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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Publication Date: 12-15-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00240


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Biden Thanks SailorsVPOTUS Welcomes Back USS Gettysburg-Photo by MC2 Gary Granger Jr.Vice President Joe Biden speaks to Sailors while waiting for the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) return to Naval Station Mayport. Gettysburg returns after a successful seven-month deployment with USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn along the theater and maritime security cooperation efforts in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastVice President Joe Biden made a surprise visit to more than 300 Sailors, friends and family mem bers during a homecoming cel ebration for USS Gettysburg (CG64) Dec 8. The guided missile cruis er returned to Naval Station Mayport after a successful sev en-month deployment from the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Biden spoke with the family members and friends on the pier before boarding Gettysburg to shake the hands of Sailors going ashore to their loved ones. Theyve missed weddings. They have missed funerals. They have missed holidays,Biden said. And let me tell you, youve missed it with them. The vice president also extend ed his thanks to military coming home as well as ashore. Only one percent of the entire population in the military are fighting these wars, said Biden. One hundred percent of the population owes you thanks and I mean that sincerely. You are an incredible bunch of folks. Gettysburgs Commanding Officer, Capt. Robert Hein, stood at the quarterdeck alongside the vice president shouting out how thrilled he is to be home. This is the greatest thing in the world, said Hein. This is Christmas, New Years, the Fourth of July and your birthday all wrapped up in one. Biden also spoke about the seven new dads on board who finally had the chance to see their newborns for the first time. There are seven of you in here that are going out to meet their child for the first time, Biden said. Ive spoken to each one of them. Theyre brilliant. They all said the same thing, beat Army Saturday. One of the dads never expect ed the amount of joy he would receive this homecoming day. Its actually the greatest thing Ive ever felt, said Quartermaster 3rd Class Marcellous McGee. Just coming off a seven-month deployment, got my newborn, never seen him before, so its a great feeling. The strike group conducted Leaving BooneFrom StaffLt. Cmdr. Robert Speight relieved Cmdr. Roy Love as com manding officer of USS Boone (FFG 28) dur ing a low-key ceremony aboard the ship on Dec. 9. Guest speaker for the event was Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, Commodore Paul Flood. Speight was born in Lynchburg, VA and enlisted in the Navy in September 1989. He served as an Electronics Technician (Submarines) before being accept ed into the Seaman to Admiral Program. He was -Photo by Paige GnannCmdr. Roy Love, outgoing commanding officer of USS Boone shakes hands with his relief and former executive officer, Lt. Cmdr. Robert Speight, before being piped off by the Officers and Chiefs Mess after a change of com mand ceremony on Dec. 8. Go Navy, Beat Army No Mirror For Holidays-Photo by ET1 Marty ParsonsThe quarterback for the Navy team dodges tackles as he makes his way to the goal during Naval Station Mayports annual flag football Army/Navy game. NAS Jacksonville represented the Navy and the Jacksonville Army Recruiting District represented the Army in this years battle. Just like the Naval Academy Midshipmen won bragging rights against the Army for the third consecutive year, NAS Jacksonville kept the title with the Navy for the third year at Mayports game. Afterwards, the teams joined more than 100 spectators at an MWR-sponsored tailgate party at Beachside Community Center to watch the Army/Navy game on the big screen.See Biden, Page 7 See Boone, Page 13Due to the upcom ing holiday season, The Mirror will not publish during the weeks of Dec. 22 and Dec. 29. All photo/story submissions to The Mirror during this time will be included in the Jan. 5, 2012 edition. For more information, please contact Base Public Affairs Office at 270-5226 ext. 1011/13.Mayport Gets Lit UpIf you live in onor off-base housing, make sure to have all of your decorations lit up and burning bright on Dec. 21. Naval Station Mayport is spon soring a Housing Lighting Contest. Judges will be out in all housing areas between 6-8 p.m. Winners will be notified on Dec. 22.Christmas Dinner At GalleyServicemembers, retired military, vet erans and guests are invited to Oasis Galley on Dec. 25 from 1-4 p.m. The menu includes roast tur key, mashed pota toes, assorted breads, cranberry sauce, and assorted desserts, along with egg. Cost is $7.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.MCPON Sends Holiday Message To FleetMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick D. West released the follow ing holiday message to the Fleet Dec. 12. Shipmates and Navy fami lies, Can you believe another year is almost over? Its amazing how quickly time passes when youre staying busy! It seems we were kicking off 2011 just yes terday and here we are, about to usher in 2012. With the tra ditional festivities of December upon us, I want to wish you all the happiest possible holidays, and to say thank you for the outstanding service and sup port you provide to our Navy and nation. I continue to be humbled by your selfless dedi cation and the outstanding job you do every day around the globe. We faced some challenges this year and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, but we will get through them together as we have done for the past 236 years. The Navy, after all, is a team sport and in 2011, we enjoyed many opera tional successes together that are worth celebrating. They are your legacy ... the deployments, the steady presence in difficult places, the helping hand when natural disasters left vulnerable people in their wake. You and your Shipmates worked hard and sacrificed often. As you visit with loved ones, scour the shopping malls, or hit the ski slopes dur ing these joyous weeks, take a moment to reflect on the special appreciation America has for you and your family. Be proud of your accomplish ments, and share sea stories with moms, dads, siblings, aunts, uncles, and old buddies. Most of all, be safe and enjoy the holiday season to its full est. Celebrate responsibly: You are important to our Navy family and we need every one of you to return recharged for the next adventure. Dont let bad judgment ruin the New Year or your life. Look out for each other, and keep an eye on your Shipmates who may be hav ing a difficult time. Its also important that we remember the thousands of our Shipmates who are deployed, on station around the world vigilantly keeping the watch, ready to answer our nations call. They are there ensuring we have this chance to deck the halls, gather around family dinner tables, and belt out Auld Lang Syne in a storm of confetti. Thank you again for serving our great Navy and preserving our nations freedom. Sailors and families, you are truly among this countrys greatest gifts. Happy holidays Shipmates and HOOYAH! Very Respectfully, MCPON Ive received many calls and emails this past month dealing with an upcoming move. While most children and their families get excited about moving to a new com munity because it is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore different scenery, and maybe get your own bedroom, military fami lies who must move in the middle of a school year sometimes face opposi tion from the children. A mid-year move is fraught with anxiety. Children will be leaving friends and starting in a new school with students who have already formed friendships and a rela tionship with the teacher. Who will be my teach er? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common questions, tinged with worry, which your children will ask about the move. While you may be concerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a climate change, your chil dren hone in on what will have the greatest impact on them: school. Roughly 16 mil lion American families move each year. And the adjustment can be hard on kids. One of the keys to making it easier is time. Psychologist Gary Santavicca says, In gen eral, the more prepara tion you have, the easier a transition is. So, he says, start talking about the move as early as possible. And include the kids. If there is time, have them get online to learn about their new school and what has been going on there like athletics, clubs, grade level activi ties. Different things to help them feel like theyre helping to make it hap pen, and its a family proj ect, he says. Totally preventing mov ing anxiety may not be possible, but attempts to do so can benefit all in the family not just the chil dren. Consider three key elements: reliability, rou tine, and relationships. By promoting these three elements, youll expe rience a more positive move for everyone. When parents trust the move, they will send a positive message to chil dren about the good place they are going to and the good people, and espe cially, the school they will encounter there. Your feeling of reliability will be transferred to your chil dren, helping them to feel confident about the move and the school experi ence. It is easy to distrust the unknown, so reli ability should be devel oped through familiarity and a pattern of helpful response. If your child is too young to do an inter net research about the school, you can help. Finding out the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports sched ules, and clubs available will provide informa tion to ease the transi tion. Also check with the School Liaison Officer or the Youth Sponsorship Program coordinator at the new installation for names of students at the school who would be willing to become email buddies. Knowing someone before you even get to school can relieve some of the anxiety about who will I know or who will sit with me at lunch? You can get in touch with the SLO at your new installa tion by calling the SLO at your current installation or Googling Navy SLO. The installations website should have information on the Youth Sponsorship Program under the MWR tab. Routine is another key element to reducing anxi ety because it provides structure to the childrens day and security in knowing what to expect. The School Liaison Officer may be able to put you in contact with the schools counselor. The counselor can provide information about the lunch schedule, PE routines (including uniforms for middle and high school students), backpack rules and other information which may not be posted on the schools website. So as you approach day one at the new school, establish a regular bedtime rou tine and morning rou tine. Decide if your child will pack a lunch or buy it. Make sure that he has clothes that are appropri ate for the schools dress code. It may be a little tricky to do this before you move, but it will cer tainly lessen fears and questions once you are in your new location. The school counselor can help the teachers receiving your children to build strategies for estab lishing positive relation ships with them. It is harder to do this once the school year has started, but by sharing informa tion about your children before they arrive will give the teacher and the class time to prepare a wel coming atmosphere. The teacher may organize an activity for the students to introduce themselves. Or in the middle or high school, the teachers may provide information on the curriculum or texts they are using. The teachers could also be encour aged to email or to send a note to the children prior to enrollment. Being proactive can minimize your time spent struggling with incidents related to move anxiety. Starting the move with Were Moving Now? Dealing With New StartJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer I was reading on the internet last week about Christmas and found some generally interest ing facts about the origin of Christmas and how it has evolved over time. I thought I would share some of what I found. How Did Christmas Start? Some theorists have surmised that the cel ebration of Christmas is related to the Jewish Festival of Lights, during which Jesus was born. Others associate it with the Roman holiday of Saturnalia, which was a celebration of the births of several Roman gods. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia online, Christmas (or Mass of Christ) was not one of the earliest celebrations of the Catholic Church. However, in various places around the Holy Land, starting in about 200 AD, masses celebrating Christs birth became annual events. In the fourth cen tury, the date of Dec. 25 was settled on by most churches as the annual celebration. Cmdr. Steven Souders Surface Force Ministry CenterOrigins Of Christmas Remind Us Of Blessings HOMEFRONTSome of the early mass es included dramatic representations of the Nativity. As early as the fourth century, hymns and carols became part of these dramatic events. It was not until 1223 that St. Francis of Assisi presented the nativity in the form of the crib or crche that we now know. How Did the Celebration Change? Elements of various pagan celebrations that took place around the month of January gradu ally worked themselves into Christmas celebra tions. Among these ele ments were gift giving, greeting cards, and the Yule log, which was based on a practice of a land lord providing a tenant with wood on the birth of a child. Various other elements, such as the Christmas tree and vis its from Saint Nicholas as Santa Claus were based on other holidays and practices. Over time, Christmas became a major feast day with special foods, such as minced meat, goose, and hot mulled spirits, not eaten the rest of the year. Other saints days, such as Saint Lucias Day in Sweden, also became associated with the Christmas holidays. The Christmas tree, which was probably based on pagan sym bols, became a symbol of everlasting life and hope, especially in Europe and North America. Adorned in lights (initially can dles) and smelling of the outdoors, it became an important part of the Christmas celebration. Gifts were originally hung on the tree and they now take a place of honor under the tree. The holy leaf is also an evergreen symbol of everlasting life and is also associated with the crown of thorns Jesus wore when he was crucified. Santa Claus has been around in one form or another since the fourth century. Santa Claus, Old St. Nick, and all of the other incarnations of Father Christmas are based on St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children and sailors. To recap then, Christmas was, none theless, consistently a time for families to come together to cel ebrate the birth of Jesus and to worship together. The religious activities were enhanced by food, drink, decorations, and an appreciation of the win ter season as a doorway to the renewal of spring. With that being said, may all the blessings of Christmas be yours this year. CHAPLAINSBase Chapel Holiday ServicesProtestant Christmas Services Do you feel like you are missing out on the spir it of Christmas? The Mayport Chapel Choir has just the remedy. Come join us on Dec. 18 at the 10:30 a.m. Service. The Choir will be presenting the Cantata When Love was Born. In addition, the Protestant Chapel will be having a Christmas Eve Candle Light Service at 7 p.m. on Dec. 24. There will also be a Christmas Morning Communion Service at 10:30 a.m. All are wel come join us in celebrat ing the birth of Christ. Catholic Christmas Mass This year the Catholic community will cel ebrate a midnight mass on Christmas Eve. After the Midnight Mass all are invited to join in a Christmas potluck served in the fellowship hall. Christmas Day Mass will be at 9 a.m. Please con sider joining us to cel ebrate the birth of Christ. See SLO, Page 3

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positive communica tion and continuing with efforts to establish reli ability, routine, and rela tionships will ensure a smoother move. Tips to help make the first days and weeks eas ier: Learn your childs schedule. If your child doesnt bring a schedule home from school, ask the teacher to send you one, or pick one up in person. Stay positive. If youre excited about the new school, it will rub off on your kids, even if they dont want you to know it. Get to know your childs teacher and help her know your child. If your spouse is deployed, be sure the teacher knows. Help teachers remember that they need to share the beginning of school information that your child missed. Listen to your child. Instead of asking, How was school today? (answer: OK) or What did you do in school today? (answer: stuff), try to ask specific ques tions like, What story did your teacher read today? or, for an older child, What experiment are you working on in science? For more information, go to Choosing a School for your Child offers check lists and pertinent ques tions which will assist parents in making schooling choices. Go to www.ed.gov/parents/ schools/find/choose/ index.html Military OneSource is a useful resource for obtaining information on schools. Access the ser vice at www.militaryo nesource.com or toll free from the United States: (800) 342-9647; from overseas: (800)-429-6477; or overseas collect: 1-484530-5908. Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC): MCEC ( www. militarychild.org) is a non-profit, world-wide organization which iden tifies the challenges facing the highly mobile military child, increases awareness of these challenges in military and educa tional communities, and initiates and implements programs to meet the challenges. Military Teens on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the Department of Defense and available at http:// dod.mil/mtom. This web site is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to military youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.SLOFrom Page 2Advancements BM3 Jesus D. Arevalo, USS Hue City OS3 Daniel K. Borek, USS Hue City GSM3 Joseph M. DeMarco, USS Hue City YN3 Carmelo Felix, USS Hue City LS3 (SW) Shakyra L. Forsythe, USS Hue City HM3 Charlotte N. Helman, USS Hue City CS3 Ryan E. Ramsey, USS Hue City CTR3 Joshua C. Robinson, USS Hue City GM3 Justin T. Stice, USS Hue City HT3 William A. Shelvin, USS Hue City ET3 Ryan M. Strandberg, USS Hue City OS3 Lance C. Devero, USS Hue City BM2(SW) Scott A. Tatum, USS Hue City DC2(SW) Jonathan R. Postle, USS Hue City EM2 Richard C. Bradley, USS Hue City EN2 Anthony D. Cusson, USS Hue City GM2 Cory W. Blakely, USS Hue City GSE2 Cody J. Street, USS Hue City GSM2(SW) Damarys Corchadogaruta, USS Hue City OS2(SW) Raymond M. Sinclair, USS Hue City STG2 James R. Garringer, USS Hue City GM2(SW) Stan Morrison, USS Hue City Command Advancement Program LS3(SW) Allie Sillah, USS Hue City DC2 John Legzedh, USS Hue City GSM1(SW) Dale F. Kaiser, USS Hue City ESWS CTR2(SW) Justin W. Freeman, USS Hue City MILESTONESKeeping Sailors Happy During HolidaysChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe director for Personnel Readiness and Community Support offered ways to reduce stress during the holiday season, Dec. 12. The holidays can be a joy ous time for Sailors and their families, but they can also be stressful. By doing some simple things, most people can man age their stress and have an enjoyable and safe holiday, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director, Personnel Readiness and Community Support. We can feel the full range of emotions during this holiday time. They can range from happiness and joy to extreme stress. And we can deal with the stress if we plan appropriately, said Herb, a mem ber of the explosive ordnance disposal communi ty and a licensed clinical professional counselor. There are practical steps Sailors can take to manage the stress of the holidays, to include: maintaining an exercise routine; ensuring enough sleep; taking time to relax; planning and keeping to a budget for gift-giving; and celebrating in mod eration. But if the stress and struggles seem over whelming, Sailors are encouraged to ask for help. Its ok to reach out and ask for help. In fact, it takes courage to reach out and tell somebody, Im struggling. I need some help. If you take the time to ask for help you can solve your issues and move on, said Herb. Sailors are also encour aged to help shipmates navigate stress by taking the time to be a friend and listen. Everybody needs a friend, said Herb. Everybody needs to be connected with another person. By connecting with somebody, you help them feel better and help them deal with stressors in life. Herb reminded Sailors that they can make a positive difference in the life of a shipmate who is struggling by tak ing a little extra time to A.C.T Ask if they need help; Care enough to lis ten, offer hope and not judge; and Treat, take action, get proper pro fessional assistance, and follow up. Additionally, command leaders can maintain a healthy unit by being familiar with the resources the Navy offers and recommending them to their Sailors who are dealing with stress or thoughts of suicide. These resources include Military OneSource at www.MilitaryOneSource. com and 1-800-342-9647, the Veterans Crisis Line at http://www.veteran scrisisline.net and 1-800273-8255, Navy Fleet and Family Support Program, Navy chaplains and medi cal providers. By looking out for each other and planning ahead, Sailors can make sure that their holidays are happy for themselves and their shipmates. Catholic Charities USAPromoting social justice and human services since 1910A CFC participant. Provided as a public service1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Photo: Steve Liss, AmericanPoverty.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 3

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HSL-46 Players Return From DeploymentFrom HSL-46 PAOTwenty-seven Sailors from HSL-46 returned to NS Mayport on Dec. 8 after seven months embarked on board USS Anzio (CG 68). The detachment comprised of two SH-60B aircraft, seven pilots, three aircrewmen, and seventeen maintain ers spent most of the past year away from homeport, beginning with work-ups in December of 2010. After a few short months at home in the Spring the Detachment Four Players departed Mayport for Norfolk, where Anzio is home ported, on May 8. The first month of deploy ment was spent visiting several ports on the Black Sea, including Bulgaria, Ukraine, and Georgia. In Georgia, the city of Batumi hosted a suppra, a traditional dinner, in honor of Anzios visit. Meeting the mayor of Batumi at the suppra, enjoying the great food, and learning about the national culture while toasting with the local Georgians was a great experience, comment ed Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Stewart Wallin. After crossing through the Suez Canal in midJune, with a brief stop in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Anzio assumed CTF151 Flagship duties from USS Mason (DDG 87) in Djibouti. During this stop the members of HSL-46 Det 7, The Intimidators, attached to Mason, had the opportunity to visit with and share stories of life in 5th Fleet with their newly arrived squadronmates on Anzio. The embarked CTF-151 staff, while officially a New Zealand staff, included members from Australia, Canada, and Great Britain. The grueling summer in the Gulf of Aden had very few milestones to mark time beyond the unprec edented number of flight hours the detachment flew in support of coun ter-piracy in the turbulent region. The overwhelm ing presence of coali tion forces ensured that piracy attempts were few and far between. Some of the most gratifying mis sions flown included the rescue of seven stranded mariners and their return to Somalia; a MEDEVAC from a merchant vessel to a British oiler; and the MEDEVAC of two piracy hostages more than 600 nautical miles around the Horn of Africa to USS Bataan (LHD 5). Pilot Lt. Dan Simonds noted that, it was a rewarding experience to coordinate coalition and national assets to MEDEVAC two hostages this great length. Near the end of August, the crew enjoyed a muchneeded respite in Port Victoria, Seychelles. The second half of deployment flew by, with brief stops in Bahrain and Oman to recharge and complete mainte nance on both the ship and the aircraft. Bahrain was the location of another change of com mand for CTF-151, and the embarked Pakistani staff assumed the task force duties until a Nov. 17 stop in Djibouti as Anzio departed the 5th Fleet AOR. With the bow finally pointed westward, the air detachment and crew looked forward to a stop in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, over Thanksgiving before heading home. The stop in Mayport on Dec. 8 served two purposes, to offload the air detachment from HSL-46 and to embark the Tigers, families and friends of the crew, invit ed for the brief coastal transit to Norfolk. The Tiger Cruise provides an insiders view of the Navy that few ever have the privilege of experiencing. For the Detachment Four Players of HSL-46 the return to Mayport was a fine reward for more than 1,000 mishap-free flight hours flown and a job well done. When asked to sum up his first deployment, Aviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Michael Struck said, It was a unique and rewarding learning expe rience. -Photos courtesy of HSL-46Air Warfare Rescue 3rd Class Kevin Sampson of HSL-46 Detachment Four holds his daughter as she plays with a rose he brought to her during the detachments homecoming last week. Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Stewart Wallin greets his family pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport with USS Anzio. Detachment Four was embarked on the cruiser for seven months as part of counter-piracy missions off Africa.Detachment 4 Deployed On Counter-Piracy MissionLt. Ken Barkovich and his wife pose for a picture after Barkovich returned with Detachment Four on Dec. 8 after a seven-month deployment embarked on USS Anzio. 4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Families Welcome Back Gettysburg -Photo by Paige GnannLt. Scott Burrill gets a welcome kiss home from his wife after reuniting with his family pierside during USS Gettysburgs homecoming on Dec. 8. USS Gettysburg Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and embarked Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 Detachment One return to their homeport of Naval Station Mayport, Florida, after concluding a regularly scheduled seven-month deploy ment to the 6th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility (AOR) as part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. Deployed with the George H.W. Bush on her maiden deploy ment, Gettysburg returned home on Dec. 8. While operating in the 5th Fleet AOR, Gettysburgs served as the Maritime Regional Air Defense Commander (MRADC) for Central Command. They provided air defense for all air space over water, including all air missions conducted by Carrier Air Wing Eight. I dont see how we could have been more successful in our mission, said Capt. Robert N. Hein, Commanding Officer of Gettysburg. You talk about things that make a CO proud and its the way the air defense team absolutely knuckled down and made the right things happen. Gettysburg got incredible praise from 5th Fleet [Vice Adm. Mark I. Fox, Commander US Naval Forces -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonBoatswains Mate 3rd Class Ahmann Brookes meets his three-month old daughter for the first time during the homecoming of the guidemissile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). Gettysburg returned from a successful seven-month deployment with the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn along with theater and maritime security cooperation efforts in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. See Gettysburg, Page 7 -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonBoatswains Mate 3rd Class Raymond Panameno from Houston, TX, hugs his sons during the homecoming of USS Gettysburg (CG 64). -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonGunners Mate 3rd Class Benjamin Lewis greets his children after receiving the first kiss from his wife Myeshia.-Photo by MC2 Gary GrangerVice President Joe Biden and Commander, Carrier Strike Group Two, Rear Adm. Nora Tyson, shake the hands of Sailors departing the guide-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) after a successful seven-month deployment with USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group.-Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist Wes Alexander hugs grandmother, Bettye Phillips, as his mother Tami Highfill watches the reunion.-Photo by Paige GnannDamage Controlman 1st Class Philip Hertz finds his wife Stephanie pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport from a deployment with USS Gettysburg

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 7 Central Command; Commander, US 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commander]. Not just for our ability to accomplish the mission, but we made it better for those who follow. We developed lessons and modified procedures for how business is done. I can see no higher honor than leaving it better than you found it, and Gettysburg did that. In late May, Gettysburg participated in Exercise Saxon Warrior 2011 off the coast of England. Saxon Warrior 11 is an exercise led by the United Kingdombased Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST). It is designed to develop theater-specific combat skills as well as enhance cooperation between multi-national forces and government agencies. On Sept. 8, Gettysburg held a change of command ceremony. Capt. Patrick O. Shea was relieved by Capt. Robert N. Hein as commanding officer of USS Gettysburg. The turnover took place in the ships pilot house where both Captains read their orders over the ships announcement system for the crew to hear. My biggest highlight was taking command of this ship and being given the opportunity to meet the incredible men and women of this ship, said Hein. Its a phenomenal crew, it really is. For example, we had 32 percent advancement rate this last cycle which crushed fleet averages. Many Sailors join the Navy to see the world, and this deployment allowed Sailors to do just that. During the seven-month deployment, Gettysburg pulled into numerous ports, including Plymouth, England; Benidorm, Spain; Naples, Italy; Manama, Bahrain; Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and Malaga, Spain. The crew has been fantastic with liberty is a mis sion, said Hein. Six port visits and zero liberty inci dents. Probably one of the highlights is seeing a crew that takes advantage of the ability to go out and see the cities and see the country that they are visiting and take the tours, vice just seeing the closest bar to the port. The Sailors aboard Gettysburg participated in several community relations (COMREL) projects in Benidorm, Manama, and Dubai. Its pretty incredible because we live to serve, and even in our off time we are able to gather up a group of Sailors and serve in a unique way, said Ensign Stephanie N. Stamm, COMREL Officer on board Gettysburg. Sailors also put forth great effort towards corrosion control, to preserve the ship and add years to the life of the ship. What is really impressive about our corrosion con trol efforts is people did it right, said Hein. Often, we dream about having the time to do it right but often fall short due to time or training constraints, and that was the great thing about being on deployment and having a team that was trained in corrosion control. They were able to do it right. Get things down to bare metal, cor rectly prime them and correctly paint them. More than 70 Sailors took advantage of their time underway to earn their enlisted surface warfare quali fication, air warfare qualification, and surface war fare officer qualification. Additionally, 10 Sailors were advanced to chief petty officer during deployment, along with 18 reenlistments and 91 advancements to a higher rank of first class petty officers and junior. We are glad to be coming home, said Hein. It is the most joyous occasion. Its like Christmas, 4th of July, and your birthday all rolled up into one. It is everything that is great about the Navy and the America. Families, friends, and all that stuff comes together for one day. Im so looking forward to sharing that with this crew, and then of course getting ready to do it all over again. Gettysburg was deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group, comprised of Carrier Strike Group 2 staff, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Destroyer Squadron 22, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg and USS Anzio (CG 68), and guided-missile destroyers USS Mitscher (DDG 57) and USS Truxtun (DDG 103).GettysburgFrom Page 6 -Photo by Paige GnannFamilies and friends line the newly refurbished Alpha Pier to welcome home their Sailors from deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannTrevor Campos, 4, sits on top of grandfather Mel Clays shoulders and waves as USS Gettysburg pulls pierside. Trevors mother, Chief Cryptologic Technician Collection Sheenah Campos, is attached to the ship.-Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonVice President Joe Biden takes a moment to chat with Heather Benefield and her fivemonth old daughter during the homecoming of USS Gettysburg.-Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonA Sailor touches foreheads with his daughter as they are reunited pierside.-Photo by Paige GnannFamily members and friends cheer as USS Gettysburg pull alongside the pier. Gettysburg returned from a successful seven-month deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannNew Dads disembark USS Gettysburg and meet their new babies for the first time after the ship pulls into Naval Station Mayport on Dec. 8. -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonSeaman Apprentice Cody Cooper meets his four-month old daughter for the first time after returning from deployment with USS Gettysburg (CG 64). -Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Xavian Deniz laughs with his son Apollos, 2, as his wife, Melany, smiles over the pair. -Photo by Paige GnannMachinery Repairman 1st Class Brandon Woodard is greeted by his wife, Anastasiya.close-air-support mis sions in conjunction with ground operations in Afghanistan, maritime patrol and power projec tion in the Arabian Gulf and counter piracy off the Horn of Africa. Gettysburg deployed with the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group support ing operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn along with theater and maritime security coop eration efforts in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome home! Biden said. You did a great job. Were proud of you and Merry Christmas.BidenFrom Page 1

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John L. Hall Conducts Burials At Sea Photo by Lt.j.g. William Hughes As the members of the Burial At Sea Detail render honors, the cremains of a Pearl Harbor Survivor and his wife are committed to the deep. Photo by Lt.j.g. William Hughes Chief Engineman(SW/CC) Raleigh Gilkinson presents an ensign to the next of kin during the ceremony. -Photo by CTT3 Michael OMalley Prior to committal, Cmdr. Michael Brand is presented with Cremains by Lt.j.g. Chris Thompson and Chief Cryptologic Technician Maintenance(SW/IDW) Michael Flowers.Photo by Lt.j.g. William Hughes At the conclusion of the ceremony, the Rifle Platoon fire a 21-gun salute to honor the fallen. See A Photo?Digital copies of all The Mirror photos are available by contacting The Mirror editor at mayportmirror@comcast.net or calling 270-7817 ext. 1012. Commissary Holiday HoursThe Mayport Commissary will be open Dec. 19 from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Dec. 24 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. It will be cclosed Dec. 25-26 for Christmas. The Commissary will be open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Dec. 31 and closed Jan. 1-2 for New Years Day. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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Underwood Hosts Pearl Harbor Ceremony Navy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East Detachment SoutheastMore than 200 veter ans and guests gathered aboard USS Underwood (FFG 36) Dec. 7 to honor and remember those who lost their lives during the attack on Pearl Harbor 70 years ago. Mayports Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) Branch 290 has hosted the annu al memorial service in conjunction with Naval Station Mayport since 1966. We have gathered here in tribute and respect to the earthly memories of those heroes on the sea, under the sea, in the air and upon the land who are now serving on the staff of the Supreme Commander, said Rick Kiger, president of FRA 290. Underwoods crew stood proudly in ranks as special guest speak er Duane Reyelts, a Pearl Harbor survi vor who served aboard USS Oklahoma (BB-37), recounted his memories of Dec. 7, 1941. The St. Augustine sur vivor was only 20 years old when the attack on his ship and the harbor thrust the United States into World War II. As he looked back on the events that day, Reyelts said Being young at that time, I wondered how I knew enough to do what I did to escape. But a lot of them didnt, and I think of them. I was still in my bunk when the ship was hit, said Reyelts. At 7:55 in the morning the general quarters buzzer sounded and I didnt even grab my clothes. I rushed to get to my battle station, which was all the way forward on the second deck. The Oklahoma was hit several times causing her to capsize and sink taking 429 members of the crew down with her. More than 2,000 people were killed that day to include civilians and the 1,177 Servicemembers who died on USS Arizona (BB-39). Chief Boatswains Mate (SW) Jeremy Doughtry, assigned to Underwood, said he is so proud and honored to be in the pres ence of such great men. When I think about what these men went through back then I get really choked up. Seeing how much joy they have in their eyes when they come on board, back in the presence of their shipmates, is truly a memo rable experience, said Doughtry. The ships observance of Pearl Harbor Day also included remarks by Lt. Gov. of Florida, Jennifer Carroll, a U.S. Navy retir ee, a wreath tossing cer emony and a gun salute. Carroll, who had also served at Pearl Harbor during her naval career, said I thank those who are serving and who have served, and God bless this great nation. The ceremony concluded in prayer with heads bowed. Though our heads are bowed in sorrow for the loss of our ship mates, there is pride in our hearts for the many things they did to keep the record of our country untarnished and unde feated, said Kiger. Vets Attend 70th Anniversary Of WW II Attack -Photo by MCSA Damian BergRetired U.S. Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Elbert W. Sawley salutes the tossing of flowers during Pearl Harbor Day Ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). The ceremony commemorated the 70th anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. -Photo by MCSA Damian BergVeterans attending the Pearl Harbor Day Ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) toss flowers overboard in remembrance of those lives lost during the attack on Pearl Harbor. -Photo by MCSA Damian BergFlorida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll delivers remarks to veterans and guests during a Pearl Harbor Day Ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 9

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TRICARE Young Adult Prime Available Jan. 1From TRICARE The TRICARE Young Adult (TYA) Prime option is avail able for purchase on Dec. 1, 2011, with coverage beginning Jan. 1, 2012. TYA Prime will offer young adult beneficiaries TRICARE Prime coverage for monthly premiums of $201. To purchase TYA Prime, dependents must be under age 26, unmarried and not eligible for their own employer-spon sored health care coverage. TYA Prime is a managed health care option with low outof-pocket costs. Care is deliv ered through military clinics and hospitals and the TRICARE network of civilian providers. Uniformed services dependents may qualify to purchase TYA Prime if they live in a designat ed Prime Service Area and their sponsors status makes them eligible for Prime coverage. In addition to TYA Prime, young adult dependents may also be eligible for TYA Standard, which has been available since May 2011. With monthly premiums of $186, Standard offers eligible depen dents the flexibility to see TRICARE-authorized network and non-network providers of their choice, wherever they live or travel. The Standard monthly premium is dropping to $176 on Jan. 1, 2012. Complete information and application forms are avail able at www.tricare.mil/ tya. Sponsors and their adult dependents are encouraged to explore both commercial and military health care plan options and costs when choosing a plan that best meets their needs. Young adults considering TYA should determine if they are eligible before completing and sending in an application. Eligible dependents may drop off the application and payment of three months of premiums at a TRICARE Service Center or send them by mail or fax to their regional health care con tractor. Once the initial payment is made, monthly premiums must be paid in advance through automated electronic payment. TYA Prime enrollment will follow the TRICARE Prime th of the month rule. As long as the TYA enrollment application is received by the 20th of the month, coverage can begin on the first day of the next month. For example, if an applicant wants TYA Prime to start Jan 1, 2012, the application and initial three-month payment must be received by Dec. 20, 2011. If its received after Dec. 20, TYA Prime coverage begins Feb.1, 2012. Dependent eligibility for TRICARE previously ended at age 21, or age 23 for full-time students. Similar to provisions in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, TYA offers eligible young adults up to age 26 the option to continue TRICARE Standard or Prime coverage, as long as their spon sor is still eligible for TRICARE. Unlike employer sponsored health plans, TYA is available only to unmarried young adult dependents. To receive e-alerts on TYA and other TRICARE news, sign up at www.tricare.mil/subscrip tions. By NH Jax Public AffairsAs of Jan. 1, 2012, Walgreens is no longer in TRICAREs retail pharmacy network. TRICARE benefi ciaries who want to fill pre scriptions at Walgreens after Dec. 31 need to file a paper claim for a non-network benefit reimbursement. Under the non-network benefit, TRICARE Prime beneficiaries pay a 50 per cent cost share after meet ing their point of service deductible, and TRICARE Standard and TRICARE For Life beneficiaries pay $12 for formulary prescriptions and $25 for non-formulary prescriptions or 20 percent of the total cost whichever is greater, after meeting the annual deductible. To find a network phar macy or get more informa tion, contact Express Scripts at 877-363-1303 or see www. tricare.mil/mybenefit/ and click on quick links, then prescriptions.Walgreens Leaves TRICARE Retail Pharmacy NetworkDoD To Honor Blood Donors For Saving Lives American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department plans to rec ognize blood donors early next year for their critical contributions to saving lives by giving blood to the Armed Forces Blood Program, the programs director said today. National Blood Donor Month, which is usually January of every year, is an attempt to recognize those blood donors and everyone involved in blood donation for their sacrifices and rolling up their sleeves in 2011, Army Col. Frank Rentas, director of the Armed Forces Blood Program, said during a Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service inter view here. Next month ... we will be recognizing those donors that have support ed our mission, he said. Our mission is to provide blood and blood supplies whenever and wherever theyre needed.The joint program plays a key role in providing quality blood products for service members and their fami lies in both peacetime and war, according to its website. Rentas noted the demand for blood -which only lasts 42 days in storage before perish ing -and shared different needs for blood donation which are based on the needs of the war fighter. Most people, when you say blood, they refer to red blood cells, he said. With red blood cells, O-negative is the most sought-after blood type because you can transfuse it to anyone out there. If you are looking at plasma, its completely opposite, Rentas contin ued. AB plasma is what we need because AB plasma is universal. So depending on our needs, we may target specific donors or specific blood types depending on what we need for a specific week. The program direc tor detailed the impor tance of receiving dona tions since one donor can potentially save three lives.If theyre donating whole blood ... we split that unit into plasma and red cells, he explained. One donation can actually save three different lives because we can make platelets out of some of those units as well. So the platelets can actually go to one recipi ent, the plasma can go to another, and the red cells can go to another, Rentas added. So that would be three different recipients that you can save with one donation. People can donate whole blood every 56 days, Rentas said, but some arent eligible to donate. Overseas, depending on where you are, you may or may not be able to donate, he explained. An example, Rentas said, is people who were based in Europe in areas afflicted with what is known as Mad Cow Disease. Even though Im an O-negative blood donor, and donated many, many times in the [1980s], I was assigned to Germany from 1987 to 1990, Rentas continued, and I have not been able to donate since because of Mad Cow Disease. Even though I feel perfectly fine, Im not allowed to donate. The colonel cited the Federal Drug Administration as the authority, which dictates policies and guidelines to both civilian and DOD blood donor facilities. Were licensed to col lect because we do have an FDA license, he said. So we need to fol low their policies ... one of their policies is if you have been in specific places where Mad Cow Disease has been a con cern, youre not allowed to donate. People can donate blood at more than 20 sites worldwide. Those who cannot donate blood, can still contribute by passing on the word, Rentas said. The best place for [service members] to get information is our web site, www.militaryblood. dod.mil, he said. [It has] anything that they need to know about locations, they can make appoint ments [and] reasons about why they may not be able to donate. Rentas expressed his gratitude to donors for rolling up their sleeves to give blood and he encouraged them to con tinue to support the pro gram. If you come to a DOD blood donor facility in January, were going to be holding recognition cer emonies to express our gratitude for what you have done in 2011, he said.NAVSAFECEN Tips On Safe ShoppingNaval Safety Center Public AffairsThe holiday shopping season is in full swing, which provides wouldbe pickpockets and thieves an opportunity to prey upon unsuspecting Sailors and their families. So many people are walking around with blinders on this time of year, assuming everyone has good intentions, said John Williams, an expert in off-duty recreation at the Naval Safety Center. The current economic situation is making the bad guys bolder. Nonetheless, Williams said it is not difficult to keep the crooks at bay it just requires situation al awareness and some common sense practices. One of the most impor tant things a holiday shopper can do is park in well-lighted, high-traffic areas. There are also other simple precautions to take. If you have a lot of pack ages, or feel nervous for any reason, ask a mall security guard to walk you to your vehicle, Williams said. Thats what theyre there for. Shoppers who do not visit a one-stop shop such as a mall may travel from store to store while they are out searching for gifts. Williams said there is a tendency for many to just toss their purchases in the back seat of the car before they head to the next stop. He said this is an open invitation for thieves to break in. Weve seen a lot of breakins, and its because the thieves were plainly able to see expensive items such as electronics or clothing inside the car, he said. He recommends putting all packages in the trunk where theyre out of sight. Statistics show that in the wake of the economic downturn, more shop pers are using cash to pur chase gifts than in years past. Some crooks are taking advantage of this with phony ATM machines. Williams said stand-alone ATM machines can be rigged to steal cards and personal identification numbers. Criminals are then able to use the card and the pin to take money out of legitimate cash machines. Check the slot for signs of tampering and look for cameras where they shouldnt be, he said. The most important thing is to be aware of your surroundings and remember that if some thing doesnt look right, it probably isnt. Many high-tech shoppers may think theyre safe from thieves because they do most of their purchas ing online, but with an increase in cyber crime, thats not always the case. However, a little vigilance can thwart most crimi nals. Make sure your com puter has good virus pro tection software and only shop from notable web sites that encrypt your information, he said. Whether shopping at home or at the mall, the unfortunate fact is thieves are out there attempt ing to hijack the holiday spirit along with vic tims money. However, Williams said the smart shopper can usually stay a few steps ahead of the bad guys. For more news from Naval Safety Center, visit www. navy.mil/local/nsc/. Dont accept defeat. F ight deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research HospitalA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport, in conjunction with Public Works, held a ribbon cutting ceremony to commemorate the completion of the Wharf Alpha Improvements project. Pictured from left is Harbor Ops Department Head, Lt. Cmdr. Cassius Farrell, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, Tony Landry, Tim Goerlich and Matt Tate of Orion Marine Group, as well as Engineer of Record Karen Falkenberry and Andy Stone of Public Works Mayport.Alpha Open For BusinessFrom Public Works MayportNaval Station Mayport officially commemorat ed the the completion of the $12.4-million Wharf Alpha Improvements project with a ribbon-cut ting ceremony on Dec. 7. The design-build con tract was awarded in May 2009 to the con struction firm of Orion Marine Construction and the A/E firm of CH2M Hill. The overhaul of the Wharf Alpha, which has two berths, was under way from May 2010 until December 2011. This project included the upgrade of the old existing cofferdam bulk head. A total of 900 linear feet of existing concrete bulkhead was demolished and replaced with a new sheet pile wall, which received a new concrete bulkhead cap. The exist ing electrical substation was demolished and replaced with a newly upgraded 4160V substa tion capable of supporting the power requirements for every current class of U.S. Navy ship. The proj ect also replaced more than 5,800 square yards roughly the size of a soccer field of asphal tic concrete pavement on Wharf Alpha. The completion of this project will provide Naval Station Mayport with modernized berthing capacity for the U.S. Fleet. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 11

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De Wert Crew Enjoys Yacht Club HospitalityFrom USS De WertUSS De Wert (FFG 45) made a port visit to Dar es Salaam during the weekend following Thanksgiving and enjoyed a wonderful reception at the Dar es Salaam Yacht Club (DYC). After passing the halfway point of their sevenmonth deployment, USS De Wert pulled into port to make some repairs to the ship and offer the crew a chance to stretch their legs with a little postThanksgiving liberty. Master Chief Vladimir Narvaez, the Operations Coordinator at the Embassy, arranged a reception at the Yacht Club with Spiros Manoloudis, DYC Commodore; Mark Hart, DYC Rear-Commodore Sail; and Vic Coppard, former DYC Vice Commodore. As far as I know the USS Forest Sherman [in 2007] was the first US ship that had been host ed at our club in about 40 years, Coppard recalled. The Yacht Club was very eager to have the crew of USS De Wert to their facility to express their gratitude for the work that the ship is doing in the fight against piracy in the Indian Ocean. Commanding Officer of USS De Wert, Cmdr. Vince Baker said, They went out of their way to invite us to their club and to thank us for the job we are doing in the counter piracy mission because it directly affects them and the economy of Tanzania. They appre ciate us, NATO and the Coalition Forces that are out there actively hunt ing pirates. They have a very personal connection to that mission because two of their members are hostages, and they were happy to hear about the negative trend in success ful pirate attacks and the positive impact military forces are having in the Somali Basin and the Gulf of Aden. The officers and sail ors from De Wert had a great time enjoying the company of their hosts and a wonderful dinner of grilled Mahi Mahi and jumbo shrimp. Lt.j.g. Bo Ames said, I thought it was amazing. They had great views, the people were really friendly and they were more than hos pitable. The Yacht Club shared their clubs history with the De Wert sailors and showed them their facil ity including the boat yard, the record wall of fish caught, and the plaques with all the past Commodores. Some of the club members were fascinated by how long a US Navy ship could stay at sea. The De Wert sailors also received invitations and advice for future trips to Tanzania including a buffalo hunt, a golf out ing and a hike up Mount Kilimanjaro. The reception was also attended by several members of the US Embassy including: Defense Attach Lt. Col. Thomas W. Cook, Army Attach Lt. Col. John Nutt and his wife Karen, Office of Security and Cooperation Lt. Col. Kevin Balisky and his wife Jane; Operations Coordinator Master Chief Vladimir T. Narvaez and his wife Elaine. In addition to the reception, the US Embassy in Dar es Salaam prepared other activities for the ship during the port visit in Dar. Chief Richard Anthonissen coordinated a Community Relations Project in which crew members from USS De Wert used some of their liberty to volunteer at the Makongo Primary School improving the facilities and interacting with the students who attend the school. USS De Wert is on a sev en-month deployment to deter and disrupt piracy in the Indian Ocean and off the Horn of Africa. USS De Wert is operat ing as a member of the Standing NATO Maritime Group (SNMG-1). -Photo by Lt. Peter Dietz Dar es Salaam Yacht Club (DYC) presenting gifts to USS De Wert (FFG 45) during their port visit. Pictured l to r: Vic Coppard, former DYC Vice Commodore; Command Master Chief LaDon Washington; Mark Hart, DYC Rear Commodore Sail; Cmdr. Vince Baker, Commanding Officer; Lt. Cmdr. Mark Quinn, Executive Officer. commissioned an Ensign through Officer Candidate School. At sea, Speights initial assignment was as Main Propulsion Assistant aboard USS Elrod (FFG 55), he also served as the Damage Control Assistant and Ships Training Officer during the tour. He then completed a follow-on sea assign ment as Main Propulsion Assistant aboard USS Moosbrugger (DD 980). While on Moosbrugger, he deployed as part of NATOs Standing Naval Forces Atlantic 2000. Following a shore tour, he was assigned as Chief Engineer aboard USS Carney (DDG 64). Following his Chief Engineer tour, he was assigned to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 24 as the Material and Readiness Officer. Speights most recent afloat assignment was to U. S. Seventh Fleet as Deputy Lead Planner. Ashore, Speight attend ed school at Jacksonville University earning a Bachelors of Science in Business Management and Marketing in 2003. His last duty was as executive officer in USS Boone. Love enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1988, attended the Broadened Opportunity for Officer Selection and Training (BOOST) Program in San Diego California in 1989, and was awarded a four-year NROTC schol arship to attend the State University of New York Maritime Academy. His first tour of duty was aboard USS Gallery (FFG 26). In September 1996, Love reported to USS Cape St George (CG 71) as the Damage Control Assistant. In March 1998, Love reported to COMNAVBEACHGROUP Two and served as Maritime Prepositioned Forces (MPF) Officer. In February 2001, Love reported to USS Stephen W. Groves (FFG 32) as Combat Systems Officer. Following his tour on Groves, Love report ed to COMDESRON 26 in October 2002. Following his tour at CDS 26, Love reported to COMSEVENTHFLT in Yokosuka, Japan. In April 2006, Love reported to USS John L. Hall (FFG 29) as Executive Officer. Following his tour at the War College, Love deployed to Iraq on an Individual Assignment in sup port of the ARMY 304th Sustainment Brigade stationed at Joint Base Balad as Team Leader of the NAVYs Petroleum Oil and Lubricant (POL) Detachment. Love will assume com mand of ATG Mayport during a ceremony on Dec. 16.BooneFrom Page 1 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 13

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SERMCs NAMTS-Trained Sailors Conduct Repairs, Training Aboard USS Hue CityNavy Regional Maintenance Cen ter (NRMC) Public AffairsSailors assigned to Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) on Naval Station Mayport completed repairs on 60 watertight doors aboard the USS Hue City (CG-66) Nov. 25. A group of SERMCs Damage Controlmen enrolled in the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) program repaired the ships water tight doors while also training ships force on proper preventive and corrective door mainte nance. NAMTS is allowing us to train, and even crosstrain, our Sailors and pro vide them with the skills necessary to perform maintenance on a vari ety of ship systems, said Capt. Ron Cook, SERMCs commanding officer. This is an especially effective program because the majority of training provided through NAMTS is conducted as on-the job, hands-on training using ship repair work that already exists and allows us to train our Sailors while providing immediate support to the Fleet, said Cook. During NAMTS training, Sailors com plete Job Qualification Requirements (JQRs), and in some cases earn Navy Enlisted Classifications (NECs), under the super vision of qualified men tors. Sailors document their training by complet ing qualification cards their mentors certify and approve. NAMTS training is available to Sailors on shore duty at a Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) Intermediate Maintenance Activities or Facilities (IMA or IMF), at shipyards and aboard tenders, as well as those stationed on ships that are undergoing extended maintenance availabilities. NAMTS goes to the heart of NRMCs initia tive to invest heavily in the professional develop ment of our IMA Sailors. In the near-term they will serve to re-estab lish the I-level capabil ity and capacity of our RMCs. In the long-term those Sailors will be the best trained and qualified operating engineers, leaders, maintainers our Navy has seen in decades. said Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) Rear Adm. David Gale, who leads Navys RMCs. Funding cuts to shorebased IMAs, which in the past served as a critical component of the training pipeline for fleet Sailors, led to the downsizing of these facilities. However, Navy leaders recognized the void, and have since undertaken several initia tives designed to rebuild resources, re-establish the RMCs capabilities and capacity, and positively influence quality main tenance and moderniza tion practices across the Navys RMCs. While training at an IMA, Sailors will receive on-the-job, rating-specif ic training, and can earn NECs in the following areas: Gas Turbine, Valve Shop, Outside Electrical, Outside Machinist, Diesel Engines, Pipefitter, Shipfitter, and Hydraulics said Osbert Teeka-Singh, SERMCs NAMTS coordi nator. At this time, the NAMTS program is open to five ratings and pro vides training in eight JQR areas that can help Sailors earn up to 12 NECs. There are also 10 other JQRs that have been disestab lished, which at this time, are no longer tracked or assigned. SERMC resurrected those disestablished JQRs in an effort to train Sailors in other ratings that would otherwise have nothing to use to base their training. The ten resurrected JQRs will not earn NECs at this time, but our goal is to re-establish those JQRs and NECs and include them in the formal track ing mechanism, as well, said Pat Shepler, SERMCs Production Department Head. In the interim, though, all of our Sailors are acquiring the mainte nance and repair skills that will allow them to support the fleet during their RMC shore duty, and again when they are aboard ships during their sea tours, said Shepler. The NAMTS program, according to Shepler, is a way to train Sailors on various shipboard opera tions and repair require ments. It also serves as the best conduit for us to communicate the same training to the fleet. To do this effectively within the Watertight Door Shop, said Shepler, we have an area set up with a flush deck scuttle, a quick-acting watertight hatch, and an individual dog watertight hatch we use to train Sailors. The same NAMTS-based training is then translated when the Sailors from the door shop goes aboard ships to conduct repairs while concurrently providing preventive and cor rective training to ship board Sailors. During their five-week repair period, SERMCs Sailors dismantled doors from the USS Hue City, pulled and inspected all door hardware, then cleaned, lubricated and reinstalled the doors. For doors that failed inspec tion due to excessive cor rosion, SERMCs Sailors performed a full removal and overhaul until they met standards based on the ships Planned Maintenance System (PMS). Specifically, SERMCs door shop reviewed the required PMS onboard each class of ship, select ed several checks for each type of door, and performed all of those checks with the ship to ensure door maintenance requirements were met. According to SERMCs Hull and Corrosion Product Family Supervisor, Brian York, the training and repair process essentially starts with the assessment phase and then follows with the repair phase. This teaches the Sailor onboard the ship to first be able to identify the problem, and then to repair the problem. We believe that self-assess ment and independence for repairs is key to the improvement of the mate rial condition onboard ships. We have already had a great deal of success with the NAMTS program, said York. Our review of the USS Hue Citys pre-INSURV assessment indicated there were no discrepancies noted on the report with regard to watertight doors, which is a direct reflection of the work and training weve been conducting in recent weeks. The success of the door shop is not only limited to USS Hue City. USS Halyburton (FFG-40) requested replacement of three watertight doors, and SERMCs door shop was able to fully repair all three doors saving more than $13,000 per door in replacement cost. These types of examples are expected to increase as their door shop continues to support the fleet, and will expand to other fleet support areas as their NAMTS training evolves into other production shops within SERMC. With the support of and investment in surface ship maintenance initia tives and resources the Navy requires to proper ly sustain our ships and train our fleet Sailors, our RMCs are now becoming uniquely positioned to ensure that the material readiness of todays, and tomorrows, fleet is sus tained. For more information about the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center, visit: www.nav sea.navy.mil/CNRMC/ SERMCCarney Disrupts Pirate AttackFrom U.S. Naval Forces Central Command Public AffairsUSS Carney (DDG 64), part of NATOs coun ter-piracy task force Operation Ocean Shield, worked with other NATO forces and coalition part ners to disrupt pirate activity in the Gulf of Aden, Dec. 5. A Japanese maritime patrol aircraft patrol ling the area on counterpiracy operations spot ted a suspicious skiff with seven suspected pirates aboard and contacted the NATO flagship ITS Andrea Doria who in turn tasked Carney to investigate. In a coordinated operation, Carney approached the skiff, while the patrol aircraft circled overhead. As the warship appeared on the horizon the skiff attempted to flee however it stopped when hailed. The patrol aircraft and Carney observed the suspected pirates throw ing items overboard. The items were visually con firmed by the patrol air craft as ladders and other pirate-related equipment. A team from Carney boarded the skiff and after a thorough search seized the excess fuel and other items useful to piracy activity, before ensuring the skiff had enough fuel to return to the Somali coast. In 2009, 45 ships were hijacked in the region; so far in 2011, 21 ships have been hijacked effectively halving the number of ships taken. Naval war ships have been in the region constantly provid ing a visible presence and deterrence and this has undoubtedly contributed to the pirates lack of suc cess. Carney is currently deployed, assigned to NATO, conducting coun ter-piracy operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. In the long-term those Sailors will be the best trained and qualified operating engineers, leaders, maintainers our Navy has seen in decades.-Rear Adm. David Gale CNRMC Eat Early At GalleyOasis Galley will be open for dinner from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Dec. 16 due to a command func tion. Dont accept defeat.Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC participant provided as a public service. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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On Dec.3, USS Carney's Supply Department hosted a psychedelic 1970's themed party for the crew. The night's events consisted of a delicious dinner, a competitive costume contest, a soul train, and a raffle with great prizes. Above, the two finalists for the costume contest are Machinery Repairman 1st Class (SW/SCW) James Heard and Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Ledric Neal. Right, Ship's Serviceman 2nd Class (SW) Angela Muratalla and Personnel Specialist 1st Class (SW) Sean Limbach in Carney's homemade 1970's photo booth. Carney Gets Psychedelic -Photo by Ensign Amalie Shaffer -Photo by ITC(SW) Willie Wilkerson THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 15

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Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bingo Special 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double Payouts on all hand cards, 3 extra $1000 games, food provided by MWR and more. 2707204. Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bash featuring Lift 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Enjoy bowling, music, prizes, snacks, and more. Reservations Required. 270-5377 Jan. 2: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Jan. 4: Quartermania Every Wednesday 9 p.m.Midnight at Mayport Bowling Center. $5 cover charge, 25 shoe rental, 25 bowling games, 25 chicken wings and more! 270-5377. Jan. 4: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Jan. 4: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Jan. 4: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Jan. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 9: Womens Volleyball Organizational Meeting 5 p.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 22; must be 18 or older. 270-5451 Jan. 9: BSC National Championship Game Party. 7 p.m. at Beachside Community Center; game kicks off at 8:30 p.m. Watch the game on our 20 ft. screen. Free food, give aways and more! 270-5451 Jan. 10: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 10: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Jan. 11: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Jan. 13: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 13: Exit. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Jan. 14: UFC 142 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Jan. 16: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 17: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Tennis Organizational Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 30. 270-5451 Jan. 24: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Volleyball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 13. 270-5451 Jan. 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by HSM40. For tickets, call (904) 270-6639 x151. Jan. 27: Paul Lundgren Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 MWRDec. 16: Teen Holiday Party & Movie Night. 4:30-11 pm at the Teen Center. Enjoy a cook ie station, art station, Christmas challenges from 4:30-6:30 p.m. fol lowed by a holiday movie. 246-0347 Dec. 20: Teens on the Go: Avenues Mall Christmas Shopping 1:30-6 p.m. Permission slip required. Bring money for shopping. 2460347 Dec. 21: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. Dec. 28: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Enjoy bowling, music, prizes, snacks, and more. Reservations Required. 270-5377 Jan. 1: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Jan. 13: Freedom Friday the 13th Fear Factor. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Jan 14: Dave & Busters Trip 1-5 p.m. Cost is $8, includes choice from 9 entrees and a $10 game card. Permission slip required. Open to the first 24 teens to sign up that have up-to-date registration. 246-0347 Jan. 16: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 20: Teen Lock In. 7:30 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. Totally cool theme. Are you ready to be cool? 2460347 Jan. 28: Teen Cosmic Bowling on Base. KID A Piece Of History -Photo by Paige GnannUSS Stephen W. Groves Chiefs Mess hold memorabilia and a plaque signify ing the history of a shadowbox they donated to the Focsle Lounge, NS Mayports Chief Petty Officers Club. The box contains a shadow box with two rocks from theWorld Trade Center after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks destroyed the Twin Towers in New York City. The Mess also donated a picture of Stephen W. Groves during a visit to New York, with the Twin Towers in the background. Also pictured is retired Chief Jim Phillips who attended the dedication. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.org 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 15: St. Johns Town Center Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Dec. 16: St. Augustine Amphitheater Trip Enjoy ice skating, sleigh rides, ice slides & more. Please bring cash. Van Departs Liberty Center 4 p.m. FREE Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Dec. 17-18: Holiday Matsuri Convention in Orlando. Convention includes video games, anime, sci-fi, celeb rity guests & more. Cost is $50; includes hotel & convention ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 17-18: Universal Studios Island of Adventure Trip Cost is $65; includes hotel & theme park ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 20: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 22: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 23: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. Dec. 24: Pool Tournament Finals 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bash featuring Lift 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Enjoy bowling, music, prizes, snacks, and more. Reservations Required. 270-5377 Jan. 1: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts Van Departs Liberty Center 11:30 a.m. Cost $5. Jan. 3: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. Jan. 4: Darts Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 4: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Jan. 4: Quartermania Every Wednesday 9 p.m.Midnight at Mayport Bowling Center. $5 cover charge, 25 shoe rental, 25 bowling games, 25 chicken wings and more! 270-5377. Jan. 4: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Jan. 7: Cosmic Ice Skating. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Cost $5. Jan. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowl ing, shoe rental, and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 9: Womens Volleyball Organizational Meeting 5 p.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 22; must be 18 or older. 270-5451 Jan. 9: BSC National Championship Game Party. 7 p.m. at Beachside Community Center; game kicks off at 8:30 p.m. Watch the game on our 20 ft. screen. Free food, give aways and more! 270-5451 Jan. 10: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 11: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Jan. 13: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 13: Exit. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Jan. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. Jan. 14: UFC 142: Aldo vs. Mendes 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Jan. 15: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 Jan. 16: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments pro vided. Jan. 16: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 17: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 30. 270-5451 Jan. 18: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 21: Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus. Van Departs Liberty Center 6:15 p.m. FREE Jan. 22: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE Jan. 24: Cornhole Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 24: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Volleyball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 13. 270-5451 Jan. 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by HSM40. For tickets, call (904) 270-6639 x151. Jan. 25: Pool Tournament Finals 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Jan. 26: Texas Hold Em Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 17

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18 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Mayport Families Enjoy FestivitiesMWR Hosts Annual Magical Christmas Event Kelsey Long, 13, pulls a prize lollipop from the lollipop tree as an MWR vol unteer congratulates her. Mike the Clown from Ringling Bros. Barnum and Bailey Circus talks with children at the festival. A young boy makes reindeer food, one of several activities set up at the event. Markus Blakely, 4, takes a rest on a hay bale as he holds his goody bag gathered from different activity stations set up at the event. Children from the Youth Activities Center perform Christmas songs during MWRs Magical Christmas on Dec. 8 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. Brian Clegg, 3, Jahmaica Clegg, 5, Lindsay Orellana, 7, and Quintin Johnson, 4, take a ride in a static airplane set up at Magical Christmas. Families enjoy roasting marshmallows over a closed fire pit at Sea Otter Pavilion during MWRs annual Magical Christmas festival. Santa and Mrs. Claus, volunteers from Santa America, pose for pictures with families attending Magical Christmas. Santa visited with children and took notes for their wish-list of special toys.From StaffFamilies of Naval Station Mayport Sailors bundled up and kept warm with fun activities at the annual MWR Magical Christmas on Dec. 8 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. This years festivities included music by the Navy Southeast Holiday Brass Band and performances by the Youth Activities Center. Santa and Mrs. Claus, volunteers from Santa Americas Military Support Program, were joined by Mike the Clown from Ringling Bros., Barnum and Bailey Circus to entertain the crowds. Children also got a chance to enjoy free arts and crafts and mini-games at the event. For more information about events happening throughout 2012, call MWR at 270-5228. A young boy tries to ring a candy cane with a frisbee at one of the booths.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 19

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DFAS To Release 2011 Tax Statements Via myPay, U.S. MailFrom DFASElectronic and postal delivery of 2011 tax statements for military service members, military retirees and federal civilian employees paid by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service will begin by mid-December through January with all customers receiving their W-2s and 1099Rs by Jan. 31. For most, tax statements will be available online using the DFAS myPay pay management system ( https://mypay.dfas.mil/mypay.aspx) a week or more earlier than delivery via mail. 2011 tax statement myPay and USPS mail schedule: Voluntary Separation Incentive/Special Separation Benefit ** Permanent Change of Station Military non-appropriate fund civilian employees receive tax statements from their respective military service. Army NAF employee tax statements are made available via myPay. The myPay advantage While tax statements are avail able on myPay earlier than waiting for an envelope in the mail, there are other advantages to using the online system throughout the year. Availability: Tax statements available on myPay will Form/Document Date available on myPay Dates mailed via the U.S. Post Office Retiree Annual Statement (RAS) Dec. 4, 2011 Dec. 19. 2011 Jan. 10, 2012 Retiree 1099R Dec. 15, 2011 Dec. 19. 2011 Jan. 10, 2012 Annuitant Account Statement (AAS) Dec. 14, 2011 Dec. 19-31, 2011 Annuitant 1099R Dec. 14, 2011 Dec. 19-31, 2011 Active Duty Air Force, Army, Navy W-2 Jan. 24, 2012 Jan. 24-29, 2012 Reserve Air Force, Army, Navy W-2 Jan. 6, 2012 Jan. 6-9, 2012 Marine Corps Active & Reserve W-2 Jan. 16, 2012 Jan. 19-21, 2012 Civilian employee W-2 (DoD/Non-DoD) Jan. 5, 2012 Jan. 7-15, 2012 Military VSI/SSB W-2 Not available via myPay Jan. 4-5, 2012 Savings Deposit Program 1099INT Jan. 21, 2012 Jan. 21-22, 2012 Vendor Pay 1099 Not available via myPay Jan. 20-25, 2012 Vendor Pay MISC W-2 Jan. 31, 2012 Jan. 20-25, 2012 Travel PCS ** W-2 Jan. 31, 2012 Jan. 20-25, 2012 Army Non-Appropriated Fund Civilian Pay W-2 Jan. 20, 2012 Not availableremain online for one year. These, as well as other doc uments such as leave and earning statements, may be printed or downloaded for storage on computer hard drives, CDs, DVDs or flash drives. Except during periodic system maintenance periods, myPay is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The only requirements are valid login credentials (ID and password) and a computer connected to the Internet. The inner circle: myPay users have a need to allow trusted individuals to access their pay documents and information. Military members deployed away from home may wish to have their spouses, parents or other associates to retrieve information for tax preparation purposes. An elderly retiree may desire to grant access to his or her tax accountant or legal guardian. Users can establish limited access passwords for their family members or other trusted individuals by logging in and establishing access in their Personal Settings. Individuals granted limited access to a myPay account may retrieve documents or view information but cannot make changes to existing addresses, bank accounts, allotments or other pay account information. Security: While each pay account customer has a personal responsibility to keep their login information secure, myPay uses security tools that surpass industry standards to keep that customers pay information safe. Recently, myPay was changed to allow customers accessing the system using a Computer Access Card (CAC) enabled computer to log in without using their login ID or password. This change made the system even easier to use while not compromising its security. Savings: By using myPay each military member, retiree and federal civilian employee saves their depart ment or agency the cost of mailing documents. While each individual W2, 1099R or LES might be inexpen sive, the overall costs of mailing millions of individual documents can become substantial. When combined with the environmental costs of paper, printing and delivery, using myPay is one way each individual can contribute to ensuring funds are available for their departments mission, such as supporting the needs of military men and women for DoD customers.Absentee Voting Guidelines Released For OverseasFrom Federal Voting Assistance ProgramThe Federal Voting Assistance Program and the Military Postal Service Agency yesterday announced absentee bal lot mailing date guide lines that apply to various overseas locations. Military members serv ing overseas and other U.S. citizens living abroad must consider mail tran sit times when submitting their absentee ballots to vote in upcoming presi dential, Senate, House, gubernatorial, state leg islature, local and other elections. The 2012 U.S. presidential election, for example, will be held Nov. 6, 2012. Officials recom mend that absentee vot ers sending ballots from the following countries mail them out no later than:-Iraq: 22 days before the election; Afghanistan (exclud ing air stop locations), Egypt, Kyrgyzstan, Oman and Turkmenistan: 17 days before the election; Germany: 11 days before the election; Afghanistan air stop locations, Bahrain, Cuba, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates: 10 days before the election; and Japan, Korea and the Philippines: seven days before the election. For a full list of absentee ballot mailing dates for overseas locations, visit www.FVAP.gov. Military members serv ing overseas may express mail their absentee bal lots free of charge from any APO/FPO/DPO or American embassy and consulate -ask to use the Express Mail Label 11-DoD. This label allows voters to track their bal lots at www.usps.com. The federal write-in absentee ballot is used as a backup ballot. Thirty days prior to an election, if voters believe theyll not receive their state ballot in time to vote and return it, they can vote using the FWAB. This ballot is accepted by all states from any overseas or mili tary voter who has regis tered and requested a bal lot for 2012.Phone Cards To DeployedNavy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs OfficeNavy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced military members underway or forward-deployed dur ing the holiday season have been given a free $10 phone card to call loved ones back home. This is the tenth holiday in a row that NEXCOM has offered free phone cards to deployed military members. We are honored to be able to give free phone cards to our military men and women who do so much and sacri fice so much through out the year to protect our country, said Jennie Zack, NEXCOM person al telecommunications specialist. These free phone cards are a way to thank them for their ser vice especially during the holiday season when they are away from their loved ones. NEXCOM will distrib ute $10 AT&T prepaid phone cards to those ships with AT&T Direct Ocean Service that will be deployed and away from their homeport for the December holiday season including Coast Guard vessels, submarines as well as forward deployed forces. NEXCOM expects to distribute nearly 45,000 free phone cards during the holidays. 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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NORAD Gears Up To Track Santa ClausAmerican Forces Press ServiceFor the 56th year run ning, the North American Aerospace Defense Command will add the job of tracking the global flight of Santa on Christmas Eve to its mis sion of North American aerospace warning and control. NORAD stands the watch protecting the skies of North America 365 days a year, but on Christmas Eve the chil dren of the world look to NORAD and our trusted partners to make sure that Santa is able to com plete his mission safely, said Army Gen. Charles H. Jacoby Jr. Jacoby commands NORAD, as well as U.S. Northern Command, both based at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. The NORAD Tracks Santa mission is a duty to the children of the world, he added, and a privilege weve enjoyed for 56 consecutive years. From a NORAD video of the 2010 Santa flight, a military specialist looks up from a bank of com puter screens: Sir, he says, turning to look at the camera, weve picked up Big Red on the radar. Hes entering from the northeast. Recommend fighter escort as he transitions over North America, the specialist adds, as the video shows an F-16 mov ing down the runway. This year, the NORAD Tracks Santa website went live Dec. 1 and features a Countdown Calendar, a Kids Countdown Village with holiday games and activities that change daily, and video messages from students and troops from around the world. The website is avail able in English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Japanese, Brazilian Portuguese and Chinese. For the first time, using free apps in the Apple iTunes Store and in the Android market, parents and children can use their smart phones to count down the days until Santa and his reindeer take off from the North Pole to deliver presents to kids everywhere. Facebook, Google+, YouTube and Twitter also offer tracking opportunities. Santa followers can type @noradsanta into each search engine to get started. And thats not the only technology that goes into the Santa tracking mis sion. To track the big man in red, NORAD uses radar, satellites, Santa cams and fighter jets. A NORAD radar system called the North Warning System consists of 47 installations strung across the northern border of North America. On Dec. 24, NORAD monitors the radar systems continu ously for indications that Santa Claus has left the North Pole. The moment radar indi cates a lift-off, satellites positioned in geo-syn chronous orbit at 22,300 miles from the Earths surface are equipped with infrared sensors, which enable them to detect heat. Rudolphs bright red nose gives off an infrared signature that allows the satellites to detect Santas sleigh. NORAD starting using the Santa cam network in 1998. Santa cams, according to NORAD, are ultracool, high-tech, highspeed digital cameras prepositioned at many locations around the world. They use the cam eras once a year to capture images and videos of Santa and his reindeer. In the air, Canadian NORAD pilots flying the CF-18 fighter will inter cept and welcome Santa to North America. In the United States, American NORAD fight er pilots in F-15s, F-16s or F-22 Raptors will fly alongside Santas air borne sleigh pulled by his famous reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and Rudolph. Once data is collected on Dec. 24, it is pushed into Google Maps and Google Earth so families all over the world can fol low Santa. Thanks to these systems and technologies, start ing at midnight Mountain Standard Time on Dec. 24, visitors to the NORAD Santa website can watch Santas progress around the globe. It all started in 1955 when a Sears media advertisement directed kids to call Santa Claus but printed a telephone number that rang through to the crew commander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. The colonel on duty told his staff to give all children who called in a current location for Santa Claus. The tradition continued when NORAD replaced CONAD in 1958. The [NORAD Tracks Santa] effort, Jacoby said, could not be carried out without the superb assis tance of numerous gov ernment and nongovern ment contributors. Sponsors of this years program include Acuity Scheduling, Big Fish Worldwide, Carousel Industries, the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Council, General Electric, the National Tree Lighting Ceremony, RadiantBlue Technologies Inc., thunderbaby stu dios, the U.S. Coast Guard Band, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Band, Visionbox, and the West Point Band. Returning sponsors include the Air Force Academy Band, Analytical Graphics Inc., Air Canada, Avaya, Booz Allen Hamilton, Colorado Springs School District 11, the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, the Federal Aviation Administration, First Choice Awards & Gifts, Globelink Foreign Language Center, Google, the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, Meshbox, the Naden Band of the Maritime Forces Pacific, Naturally Santas Inc., the Newseum, OnStar, PCI Broadband, the Space Foundation, tw telecom, Verizon and UGroup Media. It is the generosity of these contributors, the hard work of the more than 1,200 volunteers who man the NORAD Tracks Santa Operations Center, and vigilance of the Canadian and U.S. forces who work at NORAD that guarantees the programs success each and every year, Jacoby said. -Courtesy graphicThe North American Aerospace Defense Command based at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., will again track Santa Claus on his annual Christmas Eve flight to deliver pres ents to children around the globe. FFSC Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 1615 Dec. 15, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 21, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 27, 2-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Dec. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Saturday, Dec. 17 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 18 Christ United Methodist Church will host a Live Nativity from59 p.m. on the front lawn of the Church on Sunday Evening at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 24 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the difference between a conch and a whelk, or a cockle and a clam? Discover how to identify many of the frequently found shells that wash up on the Talbot Islands State Parks shores. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Please join Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach at 11:30 a.m. as they celebrate the birth of our Savior. Two services will be available to bring your family and friends to usher in Christmas morn ing at 7 p.m. Childrens Christmas Eve and Candle Lighting Service 11 p.m. Traditional Candlelight Communion Service. Services will be held in the sanctu ary at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 31 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. for a look into these past cultures and the artifacts they left behind. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 21



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Biden Thanks SailorsVPOTUS Welcomes Back USS Gettysburg-Photo by MC2 Gary Granger Jr.Vice President Joe Biden speaks to Sailors while waiting for the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) return to Naval Station Mayport. Gettysburg returns after a successful seven-month deployment with USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn along the theater and maritime security cooperation efforts in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastVice President Joe Biden made a surprise visit to more than 300 Sailors, friends and family mem bers during a homecoming cel ebration for USS Gettysburg (CG64) Dec 8. The guided missile cruis er returned to Naval Station Mayport after a successful sev en-month deployment from the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Biden spoke with the family members and friends on the pier before boarding Gettysburg to shake the hands of Sailors going ashore to their loved ones. Theyve missed weddings. They have missed funerals. They have missed holidays,Biden said. And let me tell you, youve missed it with them. The vice president also extended his thanks to military coming home as well as ashore. Only one percent of the entire population in the military are fighting these wars, said Biden. One hundred percent of the population owes you thanks and I mean that sincerely. You are an incredible bunch of folks. Gettysburgs Commanding Officer, Capt. Robert Hein, stood at the quarterdeck alongside the vice president shouting out how thrilled he is to be home. This is the greatest thing in the world, said Hein. This is Christmas, New Years, the Fourth of July and your birthday all wrapped up in one. Biden also spoke about the seven new dads on board who finally had the chance to see their newborns for the first time. There are seven of you in here that are going out to meet their child for the first time, Biden said. Ive spoken to each one of them. Theyre brilliant. They all said the same thing, beat Army Saturday. One of the dads never expect ed the amount of joy he would receive this homecoming day. Its actually the greatest thing Ive ever felt, said Quartermaster 3rd Class Marcellous McGee. Just coming off a seven-month deployment, got my newborn, never seen him before, so its a great feeling. The strike group conducted Leaving BooneFrom StaffLt. Cmdr. Robert Speight relieved Cmdr. Roy Love as com manding officer of USS Boone (FFG 28) dur ing a low-key ceremony aboard the ship on Dec. 9. Guest speaker for the event was Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, Commodore Paul Flood. Speight was born in Lynchburg, VA and enlisted in the Navy in September 1989. He served as an Electronics Technician (Submarines) before being accept ed into the Seaman to Admiral Program. He was -Photo by Paige GnannCmdr. Roy Love, outgoing commanding officer of USS Boone shakes hands with his relief and former executive officer, Lt. Cmdr. Robert Speight, before being piped off by the Officers and Chiefs Mess after a change of command ceremony on Dec. 8. Go Navy, Beat Army No Mirror For Holidays-Photo by ET1 Marty ParsonsThe quarterback for the Navy team dodges tackles as he makes his way to the goal during Naval Station Mayports annual flag football Army/Navy game. NAS Jacksonville represented the Navy and the Jacksonville Army Recruiting District represented the Army in this years battle. Just like the Naval Academy Midshipmen won bragging rights against the Army for the third consecutive year, NAS Jacksonville kept the title with the Navy for the third year at Mayports game. Afterwards, the teams joined more than 100 spectators at an MWR-sponsored tailgate party at Beachside Community Center to watch the Army/Navy game on the big screen.See Biden, Page 7 See Boone, Page 13Due to the upcoming holiday season, The Mirror will not publish during the weeks of Dec. 22 and Dec. 29. All photo/story submissions to The Mirror during this time will be included in the Jan. 5, 2012 edition. For more information, please contact Base Public Affairs Office at 270-5226 ext. 1011/13.Mayport Gets Lit UpIf you live in onor off-base housing, make sure to have all of your decorations lit up and burning bright on Dec. 21. Naval Station Mayport is spon soring a Housing Lighting Contest. Judges will be out in all housing areas between 6-8 p.m. Winners will be notified on Dec. 22.Christmas Dinner At GalleyServicemembers, retired military, vet erans and guests are invited to Oasis Galley on Dec. 25 from 1-4 p.m. The menu includes roast tur key, mashed pota toes, assorted breads, cranberry sauce, and assorted desserts, along with egg. Cost is $7.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212.MCPON Sends Holiday Message To FleetMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick D. West released the following holiday message to the Fleet Dec. 12. Shipmates and Navy fami lies, Can you believe another year is almost over? Its amazing how quickly time passes when youre staying busy! It seems we were kicking off 2011 just yes terday and here we are, about to usher in 2012. With the tra ditional festivities of December upon us, I want to wish you all the happiest possible holidays, and to say thank you for the outstanding service and sup port you provide to our Navy and nation. I continue to be humbled by your selfless dedi cation and the outstanding job you do every day around the globe. We faced some challenges this year and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, but we will get through them together as we have done for the past 236 years. The Navy, after all, is a team sport and in 2011, we enjoyed many opera tional successes together that are worth celebrating. They are your legacy ... the deployments, the steady presence in difficult places, the helping hand when natural disasters left vulnerable people in their wake. You and your Shipmates worked hard and sacrificed often. As you visit with loved ones, scour the shopping malls, or hit the ski slopes dur ing these joyous weeks, take a moment to reflect on the special appreciation America has for you and your family. Be proud of your accomplish ments, and share sea stories with moms, dads, siblings, aunts, uncles, and old buddies. Most of all, be safe and enjoy the holiday season to its full est. Celebrate responsibly: You are important to our Navy family and we need every one of you to return recharged for the next adventure. Dont let bad judgment ruin the New Year or your life. Look out for each other, and keep an eye on your Shipmates who may be hav ing a difficult time. Its also important that we remember the thousands of our Shipmates who are deployed, on station around the world vigilantly keeping the watch, ready to answer our nations call. They are there ensuring we have this chance to deck the halls, gather around family dinner tables, and belt out Auld Lang Syne in a storm of confetti. Thank you again for serving our great Navy and preserving our nations freedom. Sailors and families, you are truly among this countrys greatest gifts. Happy holidays Shipmates and HOOYAH! Very Respectfully, MCPON Ive received many calls and emails this past month dealing with an upcoming move. While most children and their families get excited about moving to a new com munity because it is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore different scenery, and maybe get your own bedroom, military fami lies who must move in the middle of a school year sometimes face opposi tion from the children. A mid-year move is fraught with anxiety. Children will be leaving friends and starting in a new school with students who have already formed friendships and a rela tionship with the teacher. Who will be my teach er? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common questions, tinged with worry, which your children will ask about the move. While you may be concerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a climate change, your chil dren hone in on what will have the greatest impact on them: school. Roughly 16 mil lion American families move each year. And the adjustment can be hard on kids. One of the keys to making it easier is time. Psychologist Gary Santavicca says, In gen eral, the more prepara tion you have, the easier a transition is. So, he says, start talking about the move as early as possible. And include the kids. If there is time, have them get online to learn about their new school and what has been going on there like athletics, clubs, grade level activi ties. Different things to help them feel like theyre helping to make it hap pen, and its a family project, he says. Totally preventing moving anxiety may not be possible, but attempts to do so can benefit all in the family not just the chil dren. Consider three key elements: reliability, routine, and relationships. By promoting these three elements, youll expe rience a more positive move for everyone. When parents trust the move, they will send a positive message to chil dren about the good place they are going to and the good people, and espe cially, the school they will encounter there. Your feeling of reliability will be transferred to your chil dren, helping them to feel confident about the move and the school experi ence. It is easy to distrust the unknown, so reli ability should be devel oped through familiarity and a pattern of helpful response. If your child is too young to do an inter net research about the school, you can help. Finding out the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports sched ules, and clubs available will provide informa tion to ease the transi tion. Also check with the School Liaison Officer or the Youth Sponsorship Program coordinator at the new installation for names of students at the school who would be willing to become email buddies. Knowing someone before you even get to school can relieve some of the anxiety about who will I know or who will sit with me at lunch? You can get in touch with the SLO at your new installa tion by calling the SLO at your current installation or Googling Navy SLO. The installations website should have information on the Youth Sponsorship Program under the MWR tab. Routine is another key element to reducing anxiety because it provides structure to the childrens day and security in knowing what to expect. The School Liaison Officer may be able to put you in contact with the schools counselor. The counselor can provide information about the lunch schedule, PE routines (including uniforms for middle and high school students), backpack rules and other information which may not be posted on the schools website. So as you approach day one at the new school, establish a regular bedtime rou tine and morning rou tine. Decide if your child will pack a lunch or buy it. Make sure that he has clothes that are appropri ate for the schools dress code. It may be a little tricky to do this before you move, but it will cer tainly lessen fears and questions once you are in your new location. The school counselor can help the teachers receiving your children to build strategies for estab lishing positive relation ships with them. It is harder to do this once the school year has started, but by sharing informa tion about your children before they arrive will give the teacher and the class time to prepare a wel coming atmosphere. The teacher may organize an activity for the students to introduce themselves. Or in the middle or high school, the teachers may provide information on the curriculum or texts they are using. The teachers could also be encour aged to email or to send a note to the children prior to enrollment. Being proactive can minimize your time spent struggling with incidents related to move anxiety. Starting the move with Were Moving Now? Dealing With New StartJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer I was reading on the internet last week about Christmas and found some generally interest ing facts about the origin of Christmas and how it has evolved over time. I thought I would share some of what I found. How Did Christmas Start? Some theorists have surmised that the cel ebration of Christmas is related to the Jewish Festival of Lights, during which Jesus was born. Others associate it with the Roman holiday of Saturnalia, which was a celebration of the births of several Roman gods. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia online, Christmas (or Mass of Christ) was not one of the earliest celebrations of the Catholic Church. However, in various places around the Holy Land, starting in about 200 AD, masses celebrating Christs birth became annual events. In the fourth cen tury, the date of Dec. 25 was settled on by most churches as the annual celebration. Cmdr. Steven Souders Surface Force Ministry CenterOrigins Of Christmas Remind Us Of Blessings HOMEFRONTSome of the early masses included dramatic representations of the Nativity. As early as the fourth century, hymns and carols became part of these dramatic events. It was not until 1223 that St. Francis of Assisi presented the nativity in the form of the crib or crche that we now know. How Did the Celebration Change? Elements of various pagan celebrations that took place around the month of January gradu ally worked themselves into Christmas celebra tions. Among these ele ments were gift giving, greeting cards, and the Yule log, which was based on a practice of a land lord providing a tenant with wood on the birth of a child. Various other elements, such as the Christmas tree and vis its from Saint Nicholas as Santa Claus were based on other holidays and practices. Over time, Christmas became a major feast day with special foods, such as minced meat, goose, and hot mulled spirits, not eaten the rest of the year. Other saints days, such as Saint Lucias Day in Sweden, also became associated with the Christmas holidays. The Christmas tree, which was probably based on pagan sym bols, became a symbol of everlasting life and hope, especially in Europe and North America. Adorned in lights (initially can dles) and smelling of the outdoors, it became an important part of the Christmas celebration. Gifts were originally hung on the tree and they now take a place of honor under the tree. The holy leaf is also an evergreen symbol of everlasting life and is also associated with the crown of thorns Jesus wore when he was crucified. Santa Claus has been around in one form or another since the fourth century. Santa Claus, Old St. Nick, and all of the other incarnations of Father Christmas are based on St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children and sailors. To recap then, Christmas was, none theless, consistently a time for families to come together to cel ebrate the birth of Jesus and to worship together. The religious activities were enhanced by food, drink, decorations, and an appreciation of the win ter season as a doorway to the renewal of spring. With that being said, may all the blessings of Christmas be yours this year. CHAPLAINSBase Chapel Holiday ServicesProtestant Christmas Services Do you feel like you are missing out on the spir it of Christmas? The Mayport Chapel Choir has just the remedy. Come join us on Dec. 18 at the 10:30 a.m. Service. The Choir will be presenting the Cantata When Love was Born. In addition, the Protestant Chapel will be having a Christmas Eve Candle Light Service at 7 p.m. on Dec. 24. There will also be a Christmas Morning Communion Service at 10:30 a.m. All are wel come join us in celebrat ing the birth of Christ. Catholic Christmas Mass This year the Catholic community will cel ebrate a midnight mass on Christmas Eve. After the Midnight Mass all are invited to join in a Christmas potluck served in the fellowship hall. Christmas Day Mass will be at 9 a.m. Please con sider joining us to cel ebrate the birth of Christ. See SLO, Page 3

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positive communica tion and continuing with efforts to establish reli ability, routine, and rela tionships will ensure a smoother move. Tips to help make the first days and weeks easier: Learn your childs schedule. If your child doesnt bring a schedule home from school, ask the teacher to send you one, or pick one up in person. Stay positive. If youre excited about the new school, it will rub off on your kids, even if they dont want you to know it. Get to know your childs teacher and help her know your child. If your spouse is deployed, be sure the teacher knows. Help teachers remember that they need to share the beginning of school information that your child missed. Listen to your child. Instead of asking, How was school today? (answer: OK) or What did you do in school today? (answer: stuff), try to ask specific ques tions like, What story did your teacher read today? or, for an older child, What experiment are you working on in science? For more information, go to Choosing a School for your Child offers check lists and pertinent ques tions which will assist parents in making schooling choices. Go to www.ed.gov/parents/ schools/find/choose/ index.html Military OneSource is a useful resource for obtaining information on schools. Access the ser vice at www.militaryo nesource.com or toll free from the United States: (800) 342-9647; from overseas: (800)-429-6477; or overseas collect: 1-484530-5908. Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC): MCEC ( www. militarychild.org) is a non-profit, world-wide organization which iden tifies the challenges facing the highly mobile military child, increases awareness of these challenges in military and educa tional communities, and initiates and implements programs to meet the challenges. Military Teens on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the Department of Defense and available at http:// dod.mil/mtom. This website is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to military youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.SLOFrom Page 2Advancements BM3 Jesus D. Arevalo, USS Hue City OS3 Daniel K. Borek, USS Hue City GSM3 Joseph M. DeMarco, USS Hue City YN3 Carmelo Felix, USS Hue City LS3 (SW) Shakyra L. Forsythe, USS Hue City HM3 Charlotte N. Helman, USS Hue City CS3 Ryan E. Ramsey, USS Hue City CTR3 Joshua C. Robinson, USS Hue City GM3 Justin T. Stice, USS Hue City HT3 William A. Shelvin, USS Hue City ET3 Ryan M. Strandberg, USS Hue City OS3 Lance C. Devero, USS Hue City BM2(SW) Scott A. Tatum, USS Hue City DC2(SW) Jonathan R. Postle, USS Hue City EM2 Richard C. Bradley, USS Hue City EN2 Anthony D. Cusson, USS Hue City GM2 Cory W. Blakely, USS Hue City GSE2 Cody J. Street, USS Hue City GSM2(SW) Damarys Corchadogaruta, USS Hue City OS2(SW) Raymond M. Sinclair, USS Hue City STG2 James R. Garringer, USS Hue City GM2(SW) Stan Morrison, USS Hue City Command Advancement Program LS3(SW) Allie Sillah, USS Hue City DC2 John Legzedh, USS Hue City GSM1(SW) Dale F. Kaiser, USS Hue City ESWS CTR2(SW) Justin W. Freeman, USS Hue City MILESTONESKeeping Sailors Happy During HolidaysChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe director for Personnel Readiness and Community Support offered ways to reduce stress during the holiday season, Dec. 12. The holidays can be a joy ous time for Sailors and their families, but they can also be stressful. By doing some simple things, most people can man age their stress and have an enjoyable and safe holiday, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director, Personnel Readiness and Community Support. We can feel the full range of emotions during this holiday time. They can range from happiness and joy to extreme stress. And we can deal with the stress if we plan appropriately, said Herb, a mem ber of the explosive ordnance disposal community and a licensed clinical professional counselor. There are practical steps Sailors can take to manage the stress of the holidays, to include: maintaining an exercise routine; ensuring enough sleep; taking time to relax; planning and keeping to a budget for gift-giving; and celebrating in mod eration. But if the stress and struggles seem over whelming, Sailors are encouraged to ask for help. Its ok to reach out and ask for help. In fact, it takes courage to reach out and tell somebody, Im struggling. I need some help. If you take the time to ask for help you can solve your issues and move on, said Herb. Sailors are also encouraged to help shipmates navigate stress by taking the time to be a friend and listen. Everybody needs a friend, said Herb. Everybody needs to be connected with another person. By connecting with somebody, you help them feel better and help them deal with stressors in life. Herb reminded Sailors that they can make a positive difference in the life of a shipmate who is struggling by tak ing a little extra time to A.C.T Ask if they need help; Care enough to lis ten, offer hope and not judge; and Treat, take action, get proper pro fessional assistance, and follow up. Additionally, command leaders can maintain a healthy unit by being familiar with the resources the Navy offers and recommending them to their Sailors who are dealing with stress or thoughts of suicide. These resources include Military OneSource at www.MilitaryOneSource. com and 1-800-342-9647, the Veterans Crisis Line at http://www.veteran scrisisline.net and 1-800273-8255, Navy Fleet and Family Support Program, Navy chaplains and medical providers. By looking out for each other and planning ahead, Sailors can make sure that their holidays are happy for themselves and their shipmates. Catholic Charities USAPromoting social justice and human services since 1910A CFC participant. Provided as a public service1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org Photo: Steve Liss, AmericanPoverty.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 3

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HSL-46 Players Return From DeploymentFrom HSL-46 PAOTwenty-seven Sailors from HSL-46 returned to NS Mayport on Dec. 8 after seven months embarked on board USS Anzio (CG 68). The detachment comprised of two SH-60B aircraft, seven pilots, three aircrewmen, and seventeen maintain ers spent most of the past year away from homeport, beginning with work-ups in December of 2010. After a few short months at home in the Spring the Detachment Four Players departed Mayport for Norfolk, where Anzio is home ported, on May 8. The first month of deploy ment was spent visiting several ports on the Black Sea, including Bulgaria, Ukraine, and Georgia. In Georgia, the city of Batumi hosted a suppra, a traditional dinner, in honor of Anzios visit. Meeting the mayor of Batumi at the suppra, enjoying the great food, and learning about the national culture while toasting with the local Georgians was a great experience, comment ed Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Stewart Wallin. After crossing through the Suez Canal in midJune, with a brief stop in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Anzio assumed CTF151 Flagship duties from USS Mason (DDG 87) in Djibouti. During this stop the members of HSL-46 Det 7, The Intimidators, attached to Mason, had the opportunity to visit with and share stories of life in 5th Fleet with their newly arrived squadronmates on Anzio. The embarked CTF-151 staff, while officially a New Zealand staff, included members from Australia, Canada, and Great Britain. The grueling summer in the Gulf of Aden had very few milestones to mark time beyond the unprec edented number of flight hours the detachment flew in support of coun ter-piracy in the turbulent region. The overwhelm ing presence of coali tion forces ensured that piracy attempts were few and far between. Some of the most gratifying mis sions flown included the rescue of seven stranded mariners and their return to Somalia; a MEDEVAC from a merchant vessel to a British oiler; and the MEDEVAC of two piracy hostages more than 600 nautical miles around the Horn of Africa to USS Bataan (LHD 5). Pilot Lt. Dan Simonds noted that, it was a rewarding experience to coordinate coalition and national assets to MEDEVAC two hostages this great length. Near the end of August, the crew enjoyed a muchneeded respite in Port Victoria, Seychelles. The second half of deployment flew by, with brief stops in Bahrain and Oman to recharge and complete mainte nance on both the ship and the aircraft. Bahrain was the location of another change of com mand for CTF-151, and the embarked Pakistani staff assumed the task force duties until a Nov. 17 stop in Djibouti as Anzio departed the 5th Fleet AOR. With the bow finally pointed westward, the air detachment and crew looked forward to a stop in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, over Thanksgiving before heading home. The stop in Mayport on Dec. 8 served two purposes, to offload the air detachment from HSL-46 and to embark the Tigers, families and friends of the crew, invit ed for the brief coastal transit to Norfolk. The Tiger Cruise provides an insiders view of the Navy that few ever have the privilege of experiencing. For the Detachment Four Players of HSL-46 the return to Mayport was a fine reward for more than 1,000 mishap-free flight hours flown and a job well done. When asked to sum up his first deployment, Aviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Michael Struck said, It was a unique and rewarding learning expe rience. -Photos courtesy of HSL-46Air Warfare Rescue 3rd Class Kevin Sampson of HSL-46 Detachment Four holds his daughter as she plays with a rose he brought to her during the detachments homecoming last week. Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Stewart Wallin greets his family pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport with USS Anzio. Detachment Four was embarked on the cruiser for seven months as part of counter-piracy missions off Africa.Detachment 4 Deployed On Counter-Piracy MissionLt. Ken Barkovich and his wife pose for a picture after Barkovich returned with Detachment Four on Dec. 8 after a seven-month deployment embarked on USS Anzio. 4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Families Welcome Back Gettysburg -Photo by Paige GnannLt. Scott Burrill gets a welcome kiss home from his wife after reuniting with his family pierside during USS Gettysburgs homecoming on Dec. 8. USS Gettysburg Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and embarked Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 Detachment One return to their homeport of Naval Station Mayport, Florida, after concluding a regularly scheduled seven-month deploy ment to the 6th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility (AOR) as part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. Deployed with the George H.W. Bush on her maiden deployment, Gettysburg returned home on Dec. 8. While operating in the 5th Fleet AOR, Gettysburgs served as the Maritime Regional Air Defense Commander (MRADC) for Central Command. They provided air defense for all air space over water, including all air missions conducted by Carrier Air Wing Eight. I dont see how we could have been more successful in our mission, said Capt. Robert N. Hein, Commanding Officer of Gettysburg. You talk about things that make a CO proud and its the way the air defense team absolutely knuckled down and made the right things happen. Gettysburg got incredible praise from 5th Fleet [Vice Adm. Mark I. Fox, Commander US Naval Forces -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonBoatswains Mate 3rd Class Ahmann Brookes meets his three-month old daughter for the first time during the homecoming of the guidemissile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). Gettysburg returned from a successful seven-month deployment with the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn along with theater and maritime security cooperation efforts in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. See Gettysburg, Page 7 -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonBoatswains Mate 3rd Class Raymond Panameno from Houston, TX, hugs his sons during the homecoming of USS Gettysburg (CG 64). -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonGunners Mate 3rd Class Benjamin Lewis greets his children after receiving the first kiss from his wife Myeshia.-Photo by MC2 Gary GrangerVice President Joe Biden and Commander, Carrier Strike Group Two, Rear Adm. Nora Tyson, shake the hands of Sailors departing the guide-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) after a successful seven-month deployment with USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group.-Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist Wes Alexander hugs grandmother, Bettye Phillips, as his mother Tami Highfill watches the reunion.-Photo by Paige GnannDamage Controlman 1st Class Philip Hertz finds his wife Stephanie pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport from a deployment with USS Gettysburg

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 7 Central Command; Commander, US 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commander]. Not just for our ability to accomplish the mission, but we made it better for those who follow. We developed lessons and modified procedures for how business is done. I can see no higher honor than leaving it better than you found it, and Gettysburg did that. In late May, Gettysburg participated in Exercise Saxon Warrior 2011 off the coast of England. Saxon Warrior 11 is an exercise led by the United Kingdombased Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST). It is designed to develop theater-specific combat skills as well as enhance cooperation between multi-national forces and government agencies. On Sept. 8, Gettysburg held a change of command ceremony. Capt. Patrick O. Shea was relieved by Capt. Robert N. Hein as commanding officer of USS Gettysburg. The turnover took place in the ships pilot house where both Captains read their orders over the ships announcement system for the crew to hear. My biggest highlight was taking command of this ship and being given the opportunity to meet the incredible men and women of this ship, said Hein. Its a phenomenal crew, it really is. For example, we had 32 percent advancement rate this last cycle which crushed fleet averages. Many Sailors join the Navy to see the world, and this deployment allowed Sailors to do just that. During the seven-month deployment, Gettysburg pulled into numerous ports, including Plymouth, England; Benidorm, Spain; Naples, Italy; Manama, Bahrain; Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and Malaga, Spain. The crew has been fantastic with liberty is a mis sion, said Hein. Six port visits and zero liberty inci dents. Probably one of the highlights is seeing a crew that takes advantage of the ability to go out and see the cities and see the country that they are visiting and take the tours, vice just seeing the closest bar to the port. The Sailors aboard Gettysburg participated in several community relations (COMREL) projects in Benidorm, Manama, and Dubai. Its pretty incredible because we live to serve, and even in our off time we are able to gather up a group of Sailors and serve in a unique way, said Ensign Stephanie N. Stamm, COMREL Officer on board Gettysburg. Sailors also put forth great effort towards corrosion control, to preserve the ship and add years to the life of the ship. What is really impressive about our corrosion control efforts is people did it right, said Hein. Often, we dream about having the time to do it right but often fall short due to time or training constraints, and that was the great thing about being on deployment and having a team that was trained in corrosion control. They were able to do it right. Get things down to bare metal, correctly prime them and correctly paint them. More than 70 Sailors took advantage of their time underway to earn their enlisted surface warfare quali fication, air warfare qualification, and surface war fare officer qualification. Additionally, 10 Sailors were advanced to chief petty officer during deployment, along with 18 reenlistments and 91 advancements to a higher rank of first class petty officers and junior. We are glad to be coming home, said Hein. It is the most joyous occasion. Its like Christmas, 4th of July, and your birthday all rolled up into one. It is everything that is great about the Navy and the America. Families, friends, and all that stuff comes together for one day. Im so looking forward to sharing that with this crew, and then of course getting ready to do it all over again. Gettysburg was deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group, comprised of Carrier Strike Group 2 staff, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Destroyer Squadron 22, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg and USS Anzio (CG 68), and guided-missile destroyers USS Mitscher (DDG 57) and USS Truxtun (DDG 103).GettysburgFrom Page 6 -Photo by Paige GnannFamilies and friends line the newly refurbished Alpha Pier to welcome home their Sailors from deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannTrevor Campos, 4, sits on top of grandfather Mel Clays shoulders and waves as USS Gettysburg pulls pierside. Trevors mother, Chief Cryptologic Technician Collection Sheenah Campos, is attached to the ship.-Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonVice President Joe Biden takes a moment to chat with Heather Benefield and her fivemonth old daughter during the homecoming of USS Gettysburg.-Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonA Sailor touches foreheads with his daughter as they are reunited pierside.-Photo by Paige GnannFamily members and friends cheer as USS Gettysburg pull alongside the pier. Gettysburg returned from a successful seven-month deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannNew Dads disembark USS Gettysburg and meet their new babies for the first time after the ship pulls into Naval Station Mayport on Dec. 8. -Photo by MC1(SW) Toiete JacksonSeaman Apprentice Cody Cooper meets his four-month old daughter for the first time after returning from deployment with USS Gettysburg (CG 64). -Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Xavian Deniz laughs with his son Apollos, 2, as his wife, Melany, smiles over the pair. -Photo by Paige GnannMachinery Repairman 1st Class Brandon Woodard is greeted by his wife, Anastasiya.close-air-support mis sions in conjunction with ground operations in Afghanistan, maritime patrol and power projec tion in the Arabian Gulf and counter piracy off the Horn of Africa. Gettysburg deployed with the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group support ing operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn along with theater and maritime security coop eration efforts in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome home! Biden said. You did a great job. Were proud of you and Merry Christmas.BidenFrom Page 1

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John L. Hall Conducts Burials At Sea Photo by Lt.j.g. William Hughes As the members of the Burial At Sea Detail render honors, the cremains of a Pearl Harbor Survivor and his wife are committed to the deep. Photo by Lt.j.g. William Hughes Chief Engineman(SW/CC) Raleigh Gilkinson presents an ensign to the next of kin during the ceremony. -Photo by CTT3 Michael OMalley Prior to committal, Cmdr. Michael Brand is presented with Cremains by Lt.j.g. Chris Thompson and Chief Cryptologic Technician Maintenance(SW/IDW) Michael Flowers.Photo by Lt.j.g. William Hughes At the conclusion of the ceremony, the Rifle Platoon fire a 21-gun salute to honor the fallen. See A Photo?Digital copies of all The Mirror photos are available by contacting The Mirror editor at mayportmirror@comcast.net or calling 270-7817 ext. 1012. Commissary Holiday HoursThe Mayport Commissary will be open Dec. 19 from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Dec. 24 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. It will be cclosed Dec. 25-26 for Christmas. The Commissary will be open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Dec. 31 and closed Jan. 1-2 for New Years Day. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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Underwood Hosts Pearl Harbor Ceremony Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detachment SoutheastMore than 200 veter ans and guests gathered aboard USS Underwood (FFG 36) Dec. 7 to honor and remember those who lost their lives during the attack on Pearl Harbor 70 years ago. Mayports Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) Branch 290 has hosted the annu al memorial service in conjunction with Naval Station Mayport since 1966. We have gathered here in tribute and respect to the earthly memories of those heroes on the sea, under the sea, in the air and upon the land who are now serving on the staff of the Supreme Commander, said Rick Kiger, president of FRA 290. Underwoods crew stood proudly in ranks as special guest speak er Duane Reyelts, a Pearl Harbor survi vor who served aboard USS Oklahoma (BB-37), recounted his memories of Dec. 7, 1941. The St. Augustine sur vivor was only 20 years old when the attack on his ship and the harbor thrust the United States into World War II. As he looked back on the events that day, Reyelts said Being young at that time, I wondered how I knew enough to do what I did to escape. But a lot of them didnt, and I think of them. I was still in my bunk when the ship was hit, said Reyelts. At 7:55 in the morning the general quarters buzzer sounded and I didnt even grab my clothes. I rushed to get to my battle station, which was all the way forward on the second deck. The Oklahoma was hit several times causing her to capsize and sink taking 429 members of the crew down with her. More than 2,000 people were killed that day to include civilians and the 1,177 Servicemembers who died on USS Arizona (BB-39). Chief Boatswains Mate (SW) Jeremy Doughtry, assigned to Underwood, said he is so proud and honored to be in the presence of such great men. When I think about what these men went through back then I get really choked up. Seeing how much joy they have in their eyes when they come on board, back in the presence of their shipmates, is truly a memo rable experience, said Doughtry. The ships observance of Pearl Harbor Day also included remarks by Lt. Gov. of Florida, Jennifer Carroll, a U.S. Navy retir ee, a wreath tossing cer emony and a gun salute. Carroll, who had also served at Pearl Harbor during her naval career, said I thank those who are serving and who have served, and God bless this great nation. The ceremony concluded in prayer with heads bowed. Though our heads are bowed in sorrow for the loss of our ship mates, there is pride in our hearts for the many things they did to keep the record of our country untarnished and unde feated, said Kiger. Vets Attend 70th Anniversary Of WW II Attack -Photo by MCSA Damian BergRetired U.S. Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Elbert W. Sawley salutes the tossing of flowers during Pearl Harbor Day Ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). The ceremony commemorated the 70th anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. -Photo by MCSA Damian BergVeterans attending the Pearl Harbor Day Ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) toss flowers overboard in remembrance of those lives lost during the attack on Pearl Harbor. -Photo by MCSA Damian BergFlorida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll delivers remarks to veterans and guests during a Pearl Harbor Day Ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36). THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 9

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TRICARE Young Adult Prime Available Jan. 1From TRICARE The TRICARE Young Adult (TYA) Prime option is avail able for purchase on Dec. 1, 2011, with coverage beginning Jan. 1, 2012. TYA Prime will offer young adult beneficiaries TRICARE Prime coverage for monthly premiums of $201. To purchase TYA Prime, dependents must be under age 26, unmarried and not eligible for their own employer-spon sored health care coverage. TYA Prime is a managed health care option with low outof-pocket costs. Care is deliv ered through military clinics and hospitals and the TRICARE network of civilian providers. Uniformed services dependents may qualify to purchase TYA Prime if they live in a designated Prime Service Area and their sponsors status makes them eligible for Prime coverage. In addition to TYA Prime, young adult dependents may also be eligible for TYA Standard, which has been available since May 2011. With monthly premiums of $186, Standard offers eligible dependents the flexibility to see TRICARE-authorized network and non-network providers of their choice, wherever they live or travel. The Standard monthly premium is dropping to $176 on Jan. 1, 2012. Complete information and application forms are avail able at www.tricare.mil/ tya. Sponsors and their adult dependents are encouraged to explore both commercial and military health care plan options and costs when choosing a plan that best meets their needs. Young adults considering TYA should determine if they are eligible before completing and sending in an application. Eligible dependents may drop off the application and payment of three months of premiums at a TRICARE Service Center or send them by mail or fax to their regional health care con tractor. Once the initial payment is made, monthly premiums must be paid in advance through automated electronic payment. TYA Prime enrollment will follow the TRICARE Prime th of the month rule. As long as the TYA enrollment application is received by the 20th of the month, coverage can begin on the first day of the next month. For example, if an applicant wants TYA Prime to start Jan 1, 2012, the application and initial three-month payment must be received by Dec. 20, 2011. If its received after Dec. 20, TYA Prime coverage begins Feb.1, 2012. Dependent eligibility for TRICARE previously ended at age 21, or age 23 for full-time students. Similar to provisions in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, TYA offers eligible young adults up to age 26 the option to continue TRICARE Standard or Prime coverage, as long as their sponsor is still eligible for TRICARE. Unlike employer sponsored health plans, TYA is available only to unmarried young adult dependents. To receive e-alerts on TYA and other TRICARE news, sign up at www.tricare.mil/subscriptions. By NH Jax Public AffairsAs of Jan. 1, 2012, Walgreens is no longer in TRICAREs retail pharmacy network. TRICARE benefi ciaries who want to fill pre scriptions at Walgreens after Dec. 31 need to file a paper claim for a non-network benefit reimbursement. Under the non-network benefit, TRICARE Prime beneficiaries pay a 50 per cent cost share after meet ing their point of service deductible, and TRICARE Standard and TRICARE For Life beneficiaries pay $12 for formulary prescriptions and $25 for non-formulary prescriptions or 20 percent of the total cost whichever is greater, after meeting the annual deductible. To find a network phar macy or get more informa tion, contact Express Scripts at 877-363-1303 or see www. tricare.mil/mybenefit/ and click on quick links, then prescriptions.Walgreens Leaves TRICARE Retail Pharmacy NetworkDoD To Honor Blood Donors For Saving Lives American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department plans to rec ognize blood donors early next year for their critical contributions to saving lives by giving blood to the Armed Forces Blood Program, the programs director said today. National Blood Donor Month, which is usually January of every year, is an attempt to recognize those blood donors and everyone involved in blood donation for their sacrifices and rolling up their sleeves in 2011, Army Col. Frank Rentas, director of the Armed Forces Blood Program, said during a Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service interview here. Next month ... we will be recognizing those donors that have supported our mission, he said. Our mission is to provide blood and blood supplies whenever and wherever theyre needed.The joint program plays a key role in providing quality blood products for service members and their fami lies in both peacetime and war, according to its website. Rentas noted the demand for blood -which only lasts 42 days in storage before perish ing -and shared different needs for blood donation which are based on the needs of the war fighter. Most people, when you say blood, they refer to red blood cells, he said. With red blood cells, O-negative is the most sought-after blood type because you can transfuse it to anyone out there. If you are looking at plasma, its completely opposite, Rentas contin ued. AB plasma is what we need because AB plasma is universal. So depending on our needs, we may target specific donors or specific blood types depending on what we need for a specific week. The program direc tor detailed the impor tance of receiving dona tions since one donor can potentially save three lives.If theyre donating whole blood ... we split that unit into plasma and red cells, he explained. One donation can actually save three different lives because we can make platelets out of some of those units as well. So the platelets can actually go to one recipi ent, the plasma can go to another, and the red cells can go to another, Rentas added. So that would be three different recipients that you can save with one donation. People can donate whole blood every 56 days, Rentas said, but some arent eligible to donate. Overseas, depending on where you are, you may or may not be able to donate, he explained. An example, Rentas said, is people who were based in Europe in areas afflicted with what is known as Mad Cow Disease. Even though Im an O-negative blood donor, and donated many, many times in the [1980s], I was assigned to Germany from 1987 to 1990, Rentas continued, and I have not been able to donate since because of Mad Cow Disease. Even though I feel perfectly fine, Im not allowed to donate. The colonel cited the Federal Drug Administration as the authority, which dictates policies and guidelines to both civilian and DOD blood donor facilities. Were licensed to col lect because we do have an FDA license, he said. So we need to fol low their policies ... one of their policies is if you have been in specific places where Mad Cow Disease has been a con cern, youre not allowed to donate. People can donate blood at more than 20 sites worldwide. Those who cannot donate blood, can still contribute by passing on the word, Rentas said. The best place for [service members] to get information is our web site, www.militaryblood. dod.mil, he said. [It has] anything that they need to know about locations, they can make appoint ments [and] reasons about why they may not be able to donate. Rentas expressed his gratitude to donors for rolling up their sleeves to give blood and he encouraged them to con tinue to support the pro gram. If you come to a DOD blood donor facility in January, were going to be holding recognition cer emonies to express our gratitude for what you have done in 2011, he said.NAVSAFECEN Tips On Safe ShoppingNaval Safety Center Public AffairsThe holiday shopping season is in full swing, which provides wouldbe pickpockets and thieves an opportunity to prey upon unsuspecting Sailors and their families. So many people are walking around with blinders on this time of year, assuming everyone has good intentions, said John Williams, an expert in off-duty recreation at the Naval Safety Center. The current economic situation is making the bad guys bolder. Nonetheless, Williams said it is not difficult to keep the crooks at bay it just requires situation al awareness and some common sense practices. One of the most impor tant things a holiday shopper can do is park in well-lighted, high-traffic areas. There are also other simple precautions to take. If you have a lot of packages, or feel nervous for any reason, ask a mall security guard to walk you to your vehicle, Williams said. Thats what theyre there for. Shoppers who do not visit a one-stop shop such as a mall may travel from store to store while they are out searching for gifts. Williams said there is a tendency for many to just toss their purchases in the back seat of the car before they head to the next stop. He said this is an open invitation for thieves to break in. Weve seen a lot of breakins, and its because the thieves were plainly able to see expensive items such as electronics or clothing inside the car, he said. He recommends putting all packages in the trunk where theyre out of sight. Statistics show that in the wake of the economic downturn, more shop pers are using cash to purchase gifts than in years past. Some crooks are taking advantage of this with phony ATM machines. Williams said stand-alone ATM machines can be rigged to steal cards and personal identification numbers. Criminals are then able to use the card and the pin to take money out of legitimate cash machines. Check the slot for signs of tampering and look for cameras where they shouldnt be, he said. The most important thing is to be aware of your surroundings and remember that if some thing doesnt look right, it probably isnt. Many high-tech shoppers may think theyre safe from thieves because they do most of their purchas ing online, but with an increase in cyber crime, thats not always the case. However, a little vigilance can thwart most crimi nals. Make sure your com puter has good virus protection software and only shop from notable web sites that encrypt your information, he said. Whether shopping at home or at the mall, the unfortunate fact is thieves are out there attempt ing to hijack the holiday spirit along with vic tims money. However, Williams said the smart shopper can usually stay a few steps ahead of the bad guys. For more news from Naval Safety Center, visit www. navy.mil/local/nsc/. Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research HospitalA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport, in conjunction with Public Works, held a ribbon cutting ceremony to commemorate the completion of the Wharf Alpha Improvements project. Pictured from left is Harbor Ops Department Head, Lt. Cmdr. Cassius Farrell, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, Tony Landry, Tim Goerlich and Matt Tate of Orion Marine Group, as well as Engineer of Record Karen Falkenberry and Andy Stone of Public Works Mayport.Alpha Open For BusinessFrom Public Works MayportNaval Station Mayport officially commemorat ed the the completion of the $12.4-million Wharf Alpha Improvements project with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Dec. 7. The design-build con tract was awarded in May 2009 to the con struction firm of Orion Marine Construction and the A/E firm of CH2M Hill. The overhaul of the Wharf Alpha, which has two berths, was under way from May 2010 until December 2011. This project included the upgrade of the old existing cofferdam bulk head. A total of 900 linear feet of existing concrete bulkhead was demolished and replaced with a new sheet pile wall, which received a new concrete bulkhead cap. The exist ing electrical substation was demolished and replaced with a newly upgraded 4160V substa tion capable of supporting the power requirements for every current class of U.S. Navy ship. The proj ect also replaced more than 5,800 square yards roughly the size of a soccer field of asphal tic concrete pavement on Wharf Alpha. The completion of this project will provide Naval Station Mayport with modernized berthing capacity for the U.S. Fleet. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 11

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De Wert Crew Enjoys Yacht Club HospitalityFrom USS De WertUSS De Wert (FFG 45) made a port visit to Dar es Salaam during the weekend following Thanksgiving and enjoyed a wonderful reception at the Dar es Salaam Yacht Club (DYC). After passing the halfway point of their sevenmonth deployment, USS De Wert pulled into port to make some repairs to the ship and offer the crew a chance to stretch their legs with a little postThanksgiving liberty. Master Chief Vladimir Narvaez, the Operations Coordinator at the Embassy, arranged a reception at the Yacht Club with Spiros Manoloudis, DYC Commodore; Mark Hart, DYC Rear-Commodore Sail; and Vic Coppard, former DYC Vice Commodore. As far as I know the USS Forest Sherman [in 2007] was the first US ship that had been host ed at our club in about 40 years, Coppard recalled. The Yacht Club was very eager to have the crew of USS De Wert to their facility to express their gratitude for the work that the ship is doing in the fight against piracy in the Indian Ocean. Commanding Officer of USS De Wert, Cmdr. Vince Baker said, They went out of their way to invite us to their club and to thank us for the job we are doing in the counter piracy mission because it directly affects them and the economy of Tanzania. They appre ciate us, NATO and the Coalition Forces that are out there actively hunt ing pirates. They have a very personal connection to that mission because two of their members are hostages, and they were happy to hear about the negative trend in successful pirate attacks and the positive impact military forces are having in the Somali Basin and the Gulf of Aden. The officers and sail ors from De Wert had a great time enjoying the company of their hosts and a wonderful dinner of grilled Mahi Mahi and jumbo shrimp. Lt.j.g. Bo Ames said, I thought it was amazing. They had great views, the people were really friendly and they were more than hospitable. The Yacht Club shared their clubs history with the De Wert sailors and showed them their facil ity including the boat yard, the record wall of fish caught, and the plaques with all the past Commodores. Some of the club members were fascinated by how long a US Navy ship could stay at sea. The De Wert sailors also received invitations and advice for future trips to Tanzania including a buffalo hunt, a golf out ing and a hike up Mount Kilimanjaro. The reception was also attended by several members of the US Embassy including: Defense Attach Lt. Col. Thomas W. Cook, Army Attach Lt. Col. John Nutt and his wife Karen, Office of Security and Cooperation Lt. Col. Kevin Balisky and his wife Jane; Operations Coordinator Master Chief Vladimir T. Narvaez and his wife Elaine. In addition to the reception, the US Embassy in Dar es Salaam prepared other activities for the ship during the port visit in Dar. Chief Richard Anthonissen coordinated a Community Relations Project in which crew members from USS De Wert used some of their liberty to volunteer at the Makongo Primary School improving the facilities and interacting with the students who attend the school. USS De Wert is on a seven-month deployment to deter and disrupt piracy in the Indian Ocean and off the Horn of Africa. USS De Wert is operat ing as a member of the Standing NATO Maritime Group (SNMG-1). -Photo by Lt. Peter Dietz Dar es Salaam Yacht Club (DYC) presenting gifts to USS De Wert (FFG 45) during their port visit. Pictured l to r: Vic Coppard, former DYC Vice Commodore; Command Master Chief LaDon Washington; Mark Hart, DYC Rear Commodore Sail; Cmdr. Vince Baker, Commanding Officer; Lt. Cmdr. Mark Quinn, Executive Officer. commissioned an Ensign through Officer Candidate School. At sea, Speights initial assignment was as Main Propulsion Assistant aboard USS Elrod (FFG 55), he also served as the Damage Control Assistant and Ships Training Officer during the tour. He then completed a follow-on sea assign ment as Main Propulsion Assistant aboard USS Moosbrugger (DD 980). While on Moosbrugger, he deployed as part of NATOs Standing Naval Forces Atlantic 2000. Following a shore tour, he was assigned as Chief Engineer aboard USS Carney (DDG 64). Following his Chief Engineer tour, he was assigned to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 24 as the Material and Readiness Officer. Speights most recent afloat assignment was to U. S. Seventh Fleet as Deputy Lead Planner. Ashore, Speight attend ed school at Jacksonville University earning a Bachelors of Science in Business Management and Marketing in 2003. His last duty was as executive officer in USS Boone. Love enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1988, attended the Broadened Opportunity for Officer Selection and Training (BOOST) Program in San Diego California in 1989, and was awarded a four-year NROTC schol arship to attend the State University of New York Maritime Academy. His first tour of duty was aboard USS Gallery (FFG 26). In September 1996, Love reported to USS Cape St George (CG 71) as the Damage Control Assistant. In March 1998, Love reported to COMNAVBEACHGROUP Two and served as Maritime Prepositioned Forces (MPF) Officer. In February 2001, Love reported to USS Stephen W. Groves (FFG 32) as Combat Systems Officer. Following his tour on Groves, Love report ed to COMDESRON 26 in October 2002. Following his tour at CDS 26, Love reported to COMSEVENTHFLT in Yokosuka, Japan. In April 2006, Love reported to USS John L. Hall (FFG 29) as Executive Officer. Following his tour at the War College, Love deployed to Iraq on an Individual Assignment in sup port of the ARMY 304th Sustainment Brigade stationed at Joint Base Balad as Team Leader of the NAVYs Petroleum Oil and Lubricant (POL) Detachment. Love will assume command of ATG Mayport during a ceremony on Dec. 16.BooneFrom Page 1 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 13

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SERMCs NAMTS-Trained Sailors Conduct Repairs, Training Aboard USS Hue CityNavy Regional Maintenance Center (NRMC) Public AffairsSailors assigned to Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) on Naval Station Mayport completed repairs on 60 watertight doors aboard the USS Hue City (CG-66) Nov. 25. A group of SERMCs Damage Controlmen enrolled in the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) program repaired the ships water tight doors while also training ships force on proper preventive and corrective door mainte nance. NAMTS is allowing us to train, and even crosstrain, our Sailors and provide them with the skills necessary to perform maintenance on a vari ety of ship systems, said Capt. Ron Cook, SERMCs commanding officer. This is an especially effective program because the majority of training provided through NAMTS is conducted as on-the job, hands-on training using ship repair work that already exists and allows us to train our Sailors while providing immediate support to the Fleet, said Cook. During NAMTS training, Sailors com plete Job Qualification Requirements (JQRs), and in some cases earn Navy Enlisted Classifications (NECs), under the super vision of qualified men tors. Sailors document their training by completing qualification cards their mentors certify and approve. NAMTS training is available to Sailors on shore duty at a Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) Intermediate Maintenance Activities or Facilities (IMA or IMF), at shipyards and aboard tenders, as well as those stationed on ships that are undergoing extended maintenance availabilities. NAMTS goes to the heart of NRMCs initia tive to invest heavily in the professional develop ment of our IMA Sailors. In the near-term they will serve to re-estab lish the I-level capabil ity and capacity of our RMCs. In the long-term those Sailors will be the best trained and qualified operating engineers, leaders, maintainers our Navy has seen in decades. said Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) Rear Adm. David Gale, who leads Navys RMCs. Funding cuts to shorebased IMAs, which in the past served as a critical component of the training pipeline for fleet Sailors, led to the downsizing of these facilities. However, Navy leaders recognized the void, and have since undertaken several initia tives designed to rebuild resources, re-establish the RMCs capabilities and capacity, and positively influence quality main tenance and moderniza tion practices across the Navys RMCs. While training at an IMA, Sailors will receive on-the-job, rating-specif ic training, and can earn NECs in the following areas: Gas Turbine, Valve Shop, Outside Electrical, Outside Machinist, Diesel Engines, Pipefitter, Shipfitter, and Hydraulics said Osbert Teeka-Singh, SERMCs NAMTS coordi nator. At this time, the NAMTS program is open to five ratings and pro vides training in eight JQR areas that can help Sailors earn up to 12 NECs. There are also 10 other JQRs that have been disestab lished, which at this time, are no longer tracked or assigned. SERMC resurrected those disestablished JQRs in an effort to train Sailors in other ratings that would otherwise have nothing to use to base their training. The ten resurrected JQRs will not earn NECs at this time, but our goal is to re-establish those JQRs and NECs and include them in the formal track ing mechanism, as well, said Pat Shepler, SERMCs Production Department Head. In the interim, though, all of our Sailors are acquiring the mainte nance and repair skills that will allow them to support the fleet during their RMC shore duty, and again when they are aboard ships during their sea tours, said Shepler. The NAMTS program, according to Shepler, is a way to train Sailors on various shipboard opera tions and repair require ments. It also serves as the best conduit for us to communicate the same training to the fleet. To do this effectively within the Watertight Door Shop, said Shepler, we have an area set up with a flush deck scuttle, a quick-acting watertight hatch, and an individual dog watertight hatch we use to train Sailors. The same NAMTS-based training is then translated when the Sailors from the door shop goes aboard ships to conduct repairs while concurrently providing preventive and corrective training to ship board Sailors. During their five-week repair period, SERMCs Sailors dismantled doors from the USS Hue City, pulled and inspected all door hardware, then cleaned, lubricated and reinstalled the doors. For doors that failed inspec tion due to excessive cor rosion, SERMCs Sailors performed a full removal and overhaul until they met standards based on the ships Planned Maintenance System (PMS). Specifically, SERMCs door shop reviewed the required PMS onboard each class of ship, select ed several checks for each type of door, and performed all of those checks with the ship to ensure door maintenance requirements were met. According to SERMCs Hull and Corrosion Product Family Supervisor, Brian York, the training and repair process essentially starts with the assessment phase and then follows with the repair phase. This teaches the Sailor onboard the ship to first be able to identify the problem, and then to repair the problem. We believe that self-assess ment and independence for repairs is key to the improvement of the material condition onboard ships. We have already had a great deal of success with the NAMTS program, said York. Our review of the USS Hue Citys pre-INSURV assessment indicated there were no discrepancies noted on the report with regard to watertight doors, which is a direct reflection of the work and training weve been conducting in recent weeks. The success of the door shop is not only limited to USS Hue City. USS Halyburton (FFG-40) requested replacement of three watertight doors, and SERMCs door shop was able to fully repair all three doors saving more than $13,000 per door in replacement cost. These types of examples are expected to increase as their door shop continues to support the fleet, and will expand to other fleet support areas as their NAMTS training evolves into other production shops within SERMC. With the support of and investment in surface ship maintenance initia tives and resources the Navy requires to proper ly sustain our ships and train our fleet Sailors, our RMCs are now becoming uniquely positioned to ensure that the material readiness of todays, and tomorrows, fleet is sus tained. For more information about the Southeast Regional Maintenance Center, visit: www.nav sea.navy.mil/CNRMC/ SERMCCarney Disrupts Pirate AttackFrom U.S. Naval Forces Central Command Public AffairsUSS Carney (DDG 64), part of NATOs coun ter-piracy task force Operation Ocean Shield, worked with other NATO forces and coalition part ners to disrupt pirate activity in the Gulf of Aden, Dec. 5. A Japanese maritime patrol aircraft patrol ling the area on counterpiracy operations spot ted a suspicious skiff with seven suspected pirates aboard and contacted the NATO flagship ITS Andrea Doria who in turn tasked Carney to investigate. In a coordinated operation, Carney approached the skiff, while the patrol aircraft circled overhead. As the warship appeared on the horizon the skiff attempted to flee however it stopped when hailed. The patrol aircraft and Carney observed the suspected pirates throw ing items overboard. The items were visually con firmed by the patrol air craft as ladders and other pirate-related equipment. A team from Carney boarded the skiff and after a thorough search seized the excess fuel and other items useful to piracy activity, before ensuring the skiff had enough fuel to return to the Somali coast. In 2009, 45 ships were hijacked in the region; so far in 2011, 21 ships have been hijacked effectively halving the number of ships taken. Naval war ships have been in the region constantly provid ing a visible presence and deterrence and this has undoubtedly contributed to the pirates lack of success. Carney is currently deployed, assigned to N ATO, conducting coun ter-piracy operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. In the long-term those Sailors will be the best trained and qualified operating engineers, leaders, maintainers our Navy has seen in decades.-Rear Adm. David Gale CNRMC Eat Early At GalleyOasis Galley will be open for dinner from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Dec. 16 due to a command function. Dont accept defeat.Fight deadly childhood diseases.A CFC participant provided as a public service. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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On Dec.3, USS Carney's Supply Department hosted a psychedelic 1970's themed party for the crew. The night's events consisted of a delicious dinner, a competitive costume contest, a soul train, and a raffle with great prizes. Above, the two finalists for the costume contest are Machinery Repairman 1st Class (SW/SCW) James Heard and Operations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Ledric Neal. Right, Ship's Serviceman 2nd Class (SW) Angela Muratalla and Personnel Specialist 1st Class (SW) Sean Limbach in Carney's homemade 1970's photo booth. Carney Gets Psychedelic -Photo by Ensign Amalie Shaffer -Photo by ITC(SW) Willie Wilkerson THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 15

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Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bingo Special 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double Payouts on all hand cards, 3 extra $1000 games, food provided by MWR and more. 2707204. Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bash featuring Lift 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Enjoy bowling, music, prizes, snacks, and more. Reservations Required. 270-5377 Jan. 2: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Jan. 4: Quartermania Every Wednesday 9 p.m.Midnight at Mayport Bowling Center. $5 cover charge, 25 shoe rental, 25 bowling games, 25 chicken wings and more! 270-5377. Jan. 4: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Jan. 4: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Jan. 4: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Jan. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 9: Womens Volleyball Organizational Meeting 5 p.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 22; must be 18 or older. 270-5451 Jan. 9: BSC National Championship Game Party. 7 p.m. at Beachside Community Center; game kicks off at 8:30 p.m. Watch the game on our 20 ft. screen. Free food, giveaways and more! 270-5451 Jan. 10: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 10: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink spe cials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Jan. 11: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Jan. 13: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 13: Exit. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Jan. 14: UFC 142 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Jan. 16: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowl ing, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 17: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Tennis Organizational Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 30. 270-5451 Jan. 24: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Volleyball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 13. 270-5451 Jan. 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by HSM40. For tickets, call (904) 270-6639 x151. Jan. 27: Paul Lundgren Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 MWRDec. 16: Teen Holiday Party & Movie Night. 4:30-11 pm at the Teen Center. Enjoy a cook ie station, art station, Christmas challenges from 4:30-6:30 p.m. fol lowed by a holiday movie. 246-0347 Dec. 20: Teens on the Go: Avenues Mall Christmas Shopping 1:30-6 p.m. Permission slip required. Bring money for shopping. 2460347 Dec. 21: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. Dec. 28: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Enjoy bowling, music, prizes, snacks, and more. Reservations Required. 270-5377 Jan. 1: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes spaghetti dinner, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Jan. 13: Freedom Friday the 13th Fear Factor. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Jan 14: Dave & Busters Trip 1-5 p.m. Cost is $8, includes choice from 9 entrees and a $10 game card. Permission slip required. Open to the first 24 teens to sign up that have up-to-date registration. 246-0347 Jan. 16: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 20: Teen Lock In. 7:30 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. Totally cool theme. Are you ready to be cool? 2460347 Jan. 28: Teen Cosmic Bowling on Base. KID A Piece Of History -Photo by Paige GnannUSS Stephen W. Groves Chiefs Mess hold memorabilia and a plaque signify ing the history of a shadowbox they donated to the Focsle Lounge, NS Mayports Chief Petty Officers Club. The box contains a shadow box with two rocks from theWorld Trade Center after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks destroyed the Twin Towers in New York City. The Mess also donated a picture of Stephen W. Groves during a visit to New York, with the Twin Towers in the background. Also pictured is retired Chief Jim Phillips who attended the dedication. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.org 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 15: St. Johns Town Center Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Dec. 16: St. Augustine Amphitheater Trip Enjoy ice skating, sleigh rides, ice slides & more. Please bring cash. Van Departs Liberty Center 4 p.m. FREE Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Dec. 17-18: Holiday Matsuri Convention in Orlando. Convention includes video games, anime, sci-fi, celeb rity guests & more. Cost is $50; includes hotel & convention ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 17-18: Universal Studios Island of Adventure Trip Cost is $65; includes hotel & theme park ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 20: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 22: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 23: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. Dec. 24: Pool Tournament Finals 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bash featuring Lift 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Enjoy bowling, music, prizes, snacks, and more. Reservations Required. 270-5377 Jan. 1: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts Van Departs Liberty Center 11:30 a.m. Cost $5. Jan. 3: Command Break-In. Look for us at Barracks 1586 and 1587 dropping off goodies. Jan. 4: Darts Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 4: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Jan. 4: Quartermania Every Wednesday 9 p.m.Midnight at Mayport Bowling Center. $5 cover charge, 25 shoe rental, 25 bowling games, 25 chicken wings and more! 270-5377. Jan. 4: Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 Jan. 7: Cosmic Ice Skating. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Cost $5. Jan. 7: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 9: Womens Volleyball Organizational Meeting 5 p.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 22; must be 18 or older. 270-5451 Jan. 9: BSC National Championship Game Party. 7 p.m. at Beachside Community Center; game kicks off at 8:30 p.m. Watch the game on our 20 ft. screen. Free food, giveaways and more! 270-5451 Jan. 10: Kick Off the New Year 3K Walk/ 5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Jan. 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 11: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Jan. 13: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Jan. 13: Exit. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Jan. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Transportation Only. Cost $5. Jan. 14: UFC 142: Aldo vs. Mendes 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Jan. 15: Paintball. Van departs Liberty Center at 9 a.m. Cost $5 Jan. 16: Minute to Win It. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Refreshments provided. Jan. 16: Martin Luther King Holiday Bowling Special. 11 a.m-5 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. 2 hours of extreme bowling, shoes, one item off Fast Lanes Grilles menu and a soda for only $15 (non-food option $12; a la carte option also avail able). 270-5377 Jan. 17: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Tennis Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Jan. 30. 270-5451 Jan. 18: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 21: Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus. Van Departs Liberty Center 6:15 p.m. FREE Jan. 22: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE Jan. 24: Cornhole Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Jan. 24: Captains Cup Mens Intramural Volleyball Organizational Meeting 11 a.m. at the Gym. League begins Feb. 13. 270-5451 Jan. 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by HSM40. For tickets, call (904) 270-6639 x151. Jan. 25: Pool Tournament Finals 6 p.m. at the Liberty Center. Jan. 26: Texas Hold Em Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 17

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18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Mayport Families Enjoy FestivitiesMWR Hosts Annual Magical Christmas Event Kelsey Long, 13, pulls a prize lollipop from the lollipop tree as an MWR volunteer congratulates her. Mike the Clown from Ringling Bros. Barnum and Bailey Circus talks with children at the festival. A young boy makes reindeer food, one of several activities set up at the event. Markus Blakely, 4, takes a rest on a hay bale as he holds his goody bag gathered from different activity stations set up at the event. Children from the Youth Activities Center perform Christmas songs during MWRs Magical Christmas on Dec. 8 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. Brian Clegg, 3, Jahmaica Clegg, 5, Lindsay Orellana, 7, and Quintin Johnson, 4, take a ride in a static airplane set up at Magical Christmas. Families enjoy roasting marshmallows over a closed fire pit at Sea Otter Pavilion during MWRs annual Magical Christmas festival. Santa and Mrs. Claus, volunteers from Santa America, pose for pictures with families attending Magical Christmas. Santa visited with children and took notes for their wish-list of special toys.From StaffFamilies of Naval Station Mayport Sailors bundled up and kept warm with fun activities at the annual MWR Magical Christmas on Dec. 8 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. This years festivities included music by the Navy Southeast Holiday Brass Band and performances by the Youth Activities Center. Santa and Mrs. Claus, volunteers from Santa Americas Military Support Program, were joined by Mike the Clown from Ringling Bros., Barnum and Bailey Circus to entertain the crowds. Children also got a chance to enjoy free arts and crafts and mini-games at the event. For more information about events happening throughout 2012, call MWR at 270-5228. A young boy tries to ring a candy cane with a frisbee at one of the booths.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 19

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DFAS To Release 2011 Tax Statements Via myPay, U.S. MailFrom DFASElectronic and postal delivery of 2011 tax statements for military service members, military retirees and federal civilian employees paid by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service will begin by mid-December through January with all customers receiving their W-2s and 1099Rs by Jan. 31. For most, tax statements will be available online using the DFAS myPay pay management system ( https://mypay.dfas.mil/mypay.aspx) a week or more earlier than delivery via mail. 2011 tax statement myPay and USPS mail schedule: Voluntary Separation Incentive/Special Separation Benefit ** Permanent Change of Station Military non-appropriate fund civilian employees receive tax statements from their respective military service. Army NAF employee tax statements are made available via myPay. The myPay advantage While tax statements are available on myPay earlier than waiting for an envelope in the mail, there are other advantages to using the online system throughout the year. Availability: Tax statements available on myPay will Form/Document Date available on myPay Dates mailed via the U.S. Post Office Retiree Annual Statement (RAS) Dec. 4, 2011 Dec. 19. 2011 Jan. 10, 2012 Retiree 1099R Dec. 15, 2011 Dec. 19. 2011 Jan. 10, 2012 Annuitant Account Statement (AAS) Dec. 14, 2011 Dec. 19-31, 2011 Annuitant 1099R Dec. 14, 2011 Dec. 19-31, 2011 Active Duty Air Force, Army, Navy W-2 Jan. 24, 2012 Jan. 24-29, 2012 Reserve Air Force, Army, Navy W-2 Jan. 6, 2012 Jan. 6-9, 2012 Marine Corps Active & Reserve W-2 Jan. 16, 2012 Jan. 19-21, 2012 Civilian employee W-2 (DoD/Non-DoD) Jan. 5, 2012 Jan. 7-15, 2012 Military VSI/SSB W-2 Not available via myPay Jan. 4-5, 2012 Savings Deposit Program 1099INT Jan. 21, 2012 Jan. 21-22, 2012 Vendor Pay 1099 Not available via myPay Jan. 20-25, 2012 Vendor Pay MISC W-2 Jan. 31, 2012 Jan. 20-25, 2012 Travel PCS ** W-2 Jan. 31, 2012 Jan. 20-25, 2012 Army Non-Appropriated Fund Civilian Pay W-2Jan. 20, 2012 Not availableremain online for one year. These, as well as other documents such as leave and earning statements, may be printed or downloaded for storage on computer hard drives, CDs, DVDs or flash drives. Except during periodic system maintenance periods, myPay is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The only requirements are valid login credentials (ID and password) and a computer connected to the Internet. The inner circle: myPay users have a need to allow trusted individuals to access their pay documents and information. Military members deployed away from home may wish to have their spouses, parents or other associates to retrieve information for tax preparation purposes. An elderly retiree may desire to grant access to his or her tax accountant or legal guardian. Users can establish limited access passwords for their family members or other trusted individuals by logging in and establishing access in their Personal Settings. Individuals granted limited access to a myPay account may retrieve documents or view information but cannot make changes to existing addresses, bank accounts, allotments or other pay account information. Security: While each pay account customer has a personal responsibility to keep their login information secure, myPay uses security tools that surpass industry standards to keep that customers pay information safe. Recently, myPay was changed to allow customers accessing the system using a Computer Access Card (CAC) enabled computer to log in without using their login ID or password. This change made the system even easier to use while not compromising its security. Savings: By using myPay each military member, retiree and federal civilian employee saves their department or agency the cost of mailing documents. While each individual W2, 1099R or LES might be inexpen sive, the overall costs of mailing millions of individual documents can become substantial. When combined with the environmental costs of paper, printing and delivery, using myPay is one way each individual can contribute to ensuring funds are available for their departments mission, such as supporting the needs of military men and women for DoD customers.Absentee Voting Guidelines Released For OverseasFrom Federal Voting Assistance ProgramThe Federal Voting Assistance Program and the Military Postal Service Agency yesterday announced absentee bal lot mailing date guide lines that apply to various overseas locations. Military members serv ing overseas and other U.S. citizens living abroad must consider mail tran sit times when submitting their absentee ballots to vote in upcoming presi dential, Senate, House, gubernatorial, state leg islature, local and other elections. The 2012 U.S. presidential election, for example, will be held Nov. 6, 2012. Officials recom mend that absentee vot ers sending ballots from the following countries mail them out no later than:-Iraq: 22 days before the election; Afghanistan (exclud ing air stop locations), Egypt, Kyrgyzstan, Oman and Turkmenistan: 17 days before the election; Germany: 11 days before the election; Afghanistan air stop locations, Bahrain, Cuba, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates: 10 days before the election; and Japan, Korea and the Philippines: seven days before the election. For a full list of absentee ballot mailing dates for overseas locations, visit www.FVAP.gov. Military members serv ing overseas may express mail their absentee bal lots free of charge from any APO/FPO/DPO or American embassy and consulate -ask to use the Express Mail Label 11-DoD. This label allows voters to track their bal lots at www.usps.com. The federal write-in absentee ballot is used as a backup ballot. Thirty days prior to an election, if voters believe theyll not receive their state ballot in time to vote and return it, they can vote using the FWAB. This ballot is accepted by all states from any overseas or military voter who has regis tered and requested a ballot for 2012.Phone Cards To DeployedNavy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs OfficeNavy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced military members underway or forward-deployed dur ing the holiday season have been given a free $10 phone card to call loved ones back home. This is the tenth holiday in a row that NEXCOM has offered free phone cards to deployed military members. We are honored to be able to give free phone cards to our military men and women who do so much and sacri fice so much through out the year to protect our country, said Jennie Zack, NEXCOM person al telecommunications specialist. These free phone cards are a way to thank them for their ser vice especially during the holiday season when they are away from their loved ones. NEXCOM will distrib ute $10 AT&T prepaid phone cards to those ships with AT&T Direct Ocean Service that will be deployed and away from their homeport for the December holiday season including Coast Guard vessels, submarines as well as forward deployed forces. NEXCOM expects to distribute nearly 45,000 free phone cards during the holidays. 20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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NORAD Gears Up To Track Santa ClausAmerican Forces Press ServiceFor the 56th year run ning, the North American Aerospace Defense Command will add the job of tracking the global flight of Santa on Christmas Eve to its mis sion of North American aerospace warning and control. NORAD stands the watch protecting the skies of North America 365 days a year, but on Christmas Eve the chil dren of the world look to NORAD and our trusted partners to make sure that Santa is able to complete his mission safely, said Army Gen. Charles H. Jacoby Jr. Jacoby commands NORAD, as well as U.S. Northern Command, both based at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. The NORAD Tracks Santa mission is a duty to the children of the world, he added, and a privilege weve enjoyed for 56 consecutive years. From a NORAD video of the 2010 Santa flight, a military specialist looks up from a bank of com puter screens: Sir, he says, turning to look at the camera, weve picked up Big Red on the radar. Hes entering from the northeast. Recommend fighter escort as he transitions over North America, the specialist adds, as the video shows an F-16 moving down the runway. This year, the NORAD Tracks Santa website went live Dec. 1 and features a Countdown Calendar, a Kids Countdown Village with holiday games and activities that change daily, and video messages from students and troops from around the world. The website is avail able in English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Japanese, Brazilian Portuguese and Chinese. For the first time, using free apps in the Apple iTunes Store and in the Android market, parents and children can use their smart phones to count down the days until Santa and his reindeer take off from the North Pole to deliver presents to kids everywhere. Facebook, Google+, YouTube and Twitter also offer tracking opportunities. Santa followers can type @noradsanta into each search engine to get started. And thats not the only technology that goes into the Santa tracking mis sion. To track the big man in red, NORAD uses radar, satellites, Santa cams and fighter jets. A NORAD radar system called the North Warning System consists of 47 installations strung across the northern border of North America. On Dec. 24, NORAD monitors the radar systems continu ously for indications that Santa Claus has left the North Pole. The moment radar indicates a lift-off, satellites positioned in geo-syn chronous orbit at 22,300 miles from the Earths surface are equipped with infrared sensors, which enable them to detect heat. Rudolphs bright red nose gives off an infrared signature that allows the satellites to detect Santas sleigh. NORAD starting using the Santa cam network in 1998. Santa cams, according to NORAD, are ultracool, high-tech, highspeed digital cameras prepositioned at many locations around the world. They use the cam eras once a year to capture images and videos of Santa and his reindeer. In the air, Canadian NORAD pilots flying the CF-18 fighter will inter cept and welcome Santa to North America. In the United States, American NORAD fight er pilots in F-15s, F-16s or F-22 Raptors will fly alongside Santas air borne sleigh pulled by his famous reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and Rudolph. Once data is collected on Dec. 24, it is pushed into Google Maps and Google Earth so families all over the world can follow Santa. Thanks to these systems and technologies, start ing at midnight Mountain Standard Time on Dec. 24, visitors to the NORAD Santa website can watch Santas progress around the globe. It all started in 1955 when a Sears media advertisement directed kids to call Santa Claus but printed a telephone number that rang through to the crew commander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. The colonel on duty told his staff to give all children who called in a current location for Santa Claus. The tradition continued when NORAD replaced CONAD in 1958. The [NORAD Tracks Santa] effort, Jacoby said, could not be carried out without the superb assis tance of numerous gov ernment and nongovern ment contributors. Sponsors of this years program include Acuity Scheduling, Big Fish Worldwide, Carousel Industries, the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Council, General Electric, the National Tree Lighting Ceremony, RadiantBlue Technologies Inc., thunderbaby stu dios, the U.S. Coast Guard Band, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Band, Visionbox, and the West Point Band. Returning sponsors include the Air Force Academy Band, Analytical Graphics Inc., Air Canada, Avaya, Booz Allen Hamilton, Colorado Springs School District 11, the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, the Federal Aviation Administration, First Choice Awards & Gifts, Globelink Foreign Language Center, Google, the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, Meshbox, the Naden Band of the Maritime Forces Pacific, Naturally Santas Inc., the Newseum, OnStar, PCI Broadband, the Space Foundation, tw telecom, Verizon and UGroup Media. It is the generosity of these contributors, the hard work of the more than 1,200 volunteers who man the NORAD Tracks Santa Operations Center, and vigilance of the Canadian and U.S. forces who work at NORAD that guarantees the programs success each and every year, Jacoby said. -Courtesy graphicThe North American Aerospace Defense Command based at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., will again track Santa Claus on his annual Christmas Eve flight to deliver presents to children around the globe. FFSC Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 1615 Dec. 15, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 21, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 27, 2-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Dec. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Saturday, Dec. 17 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 18 Christ United Methodist Church will host a Live Nativity from59 p.m. on the front lawn of the Church on Sunday Evening at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 24 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the difference between a conch and a whelk, or a cockle and a clam? Discover how to identify many of the frequently found shells that wash up on the Talbot Islands State Parks shores. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Please join Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach at 11:30 a.m. as they celebrate the birth of our Savior. Two services will be available to bring your family and friends to usher in Christmas morning at 7 p.m. Childrens Christmas Eve and Candle Lighting Service 11 p.m. Traditional Candlelight Communion Service. Services will be held in the sanctu ary at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 31 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. for a look into these past cultures and the artifacts they left behind. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 15, 2011 21