Cosmic Skate. Jacksonville Indoor Sports & Ice Complex 8-10 pm. Meet up at 6:30 p.m. at the Teen Center; return by 11 pm Permission slip required. Ages 13-17; cost $5. Bring your own money for the concession stand. 2460347 May 24: School Age Care Talent Show. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Activity Center. Advanced sign up required. 270-5680 May 25: Wet Wild Wacky Water Wars. 7-9 p.m. at the Teen Center. Beat the heat with water balloon fights, slip n slide challenges and more. 2460347 May 28: Beat the Heat Memorial Day Special: Bowl all day long (11 am-7 pm) for only $8! Kids 4-5 years old $5; Kids 3 and under FREE. First come, first serve. Individuals may be asked to share lanes. KID CDC Celebrates Anniversary-Photo by MC1(EXW/AW) William TownsendLonnie Kenney presents Dorothy Herndon her 21 year retirement certificate on Apr. 26. Dorothy Herndon retires from civil service one year after the opening of Naval Station Mayports off base Child development Center. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 7

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April 25, along with BEM training. At the luncheon Public Works Officer, Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez discussed the current energy con sumption of the base and how well it is meeting Navy energy goals. Added and replaced meters on the buildings, along with inspections and a change in behavior has put the command on the right track. The biggest thing we are fighting right now is the behavior, said Boatright. People are so used to just coming in and turning on a light and thinking it is just free energy and its not. The money we spend on energy, we could buy fuel for the ships or bullets for the guys on the ground. Some of the biggest energy consumers are also some of the big gest energy savers and were recognized for their efforts during the lun cheon. SERMC, Navy Exchange and MWR have been working hard to reduce their energy footprint, saving about $100,000 combined. The Department of the Navy tradition ally supports the obser vance of [Earth Day] to raise awareness among command elements and promote conservation efforts, said Cochrane. An added benefit from conservation and green technology is the ability to operate more efficiently at a reduced cost to the taxpayer and a reduction on dependence of foreign imports which in turn enhances energy security and increases capability to support the deployable units.From Page 1Earth DayLeyte Gulf (CG 55); com mand of USS Ross (DDG 71); and command of Destroyer Squadron 26. Ashore, Thomas served in the Surface Warfare Junior Officer Assignment Branch of the Bureau of Naval Personnel; in the Personnel Plans and Policy Division of the Joint Staff; as flag sec retary to commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; on the staff of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations as executive officer to the director of the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review and executive assistant to the director of Operations, Plans, and Policy (N3/N5); and as chief of staff to commander, 2nd Fleet. Upon selection for flag officer, Thomas has served as the deputy chief of staff for Global Force Management and Joint Operations on the staff of commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command; and commander, Joint Task Force, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; commander, Carrier Strike Group Two; and his current assign ment as commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic.From Page 1StarkUSCG Cutter Barque Eagle Moors At Mayport Navy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastLocal Jacksonville residents were given the opportunity to embark the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Barque Eagle (WIX-321) as she transits to Naval Station Mayport April 27 for a port visit. The Eagle, the largest tall ship flying the Stars and Stripes, arrived at Naval Station Mayport with her minimum active duty crew of 56 Coast Guardsmen. Coast Guard Sector Commander for Jacksonville, Capt. Andy Blomme, explained Eagles primary mission to the fleet. The coast guard cutter Eagle is our tall ship weve had since 1946 and we got it as a war prize following World War II, said Blomme. We do all of our summer sail training with our cadets and officer candidates aboard here because it does such a great job of teaching team work and binding people together like few other training experiences could. Eagles primary mission is training for cadets and officer candidates. However, the Coast Guard accommodates requests for a limited number of port visits each year, when these do not interfere with the cutters pri mary training mission. Although above deck Eagle is a three mast sailing ship, she still has all the same fittings below deck as any other U.S. Navy combatant ship has and her crew still needs to perform and train just the same as any Navy Sailor would. The crew of the Eagle has to be trained to current fleet standards every year, said the commanding officer of Eagle, Capt. Eric Jones. To get the crew ready to train officer candidates they go through the Navys Afloat Training Group drills of damage control, fire fighting, engineering, casualty, naviga tion and seamanship drills. Weve had a team from the ATG on board since New Orleans. Eagle just finished Navy Week New Orleans in conjunction with the War of 1812 bicentennial celebration and is in the middle of Operation Sail 2012. One local Jacksonville resident who embarked on Eagle men tioned how she appreciated the crew visiting the area during her busy schedule. Im absolutely amazed, I think the ship is beautiful, said Katie Ross, regional direc tor office of U.S. Senator Bill Nelson. I am so intrigued by its history and whats shes used for today and were having a great time. Most of the ships tourists were surprised to learn that Eagle began its existence as the Horst Wessel in the German Navy in 1936. Both Adolf Hitler and his deputy of the Nazi Party, Rudolph Hess, were present at the launch and christen ing. At the end of World War II Horst Wessel was taken by the United States and was commissioned into the United States Coast Guard as the Coast Guard cutter Eagle on May 15, 1946. After Jacksonville, she will head to Savannah, Ga., to pick up cadets for Fleet Week New York City. -Photo by MC2 Class Gary Granger Jr.Local Jacksonville residents prepare to board the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Barque Eagle (WIX-321) before she arrives at Naval Station Mayport. Eagle is used as a training cutter for future officers in the USCG and is one of two active sailing vessels in American military service. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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Roosevelt Awarded Yellow E for SafetyUSS Roosevelt Public Affairs For the third consecu tive year, USS Roosevelt was awarded the TYCOM Ship Safety Excellence Award, also known as the Yellow E. This award recognized Roosevelt for excellence in the maintenance and execution of afloat safety, occupational health related programs and initiatives, and Operational Risk Management (ORM). During the 2011 award period, Roosevelt completed a seven-month independent deployment in support of Commander, Sixth Fleet with objectives in the CENTCOM and AFRICOM areas of responsibility. The deployment included 205 days underway of 213 days away from the continental United States, includ ing a period of 113 consecutive days underway. The mission included 19 replenishments at sea, 16 special sea and anchor details, 11 small arms and crew served weapons shoots, and a swim call in the Indian Ocean, all with zero safety mishaps. The success of these evolutions can be contributed to proper planning with continuous emphasis on training, supervision, safety briefs, personal protective equipment, adequate rest, and proper communica tion. Roosevelts excellent safety programs contributed to the ships success, and are each run as collateral duties of crew members from different divi sions throughout the ship. Roosevelts independent duty corpsman, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Jessica Shores, plays a large role in the safety pro gram, successfully managing not only all of medical, but several of the Navy Occupational Heath programs, including heat stress, hearing conservation, sight conservation, and asbes tos protection. Ensign Russel Rawls and Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Blake Sattler lead the respiratory protection program that provided a safe breathing environment for the crews preservation work throughout deployment. Ensign David Ingraham, Chief Electricians Mate Yaphet Whitehead, and Electricians Mate 1st Class Alan Terry are the leadership to the electrical safety and Taggout program and Cryptologic Technician Technical 2nd Class Sarah Jackson manages the Web Enabled Safety System that provides online documentation of any safety issues or mishaps. Other factors in Roosevelts success are the safety stand downs that were conducted at key points of the deployment that re-emphasized safety. Although the crew worked hard the entire deployment, there was a little bit of time for play. Information Systems Technician 1st Class Thomas Brume, Electronics Technician 1st Class Kelly Gneiting, and Cryptologic Technician Collection 1st Class Jimmy Fredrickson gave Roosevelt training on recreation safety in the ships gym explaining how to stay safe on the beaches in Seychelles, climbing a moun tain in Mauritius, or snow boarding on leave when every one returned home. Taking the lead on Home safety, Damage Controlman 1st Class Edward Deleon could often be heard saying, This is stuff that we should all take seriously, especially if we want to protect our loved one. Along with Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Blake Sattler and Machinery Repairman 2nd Class Charles Baylis they stressed the importance of electrical safety at home, fire safety, and cooking meals after returning home. After a long deployment, driving safety pointed out critical statistics and emphasized the dangers of drinking and driving, texting while driving, fatigue, motor cycle safety, and basic traffic awareness. Operations Specialist 2nd Class Desirae Molina, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Jonathan Branch, and Gas Turbine System Technician 2nd Class Frank Davis staged the port helicopter hanger with a large display of what could happen when you dont pay atten tion and led a discussion with each division throughout the day to ensure the entire crew made good choices when they returned home. Just prior to returning home, Logistics Specialist 1st Class Yahaira Bolding, Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Volha Laurentsik, Ships Serviceman 1st Class Isaac Smith conducted a presenta tion on holiday safety and the importance of staying healthy during the holiday period. Safety has been at the fore front of all critical evolutions on board Roosevelt as Roosevelt Sailors continue to accomplish the ships mission of achiev ing and maintaining a level of readiness that will enable them to excel at any assigned task. Roosevelt strives to meet and exceed all standards. In recognition of their achievement, Roosevelt dis plays the Yellow E with two stripes on each of their bridge wings. Roosevelt is assigned to Destroyer Squadron Fourteen and is homeported in Mayport, Florida. Learning To React-Photos by Ensign Aaron SchwarzAbove, Seaman Mark Cruz receives a dose of oleoresin capsicum (OC) resin spray from Chief Master-at-Arms(SW) Danny Moreaux during ships reaction force bravo (SRFB) graduation course. Right, Cruz is taken off to a decontamination station among applause from his shipmates after he submits an opponent in a red man protective suit, completing his SRF-B course. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 9

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SERMC Sailors Develop Critical In-Rate Skills With NAMTS ProgramBy Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Public AffairsNew Sailors enrolled in the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) pro gram on March 29 at the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) and are devel oping in-rate skills while becoming self-sufficient in shipboard maintenance. Sailors participat ing in the NAMTS pro gram receive hands-on training tied to rate-specific Job Qualification Requirements (JQRs) resulting in either a Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) or a JQR Certificate of Completion. The NAMTS initiative has been implemented at the Regional Maintenance Centers (RMCs) across all waterfronts, and is designed to help pre pare Sailors improve their scores in their rat ing advancement exam, prepare for advancement, and offer career-enhanc ing training, said Capt. Ronald Cook, SERMCs commanding officer. Were very proud of our sailors, and strive to offer them every oppor tunity to develop skill sets that benefit the ships SERMC support, while also providing them with the knowledge, skills and abilities they will need to continue to grow and advance within their rates and in their naval careers, said Cook. During off-duty hours, Rick Smith, a retired machinery repairman and Kurtiss Reinke, a shop master, have volun teered their time to share their tricks of the trade to help SERMCs junior young Sailors. During their mentoring sessions, they have dis cussed various theories, terms, methodologies, and practical applica tions associated with the machinery repairmans rating. Topics include tools and their usage, blueprint reading, preci sion measuring instru ments, and the types of metals with their match ing principles. For math ematics, the mentors described the many for mulas that could be used in the Sailors day-today jobs to solve challenging practical problems. Sailors within each shop at SERMC have demonstrated the skills theyve acquired through their NAMTS training by demonstrating their ability to manufacture a prototype fire-pump fan blade, use Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) Technology. Others demonstrated SERMC manufacturing capabilities, including the development of 12 Baxter bolts for a surface com batant Rapid Securing Device (RSD) with 16 RSD roller shafts; fire pump motor shaft; and fire pump motor end bell housing assembly. They also received training on how to review control work packages and formal work packages. Electroplating is yet another SERMC capa bility used to train our Sailors. For example, the Inside Machine Shop has completed train ing in the electroplating process, where SERMC learned about the physi cal properties of nickel, chromium, copper and base metal preparations. As a result, SERMC cer tified seven personnel as Electroplating operators. According to Petty Officer Love, he has learned more here at SERMC in 4 months than he had learned in his eight years working as an independent duty Machinery Repairman (MR). When asked how he felt he had done on his rating exam, he said, I felt more confident and sure of my answers, because of NAMTS train ing he had received. As our Sailors strive for excellence at SERMC, we are making a million dollar work shop into a mil lion dollar training class room, said Cook. The increase in man ufacturing capabilities, coupled with new tech nologies, have reduced production cost by 10 percent, and reduced manufacturing time by 15 per cent. Other fleet machinists have also been invited to NAMTS train ing, and have gained valuable knowledge enabling SERMC to produce more skilled machinists ready for the Fleet, said Cook. For more information about Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC), visit: http:// www.navsea.navy.mil/ CNRMC/SERMC/default. aspx -Photos courtesy of SERMCSERMC Sailors are shown how to select the proper tap and drill sizes for various straight and taper threads. healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com/vfw 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe frigate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team recovered 89 bales of cocaine in support of Operation MARTILLO on April 20. A SH-60B Sea Hawk of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60 Det. 3 embarked on USS Elrod responded after receiving a transmission from a P-3 oper ated by U.S. Customs Border Protection. Elrod joined in pursuit, along with authorities from Panama, as two 40-foot twin-engine vessels tried to evade authorities in the waters of the Western Caribbean, resulting in the drugs being subsequently jet tisoned into the sea. The Navy-Coast Guard response team recovered 89 bales of cocaine, weighing 4,840 pounds, worth an estimated value of more than $362 mil lion. I am very proud of the teamwork and collaborative effort between the ship, our air detachment and our USCG Law Enforcement Detachment, said Commander Jack Killman, Commanding Officer of USS Elrod. Our mission is clear; to disrupt illicit trafficking that jeopardizes the safety in the region and ultimately our own national security. This seizure is in addition to the 1,000 lbs. recovered by Elrod on March 22. Operation MARTILLO (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force-South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation MARTILLO is a component of the U.S. governments coordi nated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transnational organized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.HSL-60, Elrod Recover 4,840 lbs. Of Drugs Saving Lives, A Pint At A Time-Photo by MC1(EXW/AW) William TownsendCivilians, military spouses and service members donate blood at Naval Station Mayports Blood Drive on April 24, 2012. -Photo by Paige GnannFORCECM Garry McClure of AIRLANT and FORCECM Jon Port of NPC/ BUPERS talk with Navy Counselors during a tri-base command career counselor training session held at the ATG auditorium last week. The FORCE Master Chiefs touched on the importance of the command career counselor and the responsibility the job entails. Port also said that the sea/shore rotation flow will be impacted for several ratings in t he future to correct an imbalance in the rate manning.Looking To FutureFerguson Guest Speaker At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, which will be held Saturday, 9 June 2012, at the renaissance resort, world golf village. Guest speaker Vice Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mark E. Ferguson III; Veterans of the Battle of Midway, several widows of Midway Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the military have been invited to attend this years dinner. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and former prison ers of war in our area who have heroically answered the call of duty. Come meet these national treasurers and hear their adventures first hand. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. The evening includes fine dining and enter tainment. Uniform will be O4 and above din ner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civil ian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1800, dinner at 1900. Reserved seating. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from Navy League Mayport Bob Price, 904-718-2118 or email bpricex4@com cast.net; or Navy League St. Augustine Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-7947814 or email anuday00@ aol.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 11

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USO Military Appreciation Day At Mayport Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host our 10th Annual Military Appreciation Day at NS Mayport Sea Otter Pavilion on Saturday, May 19, 2012. This is a great FREE family event from noon-4 p.m. There will be free food, music, bounce houses, games and much more, including free admission to pool. Play Group At The Mayport USO Fleet and Family Service Center sponsors a playgroup at the Mayport USO every Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon. May 24 will include a craft hour from 10-11 a.m. as well. For more information please contact Lauren Walton, New Parent Support Program at Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center 904-2706600. Free Banners For Returning Service Members Sign-a-Rama, a local, small business has a great offer to support returning troops! Offer details: 1. This a free banner provided to a spouse or parent or child of an individual service member returning from combat duty. 2. One free banner per household, please. 3. Orders are placed by the family, by calling (904) 272-8333, or emailing me at herb@jaxsignarama. com with the subject line banner for my loved one 4. We would like about a 7 to 10 day notice, if possible, so that we can fit it into our production schedule. 5. We are unable to ship these banners. We are a local owned fran chise, with a store at 175-1 Blanding Boulevard, and one in Jacksonville at 3663 Southside Boulevard. This is a service for the Jacksonville/Orange Park area. Banners are only for returning combat troops and unfortunately, are not available for troops assigned to NSB Kings Bay, GA. These banners are provided for FREE and please do not request a banner be prepared and no show up to pick it up. Veterans Farm Needs Your Support Veterans Farm is a farm in Jacksonville that strives to help disabled combat veterans get back into society through the use of horticulture thera py. Veterans work on the farm and develop skills to help them overcome their physical, mental, and employment problems. We grow datil peppers and blueberries that carry our Veterans Farm label. Wal-Mart is having a Get on the Shelf contest, similar to American Idol. If we win, Veterans Farm products will be on WalMart shelves all over the country. The more prod ucts we sell, the more veterans you will help. Our mission is to win this contest, and get our products on their shelves. PLEASE text 4970 to 383838 to VOTE! For more infor mation please visit www. getontheshelf.com No Dough Dinner Looking for a great night with the family? Dont want to cook/clean up? Come to the Mayport USO Center April 30 from 5-7 p.m. They will serve Burgers, Dogs, baked beans, potato salad, chips, desserts and drinks. This dinner is free to active duty service members and their immediate families. Come on out and enjoy food and friends. THANK YOU to Miss America Darling Pageant! 2012 Birdies For Charity Program Your Greater Jax Area USO is once again pleased to be participat ing in the 2012 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique, communitybased fundraising initia tive is held in conjunc tion with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 7-13, 2012. If you visit www.birdies forcharity.playerschampi onship.com, you will have the opportunity to make a donation to Greater Jax Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individ ual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2012 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an addition al $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-break er question will be used to determine the winner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 9. We hope you will take this opportunity to support your Greater Jax Area USO and THE PLAYERS by visiting www.birdies forcharity.playerscham pionship.com. Donations can be made online with a credit card. Or, you may donate via personal check made out to Greater Jax Area USO and mail to: Greater Jax Area USO, P.O. Box 108, NAS Jacksonville, FL 32212-0108. Please annotate Birdies For Charityon your person al check. All donations received via this pro gram go directly to sup port your Greater Jax Area USO. You Could Win A 1948 Pontiac Torpedo! Do you like old antique cars? The American Legion Riders Chapter 283 has proudly offered a 1948 Pontiac Torpedo car in a raffle drawing to be held on June 1 at 8 pm. NAS Jax USO and Mayport USO now have Donation Tickets available for pur chase! The tickets are only $10. Stop by your USO center today! All sales are cash only at the centers or at Post 283. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road USOThe Players Free For Military, FamiliesFrom TPCTHE PLAYERS will continue its policy of pro viding free or affordable access to the tournament for men and women of the Armed Services. There are two military ticket policies: and Reserve military per sonnel along with their dependents receive com plimentary admission to the tournament all day, every day. Free tickets are available online via a link to TicketMaster from THE PLAYERS website www.PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS; these are print-at-home tickets and military personnel and their dependents will be asked to present the paper ticket AND valid military ID at the gate for free admission. proud to partner with Veterans Advantage to distribute discounted tickets to military vet erans and their fami lies. Available to those carrying the Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card, discounted tick ets can be purchased online through a special link, and then redeemed at the admissions gate with proof of a valid Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card. Visit www.PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS (click on 2012 Tickets) for more information. On site parking is free (for all fans) MondayWednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Once again May 7-13, THE PLAYERS will offer hospitality to active, Reserve and retired mili tary and dependents at the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. The Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, pro vides complimentary food, beverages and interactive activities and is open Wednesday-Sunday. Military ID is required for admittance. USO Centers do not have tickets or sell parking passes, which are available online. Military Veterans Job Fair At The Players Championship Veterans are invited to THE PLAYERS cham pionship on Monday of tournament week for a Job Fair featuring local companies actively hir ing. The Military Job Fair at THE PLAYERS will take place in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways, and will be open to veterans who are seeking employ ment. Admission: all veterans who attend the Job Fair will be admit ted to the grounds free of charge on Monday, May 7th. Parking: free parking in tournament lot off of County Road 210. Attire is casual; bring many copies of your resume to pass out. Participating companies: ACOSTA Sales and Marketing, Bank of America, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida, BAE Systems, The Brumos Companies, Citi, City of Jacksonville, CSX, Deutsche Bank, EverBank, Incepture, Interline Brands, Lockheed Martin, PGA Tour, Prudential, Sea Star Line, Troops to Transportation and Logistics and VyStar. Also onsite will be the following education al institutions; FSCJ, Jacksonville University, UNF and Kaplan College Jacksonville. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 3, 2012 13 FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. May 2, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Family Readiness Group Leadership Training, Building One Room 1616 May 2, 11a.m. 12p.m., Paying for College FFSC Room 719 May 2, 8:30a.m. 3:30p.m., Stress Management wellness center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be ener gizing and a factor in motivat ing us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This program is designed to provide partici pants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. It will also help partici pants begin to look at their own lives and ways they currently cope with stress. Participants will be challenged to develop behavior and lifestyle changes that will improve their ability to cope with stress. May 2, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC room 702 May 3, 9a.m. 1p.m., Family Readiness Group Leadership Building One Room 1616 May 3, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 3, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 7, 9-11a.m., What About The Kids? FFSC room 702 Children who witness fam ily violence are often forgot ten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjust ment problems has been found to be associated with exposure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, develop ment and socialization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be cre ating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for ending the vio lence and seeking intervention. May 7-10, 8a.m. 4p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop Building One Room 1616 May 8, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 8, 6-7p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group, Building One Room 104 May 9, 11:30a.m. 12:30p.m., Consumer Awareness FFSC room 719 May 9, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC room 702 May 10, 1:303:30p.m., Troops to Teachers, FFSC TBD May 10, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC room 702 May 10, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 11 (rain date 18), 6:309:30p.m., IA Family Outing Swimming Pool Party NS Swimming Pool May 14, 8:30a.m. 3:30p.m., Anger Management Class FFSC room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of disdain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. May 14-18, 7:30a.m. 5:00p.m., SAPR Advocate Refresher Class, FFSC NAS JAX May 15, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 16, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 17, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 17, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 21, 1-4p.m., Relationship communication FFSC room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new tech niques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to iden tify barriers to effective communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. May 21-24, 8a.m.-4p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 May 22, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 23, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 24, 1-2p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses FFSC room 719 May 24, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 24, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. May 24, 10-11a.m., Craft Hour (during playgroup), USO May 29, 9-11a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC room 702 May 29, 6-8p.m., Ombudsman Assembly Building One Room 104 May 30, 34:30p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC room 702 May 31, 1:303p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman FFSC room 702 May 31, 9:00a.m. 12:00p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. BY APPOINTMENT: 8a.m.-4p.m., Resume Writing FFSC TBD Thursday, May 3 Whistle Talks return to the Beaches Museum & History Park with a presentation by Dr. Maarten van de Guchte, executive director of the museum. His talk entitled, The King of Florida and the French in 1562. Dr. van de Guchte will tell the story of the Frenchmen Jean Ribaults arrival to the shores of the St. Johns River 450 years ago and contact with the Native American tribes that inhabited Florida. This episode would have been breaking news in the journalistic and media culture that we live in. Whistle Talks are open to the public. Members of the Beaches Museum are free; all others are $5 per person. A recep tion at 5 p.m. is followed by the talk at 5:30 p.m. The Beaches Museum & History Park is locat ed at 381 Beach Blvd. in Jacksonville Beach. For more information please contact the museum at 904-241-5657 or www. beachesmuseum.org. Saturday, May 5 Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural com munities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Come enjoy making Kiwi Pineapple Orange Jam and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center from 9 a.m.-noon or 14 p.m. Class space is lim ited. Cost is $20 per per son. Pre-registration and prepayment should be made by April 30. To register call Jeannie at 2557450. The University Of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a program on Cinco de Mayo for Mothers Day at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 North McDuff Avenue at 10 a.m. Show your mother how much you care by learning to make a memorable meal. Join us for this family-friendly workshop where you will learn to prepare recipes using healthy ingredients, create table decorations and bake tasty breads and desserts. Children are welcome to attend with mom and dad. All ages are encouraged to par ticipate in this workshop! There is a charge of $10 per person or $15 family of four (2 adults and 2 children). Reservations and pre-payment are necessary by May 2. Call 2557450 or email sandram@ coj.net to schedule your reservation. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Spring Encampment event on May 5-6 from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m.-noon on Sunday. This program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to expe rience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with sol diers in period costume involved in firing dem onstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life.For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Monday, May 7 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR -Photo by Paige GnannA jean donation bin sits outside of Fleet and Family Support Centers reception area. Started by NS Mayport Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD), the drive will benefit victims of rape. There are several bins located around the base including Building 1, Chapel, CPO Club, Fleet and Family Support Center, Mini Mart, and Housing Office. BVMP PRVFW 3270 Post Commander, retired Army Lt. Col. Douglas Bagdasarian, announces a Memorial Day service will be held at the Beaches Veterans Memorial Park Memorial Day May 28 at 2 p.m. Located at Atlantic Blvd and Mayport Road, the ceremony will be dedicated to all of Americas fallen heroes, past and present. Guest speaker will be Atlantic Beach Mayor and retired Lt. Cmdr. Mike Borno and will also feature the American Legion Riders and the Beaches Color Guard who will offer the Rifle Salute and Taps to the fallen. The American Legion Auxiliary will provide escorts from the Post 316 parking to the seating area. As you walk to the Stage, please notice the engraved Bricks set in the path way honoring honored loved ones. Chaplain Lt. Col. Marty Pfab will offer the Benediction. A station will be available for those wishing to purchase Bricks, con tribute to the Chaplains Memorial Monument, dedicated to these brave clergy who gave their lives serving our uniformed members in combat, or, purchase Poppies All Patriotic Organizations, their families and friends are invited to attend this ceremony to honor our fallen comrades. Please bring blankets or chairs for seating.Beaches Vets Host Memorial Day Service