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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00098614:00242


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Helping At HomeMayport Holds Bone Marrow Drive To Benefit One Of Their OwnUpdated Eval, Fitness Report Software OutFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNavy is deploying a new version of the per formance evaluation soft ware used throughout the fleet, officials said Feb. 6. NMCI (Navy Marine Corps Internet) will begin deploying NAVFIT98A Version 30 throughout the Non-Classified Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNET) during scheduled maintenance peri ods starting February and concluding mid-March, said Jim Price, director, Performance Evaluation Division, Navy Personnel Command. Version 30 supports the lieutenant force distribution policy change announced in NAVADMIN 219/11, incorporates the chief evaluation (CHIEFEVAL), previously available only through PDF and pro vides additional lines to the comments block for FITREPS, CHIEFEVALS, and EVALS. In addition, this version is a complete technology refreshment to increase compatibility across vari ous workstation configu rations. The NAVFIT98A Version 30 update will be pushed to all NMCI NIPR workstations through out the Navy as a core application; however the new software will not be automatically loaded on the Secret Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNET). It will not be listed as a core application for SIPR computers, but will be available by request, said Price. Beginning Feb. 28 the old version of NAVFIT98A will be removed from all SIPR workstations. Commands that require NAVFIT98 Version 30 on their SIPR workstations can submit a Move/Add/ Change (MAC) request through their command information systems technician. Non-NMCI users may download NAVFIT98A Version 30 along with fre quently asked questions and a reference guide on using the application at http://www.npc.navy. mil/careerinfo/perfor manceevaluation/soft wareforms. NAVFIT98A is used by Navy to create, store, organize, validate and print officer fitness reports and enlisted eval uation reports for signa ture as well as the sum mary sheet required for each reporting group to be mailed to the NPC. The reports are saved to Sailors official military personnel file and may be reviewed by selection and promotion boards. Users will receive an NMCI User Alert email providing the dates of the upgrade and any actions required by the user. For more information visit www.npc.navy. mil and read NAVADMIN 047/12.USS Simpson Enjoys Visit To Casablanca Navy Public Affairs Support Element-East Detachment EuropeGuided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) and senior staff members from U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa concluded a three-day port visit of training, band engagements, and senior staff talks in Casablanca, Feb. 2. During the visit, Simpson conducted visit, board, search and sei zure training with Royal Moroccan Navy personnel and received a tour of the Royal Moroccan Navy ves sel Tarek Ben Zayid. Staff members from U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa met with senior leaders from the Royal Moroccan Navy to strengthen maritime partnerships, while members from the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe Band con ducted two community service projects at a girls orphanage and boys center in the city. Rear Adm. Kenneth Norton, deputy chief of staff for Strategy, Resources, and Plans at U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, along with his staff and the crew of Simpson, hosted the U.S. ambassador to Morocco, Samuel Kaplan, his wife and his staff, and top commanders from the Royal Moroccan Navy and Army, honoring the relationship between Morocco and their U.S. partners. Royal Moroccan Army Col. Mohammed Amharouch said he was happy to have the Simpson crew visit his city. Its good to form bridges between our two nations, said Amharouch. More visits, like the Simpsons, will help our navies and countries move together into the future with vision. Cmdr. Leonard Milliken, USS Simpson commanding officer, commented on the events and training the two countries complet ed during their time in Casablanca. Today was a great day, said Milliken. We had tours where we pro vided training aboard to members of the Royal Moroccan Navy and some of our Sailors visited and boarded a Moroccan ves sel as well. Our visit to Morocco has been a suc cess. Norton also spoke to the guests by offering praise to the Simpsons crew and stressing the importance of partner ship between the U.S. and countries like Morocco. Id like to conclude [the evening] with this thought: maritime secu -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueRoyal Moroccan Navy sailors direct Damage Controlman 3rd Class Brandon Watkins, simulating a captive, past the quarterdeck of the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) during a visit, board, search and seizure training ses sion. Simpson is conducting theater security cooperation and maritime security operations in the Naval Forces Africa area of responsibility. From StaffNaval Station Mayport is host ing a bone mar row drive in honor of Master-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet of NS Mayport Security. The active duty Sailor is diag nosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). He has had eight cycles of chemotherapy and is in dire need of a bone marrow transplant. He needs a match right now. The bone mar row drive is sched uled for Feb. 15-17 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. in Building One Security Training Room. The process is simple, Deputy Security Officer Ron Novak said. To regis ter, potential donors join the National Marrow Donor Program Registry by taking a simple swab of their mouth. Potential donors must be between the ages of 18 and 60, meet the health guidelines and be willing to donate to any patient in need. We really want to pull together and help Brian, Novak said. Hes got a young daughter who just turned one [Feb. 4] and his wife Katherine. A bone marrow transplant will give hima chance to see his daughter grow up and continue his life with his family and his Navy career, he added. For more information, call 270-5261. -Photos submitted by Mayport SecurityMaster-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet holds his young daughter, Elaina, while in his dress whites. Van Fleet pictured with his wife, Katherine, and daughter, Elaina. Brian is in need of a bone marrow transplant.See Simpson, Page 10

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Whether at work or play, conflicts can occur. These can go unresolved if the child or adult involved in the conflict does not have the neces sary skills for cooperation, collaboration, or compro mise. While older children and adults spend most of their day at school or on the job working together to successfully complete a task, younger children do not always get the neces sary practice. They may need additional practice at school by sharing sup plies or at home shar ing responsibilities for completion of a chore. Cooperation is a neces sary skill required for con flict resolution. Children and adults also need the skill of compromise. Without the ability to compromise, arguments or hurt feel ings can result. But even very young children can be taught strategies which allow them to successful ly make group decisions. For example if they must decide which fast food restaurant they would agree to, they look for common ground, discuss the final alternatives, and make a mutual decision. Involvement with sports, board games, crafts, or even volunteer ing will teach the skills of collaboration and cooperation with others. Appropriate social skills can also be learned dur ing these activities no matter what the age of the individual. One par ticularly important social skill which may need practice is agreeing to dis agree, meaning that indi viduals can express and retain their own opinions on things without argu ing, fighting, or otherwise becoming disagreeable. This skill can resolve many conflicts. Children and adults can learn and remem ber strategies that may work for them in the next situational conflict by reflecting on which strat egies have worked best for them in similar situ ations. By asking them selves questions such as, How did we both decide that? or How did I get the group or my fellow workers to decide on that course of actions? they can build a library of conflict resolution strategies. But can these skills work if the child or adult is being bullied? Both bullies and chronic vic tims can be helped by those same skills of cooperation, collaboration, and compromising, in addition to empathy and self-respect. Empathy will allow the individual to feel compas sion and caring for oth ers. And recognizing that they have something to offer others helps one to feel good about ones self. This easily translates to feeling good about help ing others. Want to learn more about teaching children and adults how to get along with others, includ ing strategies for deal ing with bullying? Attend tonights parent program at the new CDC, Building 2287 at 6 pm facilitated by the Military Family Life Consultant. The building is located at 1650 America St., Atlantic Beach, FL 32233 [phone (904) 2414075]. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Teaching Children, Adults To Get AlongJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAs we think about the constant changes in the world we live in, such as technological, cultural, political, personal, etc., we can almost be over whelmed at trying to keep up. In the midst of all this change, it is comforting to know that some things dont change. It is those core val ues that will carry us through the winds of change in our lives. As members of the great est Navy in the world, we all share the core values of Honor, Courage, and Commitment. I think at least one major reason these val ues are considered core is because over the years it has been demonstrat ed that the character of our Sailors and Marines is an absolutely essential component for mission accomplishment. This is one of the things that makes our Navy the greatest in the world. You see, greatness is not just about what you have the power to do, but also about the manner in which you choose to employ that power. And that has to do with char acter and character is based on values. Take the Super Bowl for example. Both the New York Giants and the New England Patriots can be considered great foot ball teams because of their talent which they demonstrated in achiev ing championship vic tories to get to the Super Bowl. They proved to be powerhouses on the field, which enabled them to make it to the Big Dance. But beneath the sur face of all that talent is the issue of character. And that character is what each of those players will take with them for the rest of their lives. Yes, the winning team will always have that Super Bowl ring to wear on their finger. But wear ing a Super Bowl ring can never replace the charac ter demonstrated day in and day out in how we treat others and how we choose to live your lives. The difference can be seen in the contrast between two impor tant football celebrities: O.J. Simpson and Tony Dungy. O.J. Simpson was a great football player (one of the best running backs to ever play the game). But poor deci sions later in life resulted in him being convicted of serious crimes and he is now serving time behind bars. In the end, flaws in his character have deter mined his future more than his talent on the football field. On the other hand, Tony Dungy is one of the most revered coaches in the history of the NFL and was the first African American coach to lead his team to a Super Bowl victory. What was it that inspired so many NFL greats to want to play for Tony Dungy? Was it just that he knew how to lead his team to victory? Surely that was part of it, but just as significant as that was the issue of char acter. Players and coaches alike have testified that it was Tony Dungys charac ter that was the secret to his greatness as a coach. In the end, character counted and our charac ter is based on what we value in life. What about you? What are your core values? Lt. Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCore Values Center Around Your CharacterFor the past four years I have put off writing this article. It a subject that I find easy to talk about with my friends, fam ily. Even with complete strangers, I can have a conversation about it. But for some reason, it has been hard for me to write. So here it goes... four years ago on Feb. 7 my husband had a mas sive heart attack the dreaded Widow Maker. He was only 36 years old. Yep, thats right. Only 36. And guess what? His grandfather died at 35. Too young for a heart attack. I remember standing in the emergency room. It was frantic. My husband was barely conscious and they were trying to get his vitals when a doctor asked the patients age. When they told her, she was stunned. Dont you mean 46? I heard her ask. No, I yelled at her. Hes only 36. Only 36, with a wife and two young sons at home. In that emergency room, I didnt realize how bad the situation really was. I knew he was alive. I knew I didnt have to go to my boys and tell them daddy wasnt coming home. My husband was more than lucky that day. He is one of a very FEW men and women in our age group to recognize the signs of a heart attack and survive. (For the Widow Maker, the percentage of surviving is between 3-10 percent.) Early sign recognition saved him. We were able to get an ambulance to him in time. In fact, he actually had the heart attack while en route to the hospital. Paramedics had to defib him twice to revive him. If I had picked him up -which I was on my way to do I would have dropped off a corpse. With the Widow Maker, you only have about a five min ute window to revive the patient before death. That same year, I lost three classmates (all women it doesnt just happen to men) to heart attacks. Their families werent lucky. Of course at the time of the Widow Maker, we didnt know how lucky we were. It took being visited by almost every nurse in ICU coming by to con gratulate my husband on being alive for the situa tion to sink in. Its not called Widow Maker for nothing. Ok, so why am I telling you this story now? Two reasons actually. The first is that I believe strongly that people should practice heart healthy habits starting at a very young age...think your children. My husband had a very strong family history of heart disease that we ignored. (Remember, his grandfather died at 35) But his father also died in his early 60s from con gestive heart failure after several heart attacks and strokes starting in his 40s. I guess because we were so young, we figured we had time to be heart healthy. I cooked right at home and I was active, but he wasnt. He ignored the early warning signs of heart disease his risk factors. By 30, he already had high cholesterol lev els, high blood pressure and for the past few years he had become sedentary and overweight. He had all the risk factors for a potential heart attack. Second is because February is Heart Health Month. (Ironic that he would have his heart attack in February, isnt it?) According to TRICARE, patients should also con sider tobacco and alcohol use, diabetes, and diet as risk factors. For active duty military, regular check ups and blood work are manda tory. If you are not active duty, it is up to you to take the initiative for your heart health. Little things like replac ing 100 calorie processed snacks with fresh fruit and vegetables can go a long way to controlling your weight. Taking advantage of MWRs Fitness programs and Sports program can keep you in shape (and social) with out breaking your wallet. And make sure you know the signs of a heart attack. The five main signs are: the jaw, neck or back. For women, it might feel like your bra is on too tight. headed or faint fort. My husband said it was like a thumb being pressed hard into his chest. Some patients say it feels like an elephant sit ting on you. arms or shoulder. Both of his arms were so numb it was hard for him to hold the phone as he was tell ing me to hurry and call the ambulance. So there it is. Now I have a husband who is a heart patient and I have children who could one day be heart patients as well. Thats why I preach and practice healthy eat ing habits and activities to them on a daily basis. Think youre too young for a heart attack? So did we. For detailed informa tion on heart disease, risk factors and prevention visit www.cdc.gov/heart disease. The National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention are work ing together for a hearthealthy and stroke-free world, if youre interested in learning more go to www.hearthealthystroke free.org TRICARE covers several preventive care services, to learn more visit www. tricare.mil/preventiveser vices.Heart Attacks Happen At All AgesPaige Gnann The Mirror editor Editors 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Donate Your Locks For CharityFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport and Balfour Beatty Communities are hosting a Locks of Love char ity event on Feb. 25 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center off base. Locks of Love is a non-profit organization that turns donated hair into fitted hairpieces for financially disadvantaged chil dren suffering from long-term medical hair loss. According to their press release, most of the children who are helped by Locks have lost their hair due to a medical condition called alopecia area ta. Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radi ation treatment to the brain stem or other dermatological condi tions that result in permanent hair loss. Locks has been in place since 1998 and provides t he hair piec es for children under age 21. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. Balfour Beatty is bringing in two Locks of Love approved hair stylists to take donations for the charity and will have food and drinks, along with take-home bags frilled with beauty products for donators. To donate to Locks of Love, hair must be at least 10 inches log, clean and dry. It must be bundled in a ponytail or a braid. Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be u sed. For more information about the event, contact Jessica Ennis at 372-4702 or 742-6036. Recognizing Mayports Ombudsmen -Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane presents a plaque to outgoing Command Ombudsman Debbie Pound during the monthly Ombudsman Assembly Jan. 30. Olivia Gardell, center, is stepping into the position. Also pictured is base Command Master Chief Wayne Welch and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard. Left, Cochrane congratulates USS Taylor Ombudsman Dawn Foster as the Ombudsman of the Quarter. Her name will be included on the Ombudsman of the Quarter plaque on display in Building 1.NEX Rewards Students For Good GradesFrom NEXThe Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers pay for their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Four times per school year, four students will be the recipients of a $5,000, $3,000 $2,000 or $1,000 U.S. savings bond, denominations at matu rity. The next drawing will be held at the end of February 2012. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and mili tary retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate ver ify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX prod ucts and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offering students a chance to win a savings bond through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded $504,000 in sav ings bonds with the help of its generous vendor partners. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. -Photo by Paige GnannNavy Exchange (NEX) Mayport General Manager Bill Hockenberry presents a $5,000 U.S. savings bond, cer tificate and medal to 13-year-old Ryan Taylor. Taylors good grades made him eligible for the NEX A-OK Student Reward Program in which active military, reservist or retiree dependent students with a B-grade average report card can enter the drawing. Students must be first through 12th grade. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 Taylor Families Spend Day At Sea Fire Controlman 1st Class Christopher Carr lets mom, Susie Carr Barber, look through the Big Eyes binoculars on the Bridge wing. The Mirror editorFriends and families of USS Taylor (FFG 50) got the oppor tunity to experience a day in the life of their Sailor while underway with the ship during a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Feb. 2. The day was also highlighted with special visitors, Greg and Beth Taylor, the ships namesakes son and daughter-in-law. USS Taylor was named for Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, who died on Nov. 17, 1965 after being shot down over North Vietnam while trying to rescue a downed pilot. The Taylors live in Southern California and it was their first visit to the ship since its commis sioning 27 years ago. I was very nervous to come on the ship, said Greg Taylor. I didnt feel worthy to step onto a ship that people are here serv ing their country. But every single person on this ship has made us feel comfortable. The Taylors spent the day vis iting with crew members and their families, as well as explor ing the ship and its memorabilia. Beth Taylor gifted the ship with an album with pictures of Cmdr. Taylor during his years of service. I remember my dad as just a dad, Greg said. [His service] is one of the strongest things thats defined my life. Greg said he also remembers living in Jacksonville while his father was stationed as a pilot at NAS Jacksonville and Cecil Field. His mother, Taylors widow, is still alive. She never remarried after losing her husband in the war. He was her soulmate, Greg said. She was a great Navy wife. Before setting sail, Commanding Officer, Cmdr. J.R. Hill, welcomed the group on board and thanked them for supporting their Sailors from the homefront. Having Greg and Beth Taylor on board for the Friends and Family Day cruise was an honor and privilege for me, the crew, and the families that joined us for the event, Hill said. With more than 150 friends and family members USS Taylor (FFG 50) pulls past the Jetties and into port after a family day cruise Feb. 2. The ship deployed with friends and family of the crew and special guests Greg and Beth Taylor, the ships namesakes son and daughter-in-law.See Taylor, Page 5Friends and family got a chance to purchase memorabilia from a booth set up in the hangar bay. Friends and family wave to an SH-60B helicopter from HSL-48. The crew performed helo maneuvers for Taylors family day cruise. Lt.j.g. Greg Crum, the Main Propulsion Assistant (MPA), left, explains equipment located on the bridge to friends and family of USS Taylors crew during the family day cruise. Lt. Michael Modeer enjoys a quiet moment with wife Hanna and Newman Gersin. Coast Guard Fireman Jeff Wooding and Danielle Wooding enjoy the steel beach picnic with Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Joe Wooding.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 5 underway with us, we had the opportunity to show our guests what a basic day in the Navy is like. It also gave the families a chance to see that the crew is highly proficient in operating the ship as we prepare for a deploy ment overseas. The crew takes a lot of pride in their ship and I believe the Taylor namesake family saw that in them. Seaman Apprentice Kyle Weatherman brought his father Tim, and grand father, Robert Landry, out for the day cruise. It was old times for Landry, who served in the Navy as a Machinists Mate during the 50s on the destroyer USS Cone. Landry started a tradi tion of military service, followed by three sons and two grandchildren joining different branches of the military. We tried to lead [Kyle] the way to go, Landry said. The day was also filled with activities such as a tour of the main areas of the ship, including the bridge. There was a Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) exhibit, and a chance for everyone to relax during a Steel Beach picnic on the fantail. This is great, laughed Karen Cardona, sister of Logistics Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Franklin Cardona. Its awesome. I diidnt know he had gour ment lunches and din ners! Im having a blast, Jim Selby, father of Boatswains Mate Seaman Josh Selby said. Hes walked me around all the different spaces. Im very proud [of Josh]. Hes out there for a reason.TaylorFrom Page 4Tim Grace, Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Justin Plank, Boatswains Mate Seaman Josh Selby and his dad Jim Selby enjoy a meal on the flight deck. USS Taylor Commanding Officer, Cmdr. J.R. Hill, welcomes aboard all visitors before the ship pulls out for the day. Engineman 2nd Class (SW) Michael Byrd takes his fam ily for a tour of the ship. Culinary Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Waltine Nauta and Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/AW) Vincent Hogans cook up some good eats for the Steel Beach picnic.-Photos by Paige GnannGreg Taylor, son of USS Taylors namesake Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, and his wife Beth pin the Enlisted Surface Warfare pin on Chief Aviation Machinists Mate Luis Deloreyes during a brief ceremony aboard the ship while under way for a family day cruise. Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW) Todod Thomas talks with the family of Seaman Apprentice Kyle Weatherman at the Damage Control display. Randi Davis suits up in safety gear worn by the ships Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) team. Matthew Cardona, 16, tries on the VBSS gear. Cardona was a guest of older brother, Seaman Sebastian Velez. Also pictured is mom Alexie Restrepo and sister Veronica Cardona, 12. Chief Gunners Mate Kirby Dickerson explains the various weapons on display to Jonathan Reglado at the Weapons station. Friends and family of the ships crew enjoy the warm weather and calm seas during the family day cruise hosted by USS Taylor.

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Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Extravaganza. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Free Italian buffet, double payouts on all hand cards, and more! 270-7204 Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb. 21: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 Feb. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by FLC Jax. For tickets, call SHCM Brad Watson at (904) 2707178. Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb. 26: UFC 144 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb. 10: Jeff Dunham Live. Van Departs Liberty Center 5:30 p.m. Cost $25. Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 15: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 17: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. Feb. 18: Dave & Busters Trip. Van departs 7 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Feb. 19: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and trans portation) Feb. 20: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb. 21: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 Feb. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by FLC Jax. For tickets, call SHCM Brad Watson at (904) 2707178. Feb. 22: Pool Tournament Finals 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Feb. 23: Killer Bunny. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments Provided. Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb 25: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 26: UFC 144 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 28: Texas Hold Em Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. LIBERTYFeb. 14: Teen Valentine Social 2-6:30 p.m. at the Teen Center. 246-0347. Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. Feb. 17: Freedom Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 17: Fire Pit Friday. 2-11 p.m. Bring your Blankets and chairs and sit around the fire pit for smores and music. 2460347 Feb. 18: Youth Sponsorship Mardis Gras Dance Party. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Your chances to win the drawing for a Pack Prize will increase with every new member you bring to this event! 246-0347 Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb 23: Drama Club Presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. Feb. 25: Cicis Pizza Night. 1-3:30 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Permission slip required. 270-5680. KID Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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-Photo by MC1 William TownsendLori Leggett and Joseph Belt of MWR hold the repositioned PRT start/finish sign. The PRT course has been redirected due to on-going construction at the Base Gym.Take A New Route To PRTNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, De tachment SoutheastThe PRT course is going in a new direction throughout the completion of the new fitness center in May 2013. The start, as well as the finish line, is on the east side of the paved running trail. From there, runners will run north around the trail and exit the track onto Jetty Road. The route will then follow Jetty Road to Baltimore Street. Runners will remain on Balitimore Street until they reach the turnaround point adjacent to Building 413 (Combat Systems Detachment). Runner will head back to the running trail on Jetty Road and south to the finish line. Please follow all instructions regarding the previous PRT course and keep safety of all participants the number one priority. To view a map of the new course, visit MWR Mayports Facebook page. Sports Bring your sweetheart out for our upcoming Valentines Day 3K Walk and 5K Run on Feb. 14. Registration begins at 7:30am run begins at 8:10 am in front of the gym. Open to everyone. For more information call 904-270-5451. This week in Tennis USCG BM2 Christopher Hunt beat Navy Housing CSSN Dustin Snyder in a 3 set 6-3, 4-6,6-4 match. Navy Housing CSSN Dustin Snyder beat USCG BMCS George Zitzewitz in another 3 set match 2-6, 6-3, 7-5. If you are inter ested in joining our Mens tennis league contact Rita at 904-270-5451. Matches played at player availabil ity. Dust off your gloves and pull your bats out of the closet. Its time for the 2012 Captains Cup Mens Softball league. League meeting will be held in the gym on Feb. 14 at 11 a.m. The league is open to Active Duty only. To regis ter your command or for more information contact Rita at 270-5451. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basic 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Prerequisite class is H.I.T. Level 1. Class size limited to 30. Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning MWR -Photo by Rita HammerstadEnsign Molly Hanas goes up for the block as the Phil Sea Lady War Dawgs turned it up a notch this week in the Womens Volleyball league as they beat the number 1 Lady Aces in a 3 game tie breaker 20-21, 21-14, 15-11. The team continued to tear up the floor in their second match-up against the Mamacitas winning 21-6, 21-3. The Angels continued their win streak beating Mamacitas 21-17, 21-18 in this weeks match-up. Next week 12 February at 3PM the Lady Aces take on the Angels, 3:45 Mamacitas take on the Lady Aces and 4:30 Angels take on the Lady War Dawgs. Jumping To New Heights THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 7

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-Photo by Paige GnannNewly commissioned Ensign Johnny Ortiz hugs his daughter after she and her brothers helped him don his new jacket during the commissioning ceremony.Welcome To LDO Community -Photo by MCSA Damian BergRetired CWO5 Cornelius Mitchem hears the oath of office by newly commissioned CWO Samuel Raddler during his commissioning ceremony on Feb. 3.Raddler Transitions To CWO Mayport Recognizes Top Civilians NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, stands with the nominees and winners of the Employee of the Year and Supervisor of the Year 2011 dur ing a presentation/ luncheon on Jan. 31 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Employee Mara Humphres of MWR and supervisor Ron Novak of Security were announced as the 2011 winners. Pictured from left is Cochrane, Mia Kuhn of MWR, Novak, Wendy Sawyer of MWR, Tom Douget of Air Ops, Tegwen McNeal of Air Ops, Christie Miller of Security and Humphres.-Photo by MCSA Damian Berg 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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USNAVSO Foreign Liaison Officers, SOUTHCOM DVs Embark EnterpriseFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsSix foreign liaison officers (FLOs) and Inter-American Naval Telecommunications Network (IANTN) Officers from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (USNAVSO) and three U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) distin guished visitors embarked aboard USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Feb. 1, for an overnight familiarization tour of the U.S. Navys first nuclear aircraft carrier. The international rep resentatives and distin guished visitors were hosted and escorted to the ship by USNAVSO/ C4F Deputy Commander, Rear Adm. A. B. Cruz with the purpose of showing them the distinct capa bilities and complexities of an aircraft carrier strike group operating at sea. The guests embarked the ship while conduct ing exercises off the coast of Northern Florida in preparation for the air craft carriers last sched uled deployment later this year. This embark to Enterprise is a unique opportunity for our part ner nation representatives and distinguished visitors to experience life on an aircraft carrier and better understand the immea surable maritime capa bilities of a carrier strike group. Even more impor tantly, our guests can now further recognize how to integrate aircraft carriers into combined operations in theater if needed, Cruz said. I know firsthand that they truly appreciate and understand what a special privilege this has been. It is a moment in time that I hope each of our guests will pass on to their colleagues and dis cuss the experiences that we shared with this great, great crew and famous warship. The opportunity to better understand the capabilities was also echoed by Chilean Navy Capt. Luis Bravo, USSOUTHCOM FLO. The Chilean Navy and U.S. Navy have been good friends for a long time so it is a good thing to know each others capabilities when we operate togeth er at sea. This was an enlightening experience to see an aircraft carrier in so much detail, Bravo said. During the embark, the guests observed sea-andanchor detail, day and night flight operations, underway replenishment and received briefings from many of the support departments and aviation squadrons aboard the ship. The military-to-mil itary liaisons from Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Argentina and Brazil all commented how complex the opera tions and day-to-day life were aboard the ship. Ecuadorian Navy Capt. Manuel Caamano, USNAVSOFLO said, We have a small Navy and my surprise from observ ing Sailors on the flight deck and hangar bay is everyone knows what to do without any visible direct supervision. I am impressed with the level of responsibility that is empowered to the crew to do their jobs. Caamano referred flight deck operations to that of a clock. The aircraft carrier is like a timepiece. Every Sailor is an essential part of an intricate machine that must work in har mony to be accurate and function correctly. There is obviously no time for mistakes on an aircraft carrier, he said. The group departed the ship Feb. 2 after Rear Adm. Walter E. "Ted" Carter, Jr., Commander, Carrier Strike Group TWELVE. It is a pleasure to have the chance to show off one our greatest warships in U.S. Naval aviation his tory to our coalition part ners throughout all of our friends in South America. I think they had their eyes opened up to what I would consider one of the centerpieces of our Navy, said Carter. Enterprise is the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and is the oldest aircraft carrier in the Navy with a rich histo ry reaching back 50 years. The Enterprise is the only ship of her class and is the second-oldest vessel in commission in the U.S. Navy after the woodenhulled threemasted frig ate USSConstitution. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more information, please contact COMUSNAVSO/C4F Public Affairs by email at comusnavso-c4f_mypt_ pao@navy.mil, visit www. public.navy.mil/comus navso-c4f, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ NAVSOUS4THFLT, or on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NAVSOUS4THFLT. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey Barker Lt. Cmdr. Charlie Ardinger, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Aircraft Handling Officer explains to distinguished visitors from U.S. Southern Command and U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command the purpose of the ship's Ouija board in Flight Deck Control aboard the aircraft carrier Feb. 2. Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 9

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rity allows for economic opportunity, said Norton. And economic opportu nity allows for prosperity, and I think thats in all our best interest. USS Simpson, home ported out of Mayport, Fla., is currently conduct ing theater security cooperation and maritime security operations in the Naval Forces Africa area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueRoyal Moroccan Navy 1st Sgt. Hamid Karada checks the identification papers of Chief Gunners Mate Sean Holmes, simulating a captive, on the bridge of the guidedmissile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) during a visit, board, search and seizure training session. Simpson is conducting theater security cooperation and maritime security operations in the Naval Forces Africa area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueRoyal Moroccan Naval Ensign Nabil Elkorchi gives a briefing to Sailors from the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) during a tour of the bridge on the Royal Moroccan Navy vessel Tarek Ben Zayid. -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueSenior Chief Sonar Technician (Surface) Victor Meza, left, and Ensign Joseph Schnieders, center, greet Nigerian Petty Officer Ahula Tiza, right, an Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012 shiprider, as he arrives aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). APS is an international security cooperation initiative, facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. From Page 1Simpson 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 t(BUFE$PNNVOJUZ t&VSPQFBOUZMF,JUDIFO 'FBUUBJOMFTTUFFM"QQMJBODFT (SBOJUF$PVOUFSUPQT tFTJEFOU$MVCIPVTF 'FBU$BUFSJOH,JUDIFO t(ZNQFO%BJMZ %VSJOH#VTJOFTT)PVST tPPMXJUIVOEFDL t.JOVUFT"XBZGSPNUIF#FBDI "DSPTTGSPN)BOOBBSL t.JMFGSPN .BZQPSU/BWBMUBUJPO/&9

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French Takes Helm At CNICCNIC Public AffairsVice Adm. William D. French relieved Vice Adm. Michael C. Vitale as Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) during a Change of Command ceremony in CNIC Headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard, Feb. 3, 2012. Vitale has served as the chief officer leading the Navys entire shore infrastructure for nearly three years and was the third Commander in the his tory of CNIC. This infra structure, also known as the CNIC Enterprise; includes 11 Navy Regions, 70 Installations, and 127 Naval Operations Support Centers, and is respon sible for 31 business lines and 122 critical shore capabilities across three major categories; opera tions, quality of life, and facilities management. Throughout his tenure Vitale lead efforts to stan dardize, align, synchro nize and innovate new methods and processes that furthered CNICs mission to deliver effec tive and efficient readi ness from the shore that sustain the fleet, enable the fighter, and support families. Vitale praised the numerous accomplish ments of the person nel under his command and of the entire CNIC Enterprise; from mold ing the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) into the model Personnel Accountability System used across the services, to the develop ment of new shore inte gration methods and a Total Workforce, capable of continuously support ing operations and ser vices. The personnel here at the Headquarters, and throughout the entire Enterprise have faced growing numbers of issues and challenges, said Vitale, Ive had the pleasure of witnessing this Enterprise solve com plex and dynamic prob lems, some self-imposed, some caused by outside forces, and forge a way ahead toward a model of shore integration that has forever changed how we do business and provide service the Fleet, Fighter and Family. Vitale also thanked the many Navy communities throughout the world that support and allow the Navy to oper ate in close proximity to their homes and liveli hoods, acknowledging the importance of main taining close ties from the smallest Installation to the Headquarters level. Its the communi ties, both in the U.S. and abroad, that invite us to live and operate in their backyard, and its the communities, both within the Navy and outside, that are the anchor of our abil ity to maintain and oper ate the best Naval force in the world, and I want to thank each one for their support, patience, and welcoming spirit, said Vitale. French thanked Vitale for his wisdom and guid ance and spoke briefly about his optimism and vision for the future of CNIC. During the last 6 years I have been with the CNIC Enterprise I have learned that we have some of the best, brightest, and most talented professionals in the Navy, said French. Under Vice Admiral Vitales leadership the CNIC team has set the example for how an Enterprise should func tion and have established immense credibility on how you are meeting cus tomer needs. Im honored to be taking command at this point in the history of the command. Vice Adm. French was promoted shortly before the event after having a successful tour at Navy Region Southwest in San Diego, Calif., where he accomplished major milestones towards ener gy and water conserva tion and numerous other green initiatives. French, the son of an Air Force officer and native of San Antonio, is a graduate of Vanderbilt University where he received com mission through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program in May, 1979. He earned a Master of Science degree from Naval Postgraduate School in 1985 and a Master of Arts from the Naval War College in 1999. A career subma rine officer, French has served on a number of submarines and com manded USS Salt Lake City (SSN 716) and Submarine Squadron 3 in Pearl Harbor. His prior Flag Officer com mands include tours at Navy Region Northwest, Navy Region Marianas in Guam, and Navy Region Southwest. I am proud to be part of such a superb organi zation, and look I forward to working with you over the next few years, added French. CNIC oversees a $10 billion budget, more than 83,000 facilities and 58,000 personnel, all managed from a single unified enterprise. Photo by MC1(SW/AW) Monique Hilley Vice Adm. Bill French (right) relieves Vice Adm. Michael Vitale (left) as Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) at the Washington Navy Yard February 3, 2012. CNIC is a global enterprise tasked with managing the Navys entire shore infrastructure and oversees a $12 billion budget, more than 83,000 facilities, and 58,000 personnel. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 11

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Strategic Directive To The Joint ForceThe past 10 years have been some of the most challenging in our mili tarys history. Our service members and their fami lies have endured every hardship and met every challenge with courage and dignity throughout. The responsibility for defending our nation is one we have proudly car ried for centuries. As we examine how the past 10 years have affected our military, the Joint Force faces three points of tran sition which will test our leadership and shape our future: the transition from two large land wars to a complex security environment with many challenges, the transition from abundant to con strained resources, and, as our active force shrinks in size, the transition of many service members and families into civilian life. In October, I pub lished my Letter to the Joint Force, which out lined four focus areas as we face the future. These focus areas will guide us through the transitions: Achieving our national objectives in our current conflicts; Developing a Joint Force for 2020; Recommitting our selves to the Profession of Arms; and Keeping faith with the Military Family. As a follow up, Ive just released my Strategic Direction to the Joint Force. This document goes into greater detail of the key efforts in each of our focus areas. Read these with a critical eye and ask yourself what you can do to contribute to these efforts and make them better. I invite you to comment on my blog, my Facebook page or on Twitter. Share your thoughts with me on how we can improve the Strategic Direction and together address the needs of our future.Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff From TheDoD Official Provides Tax Tips For TroopsAmerican Forces Press ServiceAs service mem bers begin preparing for the annual tax sea son, they may want to consider a new sav ings plan designed for young people, a Defense Department tax official said Feb. 3. Service members and their dependents who earn less income today than they expect to earn in the future, such as those in junior ranks who look forward to get ting promoted to higher grades, should consider investing in the Thrift Savings Plans new Roth option, said Army Lt. Col. Evan Stone, director of the Armed Forces Tax Council. The Roth TSP is a good option for service mem bers who are paying less tax now than they expect to pay later, Stone said during an interview with the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service. The traditional Thrift Savings Plan defers taxes on earned income until the money is withdrawn, Stone explained. The Roth option allows a member to contribute after-tax dollars that grow tax free and are not taxed upon withdrawal, he said. Both plans allow a maximum annual contribution of $17,000, he said, up from $16,500 last year. There are few other changes that apply to ser vice members and their dependents this tax sea son, Stone said. A new calculation for Imminent Danger Pay does not change service members eligibility for income tax exclusions. The pay was changed from a flat $225 per month, to an amount prorated per day. Stone said there has been no change to feder al income tax brackets in the past two years. They remain at 10, 15, 25, 28, 33 and 35 percent of taxable income, he said. Still, Stone said, many people dont realize that income is taxed on a progressive scale, so as a persons income increas es and they move into a higher tax bracket, only the new proportion of pay is taxed at the higher rate, not all of their income. While few people enjoy writing a check to Uncle Sam, Stone also noted that the military is a good employer come tax time because military allow ances, such as those for housing and meals, are not taxable. Military members have a tax advantage by having a chunk of their regular pay as tax-exempt income, he said. Stone said he wants to remind service mem bers that they and their dependents can get free tax preparation by IRStrained volunteers at almost every military installation in the world. The military has an excellent program for tax preparation worldwide, he said. Deployed service mem bers, he added, do not have to sign the tax forms if their spouse has power of attorney privileges. Military OneSource offers free tax-related phone consultations seven days-a-week, from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., at 1-800730-3802.Naval Academy 2012 Chooses First ShipsU.S. Naval Academy Public Af fairsMore than 250 future surface warfare officers (SWO) in the Naval Academys Class of 2012 chose their first ships dur ing a ceremony in Mahan Hall, Feb. 2. Ship selec tion is one of the most significant events for the senior class. Senior SWO leaders from around the fleet attend the ceremony, joining ship commanding officers, executive officers and command master chiefs in welcoming the Navys future ensigns into the surface warfare com munity. The midshipmen choose their ships accord ing to their order of merit, which takes into account their academic performance, physical fitness and profession alism throughout their four years at the Naval Academy. Listed are the top ten midshipmen from the 2012 Surface Warfare Community and the ships and homeports they chose. Midshipman 1st Class Michael Haydell USS Momsen (DDG 92) in Everett, Wash. Midshipman 1st Class Thomas Paul USS Chafee (DDG 90) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Midshipman 1st Class Tyler Reed USS Green Bay (LPD 20) in San Diego Midshipman 1st Class Patrick Yu USS Mustin (DDG 89) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Ros Lary USS Mustin (DDG 89) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Katherine Bollino USS Carney (DDG 64) in Mayport, Fla. Midshipman 1st Class Anand Jantzen USS Mustin (DDG 89) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Erin Jedlicka USS Shoup (DDG 86) in Everett, Wash. Midshipman 1st Class Matthew Hein USS McCampbell (DDG 85) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Coria Buck USS Dewey (DDG 105) in San DiegoMayport VITA Tax Center is open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday at 70A Evergades Ct. in base housing. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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FFSC Classes Focus On Money ManagementFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 9, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 9, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 13, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Individual Augmentee (IA) Discussion Group, USO Feb. 13, 8:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and for giveness in anger. Feb. 13-16, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 14, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 14, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group, Building One Room 104 Feb. 14, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Couponing 101 (How to Stretch Your Shopping Dollars), FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Seminar, Building One Room 104 Feb. 16, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 16, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 22, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 22, 9 a.m. noon, Thrift Savings Plan, Building One Room 104 Feb. 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 27, 6 p.m. 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 29, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m., Marketing Yourself for a Second Career, Ocean Breeze Learn To Market YourselfFrom FFSCThe Fleet and Family Support Center is spon soring a once-a-year lecture regarding tran sition here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be presented by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Feb. 29, at 9-11:30 a.m., in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center Grand Ballroom. This top-shelf pre sentation is a great pro fessional development opportunity. Transition is of course ultimate ly a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are con templating retirement in one to five years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any par ticular officer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be educated about the pro cess in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transi tions. This executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlist ed supervisor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by Colonel Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national staff. The presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-todate, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see . It includes com prehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employ er perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview tech niques, salary negotia tion, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition topics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. SPOUSES are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures com panion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career . It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transi tion process. For further infor mation, contact Jose Sanchez, at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil or call 904-270-6600, ext. 1700 or 1701. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 13



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Helping At HomeMayport Holds Bone Marrow Drive To Benefit One Of Their OwnUpdated Eval, Fitness Report Software OutFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNavy is deploying a new version of the per formance evaluation soft ware used throughout the fleet, officials said Feb. 6. NMCI (Navy Marine Corps Internet) will begin deploying NAVFIT98A Version 30 throughout the Non-Classified Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNET) during scheduled maintenance peri ods starting February and concluding mid-March, said Jim Price, director, Performance Evaluation Division, Navy Personnel Command. Version 30 supports the lieutenant force distribution policy change announced in NAVADMIN 219/11, incorporates the chief evaluation (CHIEFEVAL), previously available only through PDF and pro vides additional lines to the comments block for FITREPS, CHIEFEVALS, and EVALS. In addition, this version is a complete technology refreshment to increase compatibility across vari ous workstation configu rations. The NAVFIT98A Version 30 update will be pushed to all NMCI NIPR workstations through out the Navy as a core application; however the new software will not be automatically loaded on the Secret Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNET). It will not be listed as a core application for SIPR computers, but will be available by request, said Price. Beginning Feb. 28 the old version of NAVFIT98A will be removed from all SIPR workstations. Commands that require NAVFIT98 Version 30 on their SIPR workstations can submit a Move/Add/ Change (MAC) request through their command information systems technician. Non-NMCI users may download NAVFIT98A Version 30 along with frequently asked questions and a reference guide on using the application at http://www.npc.navy. mil/careerinfo/perfor manceevaluation/soft wareforms. NAVFIT98A is used by Navy to create, store, organize, validate and print officer fitness reports and enlisted eval uation reports for signa ture as well as the sum mary sheet required for each reporting group to be mailed to the NPC. The reports are saved to Sailors official military personnel file and may be reviewed by selection and promotion boards. Users will receive an NMCI User Alert email providing the dates of the upgrade and any actions required by the user. For more information visit www.npc.navy. mil and read NAVADMIN 047/12.USS Simpson Enjoys Visit To Casablanca Navy Public Affairs Support Element-East Detachment EuropeGuided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) and senior staff members from U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa concluded a three-day port visit of training, band engagements, and senior staff talks in Casablanca, Feb. 2. During the visit, Simpson conducted visit, board, search and sei zure training with Royal Moroccan Navy personnel and received a tour of the Royal Moroccan Navy vessel Tarek Ben Zayid. Staff members from U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa met with senior leaders from the Royal Moroccan Navy to strengthen maritime partnerships, while members from the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe Band con ducted two community service projects at a girls orphanage and boys center in the city. Rear Adm. Kenneth Norton, deputy chief of staff for Strategy, Resources, and Plans at U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, along with his staff and the crew of Simpson, hosted the U.S. ambassador to Morocco, Samuel Kaplan, his wife and his staff, and top commanders from the Royal Moroccan Navy and Army, honoring the relationship between Morocco and their U.S. partners. Royal Moroccan Army Col. Mohammed Amharouch said he was happy to have the Simpson crew visit his city. Its good to form bridges between our two nations, said Amharouch. More visits, like the Simpsons, will help our navies and countries move together into the future with vision. Cmdr. Leonard Milliken, USS Simpson commanding officer, commented on the events and training the two countries complet ed during their time in Casablanca. Today was a great day, said Milliken. We had tours where we pro vided training aboard to members of the Royal Moroccan Navy and some of our Sailors visited and boarded a Moroccan ves sel as well. Our visit to Morocco has been a suc cess. Norton also spoke to the guests by offering praise to the Simpsons crew and stressing the importance of partner ship between the U.S. and countries like Morocco. Id like to conclude [the evening] with this thought: maritime secu -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueRoyal Moroccan Navy sailors direct Damage Controlman 3rd Class Brandon Watkins, simulating a captive, past the quarterdeck of the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) during a visit, board, search and seizure training session. Simpson is conducting theater security cooperation and maritime security operations in the Naval Forces Africa area of responsibility. From StaffNaval Station Mayport is host ing a bone mar row drive in honor of Master-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet of NS Mayport Security. The active duty Sailor is diag nosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). He has had eight cycles of chemotherapy and is in dire need of a bone marrow transplant. He needs a match right now. The bone mar row drive is sched uled for Feb. 15-17 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. in Building One Security Training Room. The process is simple, Deputy Security Officer Ron Novak said. To register, potential donors join the National Marrow Donor Program Registry by taking a simple swab of their mouth. Potential donors must be between the ages of 18 and 60, meet the health guidelines and be willing to donate to any patient in need. We really want to pull together and help Brian, Novak said. Hes got a young daughter who just turned one [Feb. 4] and his wife Katherine. A bone marrow transplant will give hima chance to see his daughter grow up and continue his life with his family and his Navy career, he added. For more information, call 270-5261. -Photos submitted by Mayport SecurityMaster-at-Arms Seaman Brian Van Fleet holds his young daughter, Elaina, while in his dress whites. Van Fleet pictured with his wife, Katherine, and daughter, Elaina. Brian is in need of a bone marrow transplant.See Simpson, Page 10

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.Whether at work or play, conflicts can occur. These can go unresolved if the child or adult involved in the conflict does not have the neces sary skills for cooperation, collaboration, or compromise. While older children and adults spend most of their day at school or on the job working together to successfully complete a task, younger children do not always get the neces sary practice. They may need additional practice at school by sharing sup plies or at home shar ing responsibilities for completion of a chore. Cooperation is a neces sary skill required for conflict resolution. Children and adults also need the skill of compromise. Without the ability to compromise, arguments or hurt feel ings can result. But even very young children can be taught strategies which allow them to successfully make group decisions. For example if they must decide which fast food restaurant they would agree to, they look for common ground, discuss the final alternatives, and make a mutual decision. Involvement with sports, board games, crafts, or even volunteer ing will teach the skills of collaboration and cooperation with others. Appropriate social skills can also be learned dur ing these activities no matter what the age of the individual. One par ticularly important social skill which may need practice is agreeing to disagree, meaning that indi viduals can express and retain their own opinions on things without argu ing, fighting, or otherwise becoming disagreeable. This skill can resolve many conflicts. Children and adults can learn and remem ber strategies that may work for them in the next situational conflict by reflecting on which strat egies have worked best for them in similar situ ations. By asking them selves questions such as, How did we both decide that? or How did I get the group or my fellow workers to decide on that course of actions? they can build a library of conflict resolution strategies. But can these skills work if the child or adult is being bullied? Both bullies and chronic vic tims can be helped by those same skills of cooperation, collaboration, and compromising, in addition to empathy and self-respect. Empathy will allow the individual to feel compassion and caring for oth ers. And recognizing that they have something to offer others helps one to feel good about ones self. This easily translates to feeling good about help ing others. Want to learn more about teaching children and adults how to get along with others, including strategies for deal ing with bullying? Attend tonights parent program at the new CDC, Building 2287 at 6 pm facilitated by the Military Family Life Consultant. The building is located at 1650 America St., Atlantic Beach, FL 32233 [phone (904) 2414075]. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Teaching Children, Adults To Get AlongJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAs we think about the constant changes in the world we live in, such as technological, cultural, political, personal, etc., we can almost be over whelmed at trying to keep up. In the midst of all this change, it is comforting to know that some things dont change. It is those core val ues that will carry us through the winds of change in our lives. As members of the great est Navy in the world, we all share the core values of Honor, Courage, and Commitment. I think at least one major reason these val ues are considered core is because over the years it has been demonstrat ed that the character of our Sailors and Marines is an absolutely essential component for mission accomplishment. This is one of the things that makes our Navy the greatest in the world. You see, greatness is not just about what you have the power to do, but also about the manner in which you choose to employ that power. And that has to do with char acter and character is based on values. Take the Super Bowl for example. Both the New York Giants and the New England Patriots can be considered great foot ball teams because of their talent which they demonstrated in achiev ing championship vic tories to get to the Super Bowl. They proved to be powerhouses on the field, which enabled them to make it to the Big Dance. But beneath the sur face of all that talent is the issue of character. And that character is what each of those players will take with them for the rest of their lives. Yes, the winning team will always have that Super Bowl ring to wear on their finger. But wear ing a Super Bowl ring can never replace the character demonstrated day in and day out in how we treat others and how we choose to live your lives. The difference can be seen in the contrast between two impor tant football celebrities: O.J. Simpson and Tony Dungy. O.J. Simpson was a great football player (one of the best running backs to ever play the game). But poor deci sions later in life resulted in him being convicted of serious crimes and he is now serving time behind bars. In the end, flaws in his character have deter mined his future more than his talent on the football field. On the other hand, Tony Dungy is one of the most revered coaches in the history of the NFL and was the first African American coach to lead his team to a Super Bowl victory. What was it that inspired so many NFL greats to want to play for Tony Dungy? Was it just that he knew how to lead his team to victory? Surely that was part of it, but just as significant as that was the issue of character. Players and coaches alike have testified that it was Tony Dungys character that was the secret to his greatness as a coach. In the end, character counted and our charac ter is based on what we value in life. What about you? What are your core values? Lt. Buster Williams Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCore Values Center Around Your CharacterFor the past four years I have put off writing this article. It a subject that I find easy to talk about with my friends, fam ily. Even with complete strangers, I can have a conversation about it. But for some reason, it has been hard for me to write. So here it goes... four years ago on Feb. 7 my husband had a mas sive heart attack the dreaded Widow Maker. He was only 36 years old. Yep, thats right. Only 36. And guess what? His grandfather died at 35. Too young for a heart attack. I remember standing in the emergency room. It was frantic. My husband was barely conscious and they were trying to get his vitals when a doctor asked the patients age. When they told her, she was stunned. Dont you mean 46? I heard her ask. No, I yelled at her. Hes only 36. Only 36, with a wife and two young sons at home. In that emergency room, I didnt realize how bad the situation really was. I knew he was alive. I knew I didnt have to go to my boys and tell them daddy wasnt coming home. My husband was more than lucky that day. He is one of a very FEW men and women in our age group to recognize the signs of a heart attack and survive. (For the Widow Maker, the percentage of surviving is between 3-10 percent.) Early sign recognition saved him. We were able to get an ambulance to him in time. In fact, he actually had the heart attack while en route to the hospital. Paramedics had to defib him twice to revive him. If I had picked him up -which I was on my way to do I would have dropped off a corpse. With the Widow Maker, you only have about a five min ute window to revive the patient before death. That same year, I lost three classmates (all women it doesnt just happen to men) to heart attacks. Their families werent lucky. Of course at the time of the Widow Maker, we didnt know how lucky we were. It took being visited by almost every nurse in ICU coming by to con gratulate my husband on being alive for the situa tion to sink in. Its not called Widow Maker for nothing. Ok, so why am I telling you this story now? Two reasons actually. The first is that I believe strongly that people should practice heart healthy habits starting at a very young age...think your children. My husband had a very strong family history of heart disease that we ignored. (Remember, his grandfather died at 35) But his father also died in his early 60s from congestive heart failure after several heart attacks and strokes starting in his 40s. I guess because we were so young, we figured we had time to be heart healthy. I cooked right at home and I was active, but he wasnt. He ignored the early warning signs of heart disease his risk factors. By 30, he already had high cholesterol lev els, high blood pressure and for the past few years he had become sedentary and overweight. He had all the risk factors for a potential heart attack. Second is because February is Heart Health Month. (Ironic that he would have his heart attack in February, isnt it?) According to TRICARE, patients should also con sider tobacco and alcohol use, diabetes, and diet as risk factors. For active duty military, regular check ups and blood work are manda tory. If you are not active duty, it is up to you to take the initiative for your heart health. Little things like replacing 100 calorie processed snacks with fresh fruit and vegetables can go a long way to controlling your weight. Taking advantage of MWRs Fitness programs and Sports program can keep you in shape (and social) with out breaking your wallet. And make sure you know the signs of a heart attack. The five main signs are: the jaw, neck or back. For women, it might feel like your bra is on too tight. headed or faint fort. My husband said it was like a thumb being pressed hard into his chest. Some patients say it feels like an elephant sit ting on you. arms or shoulder. Both of his arms were so numb it was hard for him to hold the phone as he was tell ing me to hurry and call the ambulance. So there it is. Now I have a husband who is a heart patient and I have children who could one day be heart patients as well. Thats why I preach and practice healthy eat ing habits and activities to them on a daily basis. Think youre too young for a heart attack? So did we. For detailed informa tion on heart disease, risk factors and prevention visit www.cdc.gov/heart disease. The National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention are work ing together for a hearthealthy and stroke-free world, if youre interested in learning more go to www.hearthealthystroke free.org TRICARE covers several preventive care services, to learn more visit www. tricare.mil/preventiveser vices.Heart Attacks Happen At All AgesPaige Gnann The Mirror editor Editors 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Donate Your Locks For CharityFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport and Balfour Beatty Communities are hosting a Locks of Love char ity event on Feb. 25 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center off base. Locks of Love is a non-profit organization that turns donated hair into fitted hairpieces for financially disadvantaged chil dren suffering from long-term medical hair loss. According to their press release, most of the children who are helped by Locks have lost their hair due to a medical condition called alopecia area ta. Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treatment to the brain stem or other dermatological condi tions that result in permanent hair loss. Locks has been in place since 1998 and provides t he hair pieces for children under age 21. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. Balfour Beatty is bringing in two Locks of Love approved hair stylists to take donations for the charity and will have food and drinks, along with take-home bags frilled with beauty products for donators. To donate to Locks of Love, hair must be at least 10 inches log, clean and dry. It must be bundled in a ponytail or a braid. Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be u sed. For more information about the event, contact Jessica Ennis at 372-4702 or 742-6036. Recognizing Mayports Ombudsmen -Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane presents a plaque to outgoing Command Ombudsman Debbie Pound during the monthly Ombudsman Assembly Jan. 30. Olivia Gardell, center, is stepping into the position. Also pictured is base Command Master Chief Wayne Welch and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard. Left, Cochrane congratulates USS Taylor Ombudsman Dawn Foster as the Ombudsman of the Quarter. Her name will be included on the Ombudsman of the Quarter plaque on display in Building 1.NEX Rewards Students For Good GradesFrom NEXThe Navy Exchange wants to help its customers pay for their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Four times per school year, four students will be the recipients of a $5,000, $3,000 $2,000 or $1,000 U.S. savings bond, denominations at matu rity. The next drawing will be held at the end of February 2012. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and mili tary retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX prod ucts and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offering students a chance to win a savings bond through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded $504,000 in sav ings bonds with the help of its generous vendor partners. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. -Photo by Paige GnannNavy Exchange (NEX) Mayport General Manager Bill Hockenberry presents a $5,000 U.S. savings bond, cer tificate and medal to 13-year-old Ryan Taylor. Taylors good grades made him eligible for the NEX A-OK Student Reward Program in which active military, reservist or retiree dependent students with a B-grade average report card can enter the drawing. Students must be first through 12th grade. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 Taylor Families Spend Day At Sea Fire Controlman 1st Class Christopher Carr lets mom, Susie Carr Barber, look through the Big Eyes binoculars on the Bridge wing. The Mirror editorFriends and families of USS Taylor (FFG 50) got the oppor tunity to experience a day in the life of their Sailor while underway with the ship during a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Feb. 2. The day was also highlighted with special visitors, Greg and Beth Taylor, the ships namesakes son and daughter-in-law. USS Taylor was named for Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, who died on Nov. 17, 1965 after being shot down over North Vietnam while trying to rescue a downed pilot. The Taylors live in Southern California and it was their first visit to the ship since its commissioning 27 years ago. I was very nervous to come on the ship, said Greg Taylor. I didnt feel worthy to step onto a ship that people are here serv ing their country. But every single person on this ship has made us feel comfortable. The Taylors spent the day vis iting with crew members and their families, as well as explor ing the ship and its memorabilia. Beth Taylor gifted the ship with an album with pictures of Cmdr. Taylor during his years of service. I remember my dad as just a dad, Greg said. [His service] is one of the strongest things thats defined my life. Greg said he also remembers living in Jacksonville while his father was stationed as a pilot at NAS Jacksonville and Cecil Field. His mother, Taylors widow, is still alive. She never remarried after losing her husband in the war. He was her soulmate, Greg said. She was a great Navy wife. Before setting sail, Commanding Officer, Cmdr. J.R. Hill, welcomed the group on board and thanked them for supporting their Sailors from the homefront. Having Greg and Beth Taylor on board for the Friends and Family Day cruise was an honor and privilege for me, the crew, and the families that joined us for the event, Hill said. With more than 150 friends and family members USS Taylor (FFG 50) pulls past the Jetties and into port after a family day cruise Feb. 2. The ship deployed with friends and family of the crew and special guests Greg and Beth Taylor, the ships namesakes son and daughter-in-law.See Taylor, Page 5Friends and family got a chance to purchase memorabilia from a booth set up in the hangar bay. Friends and family wave to an SH-60B helicopter from HSL-48. The crew performed helo maneuvers for Taylors family day cruise. Lt.j.g. Greg Crum, the Main Propulsion Assistant (MPA), left, explains equipment located on the bridge to friends and family of USS Taylors crew during the family day cruise. Lt. Michael Modeer enjoys a quiet moment with wife Hanna and Newman Gersin. Coast Guard Fireman Jeff Wooding and Danielle Wooding enjoy the steel beach picnic with Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Joe Wooding.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 5 underway with us, we had the opportunity to show our guests what a basic day in the Navy is like. It also gave the families a chance to see that the crew is highly proficient in operating the ship as we prepare for a deploy ment overseas. The crew takes a lot of pride in their ship and I believe the Taylor namesake family saw that in them. Seaman Apprentice Kyle Weatherman brought his father Tim, and grandfather, Robert Landry, out for the day cruise. It was old times for Landry, who served in the Navy as a Machinists Mate during the 50s on the destroyer USS Cone. Landry started a tradi tion of military service, followed by three sons and two grandchildren joining different branches of the military. We tried to lead [Kyle] the way to go, Landry said. The day was also filled with activities such as a tour of the main areas of the ship, including the bridge. There was a Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) exhibit, and a chance for everyone to relax during a Steel Beach picnic on the fantail. This is great, laughed Karen Cardona, sister of Logistics Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Franklin Cardona. Its awesome. I diidnt know he had gourment lunches and din ners! Im having a blast, Jim Selby, father of Boatswains Mate Seaman Josh Selby said. Hes walked me around all the different spaces. Im very proud [of Josh]. Hes out there for a reason.TaylorFrom Page 4Tim Grace, Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Justin Plank, Boatswains Mate Seaman Josh Selby and his dad Jim Selby enjoy a meal on the flight deck. USS Taylor Commanding Officer, Cmdr. J.R. Hill, welcomes aboard all visitors before the ship pulls out for the day. Engineman 2nd Class (SW) Michael Byrd takes his family for a tour of the ship. Culinary Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Waltine Nauta and Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/AW) Vincent Hogans cook up some good eats for the Steel Beach picnic.-Photos by Paige GnannGreg Taylor, son of USS Taylors namesake Cmdr. Jesse Junior Taylor, and his wife Beth pin the Enlisted Surface Warfare pin on Chief Aviation Machinists Mate Luis Deloreyes during a brief ceremony aboard the ship while underway for a family day cruise. Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW) Todod Thomas talks with the family of Seaman Apprentice Kyle Weatherman at the Damage Control display. Randi Davis suits up in safety gear worn by the ships Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) team. Matthew Cardona, 16, tries on the VBSS gear. Cardona was a guest of older brother, Seaman Sebastian Velez. Also pictured is mom Alexie Restrepo and sister Veronica Cardona, 12. Chief Gunners Mate Kirby Dickerson explains the various weapons on display to Jonathan Reglado at the Weapons station. Friends and family of the ships crew enjoy the warm weather and calm seas during the family day cruise hosted by USS Taylor.

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Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Extravaganza. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Free Italian buffet, double payouts on all hand cards, and more! 270-7204 Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb. 21: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 Feb. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by FLC Jax. For tickets, call SHCM Brad Watson at (904) 2707178. Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb. 26: UFC 144 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE MWRThe following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb. 10: Jeff Dunham Live. Van Departs Liberty Center 5:30 p.m. Cost $25. Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 15: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 17: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. Feb. 18: Dave & Busters Trip. Van departs 7 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Feb. 19: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Feb. 20: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb. 21: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 Feb. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by FLC Jax. For tickets, call SHCM Brad Watson at (904) 2707178. Feb. 22: Pool Tournament Finals 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Feb. 23: Killer Bunny. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments Provided. Feb. 24: Ron Perry Connection. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Feb 25: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 26: UFC 144 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 28: Texas Hold Em Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. LIBERTYFeb. 14: Teen Valentine Social 2-6:30 p.m. at the Teen Center. 246-0347. Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. Feb. 17: Freedom Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 17: Fire Pit Friday. 2-11 p.m. Bring your Blankets and chairs and sit around the fire pit for smores and music. 2460347 Feb. 18: Youth Sponsorship Mardis Gras Dance Party. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Your chances to win the drawing for a Pack Prize will increase with every new member you bring to this event! 246-0347 Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb 23: Drama Club Presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. Feb. 25: Cicis Pizza Night. 1-3:30 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Permission slip required. 270-5680. KID Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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-Photo by MC1 William TownsendLori Leggett and Joseph Belt of MWR hold the repositioned PRT start/finish sign. The PRT course has been redirected due to on-going construction at the Base Gym.Take A New Route To PRTNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastThe PRT course is going in a new direction throughout the completion of the new fitness center in May 2013. The start, as well as the finish line, is on the east side of the paved running trail. From there, runners will run north around the trail and exit the track onto Jetty Road. The route will then follow Jetty Road to Baltimore Street. Runners will remain on Balitimore Street until they reach the turnaround point adjacent to Building 413 (Combat Systems Detachment). Runner will head back to the running trail on Jetty Road and south to the finish line. Please follow all instructions regarding the previous PRT course and keep safety of all participants the number one priority. To view a map of the new course, visit MWR Mayports Facebook page. Sports Bring your sweetheart out for our upcoming Valentines Day 3K Walk and 5K Run on Feb. 14. Registration begins at 7:30am run begins at 8:10 am in front of the gym. Open to everyone. For more information call 904-270-5451. This week in Tennis USCG BM2 Christopher Hunt beat Navy Housing CSSN Dustin Snyder in a 3 set 6-3, 4-6,6-4 match. Navy Housing CSSN Dustin Snyder beat USCG BMCS George Zitzewitz in another 3 set match 2-6, 6-3, 7-5. If you are inter ested in joining our Mens tennis league contact Rita at 904-270-5451. Matches played at player availability. Dust off your gloves and pull your bats out of the closet. Its time for the 2012 Captains Cup Mens Softball league. League meeting will be held in the gym on Feb. 14 at 11 a.m. The league is open to Active Duty only. To register your command or for more information contact Rita at 270-5451. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basic 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Prerequisite class is H.I.T. Level 1. Class size limited to 30. Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning MWR -Photo by Rita HammerstadEnsign Molly Hanas goes up for the block as the Phil Sea Lady War Dawgs turned it up a notch this week in the Womens Volleyball league as they beat the number 1 Lady Aces in a 3 game tie breaker 20-21, 21-14, 15-11. The team continued to tear up the floor in their second match-up against the Mamacitas winning 21-6, 21-3. The Angels continued their win streak beating Mamacitas 21-17, 21-18 in this weeks match-up. Next week 12 February at 3PM the Lady Aces take on the Angels, 3:45 Mamacitas take on the Lady Aces and 4:30 Angels take on the Lady War Dawgs. Jumping To New Heights THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 7

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-Photo by Paige GnannNewly commissioned Ensign Johnny Ortiz hugs his daughter after she and her brothers helped him don his new jacket during the commissioning ceremony.Welcome To LDO Community -Photo by MCSA Damian BergRetired CWO5 Cornelius Mitchem hears the oath of office by newly commissioned CWO Samuel Raddler during his commissioning ceremony on Feb. 3.Raddler Transitions To CWO Mayport Recognizes Top Civilians NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, stands with the nominees and winners of the Employee of the Year and Supervisor of the Year 2011 during a presentation/ luncheon on Jan. 31 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Employee Mara Humphres of MWR and supervisor Ron Novak of Security were announced as the 2011 winners. Pictured from left is Cochrane, Mia Kuhn of MWR, Novak, Wendy Sawyer of MWR, Tom Douget of Air Ops, Tegwen McNeal of Air Ops, Christie Miller of Security and Humphres.-Photo by MCSA Damian Berg 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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USNAVSO Foreign Liaison Officers, SOUTHCOM DVs Embark EnterpriseFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsSix foreign liaison officers (FLOs) and Inter-American Naval Telecommunications Network (IANTN) Officers from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (USNAVSO) and three U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) distin guished visitors embarked aboard USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Feb. 1, for an overnight familiarization tour of the U.S. Navys first nuclear aircraft carrier. The international rep resentatives and distin guished visitors were hosted and escorted to the ship by USNAVSO/ C4F Deputy Commander, Rear Adm. A. B. Cruz with the purpose of showing them the distinct capa bilities and complexities of an aircraft carrier strike group operating at sea. The guests embarked the ship while conduct ing exercises off the coast of Northern Florida in preparation for the air craft carriers last sched uled deployment later this year. This embark to Enterprise is a unique opportunity for our part ner nation representatives and distinguished visitors to experience life on an aircraft carrier and better understand the immea surable maritime capa bilities of a carrier strike group. Even more impor tantly, our guests can now further recognize how to integrate aircraft carriers into combined operations in theater if needed, Cruz said. I know firsthand that they truly appreciate and understand what a special privilege this has been. It is a moment in time that I hope each of our guests will pass on to their colleagues and dis cuss the experiences that we shared with this great, great crew and famous warship. The opportunity to better understand the capabilities was also echoed by Chilean Navy Capt. Luis Bravo, USSOUTHCOM FLO. The Chilean Navy and U.S. Navy have been good friends for a long time so it is a good thing to know each others capabilities when we operate togeth er at sea. This was an enlightening experience to see an aircraft carrier in so much detail, Bravo said. During the embark, the guests observed sea-andanchor detail, day and night flight operations, underway replenishment and received briefings from many of the support departments and aviation squadrons aboard the ship. The military-to-military liaisons from Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Argentina and Brazil all commented how complex the opera tions and day-to-day life were aboard the ship. Ecuadorian Navy Capt. Manuel Caamano, USNAVSOFLO said, We have a small Navy and my surprise from observ ing Sailors on the flight deck and hangar bay is everyone knows what to do without any visible direct supervision. I am impressed with the level of responsibility that is empowered to the crew to do their jobs. Caamano referred flight deck operations to that of a clock. The aircraft carrier is like a timepiece. Every Sailor is an essential part of an intricate machine that must work in har mony to be accurate and function correctly. There is obviously no time for mistakes on an aircraft carrier, he said. The group departed the ship Feb. 2 after Rear Adm. Walter E. "Ted" Carter, Jr., Commander, Carrier Strike Group TWELVE. It is a pleasure to have the chance to show off one our greatest warships in U.S. Naval aviation history to our coalition part ners throughout all of our friends in South America. I think they had their eyes opened up to what I would consider one of the centerpieces of our Navy, said Carter. Enterprise is the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and is the oldest aircraft carrier in the Navy with a rich history reaching back 50 years. The Enterprise is the only ship of her class and is the second-oldest vessel in commission in the U.S. Navy after the woodenhulled, threemasted frig ate USSConstitution. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more information, please contact COMUSNAVSO/C4F Public Affairs by email at comusnavso-c4f_mypt_ pao@navy.mil, visit www. public.navy.mil/comus navso-c4f, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ NAVSOUS4THFLT, or on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NAVSOUS4THFLT. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey Barker Lt. Cmdr. Charlie Ardinger, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Aircraft Handling Officer explains to distinguished visitors from U.S. Southern Command and U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command the purpose of the ship's Ouija board in Flight Deck Control aboard the aircraft carrier Feb. 2. Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 9

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rity allows for economic opportunity, said Norton. And economic opportu nity allows for prosperity, and I think thats in all our best interest. USS Simpson, home ported out of Mayport, Fla., is currently conduct ing theater security cooperation and maritime security operations in the Naval Forces Africa area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueRoyal Moroccan Navy 1st Sgt. Hamid Karada checks the identification papers of Chief Gunners Mate Sean Holmes, simulating a captive, on the bridge of the guidedmissile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) during a visit, board, search and seizure training session. Simpson is conducting theater security cooperation and maritime security operations in the Naval Forces Africa area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueRoyal Moroccan Naval Ensign Nabil Elkorchi gives a briefing to Sailors from the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) during a tour of the bridge on the Royal Moroccan Navy vessel Tarek Ben Zayid. -Photo by MC2 Felicito RustiqueSenior Chief Sonar Technician (Surface) Victor Meza, left, and Ensign Joseph Schnieders, center, greet Nigerian Petty Officer Ahula Tiza, right, an Africa Partnership Station (APS) 2012 shiprider, as he arrives aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). APS is an international security cooperation initiative, facilitated by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. From Page 1Simpson 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 t(BUFE$PNNVOJUZ t&VSPQFBOUZMF,JUDIFO 'FBUUBJOMFTTUFFM"QQMJBODFT (SBOJUF$PVOUFSUPQT tFTJEFOU$MVCIPVTF 'FBU$BUFSJOH,JUDIFO t(ZNQFO%BJMZ %VSJOH#VTJOFTT)PVST tPPMXJUIVOEFDL t.JOVUFT"XBZGSPNUIF#FBDI "DSPTTGSPN)BOOBBSL t.JMFGSPN .BZQPSU/BWBMUBUJPO/&9

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French Takes Helm At CNICCNIC Public AffairsVice Adm. William D. French relieved Vice Adm. Michael C. Vitale as Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) during a Change of Command ceremony in CNIC Headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard, Feb. 3, 2012. Vitale has served as the chief officer leading the Navys entire shore infrastructure for nearly three years and was the third Commander in the his tory of CNIC. This infra structure, also known as the CNIC Enterprise; includes 11 Navy Regions, 70 Installations, and 127 Naval Operations Support Centers, and is respon sible for 31 business lines and 122 critical shore capabilities across three major categories; opera tions, quality of life, and facilities management. Throughout his tenure Vitale lead efforts to standardize, align, synchro nize and innovate new methods and processes that furthered CNICs mission to deliver effec tive and efficient readi ness from the shore that sustain the fleet, enable the fighter, and support families. Vitale praised the numerous accomplish ments of the person nel under his command and of the entire CNIC Enterprise; from mold ing the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) into the model Personnel Accountability System used across the services, to the develop ment of new shore inte gration methods and a Total Workforce, capable of continuously support ing operations and ser vices. The personnel here at the Headquarters, and throughout the entire Enterprise have faced growing numbers of issues and challenges, said Vitale, Ive had the pleasure of witnessing this Enterprise solve complex and dynamic prob lems, some self-imposed, some caused by outside forces, and forge a way ahead toward a model of shore integration that has forever changed how we do business and provide service the Fleet, Fighter and Family. Vitale also thanked the many Navy communities throughout the world that support and allow the Navy to oper ate in close proximity to their homes and liveli hoods, acknowledging the importance of main taining close ties from the smallest Installation to the Headquarters level. Its the communi ties, both in the U.S. and abroad, that invite us to live and operate in their backyard, and its the communities, both within the Navy and outside, that are the anchor of our ability to maintain and oper ate the best Naval force in the world, and I want to thank each one for their support, patience, and welcoming spirit, said Vitale. French thanked Vitale for his wisdom and guid ance and spoke briefly about his optimism and vision for the future of CNIC. During the last 6 years I have been with the CNIC Enterprise I have learned that we have some of the best, brightest, and most talented professionals in the Navy, said French. Under Vice Admiral Vitales leadership the CNIC team has set the example for how an Enterprise should func tion and have established immense credibility on how you are meeting customer needs. Im honored to be taking command at this point in the history of the command. Vice Adm. French was promoted shortly before the event after having a successful tour at Navy Region Southwest in San Diego, Calif., where he accomplished major milestones towards ener gy and water conserva tion and numerous other green initiatives. French, the son of an Air Force officer and native of San Antonio, is a graduate of Vanderbilt University where he received com mission through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program in May, 1979. He earned a Master of Science degree from Naval Postgraduate School in 1985 and a Master of Arts from the Naval War College in 1999. A career subma rine officer, French has served on a number of submarines and com manded USS Salt Lake City (SSN 716) and Submarine Squadron 3 in Pearl Harbor. His prior Flag Officer com mands include tours at Navy Region Northwest, Navy Region Marianas in Guam, and Navy Region Southwest. I am proud to be part of such a superb organi zation, and look I forward to working with you over the next few years, added French. CNIC oversees a $10 billion budget, more than 83,000 facilities and 58,000 personnel, all managed from a single unified enterprise. Photo by MC1(SW/AW) Monique Hilley Vice Adm. Bill French (right) relieves Vice Adm. Michael Vitale (left) as Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) at the Washington Navy Yard February 3, 2012. CNIC is a global enterprise tasked with managing the Navys entire shore infrastructure and oversees a $12 billion budget, more than 83,000 facilities, and 58,000 personnel. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 11

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Strategic Directive To The Joint ForceThe past 10 years have been some of the most challenging in our mili tarys history. Our service members and their fami lies have endured every hardship and met every challenge with courage and dignity throughout. The responsibility for defending our nation is one we have proudly car ried for centuries. As we examine how the past 10 years have affected our military, the Joint Force faces three points of transition which will test our leadership and shape our future: the transition from two large land wars to a complex security environment with many challenges, the transition from abundant to con strained resources, and, as our active force shrinks in size, the transition of many service members and families into civilian life. In October, I pub lished my Letter to the Joint Force, which out lined four focus areas as we face the future. These focus areas will guide us through the transitions: Achieving our national objectives in our current conflicts; Developing a Joint Force for 2020; Recommitting our selves to the Profession of Arms; and Keeping faith with the Military Family. As a follow up, Ive just released my Strategic Direction to the Joint Force. This document goes into greater detail of the key efforts in each of our focus areas. Read these with a critical eye and ask yourself what you can do to contribute to these efforts and make them better. I invite you to comment on my blog, my Facebook page or on Twitter. Share your thoughts with me on how we can improve the Strategic Direction and together address the needs of our future.Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff From TheDoD Official Provides Tax Tips For TroopsAmerican Forces Press ServiceAs service mem bers begin preparing for the annual tax sea son, they may want to consider a new sav ings plan designed for young people, a Defense Department tax official said Feb. 3. Service members and their dependents who earn less income today than they expect to earn in the future, such as those in junior ranks who look forward to get ting promoted to higher grades, should consider investing in the Thrift Savings Plans new Roth option, said Army Lt. Col. Evan Stone, director of the Armed Forces Tax Council. The Roth TSP is a good option for service mem bers who are paying less tax now than they expect to pay later, Stone said during an interview with the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service. The traditional Thrift Savings Plan defers taxes on earned income until the money is withdrawn, Stone explained. The Roth option allows a member to contribute after-tax dollars that grow tax free and are not taxed upon withdrawal, he said. Both plans allow a maximum annual contribution of $17,000, he said, up from $16,500 last year. There are few other changes that apply to service members and their dependents this tax sea son, Stone said. A new calculation for Imminent Danger Pay does not change service members eligibility for income tax exclusions. The pay was changed from a flat $225 per month, to an amount prorated per day. Stone said there has been no change to feder al income tax brackets in the past two years. They remain at 10, 15, 25, 28, 33 and 35 percent of taxable income, he said. Still, Stone said, many people dont realize that income is taxed on a progressive scale, so as a persons income increas es and they move into a higher tax bracket, only the new proportion of pay is taxed at the higher rate, not all of their income. While few people enjoy writing a check to Uncle Sam, Stone also noted that the military is a good employer come tax time because military allow ances, such as those for housing and meals, are not taxable. Military members have a tax advantage by having a chunk of their regular pay as tax-exempt income, he said. Stone said he wants to remind service mem bers that they and their dependents can get free tax preparation by IRStrained volunteers at almost every military installation in the world. The military has an excellent program for tax preparation worldwide, he said. Deployed service members, he added, do not have to sign the tax forms if their spouse has power of attorney privileges. Military OneSource offers free tax-related phone consultations seven days-a-week, from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., at 1-800730-3802.Naval Academy 2012 Chooses First ShipsU.S. Naval Academy Public AffairsMore than 250 future surface warfare officers (SWO) in the Naval Academys Class of 2012 chose their first ships during a ceremony in Mahan Hall, Feb. 2. Ship selec tion is one of the most significant events for the senior class. Senior SWO leaders from around the fleet attend the ceremony, joining ship commanding officers, executive officers and command master chiefs in welcoming the Navys future ensigns into the surface warfare com munity. The midshipmen choose their ships according to their order of merit, which takes into account their academic performance, physical fitness and profession alism throughout their four years at the Naval Academy. Listed are the top ten midshipmen from the 2012 Surface Warfare Community and the ships and homeports they chose. Midshipman 1st Class Michael Haydell USS Momsen (DDG 92) in Everett, Wash. Midshipman 1st Class Thomas Paul USS Chafee (DDG 90) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Midshipman 1st Class Tyler Reed USS Green Bay (LPD 20) in San Diego Midshipman 1st Class Patrick Yu USS Mustin (DDG 89) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Ros Lary USS Mustin (DDG 89) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Katherine Bollino USS Carney (DDG 64) in Mayport, Fla. Midshipman 1st Class Anand Jantzen USS Mustin (DDG 89) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Erin Jedlicka USS Shoup (DDG 86) in Everett, Wash. Midshipman 1st Class Matthew Hein USS McCampbell (DDG 85) in Yokosuka, Japan Midshipman 1st Class Coria Buck USS Dewey (DDG 105) in San DiegoMayport VITA Tax Center is open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday at 70A Evergades Ct. in base housing. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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FFSC Classes Focus On Money ManagementFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 9, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 9, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 13, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Individual Augmentee (IA) Discussion Group, USO Feb. 13, 8:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Feb. 13-16, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 14, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 14, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group, Building One Room 104 Feb. 14, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Couponing 101 (How to Stretch Your Shopping Dollars), FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Seminar, Building One Room 104 Feb. 16, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 16, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 22, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 22, 9 a.m. noon, Thrift Savings Plan, Building One Room 104 Feb. 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and chil dren together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 27, 6 p.m. 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 29, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m., Marketing Yourself for a Second Career, Ocean Breeze Learn To Market YourselfFrom FFSCThe Fleet and Family Support Center is spon soring a once-a-year lecture regarding tran sition here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be presented by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Feb. 29, at 9-11:30 a.m., in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center Grand Ballroom. This top-shelf pre sentation is a great pro fessional development opportunity. Transition is of course ultimate ly a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are con templating retirement in one to five years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any par ticular officer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transi tions. This executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlist ed supervisor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by Colonel Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national staff. The presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-todate, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see . It includes com prehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employ er perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview tech niques, salary negotia tion, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition topics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. SPOUSES are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures com panion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career . It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transi tion process. For further infor mation, contact Jose Sanchez, at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil or call 904-270-6600, ext. 1700 or 1701. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 9, 2012 13