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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00247


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com ASN Answers 21st Century Questions Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastAssistant Secretary of the Navy (ASN) for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (M&RA) con ducted town hall meet ings aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., Naval Station Mayport, Fla. and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. April 10-11. Juan M. Garcia III addressed more than 1,000 Sailors and Marines from the combined tri-base area during town hall meetings where he discussed topics such as the enlisted reten tion boards, tuition assistance and the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. There is no rea son to believe the operational tempo our Sailors and Marines have lived and operated under, the impact and sacrifice for them and their families for the last ten years is going to -Photo by MCSA Damian BergPersonnel Specialist 2nd Class Johnathan Ayala, assigned to Personal Support Detachment Mayport, asks Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Juan M. Garcia a question during an all-hands call at Naval Station Mayport to talk about the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. The initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maxi mize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone combat effectiveness.-Photo by MCSA Damian BergGarcia stands by to talk to Fire Controlman 1st Class Rich Possert, assigned to USS Farragut (DDG 99), after an all-hands call at NS Mayport. No Zebras At MayportFrom StaffFleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program is hosting author and sex crimes profiler Steve Thompsons No Zebras, No Excuses presenta tion on during three ses sions on April 26 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center for all Naval Station Mayport personnel, active duty and civilian. The sessions will be held from 9-10:30 a.m. for leadership and noon-1:30 p.m. or 2-3:30 p.m. for all personnel. Thompson has been a national figure on the subject of sexual aggres sion for several years, according to his website. As a graduate student, and martial arts instruc tor at Indiana University, Thompson focused his education towards psy chology and the study of human movement. In the spring of his sec ond year, a rapist assault ed and terrorized several women on campus. This prompted intense public pressure on the university to educate the public in assault avoidance. As a black belt, Thompson was called upon to be the edu cator. Knowing little of the dynamics of rape, he still agreed to teach.TSP To Offer New Roth OptionAmerican Forces Press ServiceService members and Defense Department civilian employees who are eligible for the Thrift Savings Plan will soon have a new Roth option for retirement sav ings under the program, defense finance officials announced April 13. The change will allow participants to contrib ute after-tax dollars to the federal governmentsponsored retirement sav ings and investment plan, according to a Defense Finance and Accounting Service statement. As with traditional and Roth individual retire ment accounts, the TSPs two options will now allow plan participants to invest either beforeor after-tax dollars, although limits on annual contributions, catch-up contribu tions and agency match ing funds will remain the same, officials said. The plan, which is simi lar to a 401(k), is open to federal civilian employees and military members. For 2012, the maximum contribution is set at $17,000. Catch-up contri butions, available to par ticipants 50 or older, are capped at $5,500 over the standard limit. Agency matching con tributions are one percent for all eligible employ ees, dollar-for-dollar for the first three percent of pay an eligible employee contributes to the plan and 50 cents on the dol lar for eligible employee contributions of between three and five percent. Contributions above 5 percent of pay are not matched. The current plan treats all contributions as pretax dollars participants do not pay taxes on pay they put into the plan, but will pay deferred taxes when they receive those funds in retirement. The new Roth option will allow contributions that are taxed in the year they are made, but will be tax-free in retirement, TSP officials said. Greg T. Long, TSP exec utive director, urged in a letter to participants that they carefully consider whether Roth TSP would be to their advantage. As with all tax mat ters, you should seek the advice of a qualified tax or financial advisor for infor mation pertaining to your specific tax situation, Long wrote. He added the plans website will soon offer a Roth calculator, and other website content including forms and publications will be updated in May to include information about the Roth feature. Defense finance offi cials said the Roth option -Photo by Paige GnannRepresentatives from Fleet and Family Support Center, Security and NCIS join Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, fifth from left, during the official proclamation signing to designate April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month on April 16 in Building One.See Zebras, Page 12 Navy Wins Gold-Photo by Paige GnannMWR Fitness Specialist LaPlace Satterfield sings as the NS Mayport Color Guard presents the colors during the opening ceremonies at the Armed Forces Volleyball Championship held behind Beachside Community Center last week. See full story, Page 9. See ASN, Page 3 See Roth, Page 12An LDO/CWO brief will be held for all E-5 and above on April 20 at 1 p.m. at the Base Chapel. SERMC Executive Officer, Capt. Pierre Fuller, will speak about his experience as an LDO. Fuller started his career as an Electricians Mate Fireman Apprentice in 1980 and commissioned in 1990.

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.FOn Monday, I signed a proclama tion declaring April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month at Naval Station Mayport. There has been a big push throughout the Navy to bring this topic to the forefront and it is a problem I will not tolerate. When our CNO Adm. Greenert visited on April 3, he met with base leadership 0-4 and above to stress the importance of combating sexual assault in the Navy. It goes against our very core values and ethos. Never should our brothers and sisters at arms fear each other. Our nation depends on us to defend it against our enemies and that includes criminals who may be hiding in our midst. It is up to all of us to step in when we see a shipmate threaten ing another. It is up to all of us to create a climate that does not tolerate these types of crimes. NS Mayport has a sexual assault hotline that is open 24/7 and is completely confidential. Call 358-7273 to talk with trained staff if you have been assaulted or know of someone who has. Congratulations to our Navy athletes for winning the Armed Forces Volleyball Championship...the men captured the gold and the women took gold and sil ver home. Naval Station Mayport spent last week hosting volleyball teams from the U.S. Army, Marines, U.S. Navy/Coast Guard. It was a real treat to be able to watch the teams bring their best to the sand and show their service pride. MWR Mayport improved and built an addi tional sand volleyball court to accom modate the championship and did an outstanding job as host. I know all of the teams felt welcomed to Mayport. It was great fun and we hope to host them again in the future. This Sunday, April 22 is Earth Day and a great time to focus on green initiatives, such as energy and water conservation, recycling and upcycling. Naval Station Mayport is constantly looking for ways to diminish our carbon footprint by install ing energy efficient equipment, turning off lights in unused rooms, or zeroscap ing our public spaces. In honor of Earth Day, Mayport is teaming up with Public Works to hold a tree planting ceremony on April 25 at the NEX uniform shop on base. Thanks to Kira for donating the tree for this event. A significant piece of history will soon sail into our harbor as we welcome USCGC Eagle on April 27 through May 3. USCGC Eagle is the only active commis sioned sailing vessel in the U.S. Maritime services. She is one of five training barques in the world. Her sister ships are Mirlea of Romania, Sagres II of Portugal, Gorch Fock II of Germany, and Tovarich of Russia. Todays Eagle is the seventh in a long line of proud cutters to bear the name. She was built as a training vessel for the German Navy as SNF Horst Wessel. She was awarded to the United States as rep arations following WWII. On May 15, 1946, she was commissioned into the U.S. Coast Guard service as Eagle and sailed from Bremerhaven, Germany to New London, Conn. Eagle serves as a seagoing class room for approximately 175 cadets and instructors from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. It is on the decks and rigging of Eagle that the young men and women of the Academy get their first taste of salt air and life at sea. Working aloft they meet fear and learn to overcome it. The cadets handle more than 20,000 square feet of sail and five miles of rigging. More than 200 lines must be coordinated dur ing a major ship maneuver, so cadets must learn the name and function of each line. Several local schools are on tap to visit the Eagle, and when you see crewmem bers out and about on base, please give them a warm Mayport welcome. Ok, last call to all commands for this seasons Sports Challenge scheduled for April 24-27. I am warning you that I have my game face on and CMDCM Bob White as my wingman for this years CO/CMC Canoe Challenge. HSL-48 has had the annoying habit of taking home the prize trophy for the past several Challenges and I mean to change that! Good luck to all the other commands throughout the rest of the challenge. I hope to see everyone come out and show their command pride. One last thing, on April 24, Mayport will host another blood drive in Building One from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. to support the American Red Cross. Your donation can save a life of another human being. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe, and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSIt is almost summer and time to seriously begin researching summer camp programs for your child. Because this experience can have a major impact on your childs life, it is impor tant to choose wisely. Is the choice based on where the parents went to camp as chil dren, on the childs interests, on overnight camps available in the area, or just what are the parameters for choosing? The final camp choice must accommodate all or some of the needs, goals, interests, and expectations of both the child and the parent. To understand what kind of camp your child wants to attend and why, try asking your child the following questions: 1. What do you want to gain from the camp experience? Learn something new or develop a current skill? Develop more independence? Meet new friends? 2. Do you have any special interests you want to explore? 3. Would you prefer a sleep-away camp or a day camp? As you ask the above ques tions of your child, you may want to silently answer them yourself, and then ask yourself these additional questions: 1. Are there any physical, intellectual, or social limita tions, which should be considered? 2. What kind of emphasis will your child profit from the most? For example: Is a lot of structure desirable, is social interaction with members of the opposite sex important, or does your child need a place where he is encouraged to develop at his own pace? 3. Is your child ready for a sleep-a-way camp? 4. How much money are you willing to budget for this camp experience? With the answers to the above questions in mind, next you should consider these factors: TYPE OF CAMP: Generally, overnight camps arent coed, either all boys, or all girls. But even a coed camp will have interaction between boys and girls through activities or through the use of common facilities such as waterfront and dining hall. Sleep-a-way camps provide a summer residential program where campers enjoy daily and evening activities. Depending on the type of program chosen, a camp experience can range anywhere from one week to an entire summer. COST: Nonprofit camps, such as MWR camps, Y camps, and Operation Military Kids, are less expensive than private sleep-a-way. As a par ent you have to make a care ful assessment of your familys financial limitations regarding camp costs. Be sure to esti mate for any extras such as a camp uniform, transportation, camper day trips, and the extra spending money for your child. Costs will vary based on the camps location and the activi ties offered. SIZE: When it comes to size, choosing a camp is very similar to choosing a college. Camps may vary in size from fewer than 100 campers to more than 400. Smaller camps tend to foster special relationships and allow for individual needs to be quickly met. However, very large camps will be orga nized into small units, allowing for the same kind of attention offered by a smaller camp. LOCATION: Dont limit your search by looking at one state or by choosing a set distance from home. Consider instead the related questions involving camp environment, security, medical facilities, and accessi bility. Which is more important choosing the right camp based on your childs interests/needs or the comfort of knowing your childs camp is close to home? PROGRAMS & ACTIVITIES: As you might imagine, camps offer all kinds of programs. Some camps may emphasize a special activity horseback riding while others will offer a wide array of programs. Camps in which a camper would devote a majority of his or her time to one activity are often referred to as Specialty Camps. Choosing a summer camp program for your child involves some important research. Be careful not to focus on one of these areas and therefore omit others. For example: a camps cost might seem like a great bargain, but it wont mean a great deal if the staff and program are inad equate. Be sure to involve your child in the selection process. Look at the total camp program when making your final deci sion. Finally, ask for references of families who have had their child attend the camp. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. For Further Information: *NS Mayport Youth Activity Centers Summer Camps, https://auth. cnic.navy.mil/mayport/ FleetandFamilyReadiness/Choosing a Summer Camp For Your ChildJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingWith Mothers Day approaching in a few weeks, its time for hus bands to do a little inven tory on how they are doing. If a man really wants to know, all it requires is the bravery to ask. In a private quiet moment with your wife, ask her to honestly tell you how you are measur ing up. Be ready for the truth and dont get defensive when she tells you that you have room for improvement. Here are a few things to contemplate on your per formance: Do I come home after work and plop down in a chair with the TV remote in hand? Do I immedi ately start surfing the net or begin playing Call of Duty or Halo? Do I kiss my wife in an affec tionate way when I come home from work and ask what I can do to help? Do I give the kids a quick hug and then send them off to their mother when they need some help? Do I take care of my own clothes by hanging them up, putting dirty ones in the hamper, including my dirty socks? Do I help with the laundry? Do I tell my wife how much I appreciate her and all she does? Am I specific in my compliments to her, such as Thank you for making chicken cacciatore. You know how much I like it. It was really good. Thank you so much. Do I help clean up after dinner and help wash the dishes? Do I help fix meals? (Particularly important if both of you are employed) Do I really listen and act on what she wants, or do I ignore it? Do I keep my promises to her? Do I take her on a weekly date? Am I honest with my wife? Do I speak to her respectfully, never in a demeaning or insult ing way? Do I kneel and Ask Your Wife Am I A Good Husband?Lt. Brandon Harding CHSMWL CHAPLAINSpray with her and tell the Lord how thankful I am for her? Do I look after her when shes ill? Am I completely faithful to my wife? (Which includes complete avoidance of pornogra phy) There are many other items that could be added to the list. If you are brave enough to ask your wife how you are doing you will know what else you need to work on. Sometimes we need to hear the hard truth to make lasting changes. Make a commitment to change for a lifetime and not just a few weeks. Finally, it has been often said that the best gift a father can give his children is to love their mother. I have seen the wisdom of this quote in the thousands of hours I have spent counseling couples and families over the years. When a father shows love and respect to his wife it sends a power ful message to the chil dren. It also creates a protective barrier around them. Of all the gifts to give this Mothers Day, resolve to give this gift, its effects will last a lifetime. See Camp, Page 3 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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SupportServices/ Families/ ChildandYouthPrograms/ SchoolAgeCare/index. htm *2012 Summer Camp Issue sponsored by The First Coast Parent Family Newspaper http://web.mac.com/ SCOTTCOLLINGS/Site/ Welcome.htm *Operation Military Kids, a nationwide pro gram to provide support to children and youth of families impacted by global war on terror ism www.operationmili tarykids.org *Florida 4-H Military Program, part of OMK, supports the civilian turned military families in Florida before, dur ing, and after parents are deployed www.florida4h. org *National Camp Association, Inc. (NCA) provides feature articles and information about summer sleep-a-way camp, a free summer camp referral service, staff placement service, and information on camp supplies www.summer camps.orgFrom Page 2Campchange, said Garcia. We want to take all those existing person nel support programs, those in development and some new initia tives, bring them together in one group to ensure every Sailor, Marine and their families have the tools they need to ensure they exceed and excel in the coming decade, he added. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative has five core areas: safety, physical fitness, inclusion, readiness and continuum of service. Though Garcia addressed each of these topics, he focused on those initiatives that high light the importance of sexual assault awareness. Our leadership, our khakis, our chiefs mess, and our wardrooms will receive training to ensure their commands operate in an environment where there is no stigma to rais ing your hand and point ing out a susceptibility, said Garcia. A suscepti bility or an area of poten tial threat or danger to another Sailor or Marine. Cmdr. Roy Love, Afloat Training Group Mayport commanding officer, said the town hall sent posi tive messages that helped many Sailors and Marines rest some of their con cerns they had in regard to their careers in service. It lets us know our leadership cares and theyre looking out for our best interest, said Love. The Sailors and Marines have a great opportunity to talk to the people who make the decisions that affect them and their futures. Chief Naval Air Crewman (NAC/AW) Curtlynn Harris, an instructor from Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, said his Sailors were delighted to hear that the Enlisted Retention Board would not return. I think the informa tion was excellent, Harris said. It put out some of the angst, a lot of people had questions about the ERB and Sailors just want to know what the future holds for them in the Navy. We went over it all as far as benefits and pay, retention, education, families and benefits, every thing, he added. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative consolidates a set of objec tives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resil iency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.From Page 1ASNGet Rid Of Unwanted Prescription DrugsFrom NCISThe Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Branch Health Clinic Mayport will give the public an opportunity get rid of expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs on April 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bring your medications for disposal to the Navy Exchange Mayport Main Entrance or the Navy Exchange/Commissary Courtyard at NAS Jacksonville. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Last October, Americans turned in 377,080 pounds -188.5 tons of prescription drugs at more than 5,300 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,000 federal, state and local law enforce ment partners. In its three previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in almost a million pounds nearly 500 tons of pills. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescrip tion drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused pre scription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabi net. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for dispos ing of unused medicinesflushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards. Four days after the first event, Congress passed the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an ulti mate user of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to enti ties authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents controlled substances in certain instances. DEA is drafting regula tions to implement the Act, a process that can take as long as 24 months. Until new regulations are in place, law enforce ment agencies like NCIS and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug take-back events every few months. Additional local area collection sites and infor mation can be found by visiting www.dea.gov, and clicking on the link, Got Drugs? THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Taylor Participates In Operation Ocean Shield USS Taylor Public AffairsDuring the past sev eral weeks, guided-mis sile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and its visit, board, search, and sei zure (VBSS) team, have actively patrolled the Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) and pro vided security assistance to several merchant ves sels transiting through the Gulf of Aden region. Taylor, with embarked Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 Detachment 9, is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508 Operation Ocean Shield. This Operation is NATOs counter piracy mission in the Gulf of Aden and India Ocean. Ocean Shield is a clear demonstration of the alliances capability in the maritime field, and its flexibility in meeting the variety of challenges posed in todays security environment, said Cmdr. J. R. Hill, USS Taylors commanding officer. As part of the NATO Task Force Taylor com plements the European Union, Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), and independent nations units tackling piracy in the region,Hill added. Taylors mission is to patrol the waters of the Gulf of Aden, the Arabian Sea and Somali Basin, and investigate suspi cious maritime activ ity. Additionally, the ship supports merchant ves sels requiring assistance while transiting the IRTC and other regional water ways. Most vessels we have encountered are legiti mate fishing or trading and are not involved with piracy operations, but the data collected helps provide information for pattern of life analysis and evidence to compare between boardings that may help classify a dhow as a pirate vessel more clearly during a boarding, said Lt. Michael Modeer, Taylors senior VBSS Officer. The information col lected during each board ing operation is forward ed to other CTF 508 assets participating in Operation Ocean Shield, as well as other counter-piracy task force units from the European Union Naval Force (EUNAVFOR), CMF, and other national contributors to provide increased regional mari time awareness and secu rity for the international merchant community. Piracy and maritime crime are a significant concern to the interna tional community, con tributing nations, nongovernment and commer cial organizations. Taylor has conducted numerous maritime secu rity assist visit (MSAV) boardings in support of NATOs counter-piracy efforts. As the deployment continues, Taylor expects to remain vigilant on patrol, providing the maritime presence and security necessary to support counter-piracy efforts throughout the region. -Photo by CTSN Anders CarterU.S. Navy Sailors, assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylors (FFG 50) visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team investigate a dhow operating in the area as an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter, from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Light (HSL) 48, patrols over head. -Photo by CT3 Michael TammenU.S. Navy Sailors, assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylors (FFG 50) visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team disembark a dhow after com pleting a routine compliant boarding. Taylor is assigned to commander, NATO Task Force 508 Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interception opera tions and counter-piracy missions in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseElectronics Technician 3rd Class Gem Belen cleans and refills condiment bottles as part of his food service atten dant (FSA) duties on the mess decks aboard guided-mis sile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50). -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseGas Turbine Systems Electrical 2nd Class Phillip Goss conducts a preventative maintenance check on an unin terruptable power supply in the main engine room aboard USS Taylor (FFG 50). -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseChief Aviation Machinists Mate Luisito Delosreyes and Chief Quartermaster Carlos Crummie, the Chiefs Mess oldest and youngest members, cut the cake during the Chief Petty Officer Birthday ceremony aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50). -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseFirecontrolman 3rd Class Bradley Reist, assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), conducts maintenance checks on the MK15 close-in weapons system. -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseChief Culinary Specialist Vincent Hogans prepares to decorate a cake for crewmembers celebrating a birthday aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50).

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 5 Behind The Scenes Of A SECNAV Visit USS Simpson Public Affairs Of ficerThe sun was starting to set over the Focsle and Boatswains Mate Seaman Joshua R. Maurer looked at his watch. 19:05 it read, he figured it was soon to the end of the work day for him. He looked around at the rest of the guys around him, his supervisor Boatswains Mate 3rd Class James Bare and his peers Seaman Brian D. Massie, Seaman Daniel K. Swope, and Seaman Tyler E. Stark. They were all covered in busted up paint dust, primer and paint from previous days. The Secretary of the Navy Ray E. Mabus was visit ing in less than a week in Praia, Cape Verde and this group of Sailors was chosen out of their par ent division of deck to head up the preservation project tackling the unde featable enemy of corro sion and to have the ship reflect the quality of the crew on board Simpson. Mabus was to conduct office calls with the local government to reinforce the United States com mitment to support ing and training the host nation to defend the free dom of trade within the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) that encompasses the waters around Cape Verde. To prevent piracy, illegal drug trafficking and illegal fishing are three of the major concerns for many of these West African nations that have grown significantly in recent memory. For Maurer and his crew, the only thing that mattered was the pride they had in completing the task at hand. Chipping paint on each set of bits and chocks down to bare metal, preparing with primer and paint ing with haze grey was on his mind. The pride that the BMs and undes ignated Seaman took in their work was in evident in the details, such as the Boatswains Mate anchors painted on the mooring line bits. The work required was not limited to Deck division though; OI divi sion was busy getting the centerline pee-way that connects the mid-ships and flight deck up to par. Operational Specialist Ashley J. Ontiveros and Cortes A. Simmons and their peers spent two days preparing the centerline p-way for the SECNAVs arrival. Once the ship suc cessfully moored, all of Operations Department got started rigging a tent large enough to encom pass the entire flight deck. At reveille the follow ing morning, the crew was up and engaged in preparations. The Food Service Attendants staged all the reception gear and tables on the flight deck under the tent while keeping a watchful-eye as Electricians Mate were furiously rigging all the lighting around them. Culinary Specialist 1st Class John F. Blake began work on the cer emonial cakes down on the mess deck while the rest of his guys prepared the food. Right above him, different divisions were conducting Dress Whites uniform inspec tions to be worn later that night. The Electronics Technicians and Interior Communications Electricians, includ ing Second Class Petty Officers Bryson K. Running and Sean M. Joker, assembled and test ed the microphone and speakers on the Focsle where Mabus would speak. Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Leonard H. Milliken, walked around with his Executive Officer, Cmdr. Christopher G. Follin, and Command Senior Chief Glenn R. Daniel throughout the day thanking his Sailors for their hard work. Milliken said he was impressed to see the ship coming together and could not be happier with the effort put forward by his crew. After a long-night of rigging the reception tent on the flight deck, hang ing bunting along the life rails, touching up the sides, and stationing cer emonial quarterdeck gear, BM3 Bares mind was not concentrated around get ting the last few items ready. Rather, he was thinking of his eight sideboys and their uniforms, reminding himself to make sure he took a look at them again to correct any last second problems. He had been selected to be the Honor Boatswains Mate and, along with eight side boys, would be the first representatives of the ship to meet the SECNAV and render hon ors on the quarterdeck. After two hours, it was all over. Mabus had arrived, promoted CWO2 Ion T. Revak, re-enlisted Fire Controlman 2nd Class Dustin F. Coons, Personnel Specialist 1st Class Leon R. Buxton, awarded four Navy and Marine Corps Accommodation Medals, issued out the ships Senior Sailor, Junior Sailor, and Bluejacket of the Quarter awards. Mabus had spoken to the crew, answered a few questions and socialized at the flight-deck reception before departing. For Maurer, he said that as he walked back to berthing to take off his whites and overheard other crew members discussing liberty plans, he thought, I think itd be nice just to go to sleep early tonight. -Photo by MCSN Brian T. GluntSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus speaks with Sailors during an all-hands call commending the crew for their participation in Africa Partnership Station (APS) aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). APS is an international security cooperation initiative aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. -Photo by MCC Sam ShaversMabus pins an award on a Sailor during a ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). -Photo by MCSN Brian T. GluntFire Controlman 2nd Class Gerald Delaney cleans a close-in weapons system aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) for an upcoming departmental inspection. -Photo by MCSN Brian T. GluntGunner's Mate Seaman Apprentice Travis Locker counts live ammunition on the main deck of the USS Simpson (FFG 56) prior to uploading for a calibration test fire exercise.

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The Surfside Fitness class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series NOFFS (Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series) is a pro gram designed to improve the operational perfor mance of Navy personnel through fitness and nutrition. Emphasis is placed on injury prevention via tissue management and refueling. 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 20/20/20: A fusion of our Low Impact, Resistance and Intro Mind Body classes. Twenty minutes will be devoted to cardio train ing, twenty minutes to strength training and twenty minutes to flex ibility training. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 Provides a solid foundation to H.I.T. (High Intensity Training). Focus is placed on devel opment of proper form & mechanics for various lifts & bodyweight move ments. Participation will result in a solid platform. 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning MWR 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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April 20: Jamaican Me Crazy Night. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. at Castaways Lounge. Live music, food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 April 21: UFC 145: Jones vs. Evans. 10 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 April 24-27: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 13. 270-5452. April 25: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by FRC. For tickets, call AZC Nanney at (904) 270-6100 x149 April 25: Spring Fling. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Karaoke, food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 May 1 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 May 2: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 May 5: Ole! Run For the Border. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Latin Fusion band Conklave, free food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 May 5: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 8: Armed Forces 10K Run/ 5K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. May 8: Captains Cup Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. May 9: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) May 9: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 May 9: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 May 9: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 270-5126 x3115 May 11: Mountain Bike Trail Race (Time Trial). 11 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by May 8. 270-5451 May 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 12: 2012 Mayport Music Fest. 6:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Switchfoot, Fuel & Natalie Stovall. Admission opens at 5 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 20: Jamaican Me Crazy Night. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. at Castaways Lounge. Live music, food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 April 20: Ghosts & Gravestones Trolley of the Doomed Ride in St. Augustine. Van departs 5 p.m. Signup deadline April 16. Cost $5 April 21: UFC 145: Jones vs. Evans. 10 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 April 22: Boom Shakalakas Hawaiian Cuisine Dinner Trip. Van departs 1 p.m. Transportation Only April 24-27: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 13. 270-5452. April 25: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by FRC. For tickets, call AZC Nanney at (904) 270-6100 x149 April 25: Spring Fling. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Karaoke, food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 April 25: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 27: Laser Tag Extreme. 8 p.m. at the Liberty Center. FREE Apr 28: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. FREE. April 29: Free Drum Lesson. Introductory/ beginner guitar lesson at Georges Music. Stop by the Liberty Center front desk to reserve your place. Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. FREE April 30: Dart Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 1: Boom Shakalakas Hawaiian Cuisine Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only May 2: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 May 3: Motherload of Comedy. Chris Killian & Richie Holliday. Van Departs Liberty Center 6 p.m. FREE. May 4: Rock Climbing. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Cost $15. May 5: Ole! Run For the Border. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Latin Fusion band Conklave. 270-7205 May 5: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 7

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BBC Scholarship Deadline ExtendedFrom Balfour Beatty Communities FoundationThe Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to honoring military per sonnel active, disabled and fallen and their families,has extended the application deadline for its academic scholar ship program to May 15. High school and under graduate students resid ing in Balfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport are eli gible. One of the Foundations primary goals is to pro mote the pursuit of edu cation and a commitment to community leadership through academic schol arships for the children of active duty service mem bers that live in Balfour Beatty Communities fam ily housing. With this extension, the Foundation hopes to ensure wide spread awareness and participation in this important program. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation Scholarship applications for the 2012-2013 aca demic year are available online at http://www. bbcommunitiesfounda tion.org/scholarships. aspx Shred Personal Papers With BBCFrom Balfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities is teaming up with the Shredding Source, Inc. to offer residents of Naval Station Mayport and the surrounding area the opportu nity to shred all of their unwanted personal documents at the Ribault Bay Community Center from noon-3 p.m. on April 19. With the threat of identity theft coming largely from paper documents it is a good idea to shred all docu ments that are no longer needed, especially those that contain your personal information. This free event is open to the public and participants can bring up to 50 boxes of items to shred. A mobile shred truck will be located in the parking lot of the community center, 1201 Assisi Lane in the off base housing community. The paper collected from the event will be compressed and securely transported to the paper mill. The recycled material is placed into tanks of hot water and bleached to break it down into pulp. From this pulp state, paper towels and toilet paper are created. Some items that are suggested for shredding are: credit card statements, old checks, IRS tax returns and anything a thief could use to steal your identity. Unacceptable items are: cardboard, hard copy books, dry or wet trash, plastics or metals, hazardous materials and prescription bottles. For complete guidelines for shredding and keeping personal documents, go to www.facebook.com/may porthomes and click on the events tab. Taking On Supplies Employee Of Quarter Lunch On April 27From StaffNaval Station Civilian Employee presentation/ luncheon will be held on Tuesday, May 1 at 11:30 a.m., Ocean Breeze Conference Center. All are welcome to attend and support the nominees. Lunch is $8, pay at the door. RSVP to sandra.bar rett1@navy.mil by Friday, April 27. Nominees for Employee of the Quarter (1st Quarter) are: Ron Kremmerer, Security Ronald Renta, Air Ops Tom Krygowski, MWR Scott McPherson, PWD-Photo by MC3 Nick C. ScottLt. Cmdr. Carl Brobst, from Kingston, Pa., executive officer of the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), observes a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Serving Those Who Serve Our Country.Catholic Charities USAA CFC participant. Provided as a public service.1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Casting Calls For SUPERNANNYFrom Shed Media USThe parenting series AMERICAS SUPERNANNY is currently casting families for the next season of the show. The casting team is sending producers to the Jacksonville area to find families interested in receiving personalized advice for their unique circumstances. This season producers are searching for fam ilies with unique circumstances and challeng es. Deborah Tillman has an extraordinary abil ity to identify and tackle the toughest issues facing Americas families today. Interested parents can call (877) NANNY TIME (1-877-626-6984) or e-mail supernanny@ ShedMediaUS.com for more information. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Navy Wins Armed Forces Volleyball Tourney Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East Detachment SoutheastThe Navys Women and Men Volleyball teams came out on top at the 2012 Armed Forces Volleyball Tournament hosted by Naval Station Mayport on April 12. Military teams from the Navy, Marine Corps, Army and Air Force com peted for the Armed Forces Championship Gold Medal. Five male teams and four female teams played hard begin ning April 12 at 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. playing every hour on the hour on each court. Air Force Airman Kristiana Scott said she was overjoyed to be part of the competition. Its really exciting to be out here and to be able to represent the U. S. Air Force while playing a sport that I love, said Scott who is attached to Air Combat Command Davis Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona. Teams went on to fin ish up games on April 13 then went on to semi-final matches that led up to the championship matches on April 14. Both of the number one Navy teams for the men and the women won the Championship gold medal and the Navys number two female team, won the silver medal. This win was extra spe cial because my partner is the same guy I teamed with when we won back in 2010, said Lt.j.g. Austin Lanteigne, attached to VP-10 out of NAS Jax. Typically the teams that won Gold would go on to the World Championship overseas, but this year there will not be one so Lanteigne said he will look forward to hopefully playing and wining again next year. -Photos by MC2 Salt CebeAbove, Lt. Ashley Musser and Lt. Mary Arvidson of the Navy team wear their gold medals for placing first amongst the women at the Armed Forces Beach Volley Ball Tournament on board Naval Station Mayport. The Navy women also brought home the silver at the tourna ment. Below, Senior Chief Air Crewman John Goings and Lt.j.g. Austin Lanteigne of the Navy win gold in the men tournament. U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Katie Bachelder returns the ball during a volleyball match against an U.S. Army team at the 2012 Armed Forces Beach Volley Ball Tournament on board NS Mayport. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 9

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FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. April 23-26 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 April 24, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 April 24, 1-2 p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses, FFSC Room 719 April 25, 11 a.m. -12 p.m., Raising Financially Fit Kids FFSC Room 719 April 25, 34:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 April 26, 8a.m. -12 p.m., FAP Key Personnel Training, Building One Room 1124 April 26, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC Room 702\ April 26, 9a.m.-12 p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. April 30, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new tech niques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to iden tify barriers to effective communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. By Appointment, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., Resume Review, FFSC TBD Friday, April 20 The Ladies Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association #290, 390 Mayport Rd., will hold a chicken fried steak dinner from 5-8 p.m. Donations $10. Take out orders welcome. Open to the public. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, April 21 First Coast chil dren and their families are invited to experi ence a fun day of learning about ways to make healthy life-style changes through increased physi cal activity and proper diet. Come out and play at Healthy Family Training Camp, supported by the Fraternal Order of Police Foundation, AvMed Health Plans and 93.3 the Beat from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pepsi Cabana Villas, Everbank Field. The United Methodist Men of Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Rd., are cooking up a spaghetti dinner 5-7 p.m. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children under 12; 3 and under eat free. Take out is available. For more information, call 2495370. PAL will host the National PAL Mentoring Day FUNFEST from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Northside PAL Location (2165 W. 33rd Street). Potential mentors, men tees, and their families will enjoy free food, pony rides, games, arts and crafts, and music at the FUNFEST. The events purpose is to raise aware ness of the mentoring program and to expand the program by recruit ing new mentors and mentees. PAL will also be offering free vendor spots for community partners. For information on becoming a commu nity partner or mentor for this event, please contact Larry Major, Mentoring Coordinator, at 355-3308 x 18 or email Larry.Major@ jaxpal.com. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive, will celebrate Earth Day with a volunteer beach clean up from noon-3 p.m. Help keep Florida clean and beautiful at one of the First Coasts premier state parks. Garbage bags and gloves will be provided for this event. Closed-toe shoes, gloves, a hat and sunscreen are recommended. Park entrance fees waived for participants. Tell the staff at the ranger station you are here to volunteer for Earth Day and meet at pavilion number one. For more information, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. The Armis Club of Jacksonville in conjunc tion with the Meet-up. com and Jacksonville Public Library are hosting Family Game Day at various library branches around the city, everyone is invited to learn, play, and enjoy board games and make new friends. The Webb Wesconnett Regional Branch Conference Room B, 6887 103rd St, will be held in the Community Room from 2-5:30 p.m. Jacksonville Genealogical Society, Inc will hold their monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. at The Webb-Wesconnett Library Branch, 6887 103rd Street, in the auditorium. Speaker is Geraldine Kohn and she will present a pro gram on Genealogy and Social Medias: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. The presentation will show the benefits of using social media in our genealogy searchers. Saturday, April 28 The Isle of Faith Church, 1821 San Pablo Road S., will hold its Yard Sale from 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. to benefit Beaches Habitat. Call 221-1700 to donate items. Tree Hill Nature Center, 7152 Lone Star Rd., will hold its 11th Annual Joseph A. Strasser Butterfly Festival from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This years event will feature a live butterfly exhibit, enter tainment from folk singer Mrs. Kate and harpist Pat Cloud, hands-on educa tional programs in the Amphitheater, live ani mals, free crafts for kids, local vendors of hand made and eco-friendly arts and crafts, a variety of food and drink options (a portion of food sales are donated to Tree Hill), face painting, chalk drawing by Jax Chalk Fest and much more. The highlight of the event each year is a live butterfly release. This years release will take place at 3:30 p.m. (weather permitting) and will feature a Dreamer from Dreams Come True help ing release the butterflies. The Armis Club of Jacksonville in conjunc tion with the Meet-up. com and Jacksonville Public Library are hosting Family Game Day at various library branches around the city, everyone is invited to learn, play, and enjoy board games and make new friends. The Highlands Regional Branch Conference Room B, 1826 Dunn Ave, will be held in the Community Room from 2-5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 5 Come enjoy making Kiwi Pineapple Orange Jam and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center from 9 a.m.-noon or 14 p.m. Class space is lim ited. Cost is $20 per per son. Pre-registration and prepayment should be made by April 30. To register call Jeannie at 2557450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Commands Honor CPO Birthday -Photos submittedAbove left, active duty and retired chief petty officers at SERMC Mayport participate in a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 119th birthdy of the U.S. Navys Chief Petty Officers. Above right, USS Hu City Command Master Chief Raymond Charest Jr. and the ships chiefs mess stand at attention during the ships flag raising ceremony held in honor of the birthdday. Hu City chiefs continued the birthday celebration with their families throughout the afternoon.Navy Names Destroyer USS Lyndon B. JohnsonFrom DoNSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today the next Zumwaltclass destroyer will be named the USS Lyndon B. Johnson. The selection of Lyndon B. Johnson, designated DDG 1002, continues the Navy tradition of naming ships after presidents and honors the nations 36th president. The USS Lyndon B. Johnson is the 34th ship named by the Navy after a U.S. president. I am pleased to honor President Johnson with the naming of this ship, Mabus said. His dedi cation to a life of public service included bravely stepping forward to fight for his country during our entry into World War II. A Texas congressman, Johnson was the first member of Congress to enlist in the military fol lowing the start of World War II. After his naval ser vice, Johnson was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1948, where he served as both minority and majority leader before being elect ed vice president Nov. 8, 1960. Following President Kennedys assassination Nov. 22 1963, Johnson succeeded to the presi dency, finished the remaining term, and was reelected for a full term as president, by the greatest percentage of total popu lar vote (61 percent) ever attained by a presidential candidate. Johnsons time as president was marked by the passage of programs that greatly influenced and impacted education, healthcare and civil rights for generations to come. He signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, enacting comprehensive provisions protecting the right to vote and guard ing against racial dis crimination. His work on civil rights continued with the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which guaran teed voting rights for all people, regardless of race. Johnson signed leg islation establish ing Medicare, which allowed millions of elderly Americans access to cheaper medical ser vices. He also launched the Head Start Program, which provided preschool children from low-income families with classes, medical care, and other services. As a naval officer, Johnson requested a com bat assignment after the attack on Pearl Harbor and served in the Pacific theater during World War II. After returning from active duty ser vice, Johnson reported back to Navy leaders and Congress on what he believed were deplorable conditions for the warf ighters, and continued to fight for better standards for all military members. USS Lyndon B. Johnson will be the third Zumwaltclass (DDG 1000) destroyer. Construction began on the ship at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works April 4 and is expected to deliver to the Navy in fiscal 2018. The multimission DDG 1000 class destroyers are designed for sustained operations in the litto rals and land attack and will provide indepen dent forward presence and deterrence, sup port special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. This warship inte grates numerous critical technologies, systems, and principles into a com plete warfighting system. Zumwalt ships will be 600 feet in length, have a beam of 80.7 feet, displace approximately 15,000 tons, and capable of mak ing 30 knots speed. Each ship will have a crew size of 148 officers and Sailors. While he works to defend the country, St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgMatt Pasco Chief Warrant Of cer 2 and his daughter Delilah, a St. Jude patient. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 11

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CNRSE Signs Month Of The Military Child, Child Abuse Prevention Proclamation Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. John Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a Month of the Military Child and National Child Abuse Prevention Month proc lamation on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 9. With the signing, Scorby proclaimed April as the Month of the Military Child and Child Abuse Prevention Month throughout the Southeast Region. National Child Abuse Prevention Month and the Month of the Military Child both run through the end of the month. This proclamation was intended to help rec ognize the role that chil dren play in the armed forces community, as well as raise awareness of child maltreatment pre vention, Scorby said. Military children deal with a unique set of challenges as they constantly adapt to their parents military obligations, and it is the responsibility of many people throughout our communities, from schools to law enforce ment agencies, to support parents and make sure our children are raised in an engaged and support ive environment. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded more than 15,000 substanti ated reports of child abuse during the last ten years. While those num bers have been steadily decreasing, many inci dents go unreported, said Jeannette Werby, NRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. There are many rea sons that abuse goes unreported, Werby said. Many people who know about abuse dont report it because they think its none of their business or are concerned about the stigma a report creates and the damage it may cause to ones career. In many other cases, injuries from abuse are not visible. Also, many children do not report abuse because they worry they will not be believed, have been told not to talk to anyone and have been threat ened with physical harm, or simply feel responsible themselves for the abuse. According to Werby, the best way to combat child abuse is to raise aware ness about it through educational programs and events like the proclamation signing. Raising awareness about child abuse under scores that the problem is still here and so are the people who care about its resolution. Affirming at the highest levels that child abuse has serious, long-term outcomes for children and their fami lies adds a compelling dimension to the message that child abuse is unac ceptable. Those in lead ership roles set the tone and course for awareness, response and interven tion, she said. In addition to child abuse prevention, the proclamation is also intended to raise aware ness about the sacri fices made by military children. According to Military K-12 Partners, there are more than 1.2 million military children today, and since 2001, approximately two mil lion children have experi enced the deployment of a parent. I would like to person ally express my apprecia tion for the sacrifices our military children make, Scorby said. Despite the many challenges they face, they remain strong and resilient. The Month of the Military Child was estab lished in 1986 by former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger to underscore the role mili tary children play in the armed forces community. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center. Photo by MC2 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. John Scorby Jr. signs a Month of the Military Child and National Child Abuse Prevention Month proclamation in front of members of the Navy Region Southeast Family Advocacy Program on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville. CNRSE Signs Sexual Assault Awareness ProclamationRegion Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. John Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a sexual assault awareness proclamation on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 9. The decree proclaims April as NRSE Sexual Assault Awareness Month and emphasizes the regions com mitment to the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program. The signing coincides with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which runs through the end of April. The Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program provides an opportunity for our installations to raise awareness and to promote the prevention of sexual violence, Scorby said. Sexual assault is a crime that erodes our operational readiness and leaders at all levels of the chain of command need to communicate that we will not tolerate it! Prevention of sexual assault is everyones duty. According to Julie Mooney, NRSE credentialing and program specialist, the region recorded 103 reports of sexual assault in 2011 and 118 in 2010. Leadership input is of the utmost importance with sexual assault awareness and prevention efforts. The Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in 2009 and it has significantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the primary focus of rais ing leaderships awareness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention efforts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention efforts will have a signifi cant impact on the effectiveness of the Navys overall efforts, Mooney said. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of support services, including clinical counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advo cate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) located at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-9955247 or via http://www.safehelpline.org. To find out more about the Navys SAPR pro gram, contact your local FFSC or SARC, or visit http://cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/FleetandFamilyReadiness/ FamilyReadiness/FleetAndFamilySupportProgram/ SexualAssaultPreventionandResponse/index.htm Two months after the sexual assault avoidance program began; a stu dent of Thompsons was raped. When he arrived at the hospital to see her, the only words she could utter were, I did what you taught me to do, why didnt it work? The emotional impact of that moment changed the course of his life. Since then he devoted himself to studying the whys and hows of sexual aggression. He has conducted countless inter views with convicted rapists, psychologists, doctors, as well as thou sands of survivors. He has trained and worked beside police officers throughout the country. For more information, call FFSC at 270-6600 ext. 1730.From Page 1Zebra Dont Throw Away Old JeansFrom CSADDIn support of Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Naval Station Mayport Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) will hold a Jean Drive through the month of April. These donations will be presented to Battered Womens Rape Recovery Team of Jacksonville at the end of the month. Mayport CSADD team have place drop off bins in the fol lowing locations: Building 1, Chapel, CPO Club, Fleet and Family Support Center, Mini Mart, and Housing Office. Clothing donations only, not money. will be available on a phased basis by military service from June to October. Officials said the schedule will allow service finance employees to complete and thor oughly test the complex changes needed to the various payroll systems. Defense finance officials said more specific deploy ment dates on Roth TSP elections will soon be available on www.dfas.mil. Officials said service members and their families may contact Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 to sched ule an appointment with a financial consultant.From Page 1Roth 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 13 Coupon Policy Changes At CommissaryDeCA public affairs specialistChanges are on the way in how commissaries handle coupons and product returns without receipts, among other things, as the Defense Commissary Agency enacts customer service policy chang es to protect the commissary benefit. The average coupon user might not notice the pol icy changes because they are aimed at preventing possible misuse of the commissary ben efit primarily using coupons to get large amounts of cash back, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Commissary shoppers are big users of coupons, as evidenced by DeCAs consistent rank ing among the top 10 grocery retailers in coupon redemp tions over the past several years. Commissaries welcome coupon usage, and to acquaint customers with the changes in the coupon acceptance policy, it has been posted on the agencys website at http://www. commissaries.com/inside_ deca/publications/directives/ DeCAD40_6_PC_3.pdf and on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/YourCommissary. Key changes, which go into effect May 1, include: a customer, in conjunction with cash, whenever a transac tion total reflects $25 or more is owed to the customer due to coupon overages (when the face value of the coupon exceeds the selling price of the item purchased and the trans action results in a negative bal ance) customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is presented showing the merchandise was originally purchased with gift cards customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is not presented suspected privilege abuse tance policy that clarifies dotscan barcode requirements and pin requirements for unique numbering, that photocopies and counterfeit coupons are not accepted, and that coupons must be printed in English The changes harness the scope of the new commissary gift card, which has been in use since last summer. Available only in denominations of $25 and $50, issuing gift cards as an alternative to paying out large sums of cash brings DeCA in line with other retailers prac tices and ensures DeCAs cash flow is not adversely impacted. Amounts under $25 will be in cash. Commissaries are providers of a benefit that sell groceries at cost, and using the gift cards to cover certain refunds and coupon overages discourages practices contrary to DeCAs mission, Jeu noted. We value coupon usage because it helps our customers boost their savings, Jeu said. These changes are in the best interest of all concerned to help ensure that coupons continue to be a great source of savings for our customers. Fleet Reserve #91 Poker Run The Fleet Reserve on Collins Road will host its 6th Annual Poker Run for the USO on April 21. Registration from 11 a.m.1 p.m. Last bike in by 5 p.m. Registration is $10 with a $200 guaranteed winner take all! There are lots of door prizes, 50/50 raffle, food and live entertainment by start ing at 5:30 p.m. Stops at Rehab Saloon, American Legion Middleburg, VNV/ LV Clubhouse, Rusty Pub, Steel Pony, ending back at the Fleet Reserve. Best of five cards win. For more information call 264-2833. 2012 Birdies For Charity Program Your Greater Jax Area USO is once again pleased to be participat ing in the 2012 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique, communitybased fundraising initia tive is held in conjunc tion with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 7-13, 2012. If you visit www.birdies forcharity.playerschampi onship.com, you will have the opportunity to make a donation to Greater Jax Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individ ual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2012 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an addition al $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-break er question will be used to determine the winner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 9. We hope you will take this opportunity to support your Greater Jax Area USO and THE PLAYERS by visiting www.birdies forcharity.playerscham pionship.com. Donations can be made online with a credit card. Or, you may donate via personal check made out to Greater Jax Area USO and mail to: Greater Jax Area USO, P.O. Box 108, NAS Jacksonville, FL 32212-0108. Please annotate Birdies For Charityon your personal check. A cash donation may be made at either your Mayport or NAS Jax Area USO Centers. All donations received via this program go directly to support your Greater Jax Area USO. You Could Win A 1948 Pontiac Torpedo! Do you like old antique cars? The American Legion Riders Chapter 283 has proudly offered a 1948 Pontiac Torpedo car in a raffle drawing to be held on June 1 at 8 pm. NAS Jax USO and Mayport USO now have Donation Tickets available for pur chase! The tickets are only $10. Stop by your USO center today! All sales are cash only at the centers or at Post 283. K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount pro vides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a fam ily annual pass, which allows up to eight peo ple in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addition, hon orably discharged vet erans who have service connected disabilities, and surviving spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifi cations and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ The USO and RocketLife have partnered to deliver a heart-warming oppor tunity for the men and women of the armed forces and their fami lies. The Personal Photo Book program enables troops serving abroad and their families to create 20-page personal photo books and ship them to any APO/FPO address for free. These full-color, customized photo books are small enough to fit in a soldiers cargo pockets yet can hold more than 60 photos of loved ones. RocketLife prints the books for free, and the USO pays for the ship ping. To get started, visit http://uso.myphotoproducts.com. United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO NEXs Now Accepting Manufacturers CouponsFrom NEXCOMCustomers know they can save money every day by shopping their NEX. In addi tion to the average 23 percent savings and no sales tax, cus tomers can also save money by using manufacturers cents off coupons on their NEX purchases. Redeeming coupons pro vides our customers anoth er way to save money when shopping at their NEX, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Senior Vice President Store Operations. Coupons are a great way to save even more when shop ping for the necessities your family needs. NEXs accept current valid manufacturers coupons for the item featured on the cou pon, subject to its terms and conditions. This includes online Internet coupons, except for those coupons offering free products, coupons for Proctor & Gamble (P&G) products or those determined to be fraudulent. The NEX does not double or triple the face value of a manufac turers coupon. The NEX accepts scratchoff, percent and cents-off coupons from the Army Air Force Exchange System (AAFES), the Marine Corps Exchange System (MCX) and the Coast Guard Exchange System (CGX). These can be percent and cents-off instore coupons, coupons pre sented in a coupon book, or printed from Facebook. All coupon terms and conditions apply. The NEX also accepts a manufacturers coupon and NEX coupon, or coupon from another Military Exchange Service, on the same item. The combination of the two coupons cannot exceed the price of the product; money is not returned to a custom er on the redemption of two coupons which exceeds the price of the product. In fiscal year 2011, over 1.6 million coupons were redeemed by NEX custom ers worldwide with a value of $2.3 million. When you combine our percentage savings with the extra savings from using cou pons, customers save a con siderable amount of money when they shop at their NEX, said Dow. Swing Into Spring With A Nutritious DietTRICARE Management ActivityWith nutrition such an essential part in staying healthy, TRICARE benefi ciaries can spring into a healthier life starting with a more nutritious diet. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, published by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, say a healthy diet should include plen ty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat milk products, lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts. The guide lines also recommend Americans choose foods with low saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt and added sugars. Dietary fats are needed, but should be limited to 20 to 30 percent of the amount of calories consumed, with no more than 10 per cent of total calories from saturated fat. Read the nutrition label to find out the amount and types of fats in foods. Many fruits and vege tables contain vitamins, minerals and fiber that may help prevent the development of chronic diseases including stroke, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think color when picking fruits and veggies to add to a diet. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) list several exam ples of fruits and veg etables that have a wide range of valuable nutri ents; green spinach, orange sweet potatoes, black beans, yellow corn, purple plums, red water melon and white onions. Beneficiaries can find the daily amount of fruits and vegetables needed at www.fruitsandveggies matter.gov. Balancing food choic es is vital for the body to get all its needed nutri ents and should include fiber, potassium, and vitamins A and C. Fiber can help decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. Potassium helps keep blood pressure at a healthy level. Vitamin A keeps eyes and skin healthy plus boosts the immune system. Vitamin C helps bones, teeth and gums remain healthy and aids in the healing pro cess. Beneficiaries looking for a healthy eating plan can visit www.mypyra mid.gov. The site offers information on how many calories are needed daily, how much food equals a portion and how to make healthy choices in each food group. Nutrition and exercise affect the overall health for today, tomorrow and the future. Eat fewer calories, make informed food choices and be physically active: these steps can help TRICARE beneficia ries maintain a healthy weight, reduce the risk of chronic disease and achieve overall health. For more information on how to live healthy visit www.tricare.mil/ healthyliving.



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com ASN Answers 21st Century Questions Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastAssistant Secretary of the Navy (ASN) for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (M&RA) con ducted town hall meet ings aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., Naval Station Mayport, Fla. and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. April 10-11. Juan M. Garcia III addressed more than 1,000 Sailors and Marines from the combined tri-base area during town hall meetings where he discussed topics such as the enlisted reten tion boards, tuition assistance and the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. There is no rea son to believe the operational tempo our Sailors and Marines have lived and operated under, the impact and sacrifice for them and their families for the last ten years is going to -Photo by MCSA Damian BergPersonnel Specialist 2nd Class Johnathan Ayala, assigned to Personal Support Detachment Mayport, asks Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Juan M. Garcia a question during an all-hands call at Naval Station Mayport to talk about the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. The initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone combat effectiveness.-Photo by MCSA Damian BergGarcia stands by to talk to Fire Controlman 1st Class Rich Possert, assigned to USS Farragut (DDG 99), after an all-hands call at NS Mayport. No Zebras At MayportFrom StaffFleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program is hosting author and sex crimes profiler Steve Thompsons No Zebras, No Excuses presenta tion on during three ses sions on April 26 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center for all Naval Station Mayport personnel, active duty and civilian. The sessions will be held from 9-10:30 a.m. for leadership and noon-1:30 p.m. or 2-3:30 p.m. for all personnel. Thompson has been a national figure on the subject of sexual aggres sion for several years, according to his website. As a graduate student, and martial arts instruc tor at Indiana University, Thompson focused his education towards psy chology and the study of human movement. In the spring of his second year, a rapist assault ed and terrorized several women on campus. This prompted intense public pressure on the university to educate the public in assault avoidance. As a black belt, Thompson was called upon to be the educator. Knowing little of the dynamics of rape, he still agreed to teach.TSP To Offer New Roth OptionAmerican Forces Press ServiceService members and Defense Department civilian employees who are eligible for the Thrift Savings Plan will soon have a new Roth option for retirement sav ings under the program, defense finance officials announced April 13. The change will allow participants to contrib ute after-tax dollars to the federal governmentsponsored retirement savings and investment plan, according to a Defense Finance and Accounting Service statement. As with traditional and Roth individual retire ment accounts, the TSPs two options will now allow plan participants to invest either beforeor after-tax dollars, although limits on annual contributions, catch-up contribu tions and agency match ing funds will remain the same, officials said. The plan, which is similar to a 401(k), is open to federal civilian employees and military members. For 2012, the maximum contribution is set at $17,000. Catch-up contri butions, available to par ticipants 50 or older, are capped at $5,500 over the standard limit. Agency matching con tributions are one percent for all eligible employ ees, dollar-for-dollar for the first three percent of pay an eligible employee contributes to the plan and 50 cents on the dol lar for eligible employee contributions of between three and five percent. Contributions above 5 percent of pay are not matched. The current plan treats all contributions as pretax dollars participants do not pay taxes on pay they put into the plan, but will pay deferred taxes when they receive those funds in retirement. The new Roth option will allow contributions that are taxed in the year they are made, but will be tax-free in retirement, TSP officials said. Greg T. Long, TSP executive director, urged in a letter to participants that they carefully consider whether Roth TSP would be to their advantage. As with all tax mat ters, you should seek the advice of a qualified tax or financial advisor for information pertaining to your specific tax situation, Long wrote. He added the plans website will soon offer a Roth calculator, and other website content including forms and publications will be updated in May to include information about the Roth feature. Defense finance offi cials said the Roth option -Photo by Paige GnannRepresentatives from Fleet and Family Support Center, Security and NCIS join Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, fifth from left, during the official proclamation signing to designate April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month on April 16 in Building One.See Zebras, Page 12 Navy Wins Gold-Photo by Paige GnannMWR Fitness Specialist LaPlace Satterfield sings as the NS Mayport Color Guard presents the colors during the opening ceremonies at the Armed Forces Volleyball Championship held behind Beachside Community Center last week. See full story, Page 9. See ASN, Page 3 See Roth, Page 12An LDO/CWO brief will be held for all E-5 and above on April 20 at 1 p.m. at the Base Chapel. SERMC Executive Officer, Capt. Pierre Fuller, will speak about his experience as an LDO. Fuller started his career as an Electricians Mate Fireman Apprentice in 1980 and commissioned in 1990.

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.FOn Monday, I signed a proclama tion declaring April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month at Naval Station Mayport. There has been a big push throughout the Navy to bring this topic to the forefront and it is a problem I will not tolerate. When our CNO Adm. Greenert visited on April 3, he met with base leadership 0-4 and above to stress the importance of combating sexual assault in the Navy. It goes against our very core values and ethos. Never should our brothers and sisters at arms fear each other. Our nation depends on us to defend it against our enemies and that includes criminals who may be hiding in our midst. It is up to all of us to step in when we see a shipmate threaten ing another. It is up to all of us to create a climate that does not tolerate these types of crimes. NS Mayport has a sexual assault hotline that is open 24/7 and is completely confidential. Call 358-7273 to talk with trained staff if you have been assaulted or know of someone who has. Congratulations to our Navy athletes for winning the Armed Forces Volleyball Championship...the men captured the gold and the women took gold and sil ver home. Naval Station Mayport spent last week hosting volleyball teams from the U.S. Army, Marines, U.S. Navy/Coast Guard. It was a real treat to be able to watch the teams bring their best to the sand and show their service pride. MWR Mayport improved and built an addi tional sand volleyball court to accom modate the championship and did an outstanding job as host. I know all of the teams felt welcomed to Mayport. It was great fun and we hope to host them again in the future. This Sunday, April 22 is Earth Day and a great time to focus on green initiatives, such as energy and water conservation, recycling and upcycling. Naval Station Mayport is constantly looking for ways to diminish our carbon footprint by installing energy efficient equipment, turning off lights in unused rooms, or zeroscap ing our public spaces. In honor of Earth Day, Mayport is teaming up with Public Works to hold a tree planting ceremony on April 25 at the NEX uniform shop on base. Thanks to Kira for donating the tree for this event. A significant piece of history will soon sail into our harbor as we welcome USCGC Eagle on April 27 through May 3. USCGC Eagle is the only active commissioned sailing vessel in the U.S. Maritime services. She is one of five training barques in the world. Her sister ships are Mirlea of Romania, Sagres II of Portugal, Gorch Fock II of Germany, and Tovarich of Russia. Todays Eagle is the seventh in a long line of proud cutters to bear the name. She was built as a training vessel for the German Navy as SNF Horst Wessel. She was awarded to the United States as reparations following WWII. On May 15, 1946, she was commissioned into the U.S. Coast Guard service as Eagle and sailed from Bremerhaven, Germany to New London, Conn. Eagle serves as a seagoing class room for approximately 175 cadets and instructors from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. It is on the decks and rigging of Eagle that the young men and women of the Academy get their first taste of salt air and life at sea. Working aloft they meet fear and learn to overcome it. The cadets handle more than 20,000 square feet of sail and five miles of rigging. More than 200 lines must be coordinated during a major ship maneuver, so cadets must learn the name and function of each line. Several local schools are on tap to visit the Eagle, and when you see crewmembers out and about on base, please give them a warm Mayport welcome. Ok, last call to all commands for this seasons Sports Challenge scheduled for April 24-27. I am warning you that I have my game face on and CMDCM Bob White as my wingman for this years CO/CMC Canoe Challenge. HSL-48 has had the annoying habit of taking home the prize trophy for the past several Challenges and I mean to change that! Good luck to all the other commands throughout the rest of the challenge. I hope to see everyone come out and show their command pride. One last thing, on April 24, Mayport will host another blood drive in Building One from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. to support the American Red Cross. Your donation can save a life of another human being. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe, and keep sending those suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy.mil.Capt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSIt is almost summer and time to seriously begin researching summer camp programs for your child. Because this experience can have a major impact on your childs life, it is impor tant to choose wisely. Is the choice based on where the parents went to camp as chil dren, on the childs interests, on overnight camps available in the area, or just what are the parameters for choosing? The final camp choice must accommodate all or some of the needs, goals, interests, and expectations of both the child and the parent. To understand what kind of camp your child wants to attend and why, try asking your child the following questions: 1. What do you want to gain from the camp experience? Learn something new or develop a current skill? Develop more independence? Meet new friends? 2. Do you have any special interests you want to explore? 3. Would you prefer a sleep-away camp or a day camp? As you ask the above ques tions of your child, you may want to silently answer them yourself, and then ask yourself these additional questions: 1. Are there any physical, intellectual, or social limita tions, which should be considered? 2. What kind of emphasis will your child profit from the most? For example: Is a lot of structure desirable, is social interaction with members of the opposite sex important, or does your child need a place where he is encouraged to develop at his own pace? 3. Is your child ready for a sleep-a-way camp? 4. How much money are you willing to budget for this camp experience? With the answers to the above questions in mind, next you should consider these factors: TYPE OF CAMP: Generally, overnight camps arent coed, either all boys, or all girls. But even a coed camp will have interaction between boys and girls through activities or through the use of common facilities such as waterfront and dining hall. Sleep-a-way camps provide a summer residential program where campers enjoy daily and evening activities. Depending on the type of program chosen, a camp experience can range anywhere from one week to an entire summer. COST: Nonprofit camps, such as MWR camps, Y camps, and Operation Military Kids, are less expensive than private sleep-a-way. As a par ent you have to make a care ful assessment of your familys financial limitations regarding camp costs. Be sure to esti mate for any extras such as a camp uniform, transportation, camper day trips, and the extra spending money for your child. Costs will vary based on the camps location and the activi ties offered. SIZE: When it comes to size, choosing a camp is very similar to choosing a college. Camps may vary in size from fewer than 100 campers to more than 400. Smaller camps tend to foster special relationships and allow for individual needs to be quickly met. However, very large camps will be orga nized into small units, allowing for the same kind of attention offered by a smaller camp. LOCATION: Dont limit your search by looking at one state or by choosing a set distance from home. Consider instead the related questions involving camp environment, security, medical facilities, and accessi bility. Which is more important choosing the right camp based on your childs interests/needs or the comfort of knowing your childs camp is close to home? PROGRAMS & ACTIVITIES: As you might imagine, camps offer all kinds of programs. Some camps may emphasize a special activity horseback riding while others will offer a wide array of programs. Camps in which a camper would devote a majority of his or her time to one activity are often referred to as Specialty Camps. Choosing a summer camp program for your child involves some important research. Be careful not to focus on one of these areas and therefore omit others. For example: a camps cost might seem like a great bargain, but it wont mean a great deal if the staff and program are inadequate. Be sure to involve your child in the selection process. Look at the total camp program when making your final deci sion. Finally, ask for references of families who have had their child attend the camp. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@ navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. For Further Information: *NS Mayport Youth Activity Centers Summer Camps, https://auth. cnic.navy.mil/mayport/ FleetandFamilyReadiness/Choosing a Summer Camp For Your ChildJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingWith Mothers Day approaching in a few weeks, its time for hus bands to do a little inventory on how they are doing. If a man really wants to know, all it requires is the bravery to ask. In a private quiet moment with your wife, ask her to honestly tell you how you are measuring up. Be ready for the truth and dont get defensive when she tells you that you have room for improvement. Here are a few things to contemplate on your performance: Do I come home after work and plop down in a chair with the TV remote in hand? Do I immedi ately start surfing the net or begin playing Call of Duty or Halo? Do I kiss my wife in an affec tionate way when I come home from work and ask what I can do to help? Do I give the kids a quick hug and then send them off to their mother when they need some help? Do I take care of my own clothes by hanging them up, putting dirty ones in the hamper, including my dirty socks? Do I help with the laundry? Do I tell my wife how much I appreciate her and all she does? Am I specific in my compliments to her, such as Thank you for making chicken cacciatore. You know how much I like it. It was really good. Thank you so much. Do I help clean up after dinner and help wash the dishes? Do I help fix meals? (Particularly important if both of you are employed) Do I really listen and act on what she wants, or do I ignore it? Do I keep my promises to her? Do I take her on a weekly date? Am I honest with my wife? Do I speak to her respectfully, never in a demeaning or insulting way? Do I kneel and Ask Your Wife Am I A Good Husband?Lt. Brandon Harding CHSMWL CHAPLAINSpray with her and tell the Lord how thankful I am for her? Do I look after her when shes ill? Am I completely faithful to my wife? (Which includes complete avoidance of pornogra phy) There are many other items that could be added to the list. If you are brave enough to ask your wife how you are doing you will know what else you need to work on. Sometimes we need to hear the hard truth to make lasting changes. Make a commitment to change for a lifetime and not just a few weeks. Finally, it has been often said that the best gift a father can give his children is to love their mother. I have seen the wisdom of this quote in the thousands of hours I have spent counseling couples and families over the years. When a father shows love and respect to his wife it sends a power ful message to the chil dren. It also creates a protective barrier around them. Of all the gifts to give this Mothers Day, resolve to give this gift, its effects will last a lifetime. See Camp, Page 3 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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SupportServices/ Families/ ChildandYouthPrograms/ SchoolAgeCare/index. htm *2012 Summer Camp Issue sponsored by The First Coast Parent Family Newspaper http://web.mac.com/ SCOTTCOLLINGS/Site/ Welcome.htm *Operation Military Kids, a nationwide pro gram to provide support to children and youth of families impacted by global war on terror ism www.operationmili tarykids.org *Florida 4-H Military Program, part of OMK, supports the civilian turned military families in Florida before, dur ing, and after parents are deployed www.florida4h. org *National Camp Association, Inc. (NCA) provides feature articles and information about summer sleep-a-way camp, a free summer camp referral service, staff placement service, and information on camp supplies www.summer camps.orgFrom Page 2Campchange, said Garcia. We want to take all those existing person nel support programs, those in development and some new initia tives, bring them together in one group to ensure every Sailor, Marine and their families have the tools they need to ensure they exceed and excel in the coming decade, he added. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative has five core areas: safety, physical fitness, inclusion, readiness and continuum of service. Though Garcia addressed each of these topics, he focused on those initiatives that highlight the importance of sexual assault awareness. Our leadership, our khakis, our chiefs mess, and our wardrooms will receive training to ensure their commands operate in an environment where there is no stigma to raising your hand and point ing out a susceptibility, said Garcia. A suscepti bility or an area of potential threat or danger to another Sailor or Marine. Cmdr. Roy Love, Afloat Training Group Mayport commanding officer, said the town hall sent posi tive messages that helped many Sailors and Marines rest some of their con cerns they had in regard to their careers in service. It lets us know our leadership cares and theyre looking out for our best interest, said Love. The Sailors and Marines have a great opportunity to talk to the people who make the decisions that affect them and their futures. Chief Naval Air Crewman (NAC/AW) Curtlynn Harris, an instructor from Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, said his Sailors were delighted to hear that the Enlisted Retention Board would not return. I think the informa tion was excellent, Harris said. It put out some of the angst, a lot of people had questions about the ERB and Sailors just want to know what the future holds for them in the Navy. We went over it all as far as benefits and pay, retention, education, families and benefits, every thing, he added. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative consolidates a set of objec tives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resil iency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.From Page 1ASNGet Rid Of Unwanted Prescription DrugsFrom NCISThe Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Branch Health Clinic Mayport will give the public an opportunity get rid of expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs on April 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bring your medications for disposal to the Navy Exchange Mayport Main Entrance or the Navy Exchange/Commissary Courtyard at NAS Jacksonville. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Last October, Americans turned in 377,080 pounds -188.5 tons of prescription drugs at more than 5,300 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,000 federal, state and local law enforce ment partners. In its three previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in almost a million pounds nearly 500 tons of pills. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescrip tion drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused pre scription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabi net. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicinesflushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards. Four days after the first event, Congress passed the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an ulti mate user of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to enti ties authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents controlled substances in certain instances. DEA is drafting regula tions to implement the Act, a process that can take as long as 24 months. Until new regulations are in place, law enforce ment agencies like NCIS and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug take-back events every few months. Additional local area collection sites and infor mation can be found by visiting www.dea.gov, and clicking on the link, Got Drugs? THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Taylor Participates In Operation Ocean Shield USS Taylor Public AffairsDuring the past sev eral weeks, guided-mis sile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) and its visit, board, search, and sei zure (VBSS) team, have actively patrolled the Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC) and pro vided security assistance to several merchant ves sels transiting through the Gulf of Aden region. Taylor, with embarked Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 48 Detachment 9, is assigned to Commander, NATO Task Force 508 Operation Ocean Shield. This Operation is NATOs counter piracy mission in the Gulf of Aden and India Ocean. Ocean Shield is a clear demonstration of the alliances capability in the maritime field, and its flexibility in meeting the variety of challenges posed in todays security environment, said Cmdr. J. R. Hill, USS Taylors commanding officer. As part of the NATO Task Force Taylor com plements the European Union, Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), and independent nations units tackling piracy in the region,Hill added. Taylors mission is to patrol the waters of the Gulf of Aden, the Arabian Sea and Somali Basin, and investigate suspi cious maritime activ ity. Additionally, the ship supports merchant ves sels requiring assistance while transiting the IRTC and other regional water ways. Most vessels we have encountered are legiti mate fishing or trading and are not involved with piracy operations, but the data collected helps provide information for pattern of life analysis and evidence to compare between boardings that may help classify a dhow as a pirate vessel more clearly during a boarding, said Lt. Michael Modeer, Taylors senior VBSS Officer. The information col lected during each boarding operation is forward ed to other CTF 508 assets participating in Operation Ocean Shield, as well as other counter-piracy task force units from the European Union Naval Force (EUNAVFOR), CMF, and other national contributors to provide increased regional mari time awareness and security for the international merchant community. Piracy and maritime crime are a significant concern to the interna tional community, con tributing nations, nongovernment and commercial organizations. Taylor has conducted numerous maritime security assist visit (MSAV) boardings in support of NATOs counter-piracy efforts. As the deployment continues, Taylor expects to remain vigilant on patrol, providing the maritime presence and security necessary to support counter-piracy efforts throughout the region. -Photo by CTSN Anders CarterU.S. Navy Sailors, assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylors (FFG 50) visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team investigate a dhow operating in the area as an SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter, from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Light (HSL) 48, patrols over head. -Photo by CT3 Michael TammenU.S. Navy Sailors, assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylors (FFG 50) visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team disembark a dhow after completing a routine compliant boarding. Taylor is assigned to commander, NATO Task Force 508 Operation Ocean Shield, maritime interception operations and counter-piracy missions in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseElectronics Technician 3rd Class Gem Belen cleans and refills condiment bottles as part of his food service attendant (FSA) duties on the mess decks aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50). -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseGas Turbine Systems Electrical 2nd Class Phillip Goss conducts a preventative maintenance check on an unin terruptable power supply in the main engine room aboard USS Taylor (FFG 50). -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseChief Aviation Machinists Mate Luisito Delosreyes and Chief Quartermaster Carlos Crummie, the Chiefs Mess oldest and youngest members, cut the cake during the Chief Petty Officer Birthday ceremony aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50). -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseFirecontrolman 3rd Class Bradley Reist, assigned to guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), conducts maintenance checks on the MK15 close-in weapons system. -Photo by OS1 Travis KrauseChief Culinary Specialist Vincent Hogans prepares to decorate a cake for crewmembers celebrating a birthday aboard guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50).

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 5 Behind The Scenes Of A SECNAV Visit USS Simpson Public Affairs OfficerThe sun was starting to set over the Focsle and Boatswains Mate Seaman Joshua R. Maurer looked at his watch. 19:05 it read, he figured it was soon to the end of the work day for him. He looked around at the rest of the guys around him, his supervisor Boatswains Mate 3rd Class James Bare and his peers Seaman Brian D. Massie, Seaman Daniel K. Swope, and Seaman Tyler E. Stark. They were all covered in busted up paint dust, primer and paint from previous days. The Secretary of the Navy Ray E. Mabus was visit ing in less than a week in Praia, Cape Verde and this group of Sailors was chosen out of their par ent division of deck to head up the preservation project tackling the undefeatable enemy of corro sion and to have the ship reflect the quality of the crew on board Simpson. Mabus was to conduct office calls with the local government to reinforce the United States com mitment to support ing and training the host nation to defend the freedom of trade within the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) that encompasses the waters around Cape Verde. To prevent piracy, illegal drug trafficking and illegal fishing are three of the major concerns for many of these West African nations that have grown significantly in recent memory. For Maurer and his crew, the only thing that mattered was the pride they had in completing the task at hand. Chipping paint on each set of bits and chocks down to bare metal, preparing with primer and paint ing with haze grey was on his mind. The pride that the BMs and undes ignated Seaman took in their work was in evident in the details, such as the Boatswains Mate anchors painted on the mooring line bits. The work required was not limited to Deck division though; OI divi sion was busy getting the centerline pee-way that connects the mid-ships and flight deck up to par. Operational Specialist Ashley J. Ontiveros and Cortes A. Simmons and their peers spent two days preparing the centerline p-way for the SECNAVs arrival. Once the ship successfully moored, all of Operations Department got started rigging a tent large enough to encom pass the entire flight deck. At reveille the follow ing morning, the crew was up and engaged in preparations. The Food Service Attendants staged all the reception gear and tables on the flight deck under the tent while keeping a watchful-eye as Electricians Mate were furiously rigging all the lighting around them. Culinary Specialist 1st Class John F. Blake began work on the cer emonial cakes down on the mess deck while the rest of his guys prepared the food. Right above him, different divisions were conducting Dress Whites uniform inspec tions to be worn later that night. The Electronics Technicians and Interior Communications Electricians, includ ing Second Class Petty Officers Bryson K. Running and Sean M. Joker, assembled and tested the microphone and speakers on the Focsle where Mabus would speak. Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Leonard H. Milliken, walked around with his Executive Officer, Cmdr. Christopher G. Follin, and Command Senior Chief Glenn R. Daniel throughout the day thanking his Sailors for their hard work. Milliken said he was impressed to see the ship coming together and could not be happier with the effort put forward by his crew. After a long-night of rigging the reception tent on the flight deck, hang ing bunting along the life rails, touching up the sides, and stationing cer emonial quarterdeck gear, BM3 Bares mind was not concentrated around get ting the last few items ready. Rather, he was thinking of his eight sideboys and their uniforms, reminding himself to make sure he took a look at them again to correct any last second problems. He had been selected to be the Honor Boatswains Mate and, along with eight side boys, would be the first representatives of the ship to meet the SECNAV and render hon ors on the quarterdeck. After two hours, it was all over. Mabus had arrived, promoted CWO2 Ion T. Revak, re-enlisted Fire Controlman 2nd Class Dustin F. Coons, Personnel Specialist 1st Class Leon R. Buxton, awarded four Navy and Marine Corps Accommodation Medals, issued out the ships Senior Sailor, Junior Sailor, and Bluejacket of the Quarter awards. Mabus had spoken to the crew, answered a few questions and socialized at the flight-deck reception before departing. For Maurer, he said that as he walked back to berthing to take off his whites and overheard other crew members discussing liberty plans, he thought, I think itd be nice just to go to sleep early tonight. -Photo by MCSN Brian T. GluntSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus speaks with Sailors during an all-hands call commending the crew for their participation in Africa Partnership Station (APS) aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). APS is an international security cooperation initiative aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. -Photo by MCC Sam ShaversMabus pins an award on a Sailor during a ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). -Photo by MCSN Brian T. GluntFire Controlman 2nd Class Gerald Delaney cleans a close-in weapons system aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) for an upcoming departmental inspection. -Photo by MCSN Brian T. GluntGunner's Mate Seaman Apprentice Travis Locker counts live ammunition on the main deck of the USS Simpson (FFG 56) prior to uploading for a calibration test fire exercise.

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The Surfside Fitness class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. Caloric output, fat burning and total body toning are maximized through fun and easy to follow dance steps. Come experience the ultimate dance party in this high energy, motivating class that is great for both the body and the mind. 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba A fusion of hot, sexy and explosive Latin American and International dance music. 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series NOFFS (Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series) is a pro gram designed to improve the operational perfor mance of Navy personnel through fitness and nutrition. Emphasis is placed on injury prevention via tissue management and refueling. 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 20/20/20: A fusion of our Low Impact, Resistance and Intro Mind Body classes. Twenty minutes will be devoted to cardio train ing, twenty minutes to strength training and twenty minutes to flex ibility training. 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 Provides a solid foundation to H.I.T. (High Intensity Training). Focus is placed on devel opment of proper form & mechanics for various lifts & bodyweight move ments. Participation will result in a solid platform. 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning MWR 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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April 20: Jamaican Me Crazy Night. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. at Castaways Lounge. Live music, food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 April 21: UFC 145: Jones vs. Evans. 10 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 April 24-27: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 13. 270-5452. April 25: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by FRC. For tickets, call AZC Nanney at (904) 270-6100 x149 April 25: Spring Fling. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Karaoke, food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 May 1 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 May 2: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 May 5: Ole! Run For the Border. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Latin Fusion band Conklave, free food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 May 5: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 8: Armed Forces 10K Run/ 5K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. May 8: Captains Cup Kickball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. 270-5451. May 9: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) May 9: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 May 9: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 May 9: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 270-5126 x3115 May 11: Mountain Bike Trail Race (Time Trial). 11 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by May 8. 270-5451 May 11: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 May 12: 2012 Mayport Music Fest. 6:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Switchfoot, Fuel & Natalie Stovall. Admission opens at 5 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 20: Jamaican Me Crazy Night. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. at Castaways Lounge. Live music, food, prizes, and more! 270-7205 April 20: Ghosts & Gravestones Trolley of the Doomed Ride in St. Augustine. Van departs 5 p.m. Signup deadline April 16. Cost $5 April 21: UFC 145: Jones vs. Evans. 10 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 April 22: Boom Shakalakas Hawaiian Cuisine Dinner Trip. Van departs 1 p.m. Transportation Only April 24-27: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 13. 270-5452. April 25: All-Hands Seafood Boil. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by FRC. For tickets, call AZC Nanney at (904) 270-6100 x149 April 25: Spring Fling. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Karaoke, food, giveaways and more! FREE. 270-7205 April 25: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 27: Laser Tag Extreme. 8 p.m. at the Liberty Center. FREE Apr 28: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. FREE. April 29: Free Drum Lesson. Introductory/ beginner guitar lesson at Georges Music. Stop by the Liberty Center front desk to reserve your place. Van Departs Liberty Center 5 p.m. FREE April 30: Dart Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 1: Boom Shakalakas Hawaiian Cuisine Dinner Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only May 2: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 May 3: Motherload of Comedy. Chris Killian & Richie Holliday. Van Departs Liberty Center 6 p.m. FREE. May 4: Rock Climbing. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Cost $15. May 5: Ole! Run For the Border. 9 p.m. at Castaways lounge. Featuring Latin Fusion band Conklave. 270-7205 May 5: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 7

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BBC Scholarship Deadline ExtendedFrom Balfour Beatty Communities FoundationThe Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to honoring military per sonnel active, disabled and fallen and their families,has extended the application deadline for its academic scholar ship program to May 15. High school and under graduate students resid ing in Balfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport are eli gible. One of the Foundations primary goals is to pro mote the pursuit of edu cation and a commitment to community leadership through academic schol arships for the children of active duty service mem bers that live in Balfour Beatty Communities family housing. With this extension, the Foundation hopes to ensure wide spread awareness and participation in this important program. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation Scholarship applications for the 2012-2013 aca demic year are available online at http://www. bbcommunitiesfounda tion.org/scholarships. aspx Shred Personal Papers With BBCFrom Balfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities is teaming up with the Shredding Source, Inc. to offer residents of Naval Station Mayport and the surrounding area the opportunity to shred all of their unwanted personal documents at the Ribault Bay Community Center from noon-3 p.m. on April 19. With the threat of identity theft coming largely from paper documents it is a good idea to shred all docu ments that are no longer needed, especially those that contain your personal information. This free event is open to the public and participants can bring up to 50 boxes of items to shred. A mobile shred truck will be located in the parking lot of the community center, 1201 Assisi Lane in the off base housing community. The paper collected from the event will be compressed and securely transported to the paper mill. The recycled material is placed into tanks of hot water and bleached to break it down into pulp. From this pulp state, paper towels and toilet paper are created. Some items that are suggested for shredding are: credit card statements, old checks, IRS tax returns and anything a thief could use to steal your identity. Unacceptable items are: cardboard, hard copy books, dry or wet trash, plastics or metals, hazardous materials and prescription bottles. For complete guidelines for shredding and keeping personal documents, go to www.facebook.com/may porthomes and click on the events tab. Taking On Supplies Employee Of Quarter Lunch On April 27From StaffNaval Station Civilian Employee presentation/ luncheon will be held on Tuesday, May 1 at 11:30 a.m., Ocean Breeze Conference Center. All are welcome to attend and support the nominees. Lunch is $8, pay at the door. RSVP to sandra.bar rett1@navy.mil by Friday, April 27. Nominees for Employee of the Quarter (1st Quarter) are: Ron Kremmerer, Security Ronald Renta, Air Ops Tom Krygowski, MWR Scott McPherson, PWD-Photo by MC3 Nick C. ScottLt. Cmdr. Carl Brobst, from Kingston, Pa., executive officer of the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), observes a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Serving Those Who Serve Our Country.Catholic Charities USAA CFC participant. Provided as a public service.1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Casting Calls For SUPERNANNYFrom Shed Media USThe parenting series AMERICAS SUPERNANNY is currently casting families for the next season of the show. The casting team is sending producers to the Jacksonville area to find families interested in receiving personalized advice for their unique circumstances. This season producers are searching for fam ilies with unique circumstances and challeng es. Deborah Tillman has an extraordinary abil ity to identify and tackle the toughest issues facing Americas families today. Interested parents can call (877) NANNY TIME (1-877-626-6984) or e-mail supernanny@ ShedMediaUS.com for more information. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Navy Wins Armed Forces Volleyball Tourney Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastThe Navys Women and Men Volleyball teams came out on top at the 2012 Armed Forces Volleyball Tournament hosted by Naval Station Mayport on April 12. Military teams from the Navy, Marine Corps, Army and Air Force com peted for the Armed Forces Championship Gold Medal. Five male teams and four female teams played hard begin ning April 12 at 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. playing every hour on the hour on each court. Air Force Airman Kristiana Scott said she was overjoyed to be part of the competition. Its really exciting to be out here and to be able to represent the U. S. Air Force while playing a sport that I love, said Scott who is attached to Air Combat Command Davis Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona. Teams went on to fin ish up games on April 13 then went on to semi-final matches that led up to the championship matches on April 14. Both of the number one Navy teams for the men and the women won the Championship gold medal and the Navys number two female team, won the silver medal. This win was extra special because my partner is the same guy I teamed with when we won back in 2010, said Lt.j.g. Austin Lanteigne, attached to VP-10 out of NAS Jax. Typically the teams that won Gold would go on to the World Championship overseas, but this year there will not be one so Lanteigne said he will look forward to hopefully playing and wining again next year. -Photos by MC2 Salt CebeAbove, Lt. Ashley Musser and Lt. Mary Arvidson of the Navy team wear their gold medals for placing first amongst the women at the Armed Forces Beach Volley Ball Tournament on board Naval Station Mayport. The Navy women also brought home the silver at the tournament. Below, Senior Chief Air Crewman John Goings and Lt.j.g. Austin Lanteigne of the Navy win gold in the men tournament. U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Katie Bachelder returns the ball during a volleyball match against an U.S. Army team at the 2012 Armed Forces Beach Volley Ball Tournament on board NS Mayport. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 9

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FFSC Workshops Geared To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. April 23-26 8 a.m.-4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 April 24, 6-8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 April 24, 1-2 p.m., Resume Writing For Military Spouses, FFSC Room 719 April 25, 11 a.m. -12 p.m., Raising Financially Fit Kids FFSC Room 719 April 25, 34:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 April 26, 8a.m. -12 p.m., FAP Key Personnel Training, Building One Room 1124 April 26, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Woman, FFSC Room 702\ April 26, 9a.m.-12 p.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO USO Parents and children together meet to share parent ing concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toi let training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. April 30, 1-4 p.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new tech niques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to iden tify barriers to effective communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. By Appointment, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., Resume Review, FFSC TBD Friday, April 20 The Ladies Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association #290, 390 Mayport Rd., will hold a chicken fried steak dinner from 5-8 p.m. Donations $10. Take out orders welcome. Open to the public. For more information, call 246-6855. Saturday, April 21 First Coast chil dren and their families are invited to experi ence a fun day of learning about ways to make healthy life-style changes through increased physi cal activity and proper diet. Come out and play at Healthy Family Training Camp, supported by the Fraternal Order of Police Foundation, AvMed Health Plans and 93.3 the Beat from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pepsi Cabana Villas, Everbank Field. The United Methodist Men of Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Rd., are cooking up a spaghetti dinner 5-7 p.m. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children under 12; 3 and under eat free. Take out is available. For more information, call 2495370. PAL will host the National PAL Mentoring Day FUNFEST from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Northside PAL Location (2165 W. 33rd Street). Potential mentors, men tees, and their families will enjoy free food, pony rides, games, arts and crafts, and music at the FUNFEST. The events purpose is to raise awareness of the mentoring program and to expand the program by recruit ing new mentors and mentees. PAL will also be offering free vendor spots for community partners. For information on becoming a commu nity partner or mentor for this event, please contact Larry Major, Mentoring Coordinator, at 355-3308 x 18 or email Larry.Major@ jaxpal.com. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive, will celebrate Earth Day with a volunteer beach clean up from noon-3 p.m. Help keep Florida clean and beautiful at one of the First Coasts premier state parks. Garbage bags and gloves will be provided for this event. Closed-toe shoes, gloves, a hat and sunscreen are recommended. Park entrance fees waived for participants. Tell the staff at the ranger station you are here to volunteer for Earth Day and meet at pavilion number one. For more information, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. The Armis Club of Jacksonville in conjunc tion with the Meet-up. com and Jacksonville Public Library are hosting Family Game Day at various library branches around the city, everyone is invited to learn, play, and enjoy board games and make new friends. The Webb Wesconnett Regional Branch Conference Room B, 6887 103rd St, will be held in the Community Room from 2-5:30 p.m. Jacksonville Genealogical Society, Inc will hold their monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. at The Webb-Wesconnett Library Branch, 6887 103rd Street, in the auditorium. Speaker is Geraldine Kohn and she will present a pro gram on Genealogy and Social Medias: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. The presentation will show the benefits of using social media in our genealogy searchers. Saturday, April 28 The Isle of Faith Church, 1821 San Pablo Road S., will hold its Yard Sale from 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. to benefit Beaches Habitat. Call 221-1700 to donate items. Tree Hill Nature Center, 7152 Lone Star Rd., will hold its 11th Annual Joseph A. Strasser Butterfly Festival from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This years event will feature a live butterfly exhibit, enter tainment from folk singer Mrs. Kate and harpist Pat Cloud, hands-on educa tional programs in the Amphitheater, live ani mals, free crafts for kids, local vendors of hand made and eco-friendly arts and crafts, a variety of food and drink options (a portion of food sales are donated to Tree Hill), face painting, chalk drawing by Jax Chalk Fest and much more. The highlight of the event each year is a live butterfly release. This years release will take place at 3:30 p.m. (weather permitting) and will feature a Dreamer from Dreams Come True help ing release the butterflies. The Armis Club of Jacksonville in conjunc tion with the Meet-up. com and Jacksonville Public Library are hosting Family Game Day at various library branches around the city, everyone is invited to learn, play, and enjoy board games and make new friends. The Highlands Regional Branch Conference Room B, 1826 Dunn Ave, will be held in the Community Room from 2-5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 5 Come enjoy making Kiwi Pineapple Orange Jam and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center from 9 a.m.-noon or 14 p.m. Class space is lim ited. Cost is $20 per per son. Pre-registration and prepayment should be made by April 30. To register call Jeannie at 2557450.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Commands Honor CPO Birthday -Photos submittedAbove left, active duty and retired chief petty officers at SERMC Mayport participate in a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 119th birthdy of the U.S. Navys Chief Petty Officers. Above right, USS Hu City Command Master Chief Raymond Charest Jr. and the ships chiefs mess stand at attention during the ships flag raising ceremony held in honor of the birthdday. Hu City chiefs continued the birthday celebration with their families throughout the afternoon.Navy Names Destroyer USS Lyndon B. JohnsonFrom DoNSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today the next Zumwaltclass destroyer will be named the USS Lyndon B. Johnson. The selection of Lyndon B. Johnson, designated DDG 1002, continues the Navy tradition of naming ships after presidents and honors the nations 36th president. The USS Lyndon B. Johnson is the 34th ship named by the Navy after a U.S. president. I am pleased to honor President Johnson with the naming of this ship, Mabus said. His dedi cation to a life of public service included bravely stepping forward to fight for his country during our entry into World War II. A Texas congressman, Johnson was the first member of Congress to enlist in the military fol lowing the start of World War II. After his naval service, Johnson was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1948, where he served as both minority and majority leader before being elect ed vice president Nov. 8, 1960. Following President Kennedys assassination Nov. 22 1963, Johnson succeeded to the presi dency, finished the remaining term, and was reelected for a full term as president, by the greatest percentage of total popular vote (61 percent) ever attained by a presidential candidate. Johnsons time as president was marked by the passage of programs that greatly influenced and impacted education, healthcare and civil rights for generations to come. He signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, enacting comprehensive provisions protecting the right to vote and guard ing against racial dis crimination. His work on civil rights continued with the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which guaranteed voting rights for all people, regardless of race. Johnson signed leg islation establish ing Medicare, which allowed millions of elderly Americans access to cheaper medical ser vices. He also launched the Head Start Program, which provided preschool children from low-income families with classes, medical care, and other services. As a naval officer, Johnson requested a combat assignment after the attack on Pearl Harbor and served in the Pacific theater during World War II. After returning from active duty ser vice, Johnson reported back to Navy leaders and Congress on what he believed were deplorable conditions for the warf ighters, and continued to fight for better standards for all military members. USS Lyndon B. Johnson will be the third Zumwaltclass (DDG 1000) destroyer. Construction began on the ship at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works April 4 and is expected to deliver to the Navy in fiscal 2018. The multimission DDG 1000 class destroyers are designed for sustained operations in the litto rals and land attack and will provide indepen dent forward presence and deterrence, sup port special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. This warship inte grates numerous critical technologies, systems, and principles into a complete warfighting system. Zumwalt ships will be 600 feet in length, have a beam of 80.7 feet, displace approximately 15,000 tons, and capable of making 30 knots speed. Each ship will have a crew size of 148 officers and Sailors. While he works to defend the country, St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgMatt Pasco Chief Warrant Of cer 2 and his daughter Delilah, a St. Jude patient. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 11

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CNRSE Signs Month Of The Military Child, Child Abuse Prevention Proclamation Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. John Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a Month of the Military Child and National Child Abuse Prevention Month proc lamation on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 9. With the signing, Scorby proclaimed April as the Month of the Military Child and Child Abuse Prevention Month throughout the Southeast Region. National Child Abuse Prevention Month and the Month of the Military Child both run through the end of the month. This proclamation was intended to help rec ognize the role that chil dren play in the armed forces community, as well as raise awareness of child maltreatment pre vention, Scorby said. Military children deal with a unique set of challenges as they constantly adapt to their parents military obligations, and it is the responsibility of many people throughout our communities, from schools to law enforce ment agencies, to support parents and make sure our children are raised in an engaged and support ive environment. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded more than 15,000 substanti ated reports of child abuse during the last ten years. While those num bers have been steadily decreasing, many inci dents go unreported, said Jeannette Werby, NRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. There are many rea sons that abuse goes unreported, Werby said. Many people who know about abuse dont report it because they think its none of their business or are concerned about the stigma a report creates and the damage it may cause to ones career. In many other cases, injuries from abuse are not visible. Also, many children do not report abuse because they worry they will not be believed, have been told not to talk to anyone and have been threat ened with physical harm, or simply feel responsible themselves for the abuse. According to Werby, the best way to combat child abuse is to raise aware ness about it through educational programs and events like the proclamation signing. Raising awareness about child abuse under scores that the problem is still here and so are the people who care about its resolution. Affirming at the highest levels that child abuse has serious, long-term outcomes for children and their fami lies adds a compelling dimension to the message that child abuse is unac ceptable. Those in lead ership roles set the tone and course for awareness, response and interven tion, she said. In addition to child abuse prevention, the proclamation is also intended to raise aware ness about the sacri fices made by military children. According to Military K-12 Partners, there are more than 1.2 million military children today, and since 2001, approximately two mil lion children have experienced the deployment of a parent. I would like to personally express my apprecia tion for the sacrifices our military children make, Scorby said. Despite the many challenges they face, they remain strong and resilient. The Month of the Military Child was estab lished in 1986 by former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger to underscore the role mili tary children play in the armed forces community. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center. Photo by MC2 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. John Scorby Jr. signs a Month of the Military Child and National Child Abuse Prevention Month proclamation in front of members of the Navy Region Southeast Family Advocacy Program on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville. CNRSE Signs Sexual Assault Awareness ProclamationRegion Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. John Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a sexual assault awareness proclamation on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 9. The decree proclaims April as NRSE Sexual Assault Awareness Month and emphasizes the regions com mitment to the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program. The signing coincides with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which runs through the end of April. The Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program provides an opportunity for our installations to raise awareness and to promote the prevention of sexual violence, Scorby said. Sexual assault is a crime that erodes our operational readiness and leaders at all levels of the chain of command need to communicate that we will not tolerate it! Prevention of sexual assault is everyones duty. According to Julie Mooney, NRSE credentialing and program specialist, the region recorded 103 reports of sexual assault in 2011 and 118 in 2010. Leadership input is of the utmost importance with sexual assault awareness and prevention efforts. The Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in 2009 and it has significantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the primary focus of raising leaderships awareness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention efforts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention efforts will have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the Navys overall efforts, Mooney said. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of support services, including clinical counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advo cate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) located at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-9955247 or via http://www.safehelpline.org. To find out more about the Navys SAPR pro gram, contact your local FFSC or SARC, or visit http://cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/FleetandFamilyReadiness/ FamilyReadiness/FleetAndFamilySupportProgram/ SexualAssaultPreventionandResponse/index.htm Two months after the sexual assault avoidance program began; a stu dent of Thompsons was raped. When he arrived at the hospital to see her, the only words she could utter were, I did what you taught me to do, why didnt it work? The emotional impact of that moment changed the course of his life. Since then he devoted himself to studying the whys and hows of sexual aggression. He has conducted countless inter views with convicted rapists, psychologists, doctors, as well as thou sands of survivors. He has trained and worked beside police officers throughout the country. For more information, call FFSC at 270-6600 ext. 1730.From Page 1Zebra Dont Throw Away Old JeansFrom CSADDIn support of Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Naval Station Mayport Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) will hold a Jean Drive through the month of April. These donations will be presented to Battered Womens Rape Recovery Team of Jacksonville at the end of the month. Mayport CSADD team have place drop off bins in the fol lowing locations: Building 1, Chapel, CPO Club, Fleet and Family Support Center, Mini Mart, and Housing Office. Clothing donations only, not money. will be available on a phased basis by military service from June to October. Officials said the schedule will allow service finance employees to complete and thoroughly test the complex changes needed to the various payroll systems. Defense finance officials said more specific deploy ment dates on Roth TSP elections will soon be available on www.dfas.mil. Officials said service members and their families may contact Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 to sched ule an appointment with a financial consultant.From Page 1Roth 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 19, 2012 13 Coupon Policy Changes At CommissaryDeCA public affairs specialistChanges are on the way in how commissaries handle coupons and product returns without receipts, among other things, as the Defense Commissary Agency enacts customer service policy chang es to protect the commissary benefit. The average coupon user might not notice the pol icy changes because they are aimed at preventing possible misuse of the commissary benefit primarily using coupons to get large amounts of cash back, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Commissary shoppers are big users of coupons, as evidenced by DeCAs consistent rank ing among the top 10 grocery retailers in coupon redemp tions over the past several years. Commissaries welcome coupon usage, and to acquaint customers with the changes in the coupon acceptance policy, it has been posted on the agencys website at http://www. commissaries.com/inside_ deca/publications/directives/ DeCAD40_6_PC_3.pdf and on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/YourCommissary. Key changes, which go into effect May 1, include: a customer, in conjunction with cash, whenever a transac tion total reflects $25 or more is owed to the customer due to coupon overages (when the face value of the coupon exceeds the selling price of the item purchased and the trans action results in a negative balance) customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is presented showing the merchandise was originally purchased with gift cards customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is not presented suspected privilege abuse tance policy that clarifies dotscan barcode requirements and pin requirements for unique numbering, that photocopies and counterfeit coupons are not accepted, and that coupons must be printed in English The changes harness the scope of the new commissary gift card, which has been in use since last summer. Available only in denominations of $25 and $50, issuing gift cards as an alternative to paying out large sums of cash brings DeCA in line with other retailers prac tices and ensures DeCAs cash flow is not adversely impacted. Amounts under $25 will be in cash. Commissaries are providers of a benefit that sell groceries at cost, and using the gift cards to cover certain refunds and coupon overages discourages practices contrary to DeCAs mission, Jeu noted. We value coupon usage because it helps our customers boost their savings, Jeu said. These changes are in the best interest of all concerned to help ensure that coupons continue to be a great source of savings for our customers. Fleet Reserve #91 Poker Run The Fleet Reserve on Collins Road will host its 6th Annual Poker Run for the USO on April 21. Registration from 11 a.m.1 p.m. Last bike in by 5 p.m. Registration is $10 with a $200 guaranteed winner take all! There are lots of door prizes, 50/50 raffle, food and live entertainment by start ing at 5:30 p.m. Stops at Rehab Saloon, American Legion Middleburg, VNV/ LV Clubhouse, Rusty Pub, Steel Pony, ending back at the Fleet Reserve. Best of five cards win. For more information call 264-2833. 2012 Birdies For Charity Program Your Greater Jax Area USO is once again pleased to be participat ing in the 2012 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique, communitybased fundraising initia tive is held in conjunc tion with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 7-13, 2012. If you visit www.birdies forcharity.playerschampi onship.com, you will have the opportunity to make a donation to Greater Jax Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize. Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individ ual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2012 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an addition al $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-break er question will be used to determine the winner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 9. We hope you will take this opportunity to support your Greater Jax Area USO and THE PLAYERS by visiting www.birdies forcharity.playerscham pionship.com. Donations can be made online with a credit card. Or, you may donate via personal check made out to Greater Jax Area USO and mail to: Greater Jax Area USO, P.O. Box 108, NAS Jacksonville, FL 32212-0108. Please annotate Birdies For Charityon your personal check. A cash donation may be made at either your Mayport or NAS Jax Area USO Centers. All donations received via this program go directly to support your Greater Jax Area USO. You Could Win A 1948 Pontiac Torpedo! Do you like old antique cars? The American Legion Riders Chapter 283 has proudly offered a 1948 Pontiac Torpedo car in a raffle drawing to be held on June 1 at 8 pm. NAS Jax USO and Mayport USO now have Donation Tickets available for pur chase! The tickets are only $10. Stop by your USO center today! All sales are cash only at the centers or at Post 283. K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileg es as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount pro vides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a fam ily annual pass, which allows up to eight peo ple in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addition, hon orably discharged vet erans who have service connected disabilities, and surviving spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifi cations and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ The USO and RocketLife have partnered to deliver a heart-warming oppor tunity for the men and women of the armed forces and their fami lies. The Personal Photo Book program enables troops serving abroad and their families to create 20-page personal photo books and ship them to any APO/FPO address f or free. These full-color, customized photo books are small enough to fit in a soldiers cargo pockets yet can hold more than 60 photos of loved ones. RocketLife prints the books for free, and the USO pays for the ship ping. To get started, visit http://uso.myphotoproducts.com. United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USO NEXs Now Accepting Manufacturers CouponsFrom NEXCOMCustomers know they can save money every day by shopping their NEX. In addition to the average 23 percent savings and no sales tax, customers can also save money by using manufacturers cents off coupons on their NEX purchases. Redeeming coupons pro vides our customers anoth er way to save money when shopping at their NEX, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Senior Vice President Store Operations. Coupons are a great way to save even more when shop ping for the necessities your family needs. NEXs accept current valid manufacturers coupons for the item featured on the coupon, subject to its terms and conditions. This includes online Internet coupons, except for those coupons offering free products, coupons for Proctor & Gamble (P&G) products or those determined to be fraudulent. The NEX does not double or triple the face value of a manufac turers coupon. The NEX accepts scratchoff, percent and cents-off coupons from the Army Air Force Exchange System (AAFES), the Marine Corps Exchange System (MCX) and the Coast Guard Exchange System (CGX). These can be percent and cents-off instore coupons, coupons pre sented in a coupon book, or printed from Facebook. All coupon terms and conditions apply. The NEX also accepts a manufacturers coupon and NEX coupon, or coupon from another Military Exchange Service, on the same item. The combination of the two coupons cannot exceed the price of the product; money is not returned to a custom er on the redemption of two coupons which exceeds the price of the product. In fiscal year 2011, over 1.6 million coupons were redeemed by NEX custom ers worldwide with a value of $2.3 million. When you combine our percentage savings with the extra savings from using coupons, customers save a con siderable amount of money when they shop at their NEX, said Dow. Swing Into Spring With A Nutritious DietTRICARE Management ActivityWith nutrition such an essential part in staying healthy, TRICARE benefi ciaries can spring into a healthier life starting with a more nutritious diet. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, published by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, say a healthy diet should include plen ty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat milk products, lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts. The guide lines also recommend Americans choose foods with low saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt and added sugars. Dietary fats are needed, but should be limited to 20 to 30 percent of the amount of calories consumed, with no more than 10 percent of total calories from saturated fat. Read the nutrition label to find out the amount and types of fats in foods. Many fruits and vege tables contain vitamins, minerals and fiber that may help prevent the development of chronic diseases including stroke, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think color when picking fruits and veggies to add to a diet. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) list several exam ples of fruits and veg etables that have a wide range of valuable nutri ents; green spinach, orange sweet potatoes, black beans, yellow corn, purple plums, red water melon and white onions. Beneficiaries can find the daily amount of fruits and vegetables needed at www.fruitsandveggies matter.gov. Balancing food choic es is vital for the body to get all its needed nutri ents and should include fiber, potassium, and vitamins A and C. Fiber can help decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. Potassium helps keep blood pressure at a healthy level. Vitamin A keeps eyes and skin healthy plus boosts the immune system. Vitamin C helps bones, teeth and gums remain healthy and aids in the healing pro cess. Beneficiaries looking for a healthy eating plan can visit www.mypyra mid.gov. The site offers information on how many calories are needed daily, how much food equals a portion and how to make healthy choices in each food group. Nutrition and exercise affect the overall health for today, tomorrow and the future. Eat fewer calories, make informed food choices and be physically active: these steps can help TRICARE beneficia ries maintain a healthy weight, reduce the risk of chronic disease and achieve overall health. For more information on how to live healthy visit www.tricare.mil/ healthyliving.