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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
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Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00241


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Get Your Copy OnlineThe Mirror has something new on its front page and coming to distri bution boxes soon throughout Naval Station Mayport. A new QR code, Quick Response code, is a barcode that allows Smart Phone users to access The Mirrors Web site just by scanning it with any barcode scanner application. The full edition of The Mirror is located on its Web site, www. mayportmirror.com. The QR code is located on the bot tom right corner of The Mirror. Scan the code and read it online when youre ready. For more information, call editor Paige Gnann at 270-7817 ext. 1012 or e-mail mayportmirror@ comcast.net Gold Anchor For Retention ERB Seminar For Sailors, SpousesFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will host a two-day seminar on Feb. 6-7 to discuss the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) with Sailors and their spouses. The seminar is an opportunity for Sailors and their spouses to talk with the experts about programs and benefits available under ERB. It will be held at Beachside Community Center both days from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Feb. 6 and 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. on Feb. 7. There will be spe cialists from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), Personnel Support Detachment, Navy Housing and Human Resources, Veterans Affairs, Navy College and Child Programs Career Guidance. This event will aug ment the Transition Assistance Program (TAP) information avail able through FFSC each month. Spouses are highly encouraged to attend, as well as all ERB affected personnel and career counselors. The schedule of events is: Feb. 6 8-9 a.m., FFSC Overview 9-10:30 a.m., Stress Management 10:30 a.m.-noon, Financial Planning 1-2:30 p.m., Personnel Support Detachment 2:30-3 p.m., Navy Housing 3-4 p.m., Child Programs Career Guidance Feb. 7 7:30-9 a.m., Navy Human Resources 9-10 a.m., TRICARE Medical and Dental 10-11 a.m., Veterans Affairs 11 a.m.-noon, Navy College 1-2 p.m., Navy Credentialing Online (Navy COOL) 2-3 p.m., Florida Worksource. The Fleet Engagement Team will be in NS Mayport on Feb. 8 to hold an all hands brief and leadership round table to discuss ERB in conjunction with Mayports seminar. The team is made up of a select group of BUPERS 3 and NAVPERSCOM personnel from the mili tary community management and career man agement departments. The team will hold an all hands brief for offi cer, enlisted and family members from 911 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. There will be a leadership round table for command leadership teams at 11 a.m.noon and 3-4 p.m. The team will close the day with an enlisted brief for family members from 5-6:30 p.m. For more informa tion about either event, contact NCCS Andrew Brown at 270-6901 ext 152 or emal andre. brown2@navy.milATG Sailor Is SURFLANT Shore SOYCommander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Public AffairsNaval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) announced its 2011 Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year (SOY) during a cere mony, Jan. 26. Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Anthony F. Garcia from Afloat Training Group, Mayport, Fla., was named the 2011 SURFLANT Shore Sailor of the Year, and Ships Serviceman 1st Class Angela A. Zamora, from USS Wasp (LHD 1), was named the 2011 SURFLANT Sea Sailor of the Year. Rear Adm. David Thomas Jr., commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic, announced the winners before a crowd of sup porters for the nine nominees. During the week leading up to the ceremony, the nominees ate together, participated in group physical training and a ship driving simulator, toured the Battleship Wisconsin, and were each interviewed by award selection boards made up of senior enlisted SURFLANT Sailors. The best part of the week for me was the camaraderie, spending time with the other candidates and their spouses, and just going through this experience together, said Garcia. I am thankful for all the people I got to meet: the board members, the master chiefs and the other Sailors of the Year. It was a great experience, and I will take that with me. The SOY program was estab lished in 1972 to recognize out standing Sailors who represent not only each command, but ultimately the Navy over all. The program aims to rec ognize hard working Sailors throughout the Navy. Sailors are chosen primarily due to their exceptional work ethic, superior performance on and off duty, and leadership skills. It is a tough time to be in the military, where we are shrink -Navy Updates High Year Tenure PolicyFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy announced changes to the High Year Tenure (HYT) policy and the merging of the active and reserve policy into one Total Force policy in NAVADMIN 030/12, released Jan. 25. High Year Tenure is a vital and effective force management tool we use to properly size and shape the Navy, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, Director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. After a thorough review of the policy, we saw a need for updating the policy to keep pace with and support the other force management tools. This change will improve retention and advancement opportu nity for top performers. The NAVADMIN out lines several significant changes to HYT. Under the new policy, HYT for E-2 Sailors will be four years, down from six. Additionally, E-3 Sailors will reach HYT at five years vice six, and con tinuation to eight years for passing a Navy Wide Advancement Exam has been eliminated. These Sailors would have had a minimum of six oppor tunities for advance ment before reaching HYT. Policy changes out lined in the NAVADMIN will take effect July 1, 2012. Effective July 1, active and full time support E2 and E3 Sailors with active ser vice in excess of these HYT length of ser vice gates must sepa rate by Mar. 31, 2013, unless advanced or waived. HYT waiv er procedures can be Creative Projects Reduce Energy UseFrom Mayport Public WorksUnited States DOD bases everywhere are faced with increasing energy costs and shrinking budgets. As a result, Naval Station Mayport has been work ing diligently to respon sibly reduce energy con sumption, expand the use of renewable energy, and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Mayports challenge has been to maximize energy investments and do things smarter, faster, better and cheaper. One answer has been to leverage-third party financed Utility Energy Services, UESC, programs to meet energy goals where projects pro vide good value to the Navy. Personnel from NS Mayport, TECO Peoples Gas and Energy Systems Group recently partnered to develop a Mayport CNIC Phase 2 energy project See Energy, Page 9 See Tenure, Page 10 See SOY, Page 10 -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Command Retention Team, Navy Counselor 1st Class Jonathan Dingler, Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Shaundriel Granger and Engineman 2nd Class Jason Goooden, paint the anchor outside Building One gold after receiving the Golden Anchor for Retention Excellence for FY11. The Golden Anchor is awarded to commands that meet or exceed reenlistment and attrition goals set forth by the Navy.-Photo courtesy of Mayport Public WorksSolar panels heat pipes at the Fire Fighting School, part of Naval Station Mayports initiative to reduce energy con sumption.

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.In this day of social media we have friends all across the country that we can communicate with at the stroke of a key. Whether it is texting or typing, we are connected as never before. Can I ask you a ques tionare you lonely? Sometimes the very tech nology that connects us can leave us lonely. When you need girl chat (or guy chat) do you reach for your iPhone to call or text? Do you meet for coffee or sit at the screen typing? What is a friend? Merriam-Webster defines a friend as, one attached to another by affection or esteem, a favored com panion. Companion is defined as one that accompanies another, one that keeps company with another; one that is closely connected with something similar. We need friends. We are created to have that favored companion, to be closely connected, to be affectionately attached to others. And this dif fers from the friends on Facebook and Twitter. How many people fol low you on Twitter? How many friends on Facebook? Of those, how many will be there to clean your house, sit with you when youve had a bad day? Did you know that friend or friendship is in the top 1% of terms looked up on MerriamWebsters site? I think maybe many of us are try ing to figure out friend ship in this new age of technology. Friendships, to be healthy and fulfilling, need to be give and take. To have that compan ion walk with you you must be willing to BE that companion to walk with another. This is true in marriage but also in friendship. I hear from many women expressing the challenge of friendship and loneliness. Relocation can leave us separated from strong, supportive relationships and often when we need them most during deployment. I do not have 5 easy steps to attract friends. What I do have is ideas and tips to BECOME a good friend. Deb is my persistent friend. Deb decided we were going to be friends without my knowledge and/or consent. Deb demonstrated character istics of friendship that drew me into her loving circle of friends. willing to wait for me to respond to her overtures of friendship. She did not expect me to respond in a certain timeframe. Good thing too it took almost a year. knows we all have warts. Deb chooses to overlook warts to see the person behind the warts. I have always felt accepted by Deb. She may not always agree with me but she always accepts me as a person. This is the attribute that bothered me most about Debbut I most love and appreciate now. Deb reached out to me consis tently with an email and phone call once a week for nine months before I accepted an invitation to get together. WOW! want to be my friend to get something from me. She befriended me to give, to share. She looked for ways to be compan ions on the same journey with me. was quick to forgive me when I was stupid. She was equally quick to ask forgiveness when she wronged me. Building deep friend ships take time, but with these characteristics we can build friends that will enhance our lives and we will add to theirs. As mili tary spouses I have seen the road to friendship accelerated by the very nature of our lifestyle. Dont be discouraged. Work on becoming that friend and watch what friends bloom in your life.Everyone Needs Friends To Connect WithBeth Wilson Military Spouse Contributor HOMEFRONTStop trying to be so ordinary, Be strong and be brave, and begin your story -Ryan Star It saddens me that so many of us expend so much energy trying to fly steadily below the radar. Did you know that only 45 percent of Americans make a New Years resolu tion? I wonder, are you part of that statistic? And were you aware that by the end of the first month 45 percent of those who actually DID make a New Years reso lution have already given up. January is nearly over, how are your goals doing? The author of the book of Proverbs writes, Where there is no vision, the people perish (29:18). Did you ever think that by flying low under the radar, or by failing to make that resolution, that you might actually be per ishing? You see, life is not static. It is dynamic. If we arent moving forward, we are actually moving back ward. There is no stand ing still. God created us to do something. To live our story. You were created to be extraordinary. Stop expending so much energy trying to go unnoticed. You have gifts and talents that should be celebrated and shared with others. Stop watching the world pass you by. The world is waiting for you to move. Stop trying to be so ordinary. Be strong. Living your story, being extraordi nary, requires strength. It requires endurance. It requires an unquench able fire within your soul. Feed that fire. From where do you draw your strength? Your spouse? Your friends? Your shipmates? Your supervisors? Your chil dren? Last year, I made a goal to double the num ber of pull-ups I could complete. The day came about one-third of the way through deployment when I felt discouraged. I felt weak. Then I received a letter in the mail from my eight-year-old son. He said, Dad, I hope one day I can be as strong as you. Enclosed was a pic ture of him doing pullups. Im happy to say, I met my goal. Surround yourself with people who will encourage you to achieve your vision. Draw strength from them. Be strong. And be brave. It can be terrifying to step out in faith, to begin your story. Its terrifying because were afraid to fail. I know that. Were you aware that the Beatles were dropped from their first recording contract? Did you know that Michael Jordan was cut from his high school bas ketball team? Did you know that Walt Disney was fired from his first newspaper job, because he lacked cre ativity? Did you know that Abraham Lincoln failed in business twice, had a ner vous breakdown and lost eight elections? And yet, their stories are remark able. And so is yours. In the immortal words of Winston Churchill: Never, never, never give up. Be brave. May this moment be when you stop trying to be so ordinary May you be strong in the face of weak ness. May you be brave in the face of failure. And may today be the day that you begin your story. Peace be with you, ChapsLt. Jon Black Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSWithout The Vision The People Perish Mayport Saving Lives-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingRear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) speaks with a Sailor from Naval Station Mayport as he gives blood during the quarterly blood drive in cooperation with the Georgia/Florida Blood Alliance last week. Will You Wear Red On National Wear Red Day On Feb. 3By Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness CenterFriday, Feb. 3 is National Wear Red Day, a day when Americans nationwide take womens health to heart by wear ing red to raise awareness of womens heart disease. Join Go Red for Women to help spread the criti cal message The Heart Truth from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Heart disease doesnt care what you wearIts the #1 killer of women. Everyone can par ticipate by wearing their favorite red dress, shirt, tie or a red dress pin on Feb. 3. In addition to wearing red, please join Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Wellness Center for a health fair that day from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the hospitals pharmacy. For more information, call Wellness at 542-5292 or go to the Red Dress website at www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ educational/hearttruth/ about/red-dress.htm or the American Heart Association at www.gore dforwomen.org 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Panetta Announces FY13 Budget PrioritiesAmerican Forces Press ServiceSpending priorities in the forthcoming fis cal 2013 defense budget request call for reduc tions in the end strength of the Army and Marine Corps, an increase in spe cial operations forces and maintaining the num ber of big-deck carriers, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Jan. 26. The Pentagons bud get topline request is set at $525 billion for fiscal 2013 with an additional $88.4 billion for overseas contingency operations mostly in Afghanistan. This is down from $531 billion and $115 billion, respectively, in this fiscal year. Defense Department officials used the new defense strategy guidance that President Barack Obama announced ear lier this month to shape the budget request, the secretary said. The budget seeks to minimize the impact of cuts on personnel accounts. Service mem bers will receive their full pay raises in fiscal 2013 and 2014, Panetta said. We will achieve some cost savings by providing more limited pay raises beginning in 2015, he added. Health care is another important benefit, and one that has far outpaced inflation. Changes to health care will not affect active duty personnel or their families, Panetta said. We decided that to help control growth of health care costs, we are recommending increases in health care fees, copays and deductibles for retirees, he said. But let me be clear that even after these increases, the cost borne by military retirees will remain below the levels in comparable private-sector plans. Overall, the request puts DOD on the path to save $259 billion over the next five years and $487 billion over the next 10. Panetta called the bud get a balanced, complete package that keeps the American military the pre-eminent force in the world. It is a balanced pack age, the secretary said, because while some programs are elimi nated or delayed, others are increased. The bud get looks to re-shape the military to be more agile, quick and flexible that incorporates the lessons learned in 10 years of war, he added. Increasing the num ber of special operations forces is key to the plan, Panetta said, and special operators will begin to shift back to their tradi tional pre-9/11 mission of instructing local forces. The request puts the Army on a path to drop to 490,000 soldiers and the Marine Corps to 182,000 Marines over five years. Currently, the two ser vices have 562,000 and 202,000 active-duty mem bers, respectively. The secretary noted this is still higher than the numbers on 9/11. The budget treats the reserve components very carefully, Panetta said. After a decade of being an integral part of Americas wars, the reserve com ponents will not go back to being a strategic Cold War-era reserve. The reserves will be the nations hedge against the unexpected, the secretary said. We are making only marginal reductions in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard, and no reductions in the Marine Corps Reserve, the secretary said. The Air Force will make bal anced reductions in the Air Guard that are con sistent with reductions in the active component and Air Force Reserve. The request also calls for more base realign ments and closures, and a BRAC-like authority to recommend changes to military retirement. But the president and depart ment have made clear that the retirement bene fits of those who currently serve will be protected by grandfathering their ben efits, Panetta said. The budget maintains the current U.S. focus in the Central Command region and increases American commitment to the Pacific Command area of operations. The request looks to maintain the Navys current 11 air craft carriers and 10 car rier air wings, Panetta said. It will also maintain the current Marine and Army posture in the AsiaPacific region, and will base littoral combat ships in Singapore and Bahrain. The budget will elimi nate two forward-based Army heavy brigades in Europe. Instead, brigades will rotate in and out of the area. The United States and European allies also will look to share costs for new capabili ties such as the alliance ground surveillance pro gram. The Navy will retire seven older cruisers and two amphibious ships early, and the Air Force will eliminate six tactical air squadrons. The budget sinks more money into technologies to prevail in an antiaccess, aerial-denial sce nario and will fund the next-generation bomber and modernization of the submarine fleet. The F-35 joint strike fighter is key to maintain ing domain superiority, and the military remains committed to the pro gram, Panetta said. But in this budget, we have slowed procurement to complete more testing and allow for develop mental changes before buying in significant quantities, he added. The budget will main tain all legs of the nuclear triad -bombers, ICBMs and submarines -and will invest in significant ly more capability in the cyber world, Panetta said. Panetta stressed the budget is based on strat egy and will shape the force for the future. While the pain of cuts will be felt across the country, he said, it will also ensure a strong, agile military for the future. The budget must pass Congress, and the secre tary said he hopes mem bers of Congress under stand the strategy and nuances of the budget. My hope is that when members understand the sacrifice involved in reducing the defense budget by half a trillion dollars, it will convince Congress to avoid seques tration, a further round of cuts that would inflict severe damage to our national defense for gen erations, Panetta said.Midway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, which will be held Saturday, June 9, at the Renaissance Resort, World Golf Village. Guest speaker Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert; Veterans of the Battle of Midway, several widows of Midway Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the military have been invited to attend this years dinner. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and former prisoners of war in our area who have hero ically answered the call of duty. Come meet these national treasurers and hear their adventures first hand. The evening prom ises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of World War II. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. The evening includes fine dining and enter tainment. Uniform will be O4 and above din ner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civil ian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1800, dinner at 1900. Reserved seating. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from the fol lowing locations: Navy League Mayport Bob Price, 904-718-2118 Email: bpricex4@com cast.net Navy League St Augustine Bill Dudley, 904-8064712 or 904-794-7814 Email: anuday00@aol. com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 4th Fleet, Klakring Host NJROTCFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs A dozen students from the Cocke County High School Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC), Newport, Tenn., were greeted by Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) after several tours of warships and aviation units at Naval Station Mayport Jan. 27. The field trip was a rare opportunity for the stu dents to visit a fleet con centration and speak with Navy personnel about the Navy and what it means to be a U.S. Sailor. The Cocke County NJROTC unit is currently in its ninth year since creation and has 155 active cadets. The pro gram is open to all 9th and 12th grade students. It was an awesome experience for the kids to visit a real Navy base and meet an Admiral, said Vanessa Zagaeski, English Teacher and student chaperone. We are from a small town in Tennessee so this is an amazing opportunity for them. Before meeting Tidd, the NJROTC students took tours of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42), Arleigh Burke-class Aegis Guided Missile Destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 99), SH-60 Seahawk helicop ters at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 46 and practiced damage con trol (DC) at the DC Wet Trainer facility. They were taught how to con trol flooding in confined spaces of ships and make repairs to damaged pipes. For many of the NJROTC students, this was their first time aboard a Navy vessel. We enjoy every chance we get to show off our ship and crew to those out side of the Navy, said Cmdr. Darrell Canady, Commanding Officer, USS Klakring. It is even more gratifying when we get to engage with future lead ers such as the NJROTC members from Cocke County High School. The NJROTC curriculum emphasizes citi zenship and leadership development, as well as maritime heritage, the significance of sea power, and naval topics such as the fundamentals of naval operations, seamanship, navigation and meteo rology. However, the best experience can be obtained by visiting the fleet in person. We try to come to Mayport at least once per year to get some realworld training and expe rience life in the Navy, said Chief Information Systems Technician Raymond Rodriquez, NJROTC Naval Science Instructor. This is one of the few chances our cadets have to really see the Navy up close. The students were greeted by Tidd before getting back on their school bus and driving back to Tennessee. It is always a real pleasure to meet young peo ple with an interest in the Navy, said Tidd. To come all the way from Tennessee to spend a day with the Navy is a testa ment of their dedication to NJROTC program and a bright future in the naval services. Cocke County High School NJROTC unit has earned the Distinguished Unit with Honors award five years in a row and has recently documented its 20,000th hour of commu nity service. The Senior Naval Science Instructor, Lt. Col. William M. Ivory, said, This fine group of young men and women is among the finest pro grams in the county. They reach out and make their community a bet ter place to live. The program teaches them citizenship, and they take their classroom lessons out into community. The NROTC unit is scheduled to travel to Kansas City for the Area 9 Drill, Academic, and Athletic Championship. I hope to see them back in Mayport soon, Tidd concluded. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more information, \ contact COMUSNAVSO/ C4F Public Affairs by email at comusnavsoc4f_mypt_pao@navy. mil, visit www.public. navy.mil/comusnavsoc4f, www.facebook.com/ NAVSOUS4THFLT, or on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NAVSOUS4THFLT. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) speaks with Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) Cadets Jan. 27, during their visit to Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The Cadets, from Cocke County High School in Newport, Tenn. toured the USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), USS Klakring (FFG 42) and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 46 during their time at the naval station. NAVSO/4th Fleet Hosts Conference, Discussions -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet addresses participants to the first Maritime Synchronization Conference Jan. 23, at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Tidd (center) hosted an Executive Roundtable discussion Jan. 25 during a Maritime Synchronization Conference at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Tidd (left)speaks with Maj. Gen. John Croley, Commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South (MARFORSOUTH) and Kirsten Madison, Director, International Affairs and Foreign Policy Advisor to the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard Jan. 25, during a Maritime Synchronization Conference at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. A. B. Cruz, Deputy Commander, NAVSO/4thFlt, talks about the Navy Reserve Surface Warfare Officers (SWO) community with Southeast region SWOs Jan. 21. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Tidd responds to questions from junior Sailors Jan. 26, about the command and its role in the U.S. Southern Command AOR during an "Admiral's Call."

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 5 Mayport Takes Time To Read-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingChief Air-Traffic Controller (AW/SW) Walidah Ferrer reads to kindergarteners Jan. 24 during Finegan Elementarys Family Reading Night in conjunction with Read It Forward Jax and sponsored by Chic-fil-A. Volunteers from Naval Station Mayport and the community set up stations throughout the school to read books to students and their families partici pating in the event. -Photo by FC2 Robert LeonardNaval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, talks with students and their parents before sitting down to read a book with the group.-Photo by FC2 Robert LeonardNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, plys elementary students with sugary snacks before they sit down to listen to him read them a book.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingFinegan families got a chance to laugh it up with words thanks to a Co-Readian comedian event in the cafeteria.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingThe Co-Readian took his act to the audience.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingStudents help the Co-Readian by demonstrating Big, Bigger and Biggest.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingCoach Griffin points out the locations of the different stations to student Braeden Keesing.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingFinegan students and their parents gather in one of the classrooms to listen to a volunteer reader during the Family Reading Night at the school.

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FFSC Classes Focus On Money ManagementFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 2, 1:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m., Troops to Teachers, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 2, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 2, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 6, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., What About the Kids?, FFSC Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and develop ment and may provide an additional motivator for ending the violence and seeking intervention. Feb. 6-10, 8 a.m. 5 p.m., SAPR Advocate Class, NAS JAX FFSC Feb. 7, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, Building One Room 1615 Feb. 7, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 8, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 9, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 9, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Feb. 13, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Individual Augmentee (IA) Discussion Group, USO Feb. 13, 8:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Feb. 13-16, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 14, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 14, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group, Building One Room 104 Feb. 14, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Couponing 101 (How to Stretch Your Shopping Dollars), FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Seminar, Building One Room 104 Feb. 16, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 16, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 22, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 22, 9 a.m. noon, Thrift Savings Plan, Building One Room 104 Feb. 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 27, 6 p.m. 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 29, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m., Marketing Yourself for a Second Career, Ocean Breeze Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Saving and Investing, FFSC Room 719 Learn To Market YourselfFrom FFSCThe Fleet and Family Support Center is spon soring a once-a-year lecture regarding tran sition here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be presented by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Feb. 29, at 9-11:30 a.m., in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center Grand Ballroom. This top-shelf pre sentation is a great pro fessional development opportunity. Transition is of course ultimate ly a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are con templating retirement in one to five years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any par ticular officer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be educated about the pro cess in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transi tions. This executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlist ed supervisor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by Colonel Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national staff. The presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-todate, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see . It includes com prehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employ er perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview tech niques, salary negotia tion, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition topics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. SPOUSES are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures com panion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career . It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transi tion process. For further infor mation, contact Jose Sanchez, at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil or call 904-270-6600, ext. 1700 or 1701. Friday,Feb 3 Haven Hospice, 8301 Cypress Plaza Drive, Suite 119, is seeking vol unteers to help in the following areas: Patient and Family Care, Pastoral care, Administrative / office support, Speakers Bureau, Resale Store and Community Outreach. Call Sandra Francis (904) 733-9818 to register or for more information. Haven Hospice is North Floridas expert in end-of-life and palliative care and is one of three 2008 Circle of Life Award winners nation wide to be recognized as leaders in improving the care of patients near the end of life or with life-threatening condi tions. Haven Hospice has also been recognized as a Florida Pacesetter for its leadership in promot ing living wills. For more information visit www. havenhospice.org or call 800-727-1889. Monday, Feb. 6 Come enjoy mak ing Hot Pepper Jelly and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center, from 9 a.m. noon or 1-4 p.m. Class space is limited. Cost is $20 per person. Pre-registration and pre payment should be made by Feb. 2.. To register call Jeannie at 255-7450. Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, from 6-8 p.m. This months program is presented by Michael Straley and the topic is Retouching Techniques to Create a Glamour Image. For more information, go to www. beachesphotographyclub. com. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types welcomed and encour aged to come and learn more about photography. Friday, Feb. 10 Spring rummage sale at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. The United Methodist Women will be hosting their annual Spring Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Looking for shoes, linens, clothing, purses, luggage, toys etc? Join us and find your special treasure! For more information, please contact the church office at 904-249-5370. Saturday, Feb. 11 An Eating and Growing Seasonable Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow warm season veg etables. at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost is $10 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. The Police Athletic League of Jacksonville, Inc. (PAL) will host their annual Julian E. Jackson Amateur Boxing Championship. The box ing championship will be held at PALs Julian Jackson Center, 3450 Monument Rd, inside the Ed Austin Regional Park. Bouts will begin at 6 p.m. For more informa tion about sponsorship opportunities, registra tion or tickets to the event contact Shelly Williams at (904) 355-3308 or Tiffany Mackey, Athletic Director, at (904) 854-6555 or Tiffany.Mackey@jaxsher iff.org. Spring rummage sale at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. The United Methodist Women will be hosting their annual Spring Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Looking for shoes, linens, clothing, purses, luggage, toys etc? Join us and find your special treasure! For more information, please contact at 904-249-5370.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Thanks For Your Service -Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Naval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, hands Safety Specialist Lee Chaney a 30-year pin during a retirement luncheon held for her and coworker Sam Williams, bottom left, at Bogeys on Jan. 26. Pickard presented Chaney and Williams with pins and letters of appreciation during the luncheon.Donate Your Locks For Charity On Feb. 25From StaffNaval Station Mayport and Balfour Beatty Communities are hosting a Locks of Love charity event on Feb. 25 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center off base. Locks of Love is a nonprofit organization that turns donated hair into fitted hairpieces for financially disadvantaged chil dren suffering from longterm medical hair loss. According to their press release, most of the chil dren who are helped by Locks have lost their hair due to a medical condi tion called alopecia area ta. Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treat ment to the brain stem or other dermatological conditions that result in per manent hair loss. Locks has been in place since 1998 and provides t he hair pieces for children under age 21. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. Balfour Beatty is bring ing in two Locks of Love approved hair stylists to take donations for the charity and will have food and drinks, along with take-home bags frilled with beauty products for donators. To donate to Locks of Love, hair must be at least 10 inches log, clean and dry. It must be bundled in a ponytail or a braid. Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be u sed. For more information about the event, contact Jessica Ennis at 372-4702 or 742-6036.TRICARE Beneficiaries Have Pharmacy OptionsAmerican Forces Press ServiceDespite questions about whether the Walgreens pharmacy chain will continue as a TRICARE provider, beneficiaries will have several options for filling prescrip tions, Defense Department spokeswoman Eileen M. Lainez said Dec. 29. The retail pharmacy contract between Express Scripts Inc., or ESI, and the Walgreens pharmacy chain is set to expire on Dec. 31, she added. If the contract is not renewed, Walgreens will no longer be a pharmacy network provider, Lainez said, but bene ficiaries will be able to find a nearby net work pharmacy using the find a phar macy feature at the ESI website, http:// www.express-scripts.com/tricare. We are committed to ensuring all our pharmacy beneficiaries are aware of the many options that TRICARE makes available to them, said Army Brig. Gen. Bryan Gamble, TRICARE deputy direc tor. By now, all of our beneficiaries who use Walgreens to fill prescriptions should have been contacted to advise them of their pharmacy options and to take action to ensure their pharmacy benefit remains uninterrupted. The health of our service members, retirees and their families remains my number one priority. In addition to 56,000 network pharma cies, Lainez said, TRICARE beneficiaries have other pharmacy options, including military pharmacies at no cost; and con venient, low-cost TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. Beneficiaries can check the TRICARE website at http://www.tricare.mil for more information. ESI has mailed information or con tacted beneficiaries who use Walgreens by telephone, and in December, they followed up with reminder letters. If needed, beneficiaries can take cur rent prescription bottles to a new net work pharmacy to have prescriptions transferred. Beneficiaries who need help finding a pharmacy or changing their medications to home delivery, or who have other questions, can contact Express Scripts at 1-877-885-6313. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 7

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Oasis Galley Back In Business -Photo by MCSN Damian BergSailors enjoy a special meal of steak, crab legs and shrimp Monday when Oasis Galley reopens for business after spend ing a week deep cleaning and starting the first phase of renovation at the galley.-Photo by Paige GnannQuartermaster 3rd Class (SW) Briana Crayton with Base Services gets in the nooks and crannies of a stove during a deep cleaning of Oasis Galley last week.-Photo by Paige GnannElectricians Mate 2nd Class Kerry Mathew, right, and Yoeman Seaman Gyrid Hatcher put together shelving units at the Galley.-Photo by Paige GnannCulinary Specialist 2nd Class Roger Smith of Oasis Galley gets a mirror shine on one of the hoods in the gal ley kitchen.-Photo by Paige GnannFire Controlman 2nd Class James Blunt works to assemble a piece of new shelving unit at the Galley. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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where third party financ ing is repaid through energy savings. According to Roy Dolley, Mayport Resource Energy Manager, the Mayport CNIC Phase 2 Project included efficient lighting retrofits, A/C air handler UV lights, effi cient motor replacements, solar water heating, con trol upgrades, variable speed drive, electric and fuel oil to natural gas con versions, magnetic bear ing Turbocor chiller ret rofits and water conser vation in more than 20 buildings. In addition to green house gas emissions reductions, the CNIC Phase 2 project included annual energy savings of 15,258 MBtu and $454,364 and reduced water use by 4,805,400 gallons. The project included a post installation veri fication plan to monitor equipment performance to ensure that the project delivers projected savings. The CNIC Phase 2 proj ect was awarded and the Notice to Proceed was issued by Mayport Contracting on Aug. 6, 2010 and the project is now complete and deliv ering NS Mayport more energy savings. There have been four other Mayport UESC projects delivered and completed by the TECO Peoples Gas and Energy Systems Group team, totaling $531,000 in annu al energy savings. Ralph Terrell, TECO Senior Project Manager, states that these projects are an excellent exam ple of a true team effort between the Navy and a serving utility where the utility can provide value beyond the traditional role of simply providing an energy source. These projects could not happen without the help of the Mayport staff including Energy Management team, Contracting, the FEAD Dept. and Facilities. The future of energy man agement is full of great opportunities and I look forward to continuing to serve the Navy and NS Mayport and to help the Navy meet their energy goals. TECO Peoples Gas has also qualified fuel switching from less efficient fuels to natural gas, and submitting this project for their Energy Rebate Program. An Energy Rebate Program credit of $24,000 will be applied to the NS Mayport natural gas bill. Navy Solar Farm Construction UnderwayPublic Affairs Center San DiegoThe Navy made anoth er leap into renewable energy integration Jan. 18 with groundbreak ing on a new 118 acre solar farm in China Lake, Calif. Construction of a SunPower Corporation 13.78 megawatt solar photovoltaic power sys tem officially got under way at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake following a midmorning ceremony at the sprawling weapons devel opment base. This is the larg est solar project in the Navy, said Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installation and Environment Jackalyne Pfannenstiel. It demonstrates tangible progress toward national energy independence and reach ing the Department of the Navys energy goals. SunPowers Oasis Power Plant product, a fully-integrated, modu lar solar block consisting of 31,680 solar panels, is expected to generate more than 30 percent of NAWS China Lakes annu al energy load. The weapons division here is the consumer, and with that consump tion requirement comes responsibility, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, commander, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division. This project gives us the opportunity as the major consumer of the energy to look into our own processes and prac tices, Winter said. As we are more efficient in executing and continuing to do our mission it frees up resources for us to pro vide to our war fighter. The solar farm integra tion, which is made pos sible through a 20-year power purchase agree ment (PPA), will allow the Navy to buy electric ity below the retail utility rate and reduce costs by an estimated $13 million over the next 20 years. The PPA involves no initial out-of-pocket expenses for the Navy and will provide increased energy independence and reliable, emissionfree solar power to NAWS China Lake beginning at the end of this year. The Navy has a long standing record of iden tifying energy and water conservation opportuni ties across our facilities, said Rear Adm. Dixon Smith, commander, Navy Region Southwest. We are continuing to trans form our culture from one of consumption to one focused on conservation. NAWS China Lakes solar farm is representa tive of the Navys energy initiative, laid out by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus in 2009, which aspires to achieve 50 per cent of the Navys shorebased energy require ments produced by alter native sources by the year 2020. We face a global energy challenge, which is for us a national stra tegic imperative that we solve, said Capt. Clifford Maurer, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest command ing officer. There was an extraordinary level of effort that went into market research, indus try partnering, preparing complicated acquisition documentation, navigat ing complicated regula tions and incentives, and doing technical analysis. Under the 20-year fed eral solar PPA, SunPower will build, operate and maintain the solar power system that uses the companys highefficiency solar panels, and which it guarantees through a 25-year war ranty. SunPower has worked with federal agencies since 1999 and has installed more than 25 megawatts of solar power systems at govern ment facilities, includ ing solar power plants at Navy installations in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Coronado, Calif. NAWS China Lake is located in the Western Mojave Desert region of California. The installa tion is the Navys largest single landholding, representing 85 percent of the Navys land for research, development, acquisi tion, testing and evalua tion of weapons systems. The two ranges and main site of NAWS China Lake cover more than 1.1 mil lion acres, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island. From Page 1Energy-U.S. Navy photo by Rick NaystattA view of solar panels recently installed on the roof of Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Headquarters, Old Town Complex. The rooftop photovoltaic installation supports the Department of Defenses goal of increasing renewable energy sources to 25 percent of all energy consumed by the year 2025. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 9

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Navy Reminds Sailors Of Designated BenefitsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy is reminding Sailors of several ben efits and programs where members may designate beneficiaries of their choosing, as outlined in NAVADMIN 028/12, released Jan. 24. Recipients for these benefits may include any one designated by the service member, includ ing a dependent, friend, significant other, fiance or fianc, co-worker, or a family member who is not a military dependent. Sailors may designate any individual as benefi ciary to a total of 15 bene fits and programs, includ ing: Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (SGLI); Post Vietnam-era Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP); Basic Educational Assistance Death Benefit; Death Gratuity Benefit; Final Settlement of Accounts; Wounded Warrior Act Designated Caregiver; Thrift Savings Plan (TSP); Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP); Casualty Notification; Escorts for Dependents of Deceased or Missing Members; Designation of Persons Having Interest in Status of a Missing Member; Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI); -Person Eligible to Receive Effects (PERE) of Deceased Persons Travel and Transportation Allowance for attendance at Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program events; and Person Authorized To Direct Disposition (PADD) of the Remains of a Decedent. NAVADMIN 028/12 explains how Sailors can update or verify beneficiaries for each of these ben efits. The NAVADMIN also outlines conditions and limitations for appointing beneficiaries. I can think of few things more important for our Sailors than ensur ing their loved ones are provided for in case of an emergency, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. Ensuring this informa tion is accurate and upto-date is the responsibil ity of every Sailor. A comprehensive list ing of all benefits can be found in the Navy Pay and Benefits Guide, locat ed online on the Navy Personnel Command webpage at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/career/payandbenefits/pages/default2.aspx. For more information on member-designated benefits, contact your local personnel office or visit NPCs website at www.npc.navy.mil. Do You Know Requirements For Involuntary Separation Pay? Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsWith the release of NAVADMIN 036/12 Jan. 27, Sailors are reminded of eligibility require ments for Involuntary Separation Pay (ISP). ISP has Navy Reserve requirements and obligations. Career counselors and command leader ship can assist Sailors on applying for affiliation in conjunction with ISP. All Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a mini mum of three years past their initial military ser vice obligation. The Ready Reserve has two branch es, the Selected Reserve (SELRES) and Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). The SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. These designated Reservists are available for recall to active duty status. SELRES typically fulfill the traditional ser vice commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. The IRR offers Reserve affiliation benefits with out the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to maintain mobili zation readiness and must keep the Navy informed of any address changes or conditions that may affect their readiness. While the Navy wishes to afford every Sailor an opportunity to transition to the Navy Reserve, SELRES billets are limited. Involuntarily separated Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a SELRES quota via Perform-to-Serve/Fleet RIDE. Once approved for a quota, Sailors can con tact the Career Transition Office (CTO) to complete the process. If a SELRES quota is not available, Sailors can request to affiliate with the IRR. A Sailor who affili ates with the IRR must have their command complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their supporting per sonnel office. This must be accomplished prior to separation to ensure payment of this benefit, according to the message. If a signed Reserve affiliation contract is not com pleted prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Under current legis lation, Sailors who collect ISP and later qualify and collect a military retire ment must repay their ISP upon retirement. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service will reduce retirement payments until the ISP amount is repaid. Read the message for more information or contact the CTO via email CTO.enlisted@ navy.mil, call the Navy Personnel Command Customer Service Center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC or email CSCMailbox@navy. mil. More information on ERB transition assistance can be found on the NPC Web page at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/boards/ERB/Pages/ TransitionInfo.aspx. found in MILPERSMAN 1160-120. Sailors who have been granted a HYT waiver for a specific assignment and cannot fulfill their commitment will have their HYT waiver canceled and will have to separate, transfer to the Reserves or retire. These HYT changes will not affect Sailors who have reached sanctuary, which occurs at 18 years of cumulative active duty. Additionally, nuclear rated Sailors will be man aged separately by their community manager. HYT policy for E-4 through E-9 has not changed. For more details, read NAVADMIN 030/12 by visiting the Navy Personnel Command website at www.npc.navy. mil.NEX Rewards Students For Good GradesFrom Page 1TenureFrom NEXThe Navy Exchange wants to help its cus tomers pay for their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Four times per school year, four students will be the recipients of a $5,000, $3,000 $2,000 or $1,000 U.S. savings bond, denominations at maturity. The next drawing will be held at the end of February 2012. Any eligible fulltime student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or bet ter, as determined by their school system, may enter the draw ing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and mili tary retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the draw ing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade aver age. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and ser vices. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offering students a chance to win a sav ings bond through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded $504,000 in savings bonds with the help of its generous vendor partners. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. ing the Army and shrink ing the Marines, but we still have to have a for ward presence, explained Thomas to the nominees. These are tough chal lenges, but this is our time to lead. I am humbled because you represent the hundreds of Sailors that you lead on board your ships and at your com mands. Senior Chief Information Technician Marluis Stokes, SOY 2011 coordinator, said that during the boards, when asked what the hardest part of leadership was, the SOY nominees all responded with the word courage. It takes a lot to stand up and say when your Sailors are doing the wrong thing and correct them, said Stokes. You are all great leaders, and I am very proud of you. Even though only two of you got the award, you are all winners. You can go back to your commands with your heads held high. When the SOY program began, only the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet Sea Sailors were recognized. Within 10 years, the Sailor of the Year program was expanded to include the shore establishment and Navy Reserve Sailors. Garcia and Zamora will go on to compete with the 2011 Pacific Fleet Sailors of the Year, Feb. 12-16, during U.S. Fleet Forces Command SOY week in Norfolk.From Page 1SOY NAVY Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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New Eyeglass Frame Options At MedicalFrom Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Public AffairsNavy Medical Logistics Command (NMLC) announced Jan. 19 that all active duty and Reserve personnel, including recruits will soon have a new standard issue eyeglass frame available. Since 1990, military personnel and recruits have received standard issue S9 eyeglass frames, often jokingly referred to as birth control glasses or simply BCGs. Not any longer. We are happy to announce that the New Year brings with it a new frame option for all per sonnel serving on active duty and in the Reserves, said Capt. Matt Newton, commanding officer of Naval Ophthalmic Support and Training Activity (NOSTRA) in Yorktown, Va. Service members have told us that they like the appear ance of the new frame. We are confident this frame will increase the likeli hood that military per sonnel will continue to utilize their eyeglasses beyond boot camp. Effective Jan. 1, the current cellulose acetate spectacle frame provided at all Armed Forces initial entry training sites began the transition from male and female, brown S9 spectacles to a new, uni sex, black A frame. The change stems from a study, which was directed by the Military Health Systems Optical Fabrication Enterprise (OFE) and coordinated by NOSTRA in order to find a suitable frame to add to the standard issue inven tory. Selected samples were submitted to U.S. Army Public Health Command for review, and three frames were identified for user tests. Tests were con ducted at Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, Ill.; Advanced Infantry Training, Camp Geiger, N.C.; Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Fort Knox, Ky. and U.S. Coast Guard Recruit Training Center, Cape May, N.J. Surveys assessed func tionality, durability and cosmetic appearance and the 5A frame was selected as the best option. Initial deployment of the 5A frame will occur at all Armed Forces initial entry training sites. Within six months, the 5A frame will be made available to all active duty and Reserve service members with full imple mentation expected to be completed over a twoyear period. Retirees are currently eligible to receive stan dard issue S9, S91A and Half-Eye frames, and there will be no change to this authorization. However, over the next two years, the OFE will study the feasibility of providing 5A frames to retirees. The OFE was estab lished by Congressional mandate in 1996, with the U.S. Navy Surgeon General charged with managing the program. Upon the closure of the Army Optical Fabrication Laboratory at Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center, NOSTRA became a joint produc tion lab with Army opti cians augmenting Navy and civilian production staff. The OFE is guided by the Optical Fabrication Advisory Board, which represents the Surgeons General of the Army, Navy and Air Force. A sampling of OFE initiatives includes managing the military Frames of Choice program, standardization of military combat eye pro tection inserts, introduc tion of a new submariner frame, and operational support with the deploy ment of the new M50 gas mask insert. For the last several years, the OFE has pro duced approximately 1.5 million pairs of spectacles and optical inserts annu ally for authorized mili tary personnel. NMLC is responsible for designing, executing and administering indi vidualized state-of-the-art solutions to meet custom er medical materiel and health care requirements. NMLC supports the U.S. Navy with acquisition and logistics systems train ing, health care services strategies, operational forces support, medical equipment and logistics solutions, acquisition management, deployable platforms and eyewear fabrication. Navy Medicine is a global health care net work of 63,000 Navy med ical personnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine person nel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield.Shipmates to Workmates Helps With ERBFrom Naval Sea Systems Command Office of Corporate Com municationsSailors at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., attend ed a career forum and learned about new career opportunities on the Shipmates to Workmates program, Jan. 17. The program assists Sailors identified for early separation from the Enlisted Retention Boards find and compete for civilian jobs at part nering naval commands. As of Jan. 17, nearly 400 Sailors have attended five career forums, informing separating Sailors about hiring opportunities. Another five forums are planned for later this year, all managed by the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and seven other participating com mands. The Shipmates to Workmates program is off to a great start, said Cmdr. Pat Sanders, NAVSEA operational sup port officer. The tools we provide our Sailors will help them discover what opportunities are out there, and how to take advantage of those oppor tunities. The program also demonstrates an on-going commitment to Sailors by assisting those invol untarily separated find careers. I came today to see firsthand the transi tion assistance that we are providing our Sailors who will be leaving the Navy in the next year, said Vice Adm. Mark E. Ferguson, vice chief of naval operations. Were making a concerted effort as a Navy to provide spe cialized assistance for those Sailors affected by Enlisted Retention Boards as well as Sailors who are separating at the end of their enlistment or retir ing. The initiative also pro vides information to sepa rating sailors via its web site at http://jobs.navair. navy.mil/SM2WM/, which serves as a onestop shop for Sailors seek ing Navy-related employ ment. This is not just a pro gram that provides infor mation to separating Sailors, said Sanders. It actively assists Sailors with resume reviews and guidance on how to apply for government positions through USA Jobs. The Shipmates to Workmates program is just one of many transi tion benefits available to Sailors including those affected by the enlisted retention board. For more information about ERB and other transition ben efits, visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www.npc. navy.mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866827-5672) or email csc mailbox@navy.mil. -Photo by MC3 Lauren G. RandallVice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson conducts an interview with a Naval public affairs team to discuss career opportunities and transitioning from military to civilian during a Shipmates to Workmates career forum. Shipmates to Workmates is an initiative that helps separating Sailors complete applications and resumes as well as find and compete for jobs at partnering commands. a CFC participant Provided as a public serviceWorking together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 11

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 2: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. Feb. 4: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowl ing, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 4: UFC 143. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 5: Superbowl XLVI at Beachside Community Center. Pre-game at Castaways Lounge 5:30 p.m. Kick off in the Main Hall 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game on the 20 ft screen while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Feb. 5: All-Hand Superbowl Chili CookOff. 4-11 pm at Focsle Lounge. Watch the game on the 20 ft screen and bring the heat with your best chili recipe. 270-5431 Feb. 5: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 5: Superbowl Party. 5 p.m. Pre-game at Castaways; 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center Main Hall. Watch the game on our 20 ft. screen. Free food, give aways and more! 2705451. Feb. 7 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Feb. 7: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 8: Dart Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 2705126 x3115. Feb. 8: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb. 10: Jeff Dunham Live. Van Departs Liberty Center 5:30 p.m. Cost $25. Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 15: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. Feb. 17: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 18: Dave & Busters Trip. Van departs 7 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Feb. 19: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and trans portation) Feb. 20: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb. 21: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 Feb. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. LIBERTYFeb 3: Freedom Friday Team Jersey Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 5: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 14: Teen Valentine Social 2-6:30 p.m. at the Teen Center. 246-0347. Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. Feb. 17: Freedom Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 17: Fire Pit Friday 2-11 p.m. Bring your Blankets and chairs and sit around the fire pit for smores and music. 2460347 Feb. 18: Youth Sponsorship Mardis Gras Dance Party. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Your chances to win the drawing for a Pack Prize will increase with every new member you bring to this event! 246-0347 Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb 23: Drama Club Presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. Feb. 25: Cicis Pizza Night 1-3:30 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Permission slip required. 270-5680. KIDSports Time to set your com mand up for Captains Cup Mens Volleyball. League begins Feb. 13. Games are played at lunchtime. For more info contact Rita at 904-2705451 This weeks Captains Cup Tennis Dustin Snyder vs. Christopher Hunt Jayce Evans vs. Joe Drab George Zitzewitz vs. Dustin Snyder In you are interested in the Mens Tennis league contact Rita at 904-2705451 Womens Volleyball Sunday, Jan. 29 Lady Aces 21 vs. Angels 10 Lady Aces 21 vs. Angels 9 Angels 21 vs. Lady War Dawgs 19 Angels 21 vs. Lady War Dawgs 11 Lady Aces 21 vs. Mamacitas 5 Lady Aces 21 vs. Mamacitas 8 Next week Mamacitas vs. Angels Lady Aces vs. Lady War Dawgs Lady War Dawgs vs. Mamacitas Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basic 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga A dynamic blend of breathing, yoga postures, and relaxation tech niques. This class increas es vitality, energy, calm, agility, flexibility, mental and physical strength in the body, both internally and externally. Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Incorporate this inno vative training device invented by a Navy Seal into your workout regi men. The TRX is a suspension training system, used in confined space as well as small group work outs. Build functional and pillar strength. Mold your CORE into concrete! Class size limited to 25. Class is held at Mayport Sand Box behind Surfside Fitness Center; class is held, weather permitting. Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Prerequisite class is H.I.T. Level 1. Class size limited to 30. Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp Take your entire com mand to the next level, oceanfront! This com mand class is packed full of challenging cardio drills, muscular resistance training and explosive intervals. Meets at the Sandbox and can accom modate 200+ personnel, weather permitting. 11:30 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Prerequisite class is H.I.T. Level 1. Class size limited to 30. The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning This 45-minute indoor cycling class will enhance your speed and strength and burn mega calories without compromising joint health. Good for all fitness levels. Meets at the back of the temp Gym weightroom. 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning This 45-minute indoor cycling class will enhance your speed and strength and burn mega calories without compromising joint health. Good for all fitness levels. Meets at the back of the temp Gym weightroom. Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning MWR a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Feb. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowl ing, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 4: UFC 143. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 5: Superbowl XLVI at Beachside Community Center. Pre-game at Castaways Lounge 5:30 p.m. Kick off in the Main Hall 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game on the 20 ft screen while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Feb. 5: All-Hand Superbowl Chili CookOff. 4-11 pm at Focsle Lounge. Watch the game on the 20 ft screen and bring the heat with your best chili recipe. 270-5431 Feb. 5: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 7 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Feb. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 2705126 x3115. Feb. 8: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Extravaganza. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Free Italian buffet, double payouts on all hand cards, and more! 270-7204 Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. MWR Happy Birthday Focsle Lounge -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport new and old chiefs celebrated the 14th birthday of the CPO Club, Focsle Lounge, during the Family Steak Night hosted by HSM-40 on Jan. 25. Pictured from left is retired Chief Hospital Corpsman Tony Ross, old est chief retired Chief Culinary Specialist Jim Phillips, NS Mayport Command Master Chief Wayne Welch and youngest chiefChief Navy Counselor Thurman Winkler. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 13



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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Get Your Copy OnlineThe Mirror has something new on its front page and coming to distri bution boxes soon throughout Naval Station Mayport. A new QR code, Quick Response code, is a barcode that allows Smart Phone users to access The Mirrors Web site just by scanning it with any barcode scanner application. The full edition of The Mirror is located on its Web site, www. mayportmirror.com. The QR code is located on the bot tom right corner of The Mirror. Scan the code and read it online when youre ready. For more information, call editor Paige Gnann at 270-7817 ext. 1012 or e-mail mayportmirror@ comcast.net Gold Anchor For Retention ERB Seminar For Sailors, SpousesFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport will host a two-day seminar on Feb. 6-7 to discuss the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) with Sailors and their spouses. The seminar is an opportunity for Sailors and their spouses to talk with the experts about programs and benefits available under ERB. It will be held at Beachside Community Center both days from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Feb. 6 and 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. on Feb. 7. There will be spe cialists from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), Personnel Support Detachment, Navy Housing and Human Resources, Veterans Affairs, Navy College and Child Programs Career Guidance. This event will aug ment the Transition Assistance Program (TAP) information available through FFSC each month. Spouses are highly encouraged to attend, as well as all ERB affected personnel and career counselors. The schedule of events is: Feb. 6 8-9 a.m., FFSC Overview 9-10:30 a.m., Stress Management 10:30 a.m.-noon, Financial Planning 1-2:30 p.m., Personnel Support Detachment 2:30-3 p.m., Navy Housing 3-4 p.m., Child Programs Career Guidance Feb. 7 7:30-9 a.m., Navy Human Resources 9-10 a.m., TRICARE Medical and Dental 10-11 a.m., Veterans Affairs 11 a.m.-noon, Navy College 1-2 p.m., Navy Credentialing Online (Navy COOL) 2-3 p.m., Florida Worksource. The Fleet Engagement Team will be in NS Mayport on Feb. 8 to hold an all hands brief and leadership round table to discuss ERB in conjunction with Mayports seminar. The team is made up of a select group of BUPERS 3 and NAVPERSCOM personnel from the mili tary community management and career man agement departments. The team will hold an all hands brief for offi cer, enlisted and family members from 911 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. There will be a leadership round table for command leadership teams at 11 a.m.noon and 3-4 p.m. The team will close the day with an enlisted brief for family members from 5-6:30 p.m. For more informa tion about either event, contact NCCS Andrew Brown at 270-6901 ext 152 or emal andre. brown2@navy.milATG Sailor Is SURFLANT Shore SOYCommander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Public AffairsNaval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) announced its 2011 Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year (SOY) during a cere mony, Jan. 26. Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Anthony F. Garcia from Afloat Training Group, Mayport, Fla., was named the 2011 SURFLANT Shore Sailor of the Year, and Ships Serviceman 1st Class Angela A. Zamora, from USS Wasp (LHD 1), was named the 2011 SURFLANT Sea Sailor of the Year. Rear Adm. David Thomas Jr., commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic, announced the winners before a crowd of supporters for the nine nominees. During the week leading up to the ceremony, the nominees ate together, participated in group physical training and a ship driving simulator, toured the Battleship Wisconsin, and were each interviewed by award selection boards made up of senior enlisted SURFLANT Sailors. The best part of the week for me was the camaraderie, spending time with the other candidates and their spouses, and just going through this experience together, said Garcia. I am thankful for all the people I got to meet: the board members, the master chiefs and the other Sailors of the Year. It was a great experience, and I will take that with me. The SOY program was estab lished in 1972 to recognize outstanding Sailors who represent not only each command, but ultimately the Navy over all. The program aims to rec ognize hard working Sailors throughout the Navy. Sailors are chosen primarily due to their exceptional work ethic, superior performance on and off duty, and leadership skills. It is a tough time to be in the military, where we are shrink -Navy Updates High Year Tenure PolicyFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy announced changes to the High Year Tenure (HYT) policy and the merging of the active and reserve policy into one Total Force policy in NAVADMIN 030/12, released Jan. 25. High Year Tenure is a vital and effective force management tool we use to properly size and shape the Navy, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, Director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. After a thorough review of the policy, we saw a need for updating the policy to keep pace with and support the other force management tools. This change will improve retention and advancement opportu nity for top performers. The NAVADMIN out lines several significant changes to HYT. Under the new policy, HYT for E-2 Sailors will be four years, down from six. Additionally, E-3 Sailors will reach HYT at five years vice six, and con tinuation to eight years for passing a Navy Wide Advancement Exam has been eliminated. These Sailors would have had a minimum of six opportunities for advance ment before reaching HYT. Policy changes out lined in the NAVADMIN will take effect July 1, 2012. Effective July 1, active and full time support E2 and E3 Sailors with active ser vice in excess of these HYT length of ser vice gates must sepa rate by Mar. 31, 2013, unless advanced or waived. HYT waiv er procedures can be Creative Projects Reduce Energy UseFrom Mayport Public WorksUnited States DOD bases everywhere are faced with increasing energy costs and shrinking budgets. As a result, Naval Station Mayport has been work ing diligently to respon sibly reduce energy con sumption, expand the use of renewable energy, and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Mayports challenge has been to maximize energy investments and do things smarter, faster, better and cheaper. One answer has been to leverage-third party financed Utility Energy Services, UESC, programs to meet energy goals where projects pro vide good value to the Navy. Personnel from NS Mayport, TECO Peoples Gas and Energy Systems Group recently partnered to develop a Mayport CNIC Phase 2 energy project See Energy, Page 9 See Tenure, Page 10 See SOY, Page 10 -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayports Command Retention Team, Navy Counselor 1st Class Jonathan Dingler, Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Shaundriel Granger and Engineman 2nd Class Jason Goooden, paint the anchor outside Building One gold after receiving the Golden Anchor for Retention Excellence for FY11. The Golden Anchor is awarded to commands that meet or exceed reenlistment and attrition goals set forth by the Navy.-Photo courtesy of Mayport Public WorksSolar panels heat pipes at the Fire Fighting School, part of Naval Station Mayports initiative to reduce energy con sumption.

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The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.In this day of social media we have friends all across the country that we can communicate with at the stroke of a key. Whether it is texting or typing, we are connected as never before. Can I ask you a ques tionare you lonely? Sometimes the very tech nology that connects us can leave us lonely. When you need girl chat (or guy chat) do you reach for your iPhone to call or text? Do you meet for coffee or sit at the screen typing? What is a friend? Merriam-Webster defines a friend as, one attached to another by affection or esteem, a favored com panion. Companion is defined as one that accompanies another, one that keeps company with another; one that is closely connected with something similar. We need friends. We are created to have that favored companion, to be closely connected, to be affectionately attached to others. And this dif fers from the friends on Facebook and Twitter. How many people fol low you on Twitter? How many friends on Facebook? Of those, how many will be there to clean your house, sit with you when youve had a bad day? Did you know that friend or friendship is in the top 1% of terms looked up on MerriamWebsters site? I think maybe many of us are trying to figure out friend ship in this new age of technology. Friendships, to be healthy and fulfilling, need to be give and take. To have that compan ion walk with you you must be willing to BE that companion to walk with another. This is true in marriage but also in friendship. I hear from many women expressing the challenge of friendship and loneliness. Relocation can leave us separated from strong, supportive relationships and often when we need them most during deployment. I do not have 5 easy steps to attract friends. What I do have is ideas and tips to BECOME a good friend. Deb is my persistent friend. Deb decided we were going to be friends without my knowledge and/or consent. Deb demonstrated character istics of friendship that drew me into her loving circle of friends. willing to wait for me to respond to her overtures of friendship. She did not expect me to respond in a certain timeframe. Good thing too it took almost a year. knows we all have warts. Deb chooses to overlook warts to see the person behind the warts. I have always felt accepted by Deb. She may not always agree with me but she always accepts me as a person. This is the attribute that bothered me most about Debbut I most love and appreciate now. Deb reached out to me consistently with an email and phone call once a week for nine months before I accepted an invitation to get together. WOW! want to be my friend to get something from me. She befriended me to give, to share. She looked for ways to be compan ions on the same journey with me. was quick to forgive me when I was stupid. She was equally quick to ask forgiveness when she wronged me. Building deep friend ships take time, but with these characteristics we can build friends that will enhance our lives and we will add to theirs. As military spouses I have seen the road to friendship accelerated by the very nature of our lifestyle. Dont be discouraged. Work on becoming that friend and watch what friends bloom in your life.Everyone Needs Friends To Connect WithBeth Wilson Military Spouse Contributor HOMEFRONTStop trying to be so ordinary, Be strong and be brave, and begin your story -Ryan Star It saddens me that so many of us expend so much energy trying to fly steadily below the radar. Did you know that only 45 percent of Americans make a New Years resolution? I wonder, are you part of that statistic? And were you aware that by the end of the first month 45 percent of those who actually DID make a New Years reso lution have already given up. January is nearly over, how are your goals doing? The author of the book of Proverbs writes, Where there is no vision, the people perish (29:18). Did you ever think that by flying low under the radar, or by failing to make that resolution, that you might actually be perishing? You see, life is not static. It is dynamic. If we arent moving forward, we are actually moving back ward. There is no stand ing still. God created us to do something. To live our story. You were created to be extraordinary. Stop expending so much energy trying to go unnoticed. You have gifts and talents that should be celebrated and shared with others. Stop watching the world pass you by. The world is waiting for you to move. Stop trying to be so ordinary. Be strong. Living your story, being extraordi nary, requires strength. It requires endurance. It requires an unquench able fire within your soul. Feed that fire. From where do you draw your strength? Your spouse? Your friends? Your shipmates? Your supervisors? Your chil dren? Last year, I made a goal to double the num ber of pull-ups I could complete. The day came about one-third of the way through deployment when I felt discouraged. I felt weak. Then I received a letter in the mail from my eight-year-old son. He said, Dad, I hope one day I can be as strong as you. Enclosed was a pic ture of him doing pullups. Im happy to say, I met my goal. Surround yourself with people who will encourage you to achieve your vision. Draw strength from them. Be strong. And be brave. It can be terrifying to step out in faith, to begin your story. Its terrifying because were afraid to fail. I know that. Were you aware that the Beatles were dropped from their first recording contract? Did you know that Michael Jordan was cut from his high school bas ketball team? Did you know that Walt Disney was fired from his first newspaper job, because he lacked cre ativity? Did you know that Abraham Lincoln failed in business twice, had a nervous breakdown and lost eight elections? And yet, their stories are remark able. And so is yours. In the immortal words of Winston Churchill: Never, never, never give up. Be brave. May this moment be when you stop trying to be so ordinary May you be strong in the face of weakness. May you be brave in the face of failure. And may today be the day that you begin your story. Peace be with you, ChapsLt. Jon Black Surface Force Ministry Center CHAPLAINSWithout The Vision The People Perish Mayport Saving Lives-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingRear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) speaks with a Sailor from Naval Station Mayport as he gives blood during the quarterly blood drive in cooperation with the Georgia/Florida Blood Alliance last week. Will You Wear Red On National Wear Red Day On Feb. 3By Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness CenterFriday, Feb. 3 is National Wear Red Day, a day when Americans nationwide take womens health to heart by wear ing red to raise awareness of womens heart disease. Join Go Red for Women to help spread the criti cal message The Heart Truth from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Heart disease doesnt care what you wearIts the #1 killer of women. Everyone can par ticipate by wearing their favorite red dress, shirt, tie or a red dress pin on Feb. 3. In addition to wearing red, please join Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Wellness Center for a health fair that day from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the hospitals pharmacy. For more information, call Wellness at 542-5292 or go to the Red Dress website at www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ educational/hearttruth/ about/red-dress.htm or the American Heart Association at www.gore dforwomen.org. 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Panetta Announces FY13 Budget PrioritiesAmerican Forces Press ServiceSpending priorities in the forthcoming fis cal 2013 defense budget request call for reduc tions in the end strength of the Army and Marine Corps, an increase in special operations forces and maintaining the num ber of big-deck carriers, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Jan. 26. The Pentagons bud get topline request is set at $525 billion for fiscal 2013 with an additional $88.4 billion for overseas contingency operations mostly in Afghanistan. This is down from $531 billion and $115 billion, respectively, in this fiscal year. Defense Department officials used the new defense strategy guidance that President Barack Obama announced ear lier this month to shape the budget request, the secretary said. The budget seeks to minimize the impact of cuts on personnel accounts. Service mem bers will receive their full pay raises in fiscal 2013 and 2014, Panetta said. We will achieve some cost savings by providing more limited pay raises beginning in 2015, he added. Health care is another important benefit, and one that has far outpaced inflation. Changes to health care will not affect active duty personnel or their families, Panetta said. We decided that to help control growth of health care costs, we are recommending increases in health care fees, copays and deductibles for retirees, he said. But let me be clear that even after these increases, the cost borne by military retirees will remain below the levels in comparable private-sector plans. Overall, the request puts DOD on the path to save $259 billion over the next five years and $487 billion over the next 10. Panetta called the bud get a balanced, complete package that keeps the American military the pre-eminent force in the world. It is a balanced pack age, the secretary said, because while some programs are elimi nated or delayed, others are increased. The bud get looks to re-shape the military to be more agile, quick and flexible that incorporates the lessons learned in 10 years of war, he added. Increasing the num ber of special operations forces is key to the plan, Panetta said, and special operators will begin to shift back to their tradi tional pre-9/11 mission of instructing local forces. The request puts the Army on a path to drop to 490,000 soldiers and the Marine Corps to 182,000 Marines over five years. Currently, the two ser vices have 562,000 and 202,000 active-duty members, respectively. The secretary noted this is still higher than the numbers on 9/11. The budget treats the reserve components very carefully, Panetta said. After a decade of being an integral part of Americas wars, the reserve com ponents will not go back to being a strategic Cold War-era reserve. The reserves will be the nations hedge against the unexpected, the secretary said. We are making only marginal reductions in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard, and no reductions in the Marine Corps Reserve, the secretary said. The Air Force will make bal anced reductions in the Air Guard that are con sistent with reductions in the active component and Air Force Reserve. The request also calls for more base realign ments and closures, and a BRAC-like authority to recommend changes to military retirement. But the president and depart ment have made clear that the retirement bene fits of those who currently serve will be protected by grandfathering their ben efits, Panetta said. The budget maintains the current U.S. focus in the Central Command region and increases American commitment to the Pacific Command area of operations. The request looks to maintain the Navys current 11 air craft carriers and 10 car rier air wings, Panetta said. It will also maintain the current Marine and Army posture in the AsiaPacific region, and will base littoral combat ships in Singapore and Bahrain. The budget will elimi nate two forward-based Army heavy brigades in Europe. Instead, brigades will rotate in and out of the area. The United States and European allies also will look to share costs for new capabili ties such as the alliance ground surveillance pro gram. The Navy will retire seven older cruisers and two amphibious ships early, and the Air Force will eliminate six tactical air squadrons. The budget sinks more money into technologies to prevail in an antiaccess, aerial-denial sce nario and will fund the next-generation bomber and modernization of the submarine fleet. The F-35 joint strike fighter is key to maintaining domain superiority, and the military remains committed to the pro gram, Panetta said. But in this budget, we have slowed procurement to complete more testing and allow for develop mental changes before buying in significant quantities, he added. The budget will main tain all legs of the nuclear triad -bombers, ICBMs and submarines -and will invest in significant ly more capability in the cyber world, Panetta said. Panetta stressed the budget is based on strat egy and will shape the force for the future. While the pain of cuts will be felt across the country, he said, it will also ensure a strong, agile military for the future. The budget must pass Congress, and the secre tary said he hopes mem bers of Congress under stand the strategy and nuances of the budget. My hope is that when members understand the sacrifice involved in reducing the defense budget by half a trillion dollars, it will convince Congress to avoid sequestration, a further round of cuts that would inflict severe damage to our national defense for gen erations, Panetta said.Midway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is host ing the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner. Tickets are now on sale for this years Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, which will be held Saturday, June 9, at the Renaissance Resort, World Golf Village. Guest speaker Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert; Veterans of the Battle of Midway, several widows of Midway Veterans, and Veterans of all branches of the military have been invited to attend this years dinner. Also invited are Medal of Honor recipients and former prisoners of war in our area who have hero ically answered the call of duty. Come meet these national treasurers and hear their adventures first hand. The evening prom ises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of World War II. Ticket costs are: Active Duty E-6 and below, $25; E-7 to O3, $35; O4 to O5, $45, O6 and above, civil ians, and retirees, $60. The evening includes fine dining and enter tainment. Uniform will be O4 and above din ner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civil ian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1800, dinner at 1900. Reserved seating. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from the fol lowing locations: Navy League Mayport Bob Price, 904-718-2118 Email: bpricex4@com cast.net Navy League St Augustine Bill Dudley, 904-8064712 or 904-794-7814 Email: anuday00@aol. com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 4th Fleet, Klakring Host NJROTCFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs A dozen students from the Cocke County High School Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC), Newport, Tenn., were greeted by Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) after several tours of warships and aviation units at Naval Station Mayport Jan. 27. The field trip was a rare opportunity for the stu dents to visit a fleet con centration and speak with Navy personnel about the Navy and what it means to be a U.S. Sailor. The Cocke County NJROTC unit is currently in its ninth year since creation and has 155 active cadets. The pro gram is open to all 9th and 12th grade students. It was an awesome experience for the kids to visit a real Navy base and meet an Admiral, said Vanessa Zagaeski, English Teacher and student chaperone. We are from a small town in Tennessee so this is an amazing opportunity for them. Before meeting Tidd, the NJROTC students took tours of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42), Arleigh Burke-class Aegis Guided Missile Destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 99), SH-60 Seahawk helicop ters at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 46 and practiced damage con trol (DC) at the DC Wet Trainer facility. They were taught how to con trol flooding in confined spaces of ships and make repairs to damaged pipes. For many of the NJROTC students, this was their first time aboard a Navy vessel. We enjoy every chance we get to show off our ship and crew to those out side of the Navy, said Cmdr. Darrell Canady, Commanding Officer, USS Klakring. It is even more gratifying when we get to engage with future lead ers such as the NJROTC members from Cocke County High School. The NJROTC curriculum emphasizes citi zenship and leadership development, as well as maritime heritage, the significance of sea power, and naval topics such as the fundamentals of naval operations, seamanship, navigation and meteo rology. However, the best experience can be obtained by visiting the fleet in person. We try to come to Mayport at least once per year to get some realworld training and expe rience life in the Navy, said Chief Information Systems Technician Raymond Rodriquez, NJROTC Naval Science Instructor. This is one of the few chances our cadets have to really see the Navy up close. The students were greeted by Tidd before getting back on their school bus and driving back to Tennessee. It is always a real pleasure to meet young peo ple with an interest in the Navy, said Tidd. To come all the way from Tennessee to spend a day with the Navy is a testa ment of their dedication to NJROTC program and a bright future in the naval services. Cocke County High School NJROTC unit has earned the Distinguished Unit with Honors award five years in a row and has recently documented its 20,000th hour of commu nity service. The Senior Naval Science Instructor, Lt. Col. William M. Ivory, said, This fine group of young men and women is among the finest pro grams in the county. They reach out and make their community a bet ter place to live. The program teaches them citizenship, and they take their classroom lessons out into community. The NROTC unit is scheduled to travel to Kansas City for the Area 9 Drill, Academic, and Athletic Championship. I hope to see them back in Mayport soon, Tidd concluded. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more information, \ contact COMUSNAVSO/ C4F Public Affairs by email at comusnavsoc4f_mypt_pao@navy. mil, visit www.public. navy.mil/comusnavsoc4f, www.facebook.com/ NAVSOUS4THFLT, or on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NAVSOUS4THFLT. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) speaks with Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) Cadets Jan. 27, during their visit to Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The Cadets, from Cocke County High School in Newport, Tenn. toured the USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), USS Klakring (FFG 42) and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 46 during their time at the naval station. NAVSO/4th Fleet Hosts Conference, Discussions -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet addresses participants to the first Maritime Synchronization Conference Jan. 23, at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Tidd (center) hosted an Executive Roundtable discussion Jan. 25 during a Maritime Synchronization Conference at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Tidd (left)speaks with Maj. Gen. John Croley, Commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South (MARFORSOUTH) and Kirsten Madison, Director, International Affairs and Foreign Policy Advisor to the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard Jan. 25, during a Maritime Synchronization Conference at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Rear Adm. A. B. Cruz, Deputy Commander, NAVSO/4thFlt, talks about the Navy Reserve Surface Warfare Officers (SWO) community with Southeast region SWOs Jan. 21. -Photo by MC2(SW) Robert A. Wood Sr.Tidd responds to questions from junior Sailors Jan. 26, about the command and its role in the U.S. Southern Command AOR during an "Admiral's Call."

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 5 Mayport Takes Time To Read-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingChief Air-Traffic Controller (AW/SW) Walidah Ferrer reads to kindergarteners Jan. 24 during Finegan Elementarys Family Reading Night in conjunction with Read It Forward Jax and sponsored by Chic-fil-A. Volunteers from Naval Station Mayport and the community set up stations throughout the school to read books to students and their families participating in the event. -Photo by FC2 Robert LeonardNaval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, talks with students and their parents before sitting down to read a book with the group.-Photo by FC2 Robert LeonardNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, plys elementary students with sugary snacks before they sit down to listen to him read them a book.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingFinegan families got a chance to laugh it up with words thanks to a Co-Readian comedian event in the cafeteria.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingThe Co-Readian took his act to the audience.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingStudents help the Co-Readian by demonstrating Big, Bigger and Biggest.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingCoach Griffin points out the locations of the different stations to student Braeden Keesing.-Photo by ET3 Stacey KeesingFinegan students and their parents gather in one of the classrooms to listen to a volunteer reader during the Family Reading Night at the school.

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FFSC Classes Focus On Money ManagementFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Feb. 2, 1:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m., Troops to Teachers, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 2, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 2, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 6, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., What About the Kids?, FFSC Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and develop ment and may provide an additional motivator for ending the violence and seeking intervention. Feb. 6-10, 8 a.m. 5 p.m., SAPR Advocate Class, NAS JAX FFSC Feb. 7, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, Building One Room 1615 Feb. 7, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 8, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 9, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 9, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Feb. 13, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Individual Augmentee (IA) Discussion Group, USO Feb. 13, 8:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m., Anger Management Class, FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Feb. 13-16, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 14, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Active Parenting, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 14, 6 p.m. 7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group, Building One Room 104 Feb. 14, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Couponing 101 (How to Stretch Your Shopping Dollars), FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 15, 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Seminar, Building One Room 104 Feb. 16, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 16, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 22, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 22, 9 a.m. noon, Thrift Savings Plan, Building One Room 104 Feb. 23, 9 a.m. noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 27 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Whether youve been dating for six months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is a one-time two-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 27, 6 p.m. 8 p.m., Ombudsman Assembly, Building One Room 104 Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Building One Room 1616 Feb. 29, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m., Marketing Yourself for a Second Career, Ocean Breeze Feb. 29, 9 a.m. 11 a.m., Saving and Investing, FFSC Room 719 Learn To Market YourselfFrom FFSCThe Fleet and Family Support Center is spon soring a once-a-year lecture regarding tran sition here at Naval Station Mayport. It will be presented by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. The event will be held on Feb. 29, at 9-11:30 a.m., in the Ocean Breeze Conference Center Grand Ballroom. This top-shelf pre sentation is a great pro fessional development opportunity. Transition is of course ultimate ly a part of all military careers. Therefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are con templating retirement in one to five years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any par ticular officer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transi tions. This executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great fit for any commander, officer, or senior enlist ed supervisor -from the most senior, to the most junior. The lecture will be given by Colonel Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national staff. The presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-todate, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see . It includes com prehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employ er perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview tech niques, salary negotia tion, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition topics. The presentation is geared toward officers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are warmly welcomed. SPOUSES are highly encouraged to attend as well! All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures com panion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career . It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transi tion process. For further infor mation, contact Jose Sanchez, at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil or call 904-270-6600, ext. 1700 or 1701. Friday,Feb 3 Haven Hospice, 8301 Cypress Plaza Drive, Suite 119, is seeking vol unteers to help in the following areas: Patient and Family Care, Pastoral care, Administrative / office support, Speakers Bureau, Resale Store and Community Outreach. Call Sandra Francis (904) 733-9818 to register or for more information. Haven Hospice is North Floridas expert in end-of-life and palliative care and is one of three 2008 Circle of Life Award winners nation wide to be recognized as leaders in improving the care of patients near the end of life or with life-threatening condi tions. Haven Hospice has also been recognized as a Florida Pacesetter for its leadership in promot ing living wills. For more information visit www. havenhospice.org or call 800-727-1889. Monday, Feb. 6 Come enjoy mak ing Hot Pepper Jelly and take home some of the product made at the Duval County Extension Canning Center, from 9 a.m. noon or 1-4 p.m. Class space is limited. Cost is $20 per person. Pre-registration and pre payment should be made by Feb. 2.. To register call Jeannie at 255-7450. Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, from 6-8 p.m. This months program is presented by Michael Straley and the topic is Retouching Techniques to Create a Glamour Image. For more information, go to www. beachesphotographyclub. com. This is a free event with people of all ability levels and camera types welcomed and encour aged to come and learn more about photography. Friday, Feb. 10 Spring rummage sale at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. The United Methodist Women will be hosting their annual Spring Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Looking for shoes, linens, clothing, purses, luggage, toys etc? Join us and find your special treasure! For more information, please contact the church office at 904-249-5370. Saturday, Feb. 11 An Eating and Growing Seasonable Workshop; a food demo/ sampling using seasonal produce and learn to grow warm season veg etables. at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost is $10 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. A tour of the Canning Center will be offered at the end of this class. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. The Police Athletic League of Jacksonville, Inc. (PAL) will host their annual Julian E. Jackson Amateur Boxing Championship. The box ing championship will be held at PALs Julian Jackson Center, 3450 Monument Rd, inside the Ed Austin Regional Park. Bouts will begin at 6 p.m. For more informa tion about sponsorship opportunities, registra tion or tickets to the event contact Shelly Williams at (904) 355-3308 or Tiffany Mackey, Athletic Director, at (904) 854-6555 or Tiffany.Mackey@jaxsher iff.org. Spring rummage sale at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. The United Methodist Women will be hosting their annual Spring Rummage Sale from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Looking for shoes, linens, clothing, purses, luggage, toys etc? Join us and find your special treasure! For more information, please contact at 904-249-5370.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Thanks For Your Service -Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Naval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, hands Safety Specialist Lee Chaney a 30-year pin during a retirement luncheon held for her and coworker Sam Williams, bottom left, at Bogeys on Jan. 26. Pickard presented Chaney and Williams with pins and letters of appreciation during the luncheon.Donate Your Locks For Charity On Feb. 25From StaffNaval Station Mayport and Balfour Beatty Communities are hosting a Locks of Love charity event on Feb. 25 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center off base. Locks of Love is a nonprofit organization that turns donated hair into fitted hairpieces for financially disadvantaged chil dren suffering from longterm medical hair loss. According to their press release, most of the chil dren who are helped by Locks have lost their hair due to a medical condi tion called alopecia area ta. Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treat ment to the brain stem or other dermatological conditions that result in per manent hair loss. Locks has been in place since 1998 and provides t he hair pieces for children under age 21. Because of the high quality of the pieces, it takes between 6-10 ponytails and take approximately 4-6 months to manufacture. Balfour Beatty is bring ing in two Locks of Love approved hair stylists to take donations for the charity and will have food and drinks, along with take-home bags frilled with beauty products for donators. To donate to Locks of Love, hair must be at least 10 inches log, clean and dry. It must be bundled in a ponytail or a braid. Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be u sed. For more information about the event, contact Jessica Ennis at 372-4702 or 742-6036.TRICARE Beneficiaries Have Pharmacy OptionsAmerican Forces Press ServiceDespite questions about whether the Walgreens pharmacy chain will continue as a TRICARE provider, beneficiaries will have several options for filling prescrip tions, Defense Department spokeswoman Eileen M. Lainez said Dec. 29. The retail pharmacy contract between Express Scripts Inc., or ESI, and the Walgreens pharmacy chain is set to expire on Dec. 31, she added. If the contract is not renewed, Walgreens will no longer be a pharmacy network provider, Lainez said, but beneficiaries will be able to find a nearby network pharmacy using the find a phar macy feature at the ESI website, http:// www.express-scripts.com/tricare. We are committed to ensuring all our pharmacy beneficiaries are aware of the many options that TRICARE makes available to them, said Army Brig. Gen. Bryan Gamble, TRICARE deputy direc tor. By now, all of our beneficiaries who use Walgreens to fill prescriptions should have been contacted to advise them of their pharmacy options and to take action to ensure their pharmacy benefit remains uninterrupted. The health of our service members, retirees and their families remains my number one priority. In addition to 56,000 network pharmacies, Lainez said, TRICARE beneficiaries have other pharmacy options, including military pharmacies at no cost; and convenient, low-cost TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. Beneficiaries can check the TRICARE website at http://www.tricare.mil for more information. ESI has mailed information or con tacted beneficiaries who use Walgreens by telephone, and in December, they followed up with reminder letters. If needed, beneficiaries can take cur rent prescription bottles to a new net work pharmacy to have prescriptions transferred. Beneficiaries who need help finding a pharmacy or changing their medications to home delivery, or who have other questions, can contact Express Scripts at 1-877-885-6313. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 7

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Oasis Galley Back In Business -Photo by MCSN Damian BergSailors enjoy a special meal of steak, crab legs and shrimp Monday when Oasis Galley reopens for business after spending a week deep cleaning and starting the first phase of renovation at the galley.-Photo by Paige GnannQuartermaster 3rd Class (SW) Briana Crayton with Base Services gets in the nooks and crannies of a stove during a deep cleaning of Oasis Galley last week.-Photo by Paige GnannElectricians Mate 2nd Class Kerry Mathew, right, and Yoeman Seaman Gyrid Hatcher put together shelving units at the Galley.-Photo by Paige GnannCulinary Specialist 2nd Class Roger Smith of Oasis Galley gets a mirror shine on one of the hoods in the galley kitchen.-Photo by Paige GnannFire Controlman 2nd Class James Blunt works to assemble a piece of new shelving unit at the Galley. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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where third party financ ing is repaid through energy savings. According to Roy Dolley, Mayport Resource Energy Manager, the Mayport CNIC Phase 2 Project included efficient lighting retrofits, A/C air handler UV lights, effi cient motor replacements, solar water heating, con trol upgrades, variable speed drive, electric and fuel oil to natural gas conversions, magnetic bear ing Turbocor chiller ret rofits and water conser vation in more than 20 buildings. In addition to green house gas emissions reductions, the CNIC Phase 2 project included annual energy savings of 15,258 MBtu and $454,364 and reduced water use by 4,805,400 gallons. The project included a post installation veri fication plan to monitor equipment performance to ensure that the project delivers projected savings. The CNIC Phase 2 project was awarded and the Notice to Proceed was issued by Mayport Contracting on Aug. 6, 2010 and the project is now complete and deliv ering NS Mayport more energy savings. There have been four other Mayport UESC projects delivered and completed by the TECO Peoples Gas and Energy Systems Group team, totaling $531,000 in annual energy savings. Ralph Terrell, TECO Senior Project Manager, states that these projects are an excellent exam ple of a true team effort between the Navy and a serving utility where the utility can provide value beyond the traditional role of simply providing an energy source. These projects could not happen without the help of the Mayport staff including Energy Management team, Contracting, the FEAD Dept. and Facilities. The future of energy man agement is full of great opportunities and I look forward to continuing to serve the Navy and NS Mayport and to help the Navy meet their energy goals. TECO Peoples Gas has also qualified fuel switching from less efficient fuels to natural gas, and submitting this project for their Energy Rebate Program. An Energy Rebate Program credit of $24,000 will be applied to the NS Mayport natural gas bill. Navy Solar Farm Construction UnderwayPublic Affairs Center San DiegoThe Navy made anoth er leap into renewable energy integration Jan. 18 with groundbreak ing on a new 118 acre solar farm in China Lake, Calif. Construction of a SunPower Corporation 13.78 megawatt solar photovoltaic power sys tem officially got under way at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake following a midmorning ceremony at the sprawling weapons development base. This is the larg est solar project in the Navy, said Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installation and Environment Jackalyne Pfannenstiel. It demonstrates tangible progress toward national energy independence and reaching the Department of the Navys energy goals. SunPowers Oasis Power Plant product, a fully-integrated, modu lar solar block consisting of 31,680 solar panels, is expected to generate more than 30 percent of NAWS China Lakes annual energy load. The weapons division here is the consumer, and with that consump tion requirement comes responsibility, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, commander, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division. This project gives us the opportunity as the major consumer of the energy to look into our own processes and prac tices, Winter said. As we are more efficient in executing and continuing to do our mission it frees up resources for us to provide to our war fighter. The solar farm integra tion, which is made pos sible through a 20-year power purchase agree ment (PPA), will allow the Navy to buy electric ity below the retail utility rate and reduce costs by an estimated $13 million over the next 20 years. The PPA involves no initial out-of-pocket expenses for the Navy and will provide increased energy independence and reliable, emissionfree solar power to NAWS China Lake beginning at the end of this year. The Navy has a long standing record of iden tifying energy and water conservation opportuni ties across our facilities, said Rear Adm. Dixon Smith, commander, Navy Region Southwest. We are continuing to trans form our culture from one of consumption to one focused on conservation. NAWS China Lakes solar farm is representa tive of the Navys energy initiative, laid out by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus in 2009, which aspires to achieve 50 percent of the Navys shorebased energy require ments produced by alter native sources by the year 2020. We face a global energy challenge, which is for us a national stra tegic imperative that we solve, said Capt. Clifford Maurer, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest command ing officer. There was an extraordinary level of effort that went into market research, indus try partnering, preparing complicated acquisition documentation, navigat ing complicated regula tions and incentives, and doing technical analysis. Under the 20-year fed eral solar PPA, SunPower will build, operate and maintain the solar power system that uses the companys highefficiency solar panels, and which it guarantees through a 25-year war ranty. SunPower has worked with federal agencies since 1999 and has installed more than 25 megawatts of solar power systems at govern ment facilities, includ ing solar power plants at Navy installations in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Coronado, Calif. NAWS China Lake is located in the Western Mojave Desert region of California. The installa tion is the Navys largest single landholding, representing 85 percent of the Navys land for research, development, acquisi tion, testing and evalua tion of weapons systems. The two ranges and main site of NAWS China Lake cover more than 1.1 mil lion acres, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island. From Page 1Energy-U.S. Navy photo by Rick NaystattA view of solar panels recently installed on the roof of Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Headquarters, Old Town Complex. The rooftop photovoltaic installation supports the Department of Defenses goal of increasing renewable energy sources to 25 percent of all energy consumed by the year 2025. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 9

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Navy Reminds Sailors Of Designated BenefitsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy is reminding Sailors of several ben efits and programs where members may designate beneficiaries of their choosing, as outlined in NAVADMIN 028/12, released Jan. 24. Recipients for these benefits may include anyone designated by the service member, includ ing a dependent, friend, significant other, fiance or fianc, co-worker, or a family member who is not a military dependent. Sailors may designate any individual as benefi ciary to a total of 15 benefits and programs, including: Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (SGLI); Post Vietnam-era Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP); Basic Educational Assistance Death Benefit; Death Gratuity Benefit; Final Settlement of Accounts; Wounded Warrior Act Designated Caregiver; Thrift Savings Plan (TSP); Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP); Casualty Notification; Escorts for Dependents of Deceased or Missing Members; Designation of Persons Having Interest in Status of a Missing Member; Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI); -Person Eligible to Receive Effects (PERE) of Deceased Persons Travel and Transportation Allowance for attendance at Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program events; and Person Authorized To Direct Disposition (PADD) of the Remains of a Decedent. NAVADMIN 028/12 explains how Sailors can update or verify beneficiaries for each of these benefits. The NAVADMIN also outlines conditions and limitations for appointing beneficiaries. I can think of few things more important for our Sailors than ensur ing their loved ones are provided for in case of an emergency, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. Ensuring this informa tion is accurate and upto-date is the responsibility of every Sailor. A comprehensive list ing of all benefits can be found in the Navy Pay and Benefits Guide, located online on the Navy Personnel Command webpage at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/career/payandbenefits/pages/default2.aspx. For more information on member-designated benefits, contact your local personnel office or visit NPCs website at www.npc.navy.mil. Do You Know Requirements For Involuntary Separation Pay? Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsWith the release of NAVADMIN 036/12 Jan. 27, Sailors are reminded of eligibility require ments for Involuntary Separation Pay (ISP). ISP has Navy Reserve requirements and obligations. Career counselors and command leader ship can assist Sailors on applying for affiliation in conjunction with ISP. All Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a minimum of three years past their initial military ser vice obligation. The Ready Reserve has two branch es, the Selected Reserve (SELRES) and Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). The SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. These designated Reservists are available for recall to active duty status. SELRES typically fulfill the traditional ser vice commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. The IRR offers Reserve affiliation benefits with out the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to maintain mobili zation readiness and must keep the Navy informed of any address changes or conditions that may affect their readiness. While the Navy wishes to afford every Sailor an opportunity to transition to the Navy Reserve, SELRES billets are limited. Involuntarily separated Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a SELRES quota via Perform-to-Serve/Fleet RIDE. Once approved for a quota, Sailors can con tact the Career Transition Office (CTO) to complete the process. If a SELRES quota is not available, Sailors can request to affiliate with the IRR. A Sailor who affili ates with the IRR must have their command complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their supporting per sonnel office. This must be accomplished prior to separation to ensure payment of this benefit, according to the message. If a signed Reserve affiliation contract is not completed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Under current legis lation, Sailors who collect ISP and later qualify and collect a military retire ment must repay their ISP upon retirement. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service will reduce retirement payments until the ISP amount is repaid. Read the message for more information or contact the CTO via email CTO.enlisted@ navy.mil, call the Navy Personnel Command Customer Service Center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC or email CSCMailbox@navy. mil. More information on ERB transition assistance can be found on the NPC Web page at http://www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/boards/ERB/Pages/ TransitionInfo.aspx. found in MILPERSMAN 1160-120. Sailors who have been granted a HYT waiver for a specific assignment and cannot fulfill their commitment will have their HYT waiver canceled and will have to separate, transfer to the Reserves or retire. These HYT changes will not affect Sailors who have reached sanctuary, which occurs at 18 years of cumulative active duty. Additionally, nuclear rated Sailors will be managed separately by their community manager. HYT policy for E-4 through E-9 has not changed. For more details, read NAVADMIN 030/12 by visiting the Navy Personnel Command website at www.npc.navy. mil.NEX Rewards Students For Good GradesFrom Page 1TenureFrom NEXThe Navy Exchange wants to help its cus tomers pay for their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Four times per school year, four students will be the recipients of a $5,000, $3,000 $2,000 or $1,000 U.S. savings bond, denominations at maturity. The next drawing will be held at the end of February 2012. Any eligible fulltime student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or bet ter, as determined by their school system, may enter the draw ing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and mili tary retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the draw ing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade aver age. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offering students a chance to win a sav ings bond through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded $504,000 in savings bonds with the help of its generous vendor partners. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. ing the Army and shrink ing the Marines, but we still have to have a for ward presence, explained Thomas to the nominees. These are tough chal lenges, but this is our time to lead. I am humbled because you represent the hundreds of Sailors that you lead on board your ships and at your com mands. Senior Chief Information Technician Marluis Stokes, SOY 2011 coordinator, said that during the boards, when asked what the hardest part of leadership was, the SOY nominees all responded with the word courage. It takes a lot to stand up and say when your Sailors are doing the wrong thing and correct them, said Stokes. You are all great leaders, and I am very proud of you. Even though only two of you got the award, you are all winners. You can go back to your commands with your heads held high. When the SOY program began, only the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet Sea Sailors were recognized. Within 10 years, the Sailor of the Year program was expanded to include the shore establishment and Navy Reserve Sailors. Garcia and Zamora will go on to compete with the 2011 Pacific Fleet Sailors of the Year, Feb. 12-16, during U.S. Fleet Forces Command SOY week in Norfolk.From Page 1SOY NAVY Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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New Eyeglass Frame Options At MedicalFrom Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Public AffairsNavy Medical Logistics Command (NMLC) announced Jan. 19 that all active duty and Reserve personnel, including recruits will soon have a new standard issue eyeglass frame available. Since 1990, military personnel and recruits have received standard issue S9 eyeglass frames, often jokingly referred to as birth control glasses or simply BCGs. Not any longer. We are happy to announce that the New Year brings with it a new frame option for all per sonnel serving on active duty and in the Reserves, said Capt. Matt Newton, commanding officer of Naval Ophthalmic Support and Training Activity (NOSTRA) in Yorktown, Va. Service members have told us that they like the appear ance of the new frame. We are confident this frame will increase the likeli hood that military per sonnel will continue to utilize their eyeglasses beyond boot camp. Effective Jan. 1, the current cellulose acetate spectacle frame provided at all Armed Forces initial entry training sites began the transition from male and female, brown S9 spectacles to a new, uni sex, black A frame. The change stems from a study, which was directed by the Military Health Systems Optical Fabrication Enterprise (OFE) and coordinated by NOSTRA in order to find a suitable frame to add to the standard issue inven tory. Selected samples were submitted to U.S. Army Public Health Command for review, and three frames were identified for user tests. Tests were conducted at Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, Ill.; Advanced Infantry Training, Camp Geiger, N.C.; Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Fort Knox, Ky. and U.S. Coast Guard Recruit Training Center, Cape May, N.J. Surveys assessed func tionality, durability and cosmetic appearance and the 5A frame was selected as the best option. Initial deployment of the 5A frame will occur at all Armed Forces initial entry training sites. Within six months, the 5A frame will be made available to all active duty and Reserve service members with full imple mentation expected to be completed over a twoyear period. Retirees are currently eligible to receive stan dard issue S9, S91A and Half-Eye frames, and there will be no change to this authorization. However, over the next two years, the OFE will study the feasibility of providing 5A frames to retirees. The OFE was estab lished by Congressional mandate in 1996, with the U.S. Navy Surgeon General charged with managing the program. Upon the closure of the Army Optical Fabrication Laboratory at Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center, NOSTRA became a joint produc tion lab with Army opti cians augmenting Navy and civilian production staff. The OFE is guided by the Optical Fabrication Advisory Board, which represents the Surgeons General of the Army, Navy and Air Force. A sampling of OFE initiatives includes managing the military Frames of Choice program, standardization of military combat eye pro tection inserts, introduc tion of a new submariner frame, and operational support with the deploy ment of the new M50 gas mask insert. For the last several years, the OFE has pro duced approximately 1.5 million pairs of spectacles and optical inserts annu ally for authorized mili tary personnel. NMLC is responsible for designing, executing and administering indi vidualized state-of-the-art solutions to meet customer medical materiel and health care requirements. NMLC supports the U.S. Navy with acquisition and logistics systems train ing, health care services strategies, operational forces support, medical equipment and logistics solutions, acquisition management, deployable platforms and eyewear fabrication. Navy Medicine is a global health care net work of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine person nel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield.Shipmates to Workmates Helps With ERBFrom Naval Sea Systems Command Office of Corporate CommunicationsSailors at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., attend ed a career forum and learned about new career opportunities on the Shipmates to Workmates program, Jan. 17. The program assists Sailors identified for early separation from the Enlisted Retention Boards find and compete for civilian jobs at part nering naval commands. As of Jan. 17, nearly 400 Sailors have attended five career forums, informing separating Sailors about hiring opportunities. Another five forums are planned for later this year, all managed by the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and seven other participating com mands. The Shipmates to Workmates program is off to a great start, said Cmdr. Pat Sanders, NAVSEA operational sup port officer. The tools we provide our Sailors will help them discover what opportunities are out there, and how to take advantage of those opportunities. The program also demonstrates an on-going commitment to Sailors by assisting those invol untarily separated find careers. I came today to see firsthand the transi tion assistance that we are providing our Sailors who will be leaving the Navy in the next year, said Vice Adm. Mark E. Ferguson, vice chief of naval operations. Were making a concerted effort as a Navy to provide spe cialized assistance for those Sailors affected by Enlisted Retention Boards as well as Sailors who are separating at the end of their enlistment or retir ing. The initiative also pro vides information to separating sailors via its web site at http://jobs.navair. navy.mil/SM2WM/, which serves as a onestop shop for Sailors seeking Navy-related employ ment. This is not just a pro gram that provides infor mation to separating Sailors, said Sanders. It actively assists Sailors with resume reviews and guidance on how to apply for government positions through USA Jobs. The Shipmates to Workmates program is just one of many transi tion benefits available to Sailors including those affected by the enlisted retention board. For more information about ERB and other transition ben efits, visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www.npc. navy.mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866827-5672) or email csc mailbox@navy.mil. -Photo by MC3 Lauren G. RandallVice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson conducts an interview with a Naval public affairs team to discuss career opportunities and transitioning from military to civilian during a Shipmates to Workmates career forum. Shipmates to Workmates is an initiative that helps separating Sailors complete applications and resumes as well as find and compete for jobs at partnering commands. a CFC participantProvided as a public serviceWorking together for stronger, healthier babies marchofdimes.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 11

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 2: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. Feb. 4: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 4: UFC 143. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 5: Superbowl XLVI at Beachside Community Center. Pre-game at Castaways Lounge 5:30 p.m. Kick off in the Main Hall 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game on the 20 ft screen while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Feb. 5: All-Hand Superbowl Chili CookOff. 4-11 pm at Focsle Lounge. Watch the game on the 20 ft screen and bring the heat with your best chili recipe. 270-5431 Feb. 5: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 5: Superbowl Party. 5 p.m. Pre-game at Castaways; 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center Main Hall. Watch the game on our 20 ft. screen. Free food, give aways and more! 2705451. Feb. 7 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). Feb. 7: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 8: Dart Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 2705126 x3115. Feb. 8: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb. 10: Jeff Dunham Live. Van Departs Liberty Center 5:30 p.m. Cost $25. Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 15: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. Feb. 17: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 18: Dave & Busters Trip. Van departs 7 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Feb. 19: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 (includes paintballs, gear and transportation) Feb. 20: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb. 21: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Basketball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 19. 270-5451 Feb. 22: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. LIBERTYFeb 3: Freedom Friday Team Jersey Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 5: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 14: Teen Valentine Social 2-6:30 p.m. at the Teen Center. 246-0347. Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. Feb. 17: Freedom Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Feb. 17: Fire Pit Friday 2-11 p.m. Bring your Blankets and chairs and sit around the fire pit for smores and music. 2460347 Feb. 18: Youth Sponsorship Mardis Gras Dance Party. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Your chances to win the drawing for a Pack Prize will increase with every new member you bring to this event! 246-0347 Feb. 20: Presidents Day Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Feb 23: Drama Club Presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 4:15 p.m. at the Youth Center. 270-5680. Feb. 25: Cicis Pizza Night 1-3:30 p.m. Bring money for dinner. Permission slip required. 270-5680. KIDSports Time to set your com mand up for Captains Cup Mens Volleyball. League begins Feb. 13. Games are played at lunchtime. For more info contact Rita at 904-2705451 This weeks Captains Cup Tennis Dustin Snyder vs. Christopher Hunt Jayce Evans vs. Joe Drab George Zitzewitz vs. Dustin Snyder In you are interested in the Mens Tennis league contact Rita at 904-2705451 Womens Volleyball Sunday, Jan. 29 Lady Aces 21 vs. Angels 10 Lady Aces 21 vs. Angels 9 Angels 21 vs. Lady War Dawgs 19 Angels 21 vs. Lady War Dawgs 11 Lady Aces 21 vs. Mamacitas 5 Lady Aces 21 vs. Mamacitas 8 Next week Mamacitas vs. Angels Lady Aces vs. Lady War Dawgs Lady War Dawgs vs. Mamacitas Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basic 11:30 a.m., Cardio, Combat and Core 4:30 p.m., TRX CORE Fusion Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Yoga A dynamic blend of breathing, yoga postures, and relaxation tech niques. This class increases vitality, energy, calm, agility, flexibility, mental and physical strength in the body, both internally and externally. Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics Thursday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 4:30 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Advanced Strength Training for Women 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 11:30 a.m., TRX Incorporate this inno vative training device invented by a Navy Seal into your workout regi men. The TRX is a suspension training system, used in confined space as well as small group work outs. Build functional and pillar strength. Mold your CORE into concrete! Class size limited to 25. Class is held at Mayport Sand Box behind Surfside Fitness Center; class is held, weather permitting. Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT Wednesday 11 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Prerequisite class is H.I.T. Level 1. Class size limited to 30. Thursday 11 a.m., HIT Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp Take your entire com mand to the next level, oceanfront! This com mand class is packed full of challenging cardio drills, muscular resistance training and explosive intervals. Meets at the Sandbox and can accom modate 200+ personnel, weather permitting. 11:30 a.m., HIT Designed for those in superior shape. Will build onto an already strong fitness and skill base accomplished in H.I.T. Level 1. Includes Olympic and Power lifts, Gymnastics and intense modalities of condition ing. Prerequisite class is H.I.T. Level 1. Class size limited to 30. The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning This 45-minute indoor cycling class will enhance your speed and strength and burn mega calories without compromising joint health. Good for all fitness levels. Meets at the back of the temp Gym weightroom. 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 5:30 p.m., Spinning This 45-minute indoor cycling class will enhance your speed and strength and burn mega calories without compromising joint health. Good for all fitness levels. Meets at the back of the temp Gym weightroom. Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning MWR a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Feb. 4: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 4: UFC 143. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Feb. 5: Superbowl XLVI at Beachside Community Center. Pre-game at Castaways Lounge 5:30 p.m. Kick off in the Main Hall 6 p.m. Watch the Big Game on the 20 ft screen while you enjoy refresh ments, snacks, giveaways and more. 270-7205 Feb. 5: All-Hand Superbowl Chili CookOff. 4-11 pm at Focsle Lounge. Watch the game on the 20 ft screen and bring the heat with your best chili recipe. 270-5431 Feb. 5: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Feb. 7 : All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Feb. 8: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tick ets available at the door. Sponsored by Mayport CPOA. For tickets, call Jeff Lawrence at (904) 2705126 x3115. Feb. 8: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Feb. 9: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Feb. 10: No Clu. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Feb 14: Valentines Day 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 14: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Softball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins March 5. 270-5451 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Extravaganza. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Free Italian buffet, double payouts on all hand cards, and more! 270-7204 Feb. 15: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians children, Soccer ages 7-13 (age determined as of Aug. 1, 2012) and Baseball ages 4-18 (age determined as of Apr. 30, 2012). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. For more information, please call (904) 2705680 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy.mil. MWR Happy Birthday Focsle Lounge -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport new and old chiefs celebrated the 14th birthday of the CPO Club, Focsle Lounge, during the Family Steak Night hosted by HSM-40 on Jan. 25. Pictured from left is retired Chief Hospital Corpsman Tony Ross, oldest chief retired Chief Culinary Specialist Jim Phillips, NS Mayport Command Master Chief Wayne Welch and youngest chiefChief Navy Counselor Thurman Winkler. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 2, 2012 13