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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00244


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Carney Tapped For Port ChangeSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 16 the four Arleigh Burke-class guid ed-missile destroyers, which will be forward deployed to Rota, Spain. The four include three from Norfolk, Va; USS Ross, USS Donald Cook, and USS Porter, and one from Mayport, Fla., USS Carney. The ships are in support of President Obamas European Phased Adaptive Approach to enhance the security of the European region. We welcome Spains part nership in stationing four U.S. Navy Aegis ships at Naval Station Rota, said Mabus. We have a long history of coopera tion between our two countries and we have developed significant interoperability between our naval forces. These multi-mission ships will perform a myriad of tasks, including the full spectrum of maritime security operations, bilateral and multilateral train ing exercises, NATO operations and deployments, and NATO missile defense. Ross and Donald Cook will arrive in fiscal 2014 and Carney and Porter in fiscal 2015. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta initially announced the stationing of four Aegis ships to Rota Oct. 5, 2011, in Brussels, Belgium. By hosting these ships, Spain will continue its vital role in enhancing the securi ty of the European region, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Atlantic Ocean, said Panetta in an Oct. 5, 2011, statement. The agreement also enables the United States to provide rapid and responsive support to the U.S. Africa and U.S. Central Commands, as needed. -Photo by MAC Anthony J. SgangaWaves crash over the bow of the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64). The Secretary of the Navy announced last week that Carney and three other DDGs from Norfolk, Va., will be forward deployed to Rota, Spain.Panetta Asks Congress To Undo Sequestration, Approve BRACDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta urged Congress to undo an automatic $500 billion cut to defense spend ing due to go into effect next year, and made his case for two new rounds of military base realignments and closures. Panetta raised the issues as part of his presentation of the proposed fiscal 2013 defense budget to the House Armed Services Committee. He was joined by Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Robert F. Hale, Defense Department comptroller and undersecretary of defense for finance. The proposal a $525.4 billion base budget plus $88.5 billion for overseas contingency operations includes reductions toward $487 billion in defense spending cuts over 10 years mandated by the Budget Control Act, which Congress passed last year. It does not, however, account for more than $500 bil lion in additional cuts that will go into effect in January if Congress doesnt act to stop it. Those additional cuts, known as sequestration, were written into the Budget Control Act as automatic, across-the-board cuts to the federal budget if members of a congressional super committee could not agree on spending cuts by a November deadline. They didnt. Panetta said DOD leaders took seriously their responsibility to plan for the $487 billion in cuts in a way that does not hollow out the military. Military and civilian DOD leaders are united in support of the bud get proposal that involved careful deliberations based on strategy, he said. We need your partnership to do this in a manner that preserves the strongest military in the world, the secretary told the committee. This will be a test for all of us: whether reducing the deficit is about talk or about action. Let me be very clear, he continued. When you take a half a trillion dollars out of the defense budget, it comes with risks. Those risks include working with a smaller force, depending on new technologies, needing to mobi lize quickly and taking care of the all-volunteer force, Panetta said. There is very little margin for error in this budget, he added. Congress must do everything possible to avoid sequestration, Panetta said, because it would amount to a meat-ax approach of cutting at least 8 percent more from each defense budget category. And that, we are convinced, would hollow out the force and inflict serious damage to the national defense, he said. It would be devastating, he added. Another $500 billion and Id have to throw the strategy I just present ed to you out the window. Panetta said defense leaders would welcome working with Congress on a way to stop sequestration before it takes effect. Whatever we can do on both sides to develop an approach that we detrigger sequestration, were cer tainly willing to work on that, he said. The secretary also noted that the administration will make a formal request next month that Congress create base realignment and closure processes for fiscal 2013 -Photos courtesy of USS KlakringSailors from USS Klakring participate in a community relations project with Habitat for Humanity during a threeday port visit to Charleston, South Carolina.Klakring Visits Charleston, Exchanges With Citadel USS Klakring (FFG 42) concluded a threeday port visit last week in Charleston, South Carolina, where the ship helped celebrate orders selection night at The Citadel, a private military academy that has a large NROTC contingent. Klakring was based in Charleston until the naval station was closed, making the port visit particularly fit ting as Klakring pre pares to begin her final deployment. In addi tion to hosting tours for the Charleston Navy League, Citadel midship men, and local military, USS Klakring continued a tradition of volunteer ing while in port. Sailors volunteered liberty time to work at two Habitat for Humanity sites and vis ited a Veterans Hospital. Entering Charleston Harbor on Friday morn ing, Klakring was greet ed by a group from Joint Base Charleston. Several groups with the welcoming committee were offered tours of the ship while others greet ers briefed the crew on the surrounding area. A reception hosted by the Charleston Naval League on Friday evening allowed the officers and chiefs from Klakring to meet the senior Citadel midshipmen who will soon serve alongside them in the U.S. Navy. This was a great oppor tunity for the midship men to ask questions and gather the impressions of Klakrings crew, as the midshipmen prepare to select their first ships in the coming weeks. The following day more than 100 midship men were welcomed onboard Klakring for Klakring Sailors gather in the lobby of the VA hospital in Charleston after visiting with residents during a port visit to the city.See Klakring, Page 6 See Budget, Page 14

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Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.There is a story of a man whose shop was destroyed in the great Chicago fire of 1871. The next morning the shop owner showed up at his burned out store and set up a table in the midst of the charred debris. Above the table he placed a sign that read, Everything lost except wife, children, and hope. Business will resume as usual tomorrow. Hope is something we must have and keep in the new year! We live in a world that produces hardships and difficulties month in and month out as we prog ress throughout any given year. That fact seems to be one constant we can certainly count on. Some months we hear about hurricanes, earthquakes or tornadoes. Other months we hear sad news of accidents, illness or death. Upon hearing or per sonally experiencing tri als and tribulations, one can even begin to wonder, Does God really care about me? Is there hope for a better day tomor row? The Reverend Reginald Ponder tells of his days as a youngster when his uncle used to take him to watch the Greensboro Patriots play baseball. He describes it this way. When I went to games, I noticed that a group of boys always gathered behind the outfield fence. They would chase the balls that were hit over the fence and take them to a man who watched the gate at the end of fence in return for being allowed to sit in the stands and watch the game. Some of the boys would stand on crates or on each others shoul ders in order to watch the game. Others would stand on their tiptoes to watch through holes in the fence. They were the most enthusiastic fans at the stadium. Every time the Patriots did some thing, they cheered. They even cheered when the team was hopelessly behind and many of the paying customers had left the ballpark. They watched every play and activity on the tiptoe of hope and expectation. Let me encourage you to stand on your tiptoes and peek into 2012. Be encouraged with abun dant hope and expecta tion. How can I say this with assurance you ask? Because I have been through several trials and difficulties in 2011and I know God has been with me. I truly believe that God is in charge of this world and that God is a good and loving God. I must admit that some days I do wonder, but in the end God has not failed me. Tested me, yes. Failed me, no. Not only that, but I also believe that God desires the very best for our life, even if there are some bumps and challenges along our path. One of my favorite hymns grow ing up was This is my Fathers World. One stanza says it best. This is my Fathers world. O let me never forget, That though the wrong seems oft so strong, God is ruler yet. Keep hope alive!Are You On Your Tiptoes For 2012?Cmdr. Steve Souders Surface Force Ministry Center Balfour Beatty Foundation Offers Academic Scholarships For Family Housing ResidentsRecognizing the importance of education and its continu ing rising costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholar ships for the 2012-2013 aca demic year to high school and undergraduate students of mili tary members residing in family housing. We encourage our fam ily housing residents with high school and undergradu ate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation, its a difficult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. The application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunities foundation.org. The applica tion deadline is April 15, 2012. The Foundation notes that the requirements for scholar ships has changed slightly from years past with new essay ques tions and the reduction of the number of recommendations students must submit. Balfour Beatty Communities, responsible for the privatized family housing at Naval Station Mayport, formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization com mitted to honoring military per sonnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to community leadership through educational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality living environment that supports the diverse interests and needs of our military fam ilies. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. Deadline Feb. 24 For DeCA Scholarship Eligible students who want to apply for the 2012 Scholarships for Military Children program still have time, but the clock is ticking. Applications must be completed and deliv ered not postmarked, but delivered to a com missary by close of busi ness Feb. 24. Scholarship applica tions are available in commissaries and online at http://www.commis saries.com choose the News & Info tab and then the Scholarship Info tab. Applications are also available at http:// www.militaryscholar.org. At least one $1,500 schol arship will be awarded at every commissary with qualified applicants. The following are key reminders for scholarship applications, which are also available in greater detail on http://www.mil itaryscholar.org: Current military ID. Applicants and their sponsors must be enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System DEERS database and have a cur rent military ID card. Military family mem ber. Applicants must be a dependent, unmarried child no older than 21, or 23 if enrolled as a fulltime student at a college or university of a service member on active duty, a reservist, guardsman or retiree, or survivor of a service member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retiree. College bound. The student must be planning to attend, or already be attending, an accredited college or university, full time in the fall of 2012 or be enrolled in a pro gram of studies designed to transfer directly into a four-year program. Essay. The essay must be 500 words or less, sta pled to the application and written in the follow ing format: typed, double spaced, no more than two pages, applicants name in upper right-hand cor ner of each page. The essay topic: Whose four faces would you place on a 21st century Mount Rushmore-type monu ment, and why? The person must be nonfic tional, U.S. citizen, male or female the time frame for the selection is 1850 to 2011. Correct address. Applicants must provide their permanent home address on the front page of the application not their college address. Complete package. The submission package must include the follow ing: 1) transcript or copy of applicants grades; 2) essay with applicants name on each page; 3) parent or guardians sig nature as well as the applicants signature on application; and 4) appli cants high school College Board Code number (if available). Keep a copy. Applicants should also maintain their own copy of their application and essay. Submit to one commissary. Applicants can only submit their applica tion to one commissary; submitting to more than one store will disqualify the applicant from con sideration. No faxes or emails. Faxed or emailed applications will not be accepted. For more information, call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers. com.Scholarships Available For SNA DependentsSurface Navy Association Scholarship application deadline of March 1 2012 is fast approaching. The Surface Navy Association Scholar receives an academic scholarship awarded for demonstrated leadership, community service, aca demic achievement and a commitment to pursuing higher educational objec tives. Awards will be made on the basis of the indi viduals application, using a whole person con cept, considering the can didates scholastic profi ciency, non-scholastic activities, scholastic and non-scholastic awards, and character. Note: applicants will be per mitted to submit copies of their Federal Financial Aid Form but the absence of an aid form will not be detrimental to the candi date. Deadline is March 1, 2012. Application can be obtained at http:// www.navysna.org/SNA/ Awards/Scholarship/ ApplicationIndex.htm Selection Qualifications child, ward or spouse of a Surface Navy Association member. The member must be in their second or subsequent consecutive year of membership. ing, retired or honorably discharged and must be a Surface Warfare Officer or Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist. Qualified members must serve for a minimum of three years on surface ships of the U.S. Navy or a Coast Guardsman, Officer or Enlisted, with a perma nent Cutterman Pin. Surface ships include carriers, combatants, amphibious, service force, mine force, tenders, and U.S. Coast Guard cutters of all classes. not be consecutive but must have been served on active duty. a grant limited to $2000 per year for a maximum of four years provided a 3.0 grade point average is maintained. service period for children or spouses of personnel who died on active duty while serving in a surface ship or cutter. Association scholar ships are for studies in an accredited undergraduate or postgraduate institu tion. Full-time status may be waived in the case of spouses as long as they maintain a course load of 6 semester hours.CNO To Speak At MidwayThe Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, which will be held Saturday, June 9, at the Renaissance Resort, World Golf Village. Guest speaker is Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and for mer prisoners of war in our area who have hero ically answered the call of duty. Come meet these national treasurers and hear their adventures first hand. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from the fol lowing locations: Navy League Mayport Bob Price, Phone 904718-2118 Email: bpricex4@com cast.net 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Put NS Mayports Sewers On Fat-Free DietFats, oils, and grease arent just bad for our personal health; they are bad for the health of our sewer system as well. Just as we must be careful as to what we put into our bodies to maintain our optimum health, we must likewise be careful what we put down our sinks and drains in our homes and food establishments. Specifically, fats, oils, and grease, when improperly disposed in the sanitary sewer system or storm drain system, can cause property damage, health hazards and environmental problems. When cleaning up after dinner, pouring a little meat fat from your fry ing pan down the kitchen sink may not seem like such a bad thing. After all, what harm can that little bit of grease cause? However, grease sticks to the insides of sewer pipes (both on your property and in the streets). Over time, the small quanti ties of grease can build up and block the entire pipe. Garbage disposals do not keep grease out of the plumbing system. They only shred solid material into smaller pieces but do not prevent grease from solidifying in the drain. The result can be sew age backing up and over flowing in your or your neighbors homes, yards, streets, wetlands, or the river. When this occurs, it is not just the oils and grease that overflow, but untreated sewage as well. This would entail an expensive and unpleas ant cleanup and possibly cause contact with dis ease-causing organisms. The best way to solve the grease problem and help prevent overflows of raw sewage is to keep this material out of the sewer system in the first place. How you can help: fats, oils, or grease down sink drains or into toilets. cooking oil and grease into a metal can (soup, vegetable, etc.). Let the grease cool and solidify (you can place the con tainer in the refrigerator or freezer), then place it in the garbage can for dis posal. and food scraps from trays, plates, pots, pans, utensils and grills and cooking surfaces into the trash for disposal. greasy foods down gar bage disposals. Put bas kets/strainers in sink drains to catch food scraps and other solids, and empty the drain baskets/strainers into the trash for disposal. dishes to wash oil and grease down the drain. Restaurants that have grease traps in place still need to follow the prop er disposal practices for fats, oils, and grease. The grease traps serve as a backup and only remove minimal amounts of grease. Restaurants with grease traps or grease interceptors are respon sible for inspecting and cleaning them regularly in order for them to be effec tive. Onetime events or ongoing cooking activities can sometimes generate a large quantity of used cooking oil. Used cooking oil can be taken to the MWR Recycling Center (Bldg. 1624) and placed in the used cooking oil storage tank. This cooking oil is recycled into biodiesel and provides a beneficial reuse by fueling equip ment and vehicles. If you have ques tions about disposal or recycling of used cook ing oil or grease, call the Environmental Division at (904) 270-6816.Navy Names New Destroyers, Littoral Combat ShipsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 15 the next five Navy ships; three Arleigh Burke-class guided-mis sile destroyers, USS John Finn, USS Ralph Johnson, and USS Rafael Peralta, and two littoral combat ships (LCS), USS Sioux City and USS Omaha. Mabus named the three destroyers after Navy and Marine Corps heroes whose actions occurred during different conflicts which spanned several decades, but were united in their uncommon valor. The littoral combat ships were named after two American communities. John Finn, who retired as a lieutenant, received the Medal of Honor from Adm. Chester Nimitz for displaying magnifi cent courage in the face of almost certain death during the Japanese attack on military instal lations in Hawaii dur ing Pearl Harbor. Marine Corps Pfc. Ralph Henry Johnson was posthu mously awarded the Medal of Honor for shout ing a warning to his fel low Marines and hurling himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and prevent ing the enemy from pen etrating his sector of the patrols perimeter during the Vietnam War. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Rafael Peralta was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for selflessly covering a grenade with his body to save his fellow Marines from the blast during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Finn, Johnson and Peralta have all been rec ognized with some of our nations highest awards, said Mabus. I want to ensure their service and sacrifice will be known by todays sailors and Marines and honored for several decades to come by a new generation of Americans and people from around the world who will come in contact with these ships. The Arleigh Burke-class destroyers will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peace time presence and crisis management to sea con trol and power projec tion. All three ships will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and will contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to sup port maritime warfare in keeping with the Navys ability to execute the Department of Defense defense strategy. The littoral combat ship is a major part of the future of our Navy, Mabus said, pointing out LCS is fast, agile, and operates with a smaller crew and can perform operations in both shal low and deep waters. I chose the name for our two new littoral combat ships after Midwestern cities from Americas heartland, to honor the patriotic, hard-work ing citizens of Sioux City, Iowa, and Omaha, Nebraska, for their sup port of and contributions to the military. Sioux City and Omaha will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages, which can be changed out quickly as combat needs demand. These mission packages are supported by special detachments that will deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine, undersea and sur face warfare missions. Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wis., will build the Freedom variant, USS Sioux City, which will be 378 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 57 feet, displace approxi mately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. Austal USA in Mobile, Ala., will build the Independence variant, USS Omaha, which will be 419 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 103 feet, displace approxi mately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. For more news from secretary of the Navy public affairs, visit http:// www.navy.mil/SECNAV. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 APS 2012 Begins With Simpson Sailors and coast guardsmen from several African nations are gath ered in Lagos, Nigeria, to participate in the start of Africa Partnership Station 2012 (APS), Feb. 14. APS is part of an ongo ing international effort to assist African nations to improve maritime safety and security. The secu rity cooperation initia tive, now in its fifth year, is aimed at strengthening global maritime partner ships through training and collaborative activi ties in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. This years program builds upon relationships fostered in previous years and brings together more than 30 African, European, North and South American countries. By working together, African navies and coast guards are able to bring maritime safety and security which will help secure their future, said Chief Warrant Officer Eve McAnallen, APS training officer. USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrived in Lagos, Nigeria, to launch this years training program. While in port, Simpsons crew will work with Nigerian sail ors and coast guardsmen, and with crews from 11 other African nations par ticipating in the first leg of training events. Its a great way to start APS, said Cmdr. Leonard Milliken, Simpsons com manding officer. APS is an important mission because it helps growing navies and coast guards in Africa conduct maritime operations. Bringing these nations together for specifi cally tailored training events, both ashore and at sea, allow African mari time nations to improve their capabilities while strengthening rela tionships with partner nations. APS also allows African maritime nations to bolster regional mari time safety and security throughout the maritime environment in three spe cific areas: counter-pira cy, illicit trafficking, and energy and resource security. Through a regional, comprehensive approach, APS helps African nations build their own maritime domain awareness, cre ate maritime profession als, build required mari time infrastructure, and improve response capa bilities in the maritime environment. The com mon belief among par ticipating nations is that APS contributes to devel opment, economic pros perity and security within Africa. I really appreciate the APS program because it helps us improve and meet our potential through different experi ences, said Gabonese Chief Petty Officer Pierre Mboulou. I hope this program can be held every year and keep going to help African militaries. APS brings together African partners, allow ing them to focus on com mon security challenges. By working together, African navies and coast guards are able to improve maritime safety and security which will help secure their future, Chief Warrant Officer McAnallen said. Simpsons visit to Lagos is one example of how APS works to bring regional partners together to share and learn spe cialty skills. Experts will use practical, classroom, and sometimes realworld events to help build African navies professional skill to combat crime at sea. APS is about developing African solutions to glob al problems and build ing upon long-standing relationships. African, European, and North and South American partners, and non-governmental organizations share a common goal of regional prosperity, stability, and peace. APS helps to create partnerships among a number of organizations who have not traditionally worked with each other in the past to achieve com mon goals through col laboration. -Photos by MC2 Felicito RustiqueGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Botha Nzinga explains the propulsion control console aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) to Gabonese Ensign Luther Mouloungui as part of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. APS is an international security cooperation initiative facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collab orative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Seaman James Aguilar steadies a rigid-hull inflatable boat during small boat operations aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). Above, Sailors prepare to launch an MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) during nighttime flight operations aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). Right, Electronics Technician 3rd Class Jonathan Salas heaves a mooring line to a tugboat as the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrives in Dakar for refueling. Cmdr. Leonard Milliken, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), greets Nigerian navy Rear Adm. J. A. Akinwale, commander of the Headquarters Naval Training Command of Nigeria, during an office call as part of Africa Partnership Station 2012. Milliken is briefed by Nigerian navy Capt. A. D. Bingel, commander of the Joint Maritime Security Training Centre of Nigeria, as part of Africa Partnership Station 2012.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 5 USS Simpson Makes APS Port Visit In Ghana The flagship of Africa Partnership Station (APS) West 2012, USS Simpson (FFG 56), along with embarked staff, arrived in Tema, Ghana, Feb. 18 to begin their involvement with the APS 2012 Ghanaian hub. The hub, taking place after a recent port visit to Nigeria, brings training designed to strengthen African maritime partnerships to improve mari time safety and security to more than 40 maritime pro fessionals from the Ghanaian navy, as well as 10 ship riders from partner nations includ ing Benin, Cameroon, Gabon, Nigeria, Republic of Congo and Togo. Simpson provides APS with a platform to give handson experience in a maritime working environment. Simpson commanding offi cer, Cmdr. Leonard Milliken said the hub was an opportunity for him and his crew to build relationships, share knowledge with Ghanaian partners and show off their ship. The Simpson crew and I are excited about the opportunity of working with profession als from the Ghanaian navy, said Milliken. Its an essen tial mission within our current maritime environment, bring ing African solutions to global problems with international support. Hub participants will attend courses on board Simpson in basic first aid and basic damage control. This training furthers APS objectives to strengthen maritime professionals and develop response capabilities while encouraging regional integration. Milliken is sched uled to make office calls with senior leaders from Tema including Ghanaian navy base Command Operations Officer (COO), Cmdr. Emmanuel Kwafo; Tema Local Chief, Nii Adjei Kraku II; and Tema Mayor, the Honorable Robert Kempes Ofosuware. Simpson Sailors will have the opportunity to partake in local cultural tours including a trip to nearby Akosombo, to embark on a day cruise on the worlds largest man-made lake, and to Kakum National Park, where theyll have the opportunity to look down on a rain forest from a canopy walk. A friendly, unofficial soccer match with the Ghanaian navy is also scheduled for Simpson Sailors as an integral hub event, providing a means to enhance and enrich the APS training through fostering teamwork and camaraderie on the field and off. The hub will end with a reception on board Simpson, co-hosted by U.S. Ambassador to Ghana, the Honorable Donald Teitelbaum, and Milliken. Simpson will then depart Tema and participate in a scheduled passing exercise (PASSEX) with the Ghanaian navy ship Anzone, which will involve shipboard maneuvers out at sea, completing the hubs APS training. APS is an international secu rity cooperation initiative, facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Simpson is on a regularly scheduled deployment to the Sixth Fleet area of responsibil ity. Milliken conducts a media availability in the ships wardroom with local Nigerian media. Simpson is in Nigeria in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Musician 3rd Class Andrew Francisco, assigned to the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe Band, plays the saxophone for school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School, while books were distributed by Sailors from the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. APS is an international security cooperation initiative facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collab orative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Milliken observes British cannons from the 19th century at the Oba Palace of Lagos dur ing a site visit as part of Africa Partnership Station 2012. Ships Serviceman Seaman Recruit Bernard Ford, right, assigned to the guidedmissile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), helps offload books for school children at the Tomaro Junior Secondary School during a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Boatswains Mate Seaman Joshua Maurer, assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), hands books to school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School during a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class David Young, assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), hands books to school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School during a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Seaman Thomas Bailey, assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), hands books to school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School dur ing a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012.

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a morning tour of the ship. Four stations were set up to demonstrate VBSS procedures along with bridge, combat, and engineering operations. At one station the VBSS team simulated conduct ing compliant and noncompliant boardings and at another the Operations Officer and ships quar termasters discussed underway watch-standing and topside operations. Two of the ships Tactical Action Officers and sever al Operations Specialists demonstrated what an engagement with a hos tile jet would look like in CIC at a third station. At the final station Klakrings Chief Engineer and GSMC discussed the ships pro pulsion, auxiliary, and DC equipment, and then demonstrated engineer ing operations. Saturday afternoon the midshipmen competed in DC Olympics also hosted on board Klakring. The midshipmen were divided into four groups for the competition and compet ed in six events: DC LOK exams, FFE relay races, shoring races, dewater ing races utilizing a P-100, pipe patching races, and DC bowling. The ships Damage Control Chief crafted a medal for the winning team consist ing of a bronze ring sur rounding a command coin which was attached to a lanyard made by the Boatswains Mates. Every member of the winning team also received a com mand ballcap. Sunday after noon members of the Charleston Naval League visited Klakring for a tour. Throughout the week end the officers and crew of Klakring were able to enjoy the historic sights and world famous hospi tality of Charleston while enjoying well-deserved liberty. Monday morn ing Klakring departed Charleston to continue operations in the Atlantic, preparing for a counterterrorism deployment to the 6th fleet area of opera tions later this year.From Page 1KlakringKlakring Completes Successful WargamesA large contingent of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet has been gathering off the coast of Marble Head, North Carolina to par ticipate in Bold Alligator 2012, the largest amphibi ous war-game held by the Second Fleet in more than a decade. The force, under Combined Task Force (CTF) 995, includes AEGIS Ballistic Missile Defense destroyers and cruisers, amphibious dock and assault ships, attack submarines, and even the USS Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. Amid the backdrop of such a massive mobiliza tion, USS Klakring (FFG 42) and two other war ships were assigned to simulate an opposition force and were tasked with harassing and attack ing CTF 955. The Bold Alligator wargame is predicated on a simulated geopolitical situation where an aggres sor nation called Garnet invades neighboring Amber under the prem ise of protecting minor ity groups across the border. Amber appeals to the UN, which issues a resolution requiring Garnet to withdraw her forces and restore prehostility borders. When Garnet fails to comply, CTF 955 is dispatched to the region to restore peace. USS Klakring (FFG 42), USS Cole (DDG 67), and USS Normandy (CG 60) played the role of the Garnetian Navy, and were dispatched to prevent ing CTF 955 from landing their amphibious forces behind the Garnetian front lines. On the second day in the AOR, USS Klakring conducted a surprise early-morning raid on the USS Enterprise strike group. Sneaking through the night with her sys tems turned off so as not to give away her posi tion, Klakring closed to nine miles before launch ing all four of her antiship cruise missiles at USS Enterprise, inflict ing damage to her #3 air craft elevator and killing her Commanding Officer. With her missiles exhaust ed Klakring turned out bound at high speed and attempted to escape ret ribution, though after only five minutes carrierlaunched aircraft were in the air and Klakring was assessed as killed. After being resur rected later that morn ing (OPFOR ships are out of play for several hours after being destroyed and then resume opera tions against the task group) Klakring began closing the amphibious ships now conducting beach landings to push Garnetian forces out of Amber. Again Klakring closed under cover of darkness, keeping sys tems stealthy as to not give away her intentions. As the sun rose, Klakring found herself stuck between two escorts. Klakring quickly fired two missiles at USS New York (LPD 21) before being engaged and destroyed again by USS Vicksburg (CG 69), though both mis siles were deemed misses. The next two days saw concerted efforts by the CTF 995 ships to seek and destroy the hostile Garnetian Navy that had proven so effective, and attacks from both planes and surface-launched over the horizon missiles became routine within minutes of OPFOR ships coming back in play. Wrapping up the exercise, Klakring con ducted a refueling at sea with USNS Laramie, en route to spend a week end in Charleston, South Carolina and share in the calibrations as NROTC students at The Citadel select their orders. Klakring hosted more than 100 midship men onboard during her visit, and maintained a full schedule including visits to a local Habitat for Humanity site, the VA hospital, and local recep tions amongst the tours and demonstrations onboard. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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FFSC Workshops For Families, SailorsThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 27, 6 p.m. 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 29, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m., Marketing Yourself for a Second Career, Ocean Breeze Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Saving and Investing, FFSC Room 719 By Appointment, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., Resume Review, FFSC TBDOutplacement Firm Ready To Help Sailors Launch New Careers Navys contract for job search and assistance to help Sailors separating by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) is well underway, an official said Feb. 17. Navy has contracted Challenger, Gray and Christmas, Inc. (CGC), an outplacement service company, to personally coach and assist ERB sep arating Sailors transition to the civilian workforce, said Capt. Kate Janac, Transition Assistance Program Manager. The Sept. 1 separation date is approaching and ERB Sailors should immedi ately contact CGC via a toll-free number or email to begin their job place ment process. An employment out placement service assists clients in making the tran sition to reemployment. Founded in the early 1960s, CGC has more than four decades of experience in the career transi tion industry. The CGC team provides Sailors with individualized career assessment and professional resume writing, job search and preparation for inter views. The company assigns each Sailor a civil ian coach who proactively works their case through each step of the process and also a prior military advisor to help in the transition. Our goal is to con nect every ERB separat ing Sailor to this service. Command leadership needs to encourage and provide Sailors opportunity to enroll and move forward, said Janac. Those stationed overseas or deployed should also initiate contact and will receive support tailored to their unique situations. What really stands out is the high level of indi vidual and professional service our Sailors will receive, said Janac. Sailors can engage with their coach to learn the skills needed to devel op a personal market ing plan customized to their expertise and spe cific goals. CGC began contacting ERB Sailors via email in December. Approximately 1,000 Sailors are using services provided by CGC, a third of eligible recipients. CGC representatives have joined Navy Personnel Commands Fleet Engagement Team during its briefs in fleet concentration areas to facilitate enrollment. ERB separating Sailors should contact CGC using their toll free number 1-800-971-4288 or email CGCUSNavy@challenger gray.com. Sailors can then work with their coach to estab lish an account on the CGC website, found at https://www.icareerman ager.com/login/challeng erTops/login.aspx. For more information, contact the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866827-5672) or email csc mailbox@navy.mil. For more information about transition ben efits visit the Transition Assistance Web Page available under the Hot Links section of the Navy Personnel Command at www.npc.navy.mil. Learn How To Market YourselfThe Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-ayear lecture regarding transition here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be present ed by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Feb. 29, at 9-11:30 a.m., in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center Grand Ballroom. This top-shelf pre sentation is a great professional devel opment opportunity. Transition is of course ultimately a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are contemplat ing retirement in one to five years. Regardless of wheth er any particular offi cer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be edu cated about the pro cess in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. This executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day pro grams. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlisted super visor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by Colonel Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national staff. It includes compre hensive information on the retirement deci sion itself, employer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and impor tant transition topics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. SPOUSES are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career . For further infor mation, contact Jose Sanchez, at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil or call 904-270-6600, ext. 1700 or 1701. Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 7

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New DoD Nutrition Campaign Aims To Improve Troops, Families HealthThe Defense Department has launched a groundbreaking obe sity and nutrition aware ness campaign aimed at improving the health and well-being of troops, retirees and their families across the services, DODs top health affairs official announced Feb. 9. Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs and TRICARE Management Activity director, joined First Lady Michelle Obama at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., to unveil the campaign, which involves improving nutrition standards mili tarywide for the first time in 20 years. The Department of Defense is making a groundbreaking commit ment to the health of our troops and their fami lies, the first lady said in a news release today. And in doing so, theyre not just sending a power ful message throughout the military community, theyre sending a message to our entire country. The campaign, devel oped by the Military Health System, will rally all of the services to encourage people to make better nutritional choices and to take a more active role in their personal health, Woodson said in an interview at the Pentagon yesterday. America has a growing problem, he said, noting the pun is intended. We have an issue of increas ing obesity within the civilian population, [and] a history of poor nutri tional choices, both in the civilian and military populations, thats affect ing readiness. Nearly 30 percent of potential military candi dates ages 17 to 24 cant qualify for the military because theyre over weight, Woodson noted. Additionally, the military discharges about 1,200 entry-level candidates each year due to their inability to meet fitness and weight standards. This is really a national security issue if weve got a population of youth that could serve in the military, but cant serve because of weight stan dards, he said. The Military Health Systems campaign will call on the services and the Pentagons office of military community and family policy to help in achieving the following: -Updating menu stan dards at military dining facilities; -Assessing the nutri tional environment of military facilities; and -Ensuring healthier foods are available in dining facilities, DOD schools and other places where troops, retirees and their families purchase food on bases, such as vending machines and snack bars. In other words, as the campaign unfolds, highstarch and sugary treats will have to step aside as an abundance of fresh fruits, vegetables and lean proteins move onto installations. Our intent is to look at opportunities to improve whats on the menu, and therefore, the choices, Woodson said. DOD hasnt updated its nutritional menu stan dards in nearly 20 years, he noted. Its time to take a comprehensive look, he said. We know so much more about good nutri tion and how to prevent disease than ever before. Military children will be an important focus of this campaign, Woodson said, noting the importance of developing healthy habits at an early age. Its all about making good choices, he said. A vending machine filled with soft drinks and sweets is an attractive draw for children. But if that vending machine now contains apples, bananas and other healthy items, he added, children will make differ ent choices. Its about facilitating good decisions and cre ating environments in which theyll succeed, he explained. Todays children are tomorrows service members and leaders, Woodson said. What we do, how we teach them, the environments we put them in, will predict how successful they will be later in life, he added. The campaign also will focus efforts on military retirees, who will receive enhanced obesity-related counseling and nutrition al information, Woodson explained. The Defense Department spends about $1.4 billion a year on health-related prob lems related to obesity, he noted, including diabetes, heart disease and osteo arthritis. Obesity is a prevent able problem which, if combated, can help pre vent disease and ease the burden on our overall Military Health System, Woodson said in the release. Our strategy within health affairs is moving from what we call health care just delivery of services to producing health in our population we serve, he said in the interview. Its about a mindset that looks at dis ease prevention rather than disease treatment. This new, comprehen sive initiative is not just about health care provid ers, but also is about part nerships, Woodson noted individuals, installation commanders, military and civilian communities, family programs, schools and parents working together to build healthier populations. Theres a role every one can play, he said. Its about catalyzing the movement and synergiz ing the efforts and the leadership to focus on health. Woodson said he has high hopes for the new campaign. I think this will improve the health of the entire population, he said. The first lady agreed. Whenever our men and women in uniform step forward, Americans take notice, she said in the release. When our service members make healthy eating a priority in their lives, the rest of us are more likely to make it a priority in our lives. Simply put, she added, this is Americas entire military once again stepping forward to lead by example. The Military Health Systems campaign will call on the services and the Pentagons office of military community and family policy to help in achieving the following: -Updating menu standards at military dining facilities; -Assessing the nutritional environment of military facilities; and -Ensuring healthier foods are available in dining facilities, DOD schools and other places where troops, retirees and their families purchase food on bases, such as vending machines and snack bars. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Learning To Save Lives -Photos by Paige GnannElectronics Technician 2nd Class James Herrera performs CPR techniques on Electronics Technician 2nd Class Guisseppe Dicarrantonio during a CPR training course held by NS Mayports Fire and Emergency Services department. Several members of Mayports Ground Electronics took the course on Feb. 16 in Building One to learn life saving skills. Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Vaney Lustre gives a thumbs up to instructor Matt Allen after checking if patient Electronics Technician 3rd Class Crystal Ragas is breathing during a CPR class. You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 9

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Harvey Holds Town Hall -Photo by MCSA Damian BergAdm. John C. Harvey, Jr., Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, addresses Sailors during a town hall meeting aboard Naval Station Mayport. Harvey's visit included a series of site visits and town hall discussions with military departments and chief petty officers in the Navy Region Southeast area. Boatswains Mate Seaman Wilson Richardson and Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Wells per formsafety checks during a maintenance at sea.-Photos by CTTSN Carter USS Taylor performs a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with USNS Lewis and Clark on Feb. 9 USS Taylor Begins First Leg Of Deployment Donate Locks For CharityBalfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport will host a Locks of Love event on Feb. 25. The event will be held at the Ribault Bay Community Center from 11a.m.-3 p.m. anyone who donates will receive a trim and style from two guest hair stylists. Also, those who donate will receive a gift bag with styling and beauty prod ucts and the person who donates the longest pony tail of the day will receive a special gift. To donate to Locks of Love, hair must be at least 10 inches log, clean and dry. It must be bundled in a ponytail or a braid. Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be used. Locks has been in place since 1998 and provides t he hair pieces for children under age 21. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. The event is open to the public. Guest stylist Ladia Vargas has been a licensed cosmologist since 2001 in California and also is licensed in Florida since 2002. Guest stylist Renee Pendlay is an Independent Hair Designer & Makeup Artist at Salon @ 220 in Orange Park. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Training Day With Security Mayport Comes Out To Help Shipmate -Photos by Paige GnannEngineman 2nd Class (SW) Brian Birdsall of Harbor Operations swabs his cheek dur ing a bone marrow drive sponsored by Naval Station Mayport Security in honor of their shipmate, Master-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet who has Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia and needs a bone marrow transplant.More than 300 potential bone marrow donors showed up to Building One Feb. 15-17 to support a Naval Station Mayport Sailor in need of a transplant. Master-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet of NS Mayport Security was diagnosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in March and is in need of a bone marrow transplant. The drive was held in conjunc tion with the National Marrow Donor Program Registry and even if Brian didnt find a match at the event, it can still benefit other patients waiting for a match, Brians wife Katherine said. We are so thankful that word got out [throughout NS Mayport] and people are willing to register, Katherine said. Bone marrow drives have been held in Pennsylvania, where he earned his Eagle Scout, worked with the local fire depart ment and was named 2009 Lifesaver of the Year. It has been a difficult time for the young family, their daughter Elaina was only four weeks old when he was diag nosed with ALL. He has already been through several rounds of chemotherapy and Katherine said that the doctors want to do a bone marrow transplant sooner rather than later. To find out more about the donor pro gram, go to www.marrow.org. -Photos byMCSA Damian BergLt. Lawrence Morton conducts crowd control training with members of Naval Station Mayports Security team during an inservice training day outside of Building One. Below, Security team members help with the training by acting as aggressive protestors during the training day activity. Katherine Van Fleet holds 1-year-old daughter Elaina during the bone marrow drive on Feb. 16. Katherine attended the event to thank donors for stepping up for her husband, Brian. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 11

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12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb. 26: UFC 144 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE March 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowl ing, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 4: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spa ghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 5-8: Mens Pre Season Basketball Tournament Sign up by Feb. 27. 270-5451. March 6 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 March 7: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 7: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 March 7: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by Desron 14. For tickets, call NCCS Andre Brown at (904) 270-5951 x3115. March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 March 9: 7 Street Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 March 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 13: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 13: Mens 7v7 Soccer Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 March 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 March 15: Final Day of Youth Spring Baseball and Soccer Sign Ups. Register at the Youth Activities Center. 2705680. March 16: St. Patricks Day at Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double pay-outs on all hand cards, Pot of Gold coin game, prizes and more! 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bowling Special. 1-8 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy 2 hours of Bowling with shoe rental for $7. To get this great discount you must be wearing green! 270-5377 March 21: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the Mayport CPOA. For tick ets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 270-5126 x3115 March 24: Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by March 15. 270-5451 March 26: Pre-Season Soccer Tournament. Sign up by March 19. 270-5451 March 30: Custom Delux. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 March 31: Easter Eggstravaganza. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Egg hunt, games, prizes, train rides and more. 270-5228 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 23: Killer Bunny. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments Provided. Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb 25: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 26: UFC 144. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 28: Texas Hold Em Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. March 3: Monster Jam. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Cost $10. Sign up deadline Feb. 27. March 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowl ing, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 5-8: Mens Pre Season Basketball Tournament Sign up by Feb. 27. 270-5451. March 7: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 7: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 March 7: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by Desron 14. For tickets, call NCCS Andre Brown at (904) 270-5951 x3115. March 7: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 9: 7 Street Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 March 9: Royal Comedy Tour Van Departs Liberty Center 7 p.m. Cost $25. March 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 11: Killer Bunny. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments Provided. March 13: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 13: Mens 7v7 Soccer Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 March 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 March 16: St. Patricks Day at Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double pay-outs on all hand cards, Pot of Gold coin game, prizes and more! March 16: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. March 17: St. Patricks Day Bowling Special 1-8 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy 2 hours of Bowling with shoe rental for $7. To get this great discount you must be wearing green! 270-5377 March 18: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) March 19: Dart Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 13 Feb 23: Drama Club Presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. Feb. 25: Cicis Pizza Night. 1-3:30 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Permission slip required. 270-5680. March 2: Freedom FridayHappy Birthday, Dr. Seuss. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 3: Golden Corral Dinner Trip 5-9 p.m. Bring money for din ner. Ages 13 and up, per mission slip required. 270-5680. March 4: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spa ghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 10: Teen Center Karaoke. 6 p.m. at the Teen Center. 246-0347 March 15: Final Day of Youth Spring Baseball and Soccer Sign Ups. Register at the Youth Activities Center. 2705680. March 16: St. Patricks Day Dance 8-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. 2460347. March 16: Freedom Friday Shake Your Shamrock Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bowling Special. 1-8 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy 2 hours of Bowling with shoe rental for $7. TO get this great discount you must be wearing green! 270-5377 March 30Teen Movie Trip. 5 p.m. Free for the first 24 teens to register. Ages 13 and up; permis sion slip required. Bring your own money for con cessions. Vote all month for the movie! 246-0347 March 31: Easter Eggstravaganza. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Egg hunt, games, prizes, train rides and more. 270-5228 -Photo by Ashley VasquezJada Noll, 10, shows off her artwork Toucan. during the Youth Activities Center art exhibit. The Youth Activity Center is affiliated with the Boys and Girls Club of America, and for the last six years the center has hosted an art exhibit to showcase the childrens creativity. There are many different mediums of artwork including mixed media, cray ons, chalk, pastels, and various paints that the kids worked with throughout the year. This years exhibit showcased three different mediums and Nolls artwork from the pas tels category has made it to the Regionals. She will be representing NS Mayport in the BGCA Southeast Region Fine Arts Exhibit.Works of Art At YAC a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basic 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning

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and fiscal 2015. Panetta acknowledged that realignments and closures require significant upfront financial costs, but said they are needed in the long term not just for costsavings, but also as part of rebalancing the force from a drawdown after a decade of war. As a former Congress member from Monterey, Calif., Panetta said, he knows firsthand how hard it is for representatives to oversee base closures in their districts. He served in the House in the early 1990s when Fort Ord was closed, he noted. The post along the Monterey coast, he added, represented 25 percent of the local econ omy. As somebody who went through the BRAC process in my own dis trict, I recognize how con troversial this process is for members and for con stituencies, Panetta said. And yet, it is the only effective way to achieve needed infrastructure sav ings. The most recent BRAC round, in 2005, resulted in the department closing 14 major military instal lations and realigning nearly a dozen others. Panetta agreed with some committee members that the 2005 BRAC cost much more than expected and has yet to realize the sav ings that were planned. But, having been through three rounds of BRAC, he said, there are lessons learned for the next time. There are only so many areas in the defense bud get to find cost savings, the secretary told the House panel, and infra structure needs to be among them.-Photo by PO1 Chad J. McNeeley Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta answers a question during his testimony on the Defense Departments budget proposal before the House Armed Service Committee in Washington, D.C., Feb. 15, 2012. From Page 1Budget Serving those who serve our country.Catholic Charities USAA CFC participant. Provided as a public service1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Blue Angels Look For 2013 Team MembersThe Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, encour age qualified Navy and Marine Corps enlisted personnel to apply for the 2013 and follow-on seasons. Navy E-5 and above, and outstanding E-4, Sailors from multiple aviation platforms are considered for this typetwo sea duty billet. Blue Angels Command Master Chief Yoshimi Core explained the Blue Angels team is not locked into selecting Sailors sole ly based on naval enlisted codes (NECs) or F/A-18 experience. However, Marine Corps applicants must be F/A-18 specific electricians, communication/navigation (COMNAV), power plants or air frames. The squadrons Enlisted Applications Chief, Senior Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Patrick Hosterman, said the team has a variety of opportunities available for the following rates: aviation machinists mate (AD), aviation electri cians mate (AE), aviation structural mechanic (AM and AME), aviation ord nanceman (AO), aviation support equipmentmen (AS), aviation electronics technician (AT), aviation maintenance adminis trationman (AZ), aircrew survival equipmentman (PR), mass communica tion specialist (MC), logis tics specialist (LS), and yeoman (YN). The team is also looking for a hos pital corpsman (HM) with an 8406 NEC and E-7s in aviation maintenance rat ings. Core explained team members must have a strong work ethic, excep tional communication skills, the enthusiasm to represent the men and women of the Navy and Marine Corps and the desire to uphold the tradi tions of the Blue Angels organization. The Blue Angels Navy and Marine Corps members are all about team work, said Core. Ultimately, you can be the best technician in the world but if you do not thrive on teamwork you are not the right fit for this team. It is common to see Blue Angel HMs, YNs, MCs and LSs on the flight line servicing jets. Team members in different work centers help other shops with heavier or higher priority workloads. Prospective chief, limited duty officer and Seamen to Admiral can didates benefit from sus tained superior perfor mance, and selection to the team is just another good bullet in their resume, said Core. Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Brian Williamson, the Blue Angels detailer, says Sailors should not be concerned about get ting penalized if they do not get picked for the team. They will be given one more look in Career Management System/ Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) before they are considered needs of the Navy. For more information on how to apply visit the Blue Angels web site: www.blueangels.navy.mil or contact Hosterman at: patrick.hosterman@navy. mil. The Blue Angels team is seeking two Navy or Marine Corps F/A-18 demonstra tion pilots, a flight surgeon and one naval flight officer for the events coordinator position, for the 2013 and follows-on sea sons. The team is also seeking one Marine Corps C-130 demonstration pilot, a public affairs officer and a maintenance officer for the 2014 and follow-on seasons. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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DoD Opens More Positions To WomenThe Defense Department announced Feb. 9 changes to its assignment policy which will result in 14,325 addi tional positions being opened to women. Women are contrib uting in unprecedented ways to the militarys mis sion. Through their cour age, sacrifice, patriotism and great skill, women have proven their abil ity to serve in an expand ing number of roles on and off the battlefield, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said. We will continue to open as many positions as pos sible to women so that anyone qualified to serve can have the opportunity to do so. In a report required by the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act, the department notified Congress today it intends to make two changes to rules in place since 1994 governing the service of female members of the armed forces: first, occu pations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-locat ed with ground combat units; and second, a siz able number of positions will be opened to women at the battalion level in select direct ground com bat units in specific occu pations. The services also will continuously assess their experience with these changes to help determine future changes to the 1994 rules. The services will con tinue to review posi tions and requirements to determine what addi tional positions may be opened, ensuring the mis sion is met with the best qualified and most capa ble, regardless of gender, Panetta said. The 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule articu lated five basic elements informing decisions on the service of women in the military: direct ground combat; berthing and privacy; co-location; long range reconnaissance and special operations forces; and physically demand ing tasks. The 1994 DoD poli cy allowed women to be restricted from some occupational specialties if those specialties were physically co-located with direct ground combat units. Because the mod ern-day battlefield is nonlinear and fluid, with no clearly defined front line or safer rear area, combat support operations are dispersed throughout the battlespace. Removal of the co-location exclusion will result in 13,139 Army positions being opened to women, in specialties such as tank mechanic and field artillery radar operator. Additionally, the 1994 policy prohibited women from being assigned below brigade level to units whose principal mission was to engage in combat. The Army, Marines and Navy have been granted exceptions to policy to allow select positions at the battalion level in specialties already open to women, open ing 1,186 additional posi tions. These exceptions to policy will help the ser vices assess the suitabil ity and relevance of the direct ground combat unit assignment prohibition, and inform future policy decisions. Regarding other policy restrictions, the depart ment recognizes there are practical barriers that require time to resolve to ensure the services maxi mize the safety and priva cy of all service members while maintaining mili tary readiness. Building upon analysis and expe rience, the services will develop gender-neutral physical standards for use by all members. Gender-neutral physi cal standards ensure all members can meet the physical demands of the duties they are assigned, acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney said, ultimately contributing to high er states of readiness through an increased understanding of the demands we place upon our members and by pre venting injuries. Panetta directed the services to update him in six months on assignment policy implementation and the progress made developing gender-neu tral physical standards. As required by law, these changes to policy will take effect after 30 days of continuous ses sion of Congress, which is expected to occur later this spring. The report can be viewed at http://www. defense.gov/news/WISR_ Report_to_Congress.pdf. A Quilt To Remember Thanks For Service Naval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, congratulates Safety Specialist Sam Williams for 36 years of service during a retirement lun cheon at Bogeys on Jan. 26. Pickard presented Williams with a 30-year pin and letter of appreciation during the luncheon.-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Branch Health Clinic Mayport Officer in Charge, Capt. Alan Siewertsen, stands with retired Electricians Mate 1st Class Donald Smith, wife Angela and grandson Devin Smith after presenting the clinic with a military quilt designed and embroidered by the retiree. The quilt was originally made for his grandson, but the family agreed that its place was at the clinic instead. Smiths next project is a Wounded Warrior quilt for Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Time to renew your vehicle DoD stickers? Do it online at https://www.pid.cnic.navy.mil/ 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Carney Tapped For Port ChangeSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 16 the four Arleigh Burke-class guid ed-missile destroyers, which will be forward deployed to Rota, Spain. The four include three from Norfolk, Va; USS Ross, USS Donald Cook, and USS Porter, and one from Mayport, Fla., USS Carney. The ships are in support of President Obamas European Phased Adaptive Approach to enhance the security of the European region. We welcome Spains part nership in stationing four U.S. Navy Aegis ships at Naval Station Rota, said Mabus. We have a long history of cooperation between our two countries and we have developed significant interoperability between our naval forces. These multi-mission ships will perform a myriad of tasks, including the full spectrum of maritime security operations, bilateral and multilateral train ing exercises, NATO operations and deployments, and NATO missile defense. Ross and Donald Cook will arrive in fiscal 2014 and Carney and Porter in fiscal 2015. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta initially announced the stationing of four Aegis ships to Rota Oct. 5, 2011, in Brussels, Belgium. By hosting these ships, Spain will continue its vital role in enhancing the securi ty of the European region, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Atlantic Ocean, said Panetta in an Oct. 5, 2011, statement. The agreement also enables the United States to provide rapid and responsive support to the U.S. Africa and U.S. Central Commands, as needed. -Photo by MAC Anthony J. SgangaWaves crash over the bow of the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64). The Secretary of the Navy announced last week that Carney and three other DDGs from Norfolk, Va., will be forward deployed to Rota, Spain.Panetta Asks Congress To Undo Sequestration, Approve BRACDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta urged Congress to undo an automatic $500 billion cut to defense spend ing due to go into effect next year, and made his case for two new rounds of military base realignments and closures. Panetta raised the issues as part of his presentation of the proposed fiscal 2013 defense budget to the House Armed Services Committee. He was joined by Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Robert F. Hale, Defense Department comptroller and undersecretary of defense for finance. The proposal a $525.4 billion base budget plus $88.5 billion for overseas contingency operations includes reductions toward $487 billion in defense spending cuts over 10 years mandated by the Budget Control Act, which Congress passed last year. It does not, however, account for more than $500 billion in additional cuts that will go into effect in January if Congress doesnt act to stop it. Those additional cuts, known as sequestration, were written into the Budget Control Act as automatic, across-the-board cuts to the federal budget if members of a congressional super committee could not agree on spending cuts by a November deadline. They didnt. Panetta said DOD leaders took seriously their responsibility to plan for the $487 billion in cuts in a way that does not hollow out the military. Military and civilian DOD leaders are united in support of the budget proposal that involved careful deliberations based on strategy, he said. We need your partnership to do this in a manner that preserves the strongest military in the world, the secretary told the committee. This will be a test for all of us: whether reducing the deficit is about talk or about action. Let me be very clear, he continued. When you take a half a trillion dollars out of the defense budget, it comes with risks. Those risks include working with a smaller force, depending on new technologies, needing to mobi lize quickly and taking care of the all-volunteer force, Panetta said. There is very little margin for error in this budget, he added. Congress must do everything possible to avoid sequestration, Panetta said, because it would amount to a meat-ax approach of cutting at least 8 percent more from each defense budget category. And that, we are convinced, would hollow out the force and inflict serious damage to the national defense, he said. It would be devastating, he added. Another $500 billion and Id have to throw the strategy I just presented to you out the window. Panetta said defense leaders would welcome working with Congress on a way to stop sequestration before it takes effect. Whatever we can do on both sides to develop an approach that we detrigger sequestration, were cer tainly willing to work on that, he said. The secretary also noted that the administration will make a formal request next month that Congress create base realignment and closure processes for fiscal 2013 -Photos courtesy of USS KlakringSailors from USS Klakring participate in a community relations project with Habitat for Humanity during a threeday port visit to Charleston, South Carolina.Klakring Visits Charleston, Exchanges With Citadel USS Klakring (FFG 42) concluded a threeday port visit last week in Charleston, South Carolina, where the ship helped celebrate orders selection night at The Citadel, a private military academy that has a large NROTC contingent. Klakring was based in Charleston until the naval station was closed, making the port visit particularly fit ting as Klakring pre pares to begin her final deployment. In addi tion to hosting tours for the Charleston Navy League, Citadel midshipmen, and local military, USS Klakring continued a tradition of volunteer ing while in port. Sailors volunteered liberty time to work at two Habitat for Humanity sites and visited a Veterans Hospital. Entering Charleston Harbor on Friday morn ing, Klakring was greet ed by a group from Joint Base Charleston. Several groups with the welcoming committee were offered tours of the ship while others greet ers briefed the crew on the surrounding area. A reception hosted by the Charleston Naval League on Friday evening allowed the officers and chiefs from Klakring to meet the senior Citadel midshipmen who will soon serve alongside them in the U.S. Navy. This was a great oppor tunity for the midship men to ask questions and gather the impressions of Klakrings crew, as the midshipmen prepare to select their first ships in the coming weeks. The following day more than 100 midship men were welcomed onboard Klakring for Klakring Sailors gather in the lobby of the VA hospital in Charleston after visiting with residents during a port visit to the city.See Klakring, Page 6 See Budget, Page 14

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Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.There is a story of a man whose shop was destroyed in the great Chicago fire of 1871. The next morning the shop owner showed up at his burned out store and set up a table in the midst of the charred debris. Above the table he placed a sign that read, Everything lost except wife, children, and hope. Business will resume as usual tomorrow. Hope is something we must have and keep in the new year! We live in a world that produces hardships and difficulties month in and month out as we prog ress throughout any given year. That fact seems to be one constant we can certainly count on. Some months we hear about hurricanes, earthquakes or tornadoes. Other months we hear sad news of accidents, illness or death. Upon hearing or per sonally experiencing tri als and tribulations, one can even begin to wonder, Does God really care about me? Is there hope for a better day tomor row? The Reverend Reginald Ponder tells of his days as a youngster when his uncle used to take him to watch the Greensboro Patriots play baseball. He describes it this way. When I went to games, I noticed that a group of boys always gathered behind the outfield fence. They would chase the balls that were hit over the fence and take them to a man who watched the gate at the end of fence in return for being allowed to sit in the stands and watch the game. Some of the boys would stand on crates or on each others shoul ders in order to watch the game. Others would stand on their tiptoes to watch through holes in the fence. They were the most enthusiastic fans at the stadium. Every time the Patriots did some thing, they cheered. They even cheered when the team was hopelessly behind and many of the paying customers had left the ballpark. They watched every play and activity on the tiptoe of hope and expectation. Let me encourage you to stand on your tiptoes and peek into 2012. Be encouraged with abun dant hope and expecta tion. How can I say this with assurance you ask? Because I have been through several trials and difficulties in 2011and I know God has been with me. I truly believe that God is in charge of this world and that God is a good and loving God. I must admit that some days I do wonder, but in the end God has not failed me. Tested me, yes. Failed me, no. Not only that, but I also believe that God desires the very best for our life, even if there are some bumps and challenges along our path. One of my favorite hymns grow ing up was This is my Fathers World. One stanza says it best. This is my Fathers world. O let me never forget, That though the wrong seems oft so strong, God is ruler yet. Keep hope alive!Are You On Your Tiptoes For 2012?Cmdr. Steve Souders Surface Force Ministry Center Balfour Beatty Foundation Offers Academic Scholarships For Family Housing ResidentsRecognizing the importance of education and its continu ing rising costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholar ships for the 2012-2013 aca demic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. We encourage our fam ily housing residents with high school and undergradu ate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation, its a difficult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. The application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunities foundation.org. The applica tion deadline is April 15, 2012. The Foundation notes that the requirements for scholar ships has changed slightly from years past with new essay questions and the reduction of the number of recommendations students must submit. Balfour Beatty Communities, responsible for the privatized family housing at Naval Station Mayport, formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization com mitted to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to community leadership through educational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality living environment that supports the diverse interests and needs of our military fam ilies. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. Deadline Feb. 24 For DeCA Scholarship Eligible students who want to apply for the 2012 Scholarships for Military Children program still have time, but the clock is ticking. Applications must be completed and deliv ered not postmarked, but delivered to a com missary by close of busi ness Feb. 24. Scholarship applica tions are available in commissaries and online at http://www.commis saries.com choose the News & Info tab and then the Scholarship Info tab. Applications are also available at http:// www.militaryscholar.org. At least one $1,500 schol arship will be awarded at every commissary with qualified applicants. The following are key reminders for scholarship applications, which are also available in greater detail on http://www.militaryscholar.org: Current military ID. Applicants and their sponsors must be enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System DEERS database and have a cur rent military ID card. Military family mem ber. Applicants must be a dependent, unmarried child no older than 21, or 23 if enrolled as a fulltime student at a college or university of a service member on active duty, a reservist, guardsman or retiree, or survivor of a service member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retiree. College bound. The student must be planning to attend, or already be attending, an accredited college or university, full time in the fall of 2012 or be enrolled in a pro gram of studies designed to transfer directly into a four-year program. Essay. The essay must be 500 words or less, sta pled to the application and written in the follow ing format: typed, double spaced, no more than two pages, applicants name in upper right-hand cor ner of each page. The essay topic: Whose four faces would you place on a 21st century Mount Rushmore-type monu ment, and why? The person must be nonfic tional, U.S. citizen, male or female the time frame for the selection is 1850 to 2011. Correct address. Applicants must provide their permanent home address on the front page of the application not their college address. Complete package. The submission package must include the follow ing: 1) transcript or copy of applicants grades; 2) essay with applicants name on each page; 3) parent or guardians sig nature as well as the applicants signature on application; and 4) appli cants high school College Board Code number (if available). Keep a copy. Applicants should also maintain their own copy of their application and essay. Submit to one commissary. Applicants can only submit their application to one commissary; submitting to more than one store will disqualify the applicant from con sideration. No faxes or emails. Faxed or emailed applications will not be accepted. For more information, call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers. com.Scholarships Available For SNA DependentsSurface Navy Association Scholarship application deadline of March 1 2012 is fast approaching. The Surface Navy Association Scholar receives an academic scholarship awarded for demonstrated leadership, community service, aca demic achievement and a commitment to pursuing higher educational objec tives. Awards will be made on the basis of the indi viduals application, using a whole person con cept, considering the candidates scholastic profi ciency, non-scholastic activities, scholastic and non-scholastic awards, and character. Note: applicants will be per mitted to submit copies of their Federal Financial Aid Form but the absence of an aid form will not be detrimental to the candi date. Deadline is March 1, 2012. Application can be obtained at http:// www.navysna.org/SNA/ Awards/Scholarship/ ApplicationIndex.htm Selection Qualifications child, ward or spouse of a Surface Navy Association member. The member must be in their second or subsequent consecutive year of membership. ing, retired or honorably discharged and must be a Surface Warfare Officer or Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist. Qualified members must serve for a minimum of three years on surface ships of the U.S. Navy or a Coast Guardsman, Officer or Enlisted, with a perma nent Cutterman Pin. Surface ships include carriers, combatants, amphibious, service force, mine force, tenders, and U.S. Coast Guard cutters of all classes. not be consecutive but must have been served on active duty. a grant limited to $2000 per year for a maximum of four years provided a 3.0 grade point average is maintained. service period for children or spouses of personnel who died on active duty while serving in a surface ship or cutter. Association scholar ships are for studies in an accredited undergraduate or postgraduate institu tion. Full-time status may be waived in the case of spouses as long as they maintain a course load of 6 semester hours.CNO To Speak At MidwayThe Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, which will be held Saturday, June 9, at the Renaissance Resort, World Golf Village. Guest speaker is Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and for mer prisoners of war in our area who have hero ically answered the call of duty. Come meet these national treasurers and hear their adventures first hand. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from the fol lowing locations: Navy League Mayport Bob Price, Phone 904718-2118 Email: bpricex4@com cast.net 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Put NS Mayports Sewers On Fat-Free DietFats, oils, and grease arent just bad for our personal health; they are bad for the health of our sewer system as well. Just as we must be careful as to what we put into our bodies to maintain our optimum health, we must likewise be careful what we put down our sinks and drains in our homes and food establishments. Specifically, fats, oils, and grease, when improperly disposed in the sanitary sewer system or storm drain system, can cause property damage, health hazards and environmental problems. When cleaning up after dinner, pouring a little meat fat from your fry ing pan down the kitchen sink may not seem like such a bad thing. After all, what harm can that little bit of grease cause? However, grease sticks to the insides of sewer pipes (both on your property and in the streets). Over time, the small quanti ties of grease can build up and block the entire pipe. Garbage disposals do not keep grease out of the plumbing system. They only shred solid material into smaller pieces but do not prevent grease from solidifying in the drain. The result can be sew age backing up and over flowing in your or your neighbors homes, yards, streets, wetlands, or the river. When this occurs, it is not just the oils and grease that overflow, but untreated sewage as well. This would entail an expensive and unpleas ant cleanup and possibly cause contact with dis ease-causing organisms. The best way to solve the grease problem and help prevent overflows of raw sewage is to keep this material out of the sewer system in the first place. How you can help: fats, oils, or grease down sink drains or into toilets. cooking oil and grease into a metal can (soup, vegetable, etc.). Let the grease cool and solidify (you can place the con tainer in the refrigerator or freezer), then place it in the garbage can for disposal. and food scraps from trays, plates, pots, pans, utensils and grills and cooking surfaces into the trash for disposal. greasy foods down gar bage disposals. Put bas kets/strainers in sink drains to catch food scraps and other solids, and empty the drain baskets/strainers into the trash for disposal. dishes to wash oil and grease down the drain. Restaurants that have grease traps in place still need to follow the prop er disposal practices for fats, oils, and grease. The grease traps serve as a backup and only remove minimal amounts of grease. Restaurants with grease traps or grease interceptors are respon sible for inspecting and cleaning them regularly in order for them to be effective. Onetime events or ongoing cooking activities can sometimes generate a large quantity of used cooking oil. Used cooking oil can be taken to the MWR Recycling Center (Bldg. 1624) and placed in the used cooking oil storage tank. This cooking oil is recycled into biodiesel and provides a beneficial reuse by fueling equip ment and vehicles. If you have ques tions about disposal or recycling of used cook ing oil or grease, call the Environmental Division at (904) 270-6816.Navy Names New Destroyers, Littoral Combat ShipsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 15 the next five Navy ships; three Arleigh Burke-class guided-mis sile destroyers, USS John Finn, USS Ralph Johnson, and USS Rafael Peralta, and two littoral combat ships (LCS), USS Sioux City and USS Omaha. Mabus named the three destroyers after Navy and Marine Corps heroes whose actions occurred during different conflicts which spanned several decades, but were united in their uncommon valor. The littoral combat ships were named after two American communities. John Finn, who retired as a lieutenant, received the Medal of Honor from Adm. Chester Nimitz for displaying magnifi cent courage in the face of almost certain death during the Japanese attack on military instal lations in Hawaii dur ing Pearl Harbor. Marine Corps Pfc. Ralph Henry Johnson was posthu mously awarded the Medal of Honor for shouting a warning to his fel low Marines and hurling himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and prevent ing the enemy from pen etrating his sector of the patrols perimeter during the Vietnam War. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Rafael Peralta was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for selflessly covering a grenade with his body to save his fellow Marines from the blast during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Finn, Johnson and Peralta have all been rec ognized with some of our nations highest awards, said Mabus. I want to ensure their service and sacrifice will be known by todays sailors and Marines and honored for several decades to come by a new generation of Americans and people from around the world who will come in contact with these ships. The Arleigh Burke-class destroyers will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peace time presence and crisis management to sea con trol and power projec tion. All three ships will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and will contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare in keeping with the Navys ability to execute the Department of Defense defense strategy. The littoral combat ship is a major part of the future of our Navy, Mabus said, pointing out LCS is fast, agile, and operates with a smaller crew and can perform operations in both shal low and deep waters. I chose the name for our two new littoral combat ships after Midwestern cities from Americas heartland, to honor the patriotic, hard-work ing citizens of Sioux City, Iowa, and Omaha, Nebraska, for their sup port of and contributions to the military. Sioux City and Omaha will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages, which can be changed out quickly as combat needs demand. These mission packages are supported by special detachments that will deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine, undersea and sur face warfare missions. Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wis., will build the Freedom variant, USS Sioux City, which will be 378 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 57 feet, displace approxi mately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. Austal USA in Mobile, Ala., will build the Independence variant, USS Omaha, which will be 419 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 103 feet, displace approxi mately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. For more news from secretary of the Navy public affairs, visit http:// www.navy.mil/SECNAV. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 APS 2012 Begins With Simpson Sailors and coast guardsmen from several African nations are gath ered in Lagos, Nigeria, to participate in the start of Africa Partnership Station 2012 (APS), Feb. 14. APS is part of an ongo ing international effort to assist African nations to improve maritime safety and security. The secu rity cooperation initia tive, now in its fifth year, is aimed at strengthening global maritime partner ships through training and collaborative activi ties in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. This years program builds upon relationships fostered in previous years and brings together more than 30 African, European, North and South American countries. By working together, African navies and coast guards are able to bring maritime safety and security which will help secure their future, said Chief Warrant Officer Eve McAnallen, APS training officer. USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrived in Lagos, Nigeria, to launch this years training program. While in port, Simpsons crew will work with Nigerian sail ors and coast guardsmen, and with crews from 11 other African nations participating in the first leg of training events. Its a great way to start APS, said Cmdr. Leonard Milliken, Simpsons com manding officer. APS is an important mission because it helps growing navies and coast guards in Africa conduct maritime operations. Bringing these nations together for specifi cally tailored training events, both ashore and at sea, allow African maritime nations to improve their capabilities while strengthening rela tionships with partner nations. APS also allows African maritime nations to bolster regional mari time safety and security throughout the maritime environment in three specific areas: counter-piracy, illicit trafficking, and energy and resource security. Through a regional, comprehensive approach, APS helps African nations build their own maritime domain awareness, cre ate maritime profession als, build required mari time infrastructure, and improve response capa bilities in the maritime environment. The com mon belief among par ticipating nations is that APS contributes to devel opment, economic pros perity and security within Africa. I really appreciate the APS program because it helps us improve and meet our potential through different experi ences, said Gabonese Chief Petty Officer Pierre Mboulou. I hope this program can be held every year and keep going to help African militaries. APS brings together African partners, allow ing them to focus on common security challenges. By working together, African navies and coast guards are able to improve maritime safety and security which will help secure their future, Chief Warrant Officer McAnallen said. Simpsons visit to Lagos is one example of how APS works to bring regional partners together to share and learn spe cialty skills. Experts will use practical, classroom, and sometimes realworld events to help build African navies professional skill to combat crime at sea. APS is about developing African solutions to glob al problems and build ing upon long-standing relationships. African, European, and North and South American partners, and non-governmental organizations share a common goal of regional prosperity, stability, and peace. APS helps to create partnerships among a number of organizations who have not traditionally worked with each other in the past to achieve com mon goals through col laboration. -Photos by MC2 Felicito RustiqueGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Botha Nzinga explains the propulsion control console aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) to Gabonese Ensign Luther Mouloungui as part of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. APS is an international security cooperation initiative facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Seaman James Aguilar steadies a rigid-hull inflatable boat during small boat operations aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). Above, Sailors prepare to launch an MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) during nighttime flight operations aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). Right, Electronics Technician 3rd Class Jonathan Salas heaves a mooring line to a tugboat as the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrives in Dakar for refueling. Cmdr. Leonard Milliken, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), greets Nigerian navy Rear Adm. J. A. Akinwale, commander of the Headquarters Naval Training Command of Nigeria, during an office call as part of Africa Partnership Station 2012. Milliken is briefed by Nigerian navy Capt. A. D. Bingel, commander of the Joint Maritime Security Training Centre of Nigeria, as part of Africa Partnership Station 2012.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 5 USS Simpson Makes APS Port Visit In Ghana The flagship of Africa Partnership Station (APS) West 2012, USS Simpson (FFG 56), along with embarked staff, arrived in Tema, Ghana, Feb. 18 to begin their involvement with the APS 2012 Ghanaian hub. The hub, taking place after a recent port visit to Nigeria, brings training designed to strengthen African maritime partnerships to improve mari time safety and security to more than 40 maritime pro fessionals from the Ghanaian navy, as well as 10 ship riders from partner nations includ ing Benin, Cameroon, Gabon, Nigeria, Republic of Congo and Togo. Simpson provides APS with a platform to give handson experience in a maritime working environment. Simpson commanding offi cer, Cmdr. Leonard Milliken said the hub was an opportunity for him and his crew to build relationships, share knowledge with Ghanaian partners and show off their ship. The Simpson crew and I are excited about the opportunity of working with profession als from the Ghanaian navy, said Milliken. Its an essen tial mission within our current maritime environment, bring ing African solutions to global problems with international support. Hub participants will attend courses on board Simpson in basic first aid and basic damage control. This training furthers APS objectives to strengthen maritime professionals and develop response capabilities while encouraging regional integration. Milliken is sched uled to make office calls with senior leaders from Tema including Ghanaian navy base Command Operations Officer (COO), Cmdr. Emmanuel Kwafo; Tema Local Chief, Nii Adjei Kraku II; and Tema Mayor, the Honorable Robert Kempes Ofosuware. Simpson Sailors will have the opportunity to partake in local cultural tours including a trip to nearby Akosombo, to embark on a day cruise on the worlds largest man-made lake, and to Kakum National Park, where theyll have the opportunity to look down on a rain forest from a canopy walk. A friendly, unofficial soccer match with the Ghanaian navy is also scheduled for Simpson Sailors as an integral hub event, providing a means to enhance and enrich the APS training through fostering teamwork and camaraderie on the field and off. The hub will end with a reception on board Simpson, co-hosted by U.S. Ambassador to Ghana, the Honorable Donald Teitelbaum, and Milliken. Simpson will then depart Tema and participate in a scheduled passing exercise (PASSEX) with the Ghanaian navy ship Anzone, which will involve shipboard maneuvers out at sea, completing the hubs APS training. APS is an international secu rity cooperation initiative, facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Simpson is on a regularly scheduled deployment to the Sixth Fleet area of responsibil ity. Milliken conducts a media availability in the ships wardroom with local Nigerian media. Simpson is in Nigeria in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Musician 3rd Class Andrew Francisco, assigned to the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe Band, plays the saxophone for school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School, while books were distributed by Sailors from the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. APS is an international security cooperation initiative facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Milliken observes British cannons from the 19th century at the Oba Palace of Lagos during a site visit as part of Africa Partnership Station 2012. Ships Serviceman Seaman Recruit Bernard Ford, right, assigned to the guidedmissile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), helps offload books for school children at the Tomaro Junior Secondary School during a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Boatswains Mate Seaman Joshua Maurer, assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), hands books to school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School during a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class David Young, assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), hands books to school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School during a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012. Seaman Thomas Bailey, assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), hands books to school children from the Tomaro Junior Secondary School dur ing a community project in support of Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012.

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a morning tour of the ship. Four stations were set up to demonstrate VBSS procedures along with bridge, combat, and engineering operations. At one station the VBSS team simulated conduct ing compliant and noncompliant boardings and at another the Operations Officer and ships quar termasters discussed underway watch-standing and topside operations. Two of the ships Tactical Action Officers and several Operations Specialists demonstrated what an engagement with a hos tile jet would look like in CIC at a third station. At the final station Klakrings Chief Engineer and GSMC discussed the ships pro pulsion, auxiliary, and DC equipment, and then demonstrated engineer ing operations. Saturday afternoon the midshipmen competed in DC Olympics also hosted on board Klakring. The midshipmen were divided into four groups for the competition and compet ed in six events: DC LOK exams, FFE relay races, shoring races, dewater ing races utilizing a P-100, pipe patching races, and DC bowling. The ships Damage Control Chief crafted a medal for the winning team consist ing of a bronze ring sur rounding a command coin which was attached to a lanyard made by the Boatswains Mates. Every member of the winning team also received a command ballcap. Sunday after noon members of the Charleston Naval League visited Klakring for a tour. Throughout the week end the officers and crew of Klakring were able to enjoy the historic sights and world famous hospi tality of Charleston while enjoying well-deserved liberty. Monday morn ing Klakring departed Charleston to continue operations in the Atlantic, preparing for a counterterrorism deployment to the 6th fleet area of operations later this year.From Page 1KlakringKlakring Completes Successful WargamesA large contingent of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet has been gathering off the coast of Marble Head, North Carolina to par ticipate in Bold Alligator 2012, the largest amphibious war-game held by the Second Fleet in more than a decade. The force, under Combined Task Force (CTF) 995, includes AEGIS Ballistic Missile Defense destroyers and cruisers, amphibious dock and assault ships, attack submarines, and even the USS Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. Amid the backdrop of such a massive mobiliza tion, USS Klakring (FFG 42) and two other war ships were assigned to simulate an opposition force and were tasked with harassing and attacking CTF 955. The Bold Alligator wargame is predicated on a simulated geopolitical situation where an aggressor nation called Garnet invades neighboring Amber under the prem ise of protecting minor ity groups across the border. Amber appeals to the UN, which issues a resolution requiring Garnet to withdraw her forces and restore prehostility borders. When Garnet fails to comply, CTF 955 is dispatched to the region to restore peace. USS Klakring (FFG 42), USS Cole (DDG 67), and USS Normandy (CG 60) played the role of the Garnetian Navy, and were dispatched to prevent ing CTF 955 from landing their amphibious forces behind the Garnetian front lines. On the second day in the AOR, USS Klakring conducted a surprise early-morning raid on the USS Enterprise strike group. Sneaking through the night with her sys tems turned off so as not to give away her posi tion, Klakring closed to nine miles before launching all four of her antiship cruise missiles at USS Enterprise, inflict ing damage to her #3 air craft elevator and killing her Commanding Officer. With her missiles exhausted Klakring turned out bound at high speed and attempted to escape ret ribution, though after only five minutes carrierlaunched aircraft were in the air and Klakring was assessed as killed. After being resur rected later that morn ing (OPFOR ships are out of play for several hours after being destroyed and then resume opera tions against the task group) Klakring began closing the amphibious ships now conducting beach landings to push Garnetian forces out of Amber. Again Klakring closed under cover of darkness, keeping sys tems stealthy as to not give away her intentions. As the sun rose, Klakring found herself stuck between two escorts. Klakring quickly fired two missiles at USS New York (LPD 21) before being engaged and destroyed again by USS Vicksburg (CG 69), though both missiles were deemed misses. The next two days saw concerted efforts by the CTF 995 ships to seek and destroy the hostile Garnetian Navy that had proven so effective, and attacks from both planes and surface-launched over the horizon missiles became routine within minutes of OPFOR ships coming back in play. Wrapping up the exercise, Klakring con ducted a refueling at sea with USNS Laramie, en route to spend a week end in Charleston, South Carolina and share in the calibrations as NROTC students at The Citadel select their orders. Klakring hosted more than 100 midship men onboard during her visit, and maintained a full schedule including visits to a local Habitat for Humanity site, the VA hospital, and local recep tions amongst the tours and demonstrations onboard. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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FFSC Workshops For Families, SailorsThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 27, 6 p.m. 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 29, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m., Marketing Yourself for a Second Career, Ocean Breeze Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Saving and Investing, FFSC Room 719 By Appointment, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., Resume Review, FFSC TBDOutplacement Firm Ready To Help Sailors Launch New Careers Navys contract for job search and assistance to help Sailors separating by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) is well underway, an official said Feb. 17. Navy has contracted Challenger, Gray and Christmas, Inc. (CGC), an outplacement service company, to personally coach and assist ERB separating Sailors transition to the civilian workforce, said Capt. Kate Janac, Transition Assistance Program Manager. The Sept. 1 separation date is approaching and ERB Sailors should immedi ately contact CGC via a toll-free number or email to begin their job place ment process. An employment out placement service assists clients in making the transition to reemployment. Founded in the early 1960s, CGC has more than four decades of experience in the career transi tion industry. The CGC team provides Sailors with individualized career assessment and professional resume writing, job search and preparation for inter views. The company assigns each Sailor a civilian coach who proactively works their case through each step of the process and also a prior military advisor to help in the transition. Our goal is to con nect every ERB separat ing Sailor to this service. Command leadership needs to encourage and provide Sailors opportunity to enroll and move forward, said Janac. Those stationed overseas or deployed should also initiate contact and will receive support tailored to their unique situations. What really stands out is the high level of indi vidual and professional service our Sailors will receive, said Janac. Sailors can engage with their coach to learn the skills needed to devel op a personal market ing plan customized to their expertise and spe cific goals. CGC began contacting ERB Sailors via email in December. Approximately 1,000 Sailors are using services provided by CGC, a third of eligible recipients. CGC representatives have joined Navy Personnel Commands Fleet Engagement Team during its briefs in fleet concentration areas to facilitate enrollment. ERB separating Sailors should contact CGC using their toll free number 1-800-971-4288 or email CGCUSNavy@challenger gray.com. Sailors can then work with their coach to establish an account on the CGC website, found at https://www.icareerman ager.com/login/challeng erTops/login.aspx. For more information, contact the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866827-5672) or email csc mailbox@navy.mil. For more information about transition ben efits visit the Transition Assistance Web Page available under the Hot Links section of the Navy Personnel Command at www.npc.navy.mil. Learn How To Market YourselfThe Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-ayear lecture regarding transition here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be present ed by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Feb. 29, at 9-11:30 a.m., in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center Grand Ballroom. This top-shelf pre sentation is a great professional devel opment opportunity. Transition is of course ultimately a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are contemplat ing retirement in one to five years. Regardless of whether any particular offi cer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be edu cated about the pro cess in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. This executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day pro grams. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlisted super visor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by Colonel Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national staff. It includes compre hensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and impor tant transition topics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. SPOUSES are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career . For further infor mation, contact Jose Sanchez, at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil or call 904-270-6600, ext. 1700 or 1701. Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 7

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New DoD Nutrition Campaign Aims To Improve Troops, Families HealthThe Defense Department has launched a groundbreaking obe sity and nutrition aware ness campaign aimed at improving the health and well-being of troops, retirees and their families across the services, DODs top health affairs official announced Feb. 9. Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs and TRICARE Management Activity director, joined First Lady Michelle Obama at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., to unveil the campaign, which involves improving nutrition standards mili tarywide for the first time in 20 years. The Department of Defense is making a groundbreaking commit ment to the health of our troops and their fami lies, the first lady said in a news release today. And in doing so, theyre not just sending a powerful message throughout the military community, theyre sending a message to our entire country. The campaign, devel oped by the Military Health System, will rally all of the services to encourage people to make better nutritional choices and to take a more active role in their personal health, Woodson said in an interview at the Pentagon yesterday. America has a growing problem, he said, noting the pun is intended. We have an issue of increas ing obesity within the civilian population, [and] a history of poor nutri tional choices, both in the civilian and military populations, thats affect ing readiness. Nearly 30 percent of potential military candi dates ages 17 to 24 cant qualify for the military because theyre over weight, Woodson noted. Additionally, the military discharges about 1,200 entry-level candidates each year due to their inability to meet fitness and weight standards. This is really a national security issue if weve got a population of youth that could serve in the military, but cant serve because of weight stan dards, he said. The Military Health Systems campaign will call on the services and the Pentagons office of military community and family policy to help in achieving the following: -Updating menu stan dards at military dining facilities; -Assessing the nutri tional environment of military facilities; and -Ensuring healthier foods are available in dining facilities, DOD schools and other places where troops, retirees and their families purchase food on bases, such as vending machines and snack bars. In other words, as the campaign unfolds, highstarch and sugary treats will have to step aside as an abundance of fresh fruits, vegetables and lean proteins move onto installations. Our intent is to look at opportunities to improve whats on the menu, and therefore, the choices, Woodson said. DOD hasnt updated its nutritional menu stan dards in nearly 20 years, he noted. Its time to take a comprehensive look, he said. We know so much more about good nutri tion and how to prevent disease than ever before. Military children will be an important focus of this campaign, Woodson said, noting the importance of developing healthy habits at an early age. Its all about making good choices, he said. A vending machine filled with soft drinks and sweets is an attractive draw for children. But if that vending machine now contains apples, bananas and other healthy items, he added, children will make differ ent choices. Its about facilitating good decisions and cre ating environments in which theyll succeed, he explained. Todays children are tomorrows service members and leaders, Woodson said. What we do, how we teach them, the environments we put them in, will predict how successful they will be later in life, he added. The campaign also will focus efforts on military retirees, who will receive enhanced obesity-related counseling and nutrition al information, Woodson explained. The Defense Department spends about $1.4 billion a year on health-related prob lems related to obesity, he noted, including diabetes, heart disease and osteo arthritis. Obesity is a prevent able problem which, if combated, can help pre vent disease and ease the burden on our overall Military Health System, Woodson said in the release. Our strategy within health affairs is moving from what we call health care just delivery of services to producing health in our population we serve, he said in the interview. Its about a mindset that looks at dis ease prevention rather than disease treatment. This new, comprehen sive initiative is not just about health care provid ers, but also is about partnerships, Woodson noted individuals, installation commanders, military and civilian communities, family programs, schools and parents working together to build healthier populations. Theres a role every one can play, he said. Its about catalyzing the movement and synergiz ing the efforts and the leadership to focus on health. Woodson said he has high hopes for the new campaign. I think this will improve the health of the entire population, he said. The first lady agreed. Whenever our men and women in uniform step forward, Americans take notice, she said in the release. When our service members make healthy eating a priority in their lives, the rest of us are more likely to make it a priority in our lives. Simply put, she added, this is Americas entire military once again stepping forward to lead by example. The Military Health Systems campaign will call on the services and the Pentagons office of military community and family policy to help in achieving the following: -Updating menu standards at military dining facilities; -Assessing the nutritional environment of military facilities; and -Ensuring healthier foods are available in dining facilities, DOD schools and other places where troops, retirees and their families purchase food on bases, such as vending machines and snack bars. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Learning To Save Lives -Photos by Paige GnannElectronics Technician 2nd Class James Herrera performs CPR techniques on Electronics Technician 2nd Class Guisseppe Dicarrantonio during a CPR training course held by NS Mayports Fire and Emergency Services department. Several members of Mayports Ground Electronics took the course on Feb. 16 in Building One to learn life saving skills. Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Vaney Lustre gives a thumbs up to instructor Matt Allen after checking if patient Electronics Technician 3rd Class Crystal Ragas is breathing during a CPR class. You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.orgA CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 9

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Harvey Holds Town Hall -Photo by MCSA Damian BergAdm. John C. Harvey, Jr., Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, addresses Sailors during a town hall meeting aboard Naval Station Mayport. Harvey's visit included a series of site visits and town hall discussions with military departments and chief petty officers in the Navy Region Southeast area. Boatswains Mate Seaman Wilson Richardson and Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Wells per formsafety checks during a maintenance at sea.-Photos by CTTSN Carter USS Taylor performs a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with USNS Lewis and Clark on Feb. 9 USS Taylor Begins First Leg Of Deployment Donate Locks For CharityBalfour Beatty Communities at Naval Station Mayport will host a Locks of Love event on Feb. 25. The event will be held at the Ribault Bay Community Center from 11a.m.-3 p.m. anyone who donates will receive a trim and style from two guest hair stylists. Also, those who donate will receive a gift bag with styling and beauty prod ucts and the person who donates the longest ponytail of the day will receive a special gift. To donate to Locks of Love, hair must be at least 10 inches log, clean and dry. It must be bundled in a ponytail or a braid. Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be used. Locks has been in place since 1998 and provides t he hair pieces for children under age 21. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. The event is open to the public. Guest stylist Ladia Vargas has been a licensed cosmologist since 2001 in California and also is licensed in Florida since 2002. Guest stylist Renee Pendlay is an Independent Hair Designer & Makeup Artist at Salon @ 220 in Orange Park. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Training Day With Security Mayport Comes Out To Help Shipmate -Photos by Paige GnannEngineman 2nd Class (SW) Brian Birdsall of Harbor Operations swabs his cheek during a bone marrow drive sponsored by Naval Station Mayport Security in honor of their shipmate, Master-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet who has Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia and needs a bone marrow transplant.More than 300 potential bone marrow donors showed up to Building One Feb. 15-17 to support a Naval Station Mayport Sailor in need of a transplant. Master-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet of NS Mayport Security was diagnosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in March and is in need of a bone marrow transplant. The drive was held in conjunc tion with the National Marrow Donor Program Registry and even if Brian didnt find a match at the event, it can still benefit other patients waiting for a match, Brians wife Katherine said. We are so thankful that word got out [throughout NS Mayport] and people are willing to register, Katherine said. Bone marrow drives have been held in Pennsylvania, where he earned his Eagle Scout, worked with the local fire department and was named 2009 Lifesaver of the Year. It has been a difficult time for the young family, their daughter Elaina was only four weeks old when he was diag nosed with ALL. He has already been through several rounds of chemotherapy and Katherine said that the doctors want to do a bone marrow transplant sooner rather than later. To find out more about the donor program, go to www.marrow.org. -Photos byMCSA Damian BergLt. Lawrence Morton conducts crowd control training with members of Naval Station Mayports Security team during an inservice training day outside of Building One. Below, Security team members help with the training by acting as aggressive protestors during the training day activity. Katherine Van Fleet holds 1-year-old daughter Elaina during the bone marrow drive on Feb. 16. Katherine attended the event to thank donors for stepping up for her husband, Brian. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 11

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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb. 26: UFC 144 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE March 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 4: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spa ghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 5-8: Mens Pre Season Basketball Tournament Sign up by Feb. 27. 270-5451. March 6 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 March 7: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 7: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 March 7: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by Desron 14. For tickets, call NCCS Andre Brown at (904) 270-5951 x3115. March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 March 9: 7 Street Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 March 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 13: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 13: Mens 7v7 Soccer Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 March 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 March 15: Final Day of Youth Spring Baseball and Soccer Sign Ups. Register at the Youth Activities Center. 2705680. March 16: St. Patricks Day at Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double pay-outs on all hand cards, Pot of Gold coin game, prizes and more! 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bowling Special. 1-8 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy 2 hours of Bowling with shoe rental for $7. To get this great discount you must be wearing green! 270-5377 March 21: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by the Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 270-5126 x3115 March 24: Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by March 15. 270-5451 March 26: Pre-Season Soccer Tournament. Sign up by March 19. 270-5451 March 30: Custom Delux. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 March 31: Easter Eggstravaganza. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Egg hunt, games, prizes, train rides and more. 270-5228 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 23: Killer Bunny. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments Provided. Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb 25: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 26: UFC 144. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 28: Texas Hold Em Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 1: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. March 3: Monster Jam. Van departs Liberty Center at 6 p.m. Cost $10. Sign up deadline Feb. 27. March 3: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 5-8: Mens Pre Season Basketball Tournament Sign up by Feb. 27. 270-5451. March 7: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 7: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) March 7: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 March 7: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by Desron 14. For tickets, call NCCS Andre Brown at (904) 270-5951 x3115. March 7: Chess Club & Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 9: 7 Street Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 March 9: Royal Comedy Tour Van Departs Liberty Center 7 p.m. Cost $25. March 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 March 11: Killer Bunny. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments Provided. March 13: Catch a Leprechaun 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. March 13: Mens 7v7 Soccer Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 March 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 March 16: St. Patricks Day at Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double pay-outs on all hand cards, Pot of Gold coin game, prizes and more! March 16: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. March 17: St. Patricks Day Bowling Special 1-8 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy 2 hours of Bowling with shoe rental for $7. To get this great discount you must be wearing green! 270-5377 March 18: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) March 19: Dart Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012 13 Feb 23: Drama Club Presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. Feb. 25: Cicis Pizza Night. 1-3:30 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Permission slip required. 270-5680. March 2: Freedom FridayHappy Birthday, Dr. Seuss. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 3: Golden Corral Dinner Trip 5-9 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Ages 13 and up, per mission slip required. 270-5680. March 4: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spa ghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 March 10: Teen Center Karaoke. 6 p.m. at the Teen Center. 246-0347 March 15: Final Day of Youth Spring Baseball and Soccer Sign Ups. Register at the Youth Activities Center. 2705680. March 16: St. Patricks Day Dance 8-11 p.m. at the Teen Center. 2460347. March 16: Freedom Friday Shake Your Shamrock Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bowling Special. 1-8 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy 2 hours of Bowling with shoe rental for $7. TO get this great discount you must be wearing green! 270-5377 March 30Teen Movie Trip. 5 p.m. Free for the first 24 teens to register. Ages 13 and up; permis sion slip required. Bring your own money for con cessions. Vote all month for the movie! 246-0347 March 31: Easter Eggstravaganza. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Egg hunt, games, prizes, train rides and more. 270-5228 -Photo by Ashley VasquezJada Noll, 10, shows off her artwork Toucan. during the Youth Activities Center art exhibit. The Youth Activity Center is affiliated with the Boys and Girls Club of America, and for the last six years the center has hosted an art exhibit to showcase the childrens creativity. There are many different mediums of artwork including mixed media, crayons, chalk, pastels, and various paints that the kids worked with throughout the year. This years exhibit showcased three different mediums and Nolls artwork from the pastels category has made it to the Regionals. She will be representing NS Mayport in the BGCA Southeast Region Fine Arts Exhibit.Works of Art At YAC a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basic 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning

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and fiscal 2015. Panetta acknowledged that realignments and closures require significant upfront financial costs, but said they are needed in the long term not just for costsavings, but also as part of rebalancing the force from a drawdown after a decade of war. As a former Congress member from Monterey, Calif., Panetta said, he knows firsthand how hard it is for representatives to oversee base closures in their districts. He served in the House in the early 1990s when Fort Ord was closed, he noted. The post along the Monterey coast, he added, represented 25 percent of the local economy. As somebody who went through the BRAC process in my own dis trict, I recognize how controversial this process is for members and for constituencies, Panetta said. And yet, it is the only effective way to achieve needed infrastructure savings. The most recent BRAC round, in 2005, resulted in the department closing 14 major military instal lations and realigning nearly a dozen others. Panetta agreed with some committee members that the 2005 BRAC cost much more than expected and has yet to realize the sav ings that were planned. But, having been through three rounds of BRAC, he said, there are lessons learned for the next time. There are only so many areas in the defense bud get to find cost savings, the secretary told the House panel, and infra structure needs to be among them.-Photo by PO1 Chad J. McNeeley Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta answers a question during his testimony on the Defense Departments budget proposal before the House Armed Service Committee in Washington, D.C., Feb. 15, 2012. From Page 1Budget Serving those who serve our country.Catholic Charities USAA CFC participant. Provided as a public service1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Blue Angels Look For 2013 Team MembersThe Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, encour age qualified Navy and Marine Corps enlisted personnel to apply for the 2013 and follow-on seasons. Navy E-5 and above, and outstanding E-4, Sailors from multiple aviation platforms are considered for this typetwo sea duty billet. Blue Angels Command Master Chief Yoshimi Core explained the Blue Angels team is not locked into selecting Sailors solely based on naval enlisted codes (NECs) or F/A-18 experience. However, Marine Corps applicants must be F/A-18 specific electricians, communication/navigation (COMNAV), power plants or air frames. The squadrons Enlisted Applications Chief, Senior Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Patrick Hosterman, said the team has a variety of opportunities available for the following rates: aviation machinists mate (AD), aviation electri cians mate (AE), aviation structural mechanic (AM and AME), aviation ord nanceman (AO), aviation support equipmentmen (AS), aviation electronics technician (AT), aviation maintenance adminis trationman (AZ), aircrew survival equipmentman (PR), mass communica tion specialist (MC), logistics specialist (LS), and yeoman (YN). The team is also looking for a hos pital corpsman (HM) with an 8406 NEC and E-7s in aviation maintenance ratings. Core explained team members must have a strong work ethic, excep tional communication skills, the enthusiasm to represent the men and women of the Navy and Marine Corps and the desire to uphold the traditions of the Blue Angels organization. The Blue Angels Navy and Marine Corps members are all about team work, said Core. Ultimately, you can be the best technician in the world but if you do not thrive on teamwork you are not the right fit for this team. It is common to see Blue Angel HMs, YNs, MCs and LSs on the flight line servicing jets. Team members in different work centers help other shops with heavier or higher priority workloads. Prospective chief, limited duty officer and Seamen to Admiral can didates benefit from sus tained superior perfor mance, and selection to the team is just another good bullet in their resume, said Core. Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Brian Williamson, the Blue Angels detailer, says Sailors should not be concerned about get ting penalized if they do not get picked for the team. They will be given one more look in Career Management System/ Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) before they are considered needs of the Navy. For more information on how to apply visit the Blue Angels web site: www.blueangels.navy.mil or contact Hosterman at: patrick.hosterman@navy. mil. The Blue Angels team is seeking two Navy or Marine Corps F/A-18 demonstration pilots, a flight surgeon and one naval flight officer for the events coordinator position, for the 2013 and follows-on seasons. The team is also seeking one Marine Corps C-130 demonstration pilot, a public affairs officer and a maintenance officer for the 2014 and follow-on seasons. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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DoD Opens More Positions To WomenThe Defense Department announced Feb. 9 changes to its assignment policy which will result in 14,325 addi tional positions being opened to women. Women are contrib uting in unprecedented ways to the militarys mission. Through their cour age, sacrifice, patriotism and great skill, women have proven their abil ity to serve in an expanding number of roles on and off the battlefield, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said. We will continue to open as many positions as pos sible to women so that anyone qualified to serve can have the opportunity to do so. In a report required by the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act, the department notified Congress today it intends to make two changes to rules in place since 1994 governing the service of female members of the armed forces: first, occu pations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-locat ed with ground combat units; and second, a siz able number of positions will be opened to women at the battalion level in select direct ground com bat units in specific occupations. The services also will continuously assess their experience with these changes to help determine future changes to the 1994 rules. The services will con tinue to review posi tions and requirements to determine what addi tional positions may be opened, ensuring the mission is met with the best qualified and most capa ble, regardless of gender, Panetta said. The 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule articu lated five basic elements informing decisions on the service of women in the military: direct ground combat; berthing and privacy; co-location; long range reconnaissance and special operations forces; and physically demand ing tasks. The 1994 DoD poli cy allowed women to be restricted from some occupational specialties if those specialties were physically co-located with direct ground combat units. Because the mod ern-day battlefield is nonlinear and fluid, with no clearly defined front line or safer rear area, combat support operations are dispersed throughout the battlespace. Removal of the co-location exclusion will result in 13,139 Army positions being opened to women, in specialties such as tank mechanic and field artillery radar operator. Additionally, the 1994 policy prohibited women from being assigned below brigade level to units whose principal mission was to engage in combat. The Army, Marines and Navy have been granted exceptions to policy to allow select positions at the battalion level in specialties already open to women, open ing 1,186 additional posi tions. These exceptions to policy will help the ser vices assess the suitabil ity and relevance of the direct ground combat unit assignment prohibition, and inform future policy decisions. Regarding other policy restrictions, the depart ment recognizes there are practical barriers that require time to resolve to ensure the services maxi mize the safety and privacy of all service members while maintaining mili tary readiness. Building upon analysis and expe rience, the services will develop gender-neutral physical standards for use by all members. Gender-neutral physi cal standards ensure all members can meet the physical demands of the duties they are assigned, acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney said, ultimately contributing to high er states of readiness through an increased understanding of the demands we place upon our members and by preventing injuries. Panetta directed the services to update him in six months on assignment policy implementation and the progress made developing gender-neu tral physical standards. As required by law, these changes to policy will take effect after 30 days of continuous ses sion of Congress, which is expected to occur later this spring. The report can be viewed at http://www. defense.gov/news/WISR_ Report_to_Congress.pdf. A Quilt To Remember Thanks For Service Naval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, congratulates Safety Specialist Sam Williams for 36 years of service during a retirement luncheon at Bogeys on Jan. 26. Pickard presented Williams with a 30-year pin and letter of appreciation during the luncheon.-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Branch Health Clinic Mayport Officer in Charge, Capt. Alan Siewertsen, stands with retired Electricians Mate 1st Class Donald Smith, wife Angela and grandson Devin Smith after presenting the clinic with a military quilt designed and embroidered by the retiree. The quilt was originally made for his grandson, but the family agreed that its place was at the clinic instead. Smiths next project is a Wounded Warrior quilt for Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Time to renew your vehicle DoD stickers? Do it online at https://www.pid.cnic.navy.mil/ 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 23, 2012