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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Publication Date: 12-08-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00239


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Wear Rules For NWU ExpandedFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced expanded occasion for wear and updated policies for the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I, II and III in NAVADMIN 366/11, released Dec. 2. There has been a lot of inter est throughout the fleet regard ing expanding the locations that Sailors can wear the Navys working uniform. Several weeks ago the CNO asked Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Rick West to take a look at the Navy Working Uniform policy. Following their review, I am proud to report that we are extending the wear policy of the working uniform to improve the practicality while ensuring pro fessionalism and maintaining its value, said Greenert. I want my shipmates to look sharp, be uniform and have the quality they deserve. The NAVADMIN expands the authorized stops for which NWUs may be worn when com muting to and from home and work, and to allow wear of the NWU during selected events when authorized by regional commanders or commanding officers. These policies will take effect Jan. 1 for all continental United States, Hawaii and Guam com mands. NWU wear is authorized for commuting and all normal tasks, such as stops at child care centers, gas stations, off-base shopping, banking, at the DMV, and dining before, during and after the workday. Since NWUs are not a liberty uniform, con sumption of alcohol while offbase in the NWUs is not permit ted. Area or regional command ers may further restrict this policy within their geographic limits. Additionally, the NWU Type I, II and III are authorized Jan. 1 for wear at all locations with the exception of sev eral National Capitol Region (NCR) locations. These include inside the Pentagon build ing and the National Mall area bounded by Capitol Hill and surrounding senate and house staff offices, the White House and executive office build ing, State Department and all monuments and memorials. Slides depicting NCR prohib ited areas can be found at the Navy Uniform Matters website at http://www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/uniforms/ Pages/default2.aspx. The ser vice uniform and service dress uniform will remain the uni form of the day at these NCR locations. Additionally, the NWU Type I is authorized for wear by all Commander, Navy Recruiting Command (CNRC) recruiters in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam. NWUs are not authorized See NWU, Page 12 -Photo by Lt. Justin CooperIncoming Commanding Officer of HSL-48, Cmdr. Tyrel Simpson, shakes hands with the outgoing Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Donald Kennedy, during the squadrons change of command ceremony held at HSL-48s hangar on Nov. 30.New CO For HSL-48 HSL-48 PAOThe World Famous Vipers of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron (Light) 48 held a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Mayport on Nov. 30 in the HSL-48 Hangar at 10 a.m. Cmdr. Tyrel Simpson relieved Cmdr. Donald Kennedy as commanding officer of the squadron. During Kennedys com mand tour, he deployed seven fully combat-ready detachments support ing operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, antipiracy, and counter nar co-terrorism operations. His aggressive pursuit of operational excellence with an unwavering com mitment to safety resulted in more than 8,500 total mishap-free flight hours and 11,500 shipboard landings. The Vipers led HSMWINGLANT in tactical proficiency, 13 anti-piracy engagements resulted in four pirates terminated and 38 cap tured suspected pirates, as well as more than 120 civilian mariners res cued. Additionally, HSL48 scored above fleet average during the 2011 Commander Naval Air Forces aviation mainte nance inspection, with 19 programs receiving zero discrepancies. Under his leadership, HSL-48 exceeded overall Navy retention averages by more than 25 percent and promoted seven Sailors to Chief Petty Officer, seven to Senior Chief Petty Officer, and 91 Sailors to Petty Officer, meet ing or exceeding the fleet advancement rates in every category. Simpson, a native of Nebraska, is a 1993 gradu ate of the United States Naval Academy and was designated a naval aviator in February 1996. Seagoing assign ments include service in Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 48, Carrier Strike Group 2 staff, and Helicopter Anti-See HSL-48, Page 12Wrapping Up -Photo by MC2 Brian M. BrooksLt. Nicole Scherer, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 46, Detachment 4, keeps track of pallets received inside the landing safety officer shack aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68) during a vertical replen ishment at sea with The Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2). Anzio, with embarked air squadron HSL-46, is deployed in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation efforts. HSL-46 Det Four returns to Mayport today along with USS Gettysburg (CG 64). See the full story in next weeks edition of The Mirror. Essay Winner Tells Why Shes ProudEditors Note: Fleet and Family Support Center hosted a Month of the Military Family Essay Contest last month. The subject was Why are you grate ful to be a member of a mili tary family. Prize for the essay included a free Thanksgiving turkey from Whitz Pitt and publication in The Mirror Congratulations Keana! I am grateful to be a military family for two reasons. The first reason is because my dad is a hero! He protects me, my friend and this country. I know he has to leave, but when hes gone I know he is doing a great thing. My class is writing letters and making a package to send to my Dad and all his Navy friends on the USS Gettysburg for Veterans Day and Thanksgiving. Everybody is thankful for the job they do. The second reason I am grateful to be a military family is the real reason why my Dad is in the Navy. I have Muscular Dystrophy. That means my mus cles dont work as good as other peoples muscles do. So I need lots of stuff to help me. I need a wheelchair, a stander, a gait trainer, a lift, surgeries, special medicines, therapy, special doc tor appointments and a house with ramp and lots of room to get around. The Navy pays a lot of money to help me. If my dad wasnt in the Navy, it would be a lot harder. I have friends at school whose mom or dad is not in the Navy and they cant afford to buy wheelchairs or the stuff they need. But the Navy helps them too, because when I grow out of something I find someone who needs it and give it to them. Even though its hard that my Dads gone a lot, it means a mil lion to me and my friends for us to be a Navy family. Keana Altis, 8-Photo by Lauren Waltin FFSC Essay Contest Winner Keana Altis and mom, Katie, proudly show their military family pride by wearing USS Gettysburg jer seys, the ship Keanas father is currently stationed aboard.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror On Tuesday, Nov. 29, N.S. Mayport and NAS JAX joined with Duval County Public Schools in a partnership designed to connect students with military personnel. This collaboration will provide positive role models for students and demonstrate commitment, service to others, character, and discipline. While part nerships between com mands and individual schools have been facili tated in the past, this is the first time that a whole base partnership with the school district has been initiated. The kick-off fea tured base command ers Captain Douglas Cochrane, N.S. Mayport, and Captain Jeffrey Maclay. Duval schools were represented by Ed Pratt-Dannals, Superintendent of Schools; Betty Burney, Board Chairman/ School Board District 5 Representative; and Paula D. Wright, School board District 4 Representative. Dr. Alvin Brennan, Principal, Forrest High School, emceed the pro gram. The presentation of colors was performed by the Forrest High School Air Force JROTC and was followed by the National Anthem performed by the U.S. Navy Band. James M. Stevens, JROTC Cadet, led the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance. Following greetings by the superintendent, Mrs. Wright, whose district includes Ribault Middle School, remarked on the importance of this new partnership. Mrs. Burney, representing the Board and NS Mayports other partner school George Washington Carver Elementary School, brought greetings from the Board. Capt. Douglas Cochrane, commanding officer of NS Mayport, gave an impassioned speech on dreamers and how they have changed the world. He shared with the Kick-Off audience, which included Forrest High students and stu dents from Ribault Middle and Stilwell Middle, that this partnership with the Navy community, the dis trict, school staffs, and parents will not let them fail! That they must dare to be dreamers like the Wright Brothers, Captain Scott Spiker a Forrest High graduate, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He reminded them of Dr. Kings statement that the function of education is to teach one to think critical ly. Intelligence and char acter: those are the goals of education. He gave a special shout-out to teachers, another group of dream ers, who give nothing but 100% from the first day they stepped into this school. He reminded the audience that while teachers dont get paid well commensurate with the effort they put into your well-being. They dont get the accolades that he and Captain Maclay routinely receive. But, they too are world changers. . They dream of a better world just like Dr. King. Capt.Cochrane emphasized that this better world will come because of you and their efforts on your behalf. The partnership fea tures a collaboration between NS Mayport and Ribault Middle and George Washington Carver Elementary Schools whose princi pals were also in atten dance. Edward Robinson is the principal of Ribault Middle and Timothy Warren is Carvers princi pal. SERMC will be work ing with Ribault Middle and NAVSTA will assist Carver Elementary. NAS Jax will partner with Forrest High School and Stilwell Middle. Their principals Dr. Alvin Brennan, Forrest, and Catherine Barnes, Stilwell, were also in attendance. The commands at both bases will focus on providing positive role models for the students. Additionally they will assist their schools with ship activities, and The year of activities will conclude with field trips to their respective bases. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Project N.A.V.Y. Kicks Off At Forrest H.S.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer This year was a spe cial Thanksgiving. It was marked with good food, family football and some special memories. A year ago, I was deployed. I enjoyed Thanksgiving with service members and contractors on the island of Diego Garcia, in the British Indian Ocean Territory. After a years deployment, it is good to be back home. Many of our service men and women are away from their families and friends. Yet we are still a unique adopted fam ily where-ever we may be. As a young Sailor, I was reminded that the most important attitude that we can nurture or exhibit, is the attitude of thanks giving. Whatever chal lenges we face, whatever burdens we carry, the Lt. Tom Bingol Surface Force Ministry CenterThanksgiving Is Bridge Between Good, Hard Times HOMEFRONTShipmates, Tuesday we welcomed Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast to Naval Station Mayport. Each stop during the day look-see of the base, Admiral Scorby got a firsthand look at the pride and professionalism each of you bring to the table each day. Special thanks to everyone involved in showing the boss around, and a huge thanks to the crew of USS Independence (LCS2) for showing Admiral Scorby your extremely sharp and stealthy littoral combat ship. Yesterday more than 200 veter ans and Florida Lt. Governor Jennifer Carroll participated in a remembrance ceremony with the men and women of USS Underwood (FFG 36) for the service members lost during the 1941 attack at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 70 years ago. Sponsored by the Mayport Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290, this annual commemorative service has been a Mayport tradition since 1966. Guests from various veterans organiza tions throughout the State of Florida and beyond are attending this years service. Special thanks to Lt. Gov. Carroll for attending, Cmdr. Pete Mirisola for host ing and each one of the men and women of USS Underwood for your duty and dedication. Spending a day with our veterans will be something you wont forget. Take in their memories they will no doubt share, they are living proof of Americas greatest generation. Huge day today as we welcome USS George W. Bush (CVN 77), USS Anzio (CG 68), USS Mitcsher (DDG 57), USS Truxton (DDG 103) and more than 1,300 Tigers who will board CVN and make the trek back to Norfolk tomorrow evening. Harbor Operations, Security, Public Works, MWR and a host of others will certainly have their hands full. Please drive safe as you make your way around the base...there will be some extra folks out and about to say the least! Also happening today is the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) as they make their way back from the Mediterranean and six months away from family. I wish each and every one of you on board a happy holiday and welcome back. Last week I had the pleasure of talking with a room full of great kids from the on base Youth Activity Center Torch Club. They were all armed with great questions as they sat at the table in the executive conference room and conducted one of the best interviews I have ever had! Special thanks to School Age Counselors Yvonne Beisser and Shawanna Anderson for bringing the kids in and making my day. It was awesome. And last, but certainly not least, please watch over your shipmates. There is no problem big or small that we cant fix together. I realize that holidays are often times when we see a spike in suicide and other problems both financial and domestic, and YOU NEED TO KNOW that we have a host of counselors, finan cial specialists and your own leadership that can guide you through anything. We are a team. We are a family. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe, and keep sending those sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy. milCapt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSload seems lighter when we put each day into per spective. We often have many more blessings than we are willing to count. Coming to know the DG-21 contractors, many from the Philippines, whose meager wages helped to support their families back home exemplified a true attitude of being thankful, of being grateful. This week, we stand between the joy of Thanksgiving Day and the shadow of Pearl Harbor Day. My grand father served in the U.S. Navy after World War I; his eldest son, my uncle, served as a Marine in World War II. I am pre paring for our celebration of Pearl Harbor Day, marking the 70th anni versary of a day that was filled with sacrifice, loss, and grief. But I offer that same sense of gratitude for those who rose to the challenge of defending our nation in its darkest hour. Paul, in his letter to the Philippians, says, Make your petitions known. Pray to God for what con cerns you, what troubles you, what you desire; but, in everything, give thanks. I have not always been the first to demon strate that attitude of Thanksgiving, but I strive to thankful each and every day. I have met with sail ors who are facing the Enlisted Retention Boards and Perform To Serve announcements. For all who have served our Navy in every generation, I extend a heartfelt Thank You. For all who are fac ing the challenges of not knowing what tomorrow brings, please know that our Chaplains are stand ing with you. May God cultivate in each of us, an attitude of thanksgiving in what we do and what we say, even as lifes challenges gather around us. In the shadow of December 7th, I hope that you were able to offer a moment of silence and remembrance for the battle of Pearl Harbor. Perhaps you will meet a WWII veteran, and offer a simple word to them. Thank You. CHAPLAINS Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. Poverty in America: Our nations most profound moral failingA CFC participant. Provided as a public service Is Your Child 2012 Military Child Of Year?From Operation HomefrontOperation Homefront announced the open ing of the 2012 Military Child of the Year Award nomination period. The award will be given to an outstanding military child from each Service Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The winners, who each will receive $5,000, will be flown with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for special recogni tion ceremony on April 5, 2012. Nominations are being accepted online until Jan. 15, 2012 at www. OperationHomefront.net/ MCOY. Ideal candidates for the Military Child of the Year Award demonstrate resilience and strength of character, and thrive in the face of the challenges of military life. They dem onstrate leadership within their families and within their communities. Nominees must: tary ID or currently be enrolled in DEERS ages of 8-18 to Washington, D.C., for the ceremony on April 5, 2012 Finalists must have a background check to con firm the information in the nomination and must provide references. Recipients of the 2011 awards are profiled in the book Our Youngest Heroes, available through Amazon.com.

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Keep Mental Health In Mind During Holidays Naval Hospital Jacksonville Mental Health Department psy chologist While its a myth that the suicide rate jumps around the holidays, the stress of the holidays can lead to neglecting the basic things that help people feel good: diet, exercise, rest and peace of mind. During the holidays, its easy to neglect men tal health, along with diet, exercise and sleep. Not taking care of ones self leads to stress, irritability, fatigue, sleep problems, indulgent eating, loss of enthusiasm and feelings of detachment and angst. Stressed-out people have a hard time enjoying things, because theyre preoccupied and some times just going through the motions. Its hard to feel like this is the most wonderful time of the year, when people are worrying about money, finances, family, travel, cooking, shopping and other activities that come with the season. An American Psychological Association survey shows that the number one stressor dur ing the holidays is finan cial stress. Coming in at number two is the pres sure of gift-giving. Plus, the family get-togethers can resurrect old con flicts. And negotiating family obligations and vis its can make travel more stressful. Here are some simple steps people can take to make this time of year less stressful: Take time. Spend just 10 minutes without dis tractions to get refreshed. Go for a walk, look at holi day lights, take a bath or unplug! Get organized! Its easy to feel overwhelmed. Make a list, check it twice and be sure things are correctly prioritized. Try to separate the control lable from the non-con trollable. Dont forget diet and exercise. Overeating or neglecting fitness can lead to feelings of guilt or poor body image. Dont skip meals. Being hungry can make people irritable and prone to overeating. Eat healthy snacks to help stay sharp. Reach out. If feeling isolated, seek out community, spiritual or other social eventssuch as volunteeringto lift spir its. If a to-do list is too long, delegate and ask for help. Get some sleep. Skimping on sleep can lead to problems, from irritability and dangerous driving to an increased susceptibility to illness. Ward off germs. With the increased travel, cold er weather and stress, be sure to wash hands or use hand sanitizer. Get a flu shot. Stay hydrated. Be sure to keep an eye on shipmatesthis com mon Navy expression reminds people to watch out for friends, colleagues and loved ones. And dont forget people who have loved ones deployed or away from home dur ing the holidays, or who recently experienced a loss like divorce or death. Its important to help those who show warning signswhich include irri tability, fatigue, sleep dis orders, indulgent eating, loss of enthusiasm and feelings of detachment and angst. But remem ber that people who are very stressed can some times feel like they have to maintain appearances when theyre really falling apart inside. Reaching out to help someone can be their first step to get ting back on track, during the holidays or anytime. For help, military mem bers and their families can make use of ser vices at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles mental health clinic (542-3473), Fleet and Family Support Center (542-5745), base or hospital chaplain, Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 or www. militaryonesource.mil or Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273-8255 (or text to 838255), or families can contact TRICAREs Value Options at 800-700-8646 for mental health care in the civilian community. The hardest part can be asking for help; theres a tremendous amount of help out there waiting to be found.Share Your Energy-Conserving Tips OnlineChief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness DivisionThe director of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy & Environmental Readiness Division released a video pod cast for the 2011 holiday season. In the podcast, Rear Adm. Phil Cullom reminds viewers that while decorative lighting is an enjoyable part of celebrat ing the holidays, it presents two avoidable factors that can degrade Navy readiness: the energy intensity of outdated lighting and safety issues that can result from these systems. Cullom presents challenges in the categories of lighting, recycling, and safety. He rec ommends upgrading to energy efficient holiday lights by using solar lighting to decorate out doors, employing lighting tim ers to reduce holiday lighting energy consumption, and using recycled materials to wrap gifts. Year round, he suggests turning off computers at the end of the work day to conserve energy. From a safety standpoint, he encourages personnel to exer cise caution with space heaters and avoid overloading electrical circuits. Cullom invites Sailors and civilians to post holiday energysaving and safety tips from their ships and bases on the Navys Task Force Energy Facebook page, http://www.facebook. com/NavalEnergy. This presents a great opportu nity for Navy personnel to share their knowledge and hands-on experience to improve readi ness, conserve energy, and safe ly celebrate in the holiday spirit. The complete video mes sage can be viewed at http:// youtu.be/9rtIXx7p7Js, and a written transcript is avail able on the Navys Energy, Environment, and Climate Change website at http://greenfleet.dodlive.mil/files/2011/11/ NavyEnergyHolidayTranscript1. pdf. This and other podcasts, arti cles, and stories are available on the Navys Task Force Energy Facebook page at http://www. facebook.com/NavalEnergy. For additional information about the Navys energy, envi ronment, and climate change initiatives, please visit http:// www.greenfleet.dodlive.mil/ home. For more news from Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division, visit www.navy.mil/ local/n45/. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 USS Carney Halfway Carneyval Celebration USS CarneyDuring the week of Nov. 14-21, USS Carney executed their Halfway Carneyval Celebration. Among the many events coordinated by MWR dur ing the week of Carneyval was a Carneys Got Talent Talent Show, a Treadmill/Elliptical/Bike Triathlon Competition, a Skeet Shoot, an Ultimate Fire Fighting Challenge, the Bite My Hook Fishing Competition, and an extremely competitive Corn Hole competition. Although the seas were too rough for a swim call, Carneyval was a great success and an awesome way to celebrate the half way mark of a 7-month deployment. -Photo by Ensign Amalie ShafferCarneys Halfway Celebration cake made by Culinary Specialist Third Class (SW) Joshua Tucker. The crew gathered on the mess decks for a cake and ice cream social. -Photo by Ensign Lily PowersBoatswains Mate Second Class (SW) Dustin Foster and Operations Specialist Chief (SW) Bruce Dokey compete in the Cornhole Tournament on the aft VLS deck. -Photo by Ensign Jessica CurryMembers of the Auxiliaries Division, or A-Gang smile for the camera after taking first place in the Triathlon. From left to right, Ensign Amalie Shaffer, Engineman Fireman Apprentice Dustin Leonard and Engineman Second Class (SW) Juan Gomez. -Photo by ITC(SW) Willie Wilkerson The crew enjoys a thanksgiving meal on the mess decks while in port in Bahrain.Crew Enjoys Activities

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-Photo by Ensign Lily PowersHull Technician 2nd Class (SW) Christopher Colafati competes in the Carney Ultimate Fire-Fighting Challenge. -Photo by Ensign Amalie ShafferLt.j.g. Andrew Ashby, left, and Skeet Shoot Winner, Command Master Chief (SW) Alton Smith, pose with a Mossberg Rifle. -Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonBoatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Dustin Foster directing a helo during flight opera tions.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonGunners Mates 2nd Class (SW) Anthony Collins instructs another Sailor with the M240.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonGas Turbine Technician (Electical) 3rd Class Can Ngo troubleshoots fuel console.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonCulinary Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Katherine Ledford works in the galley preparing a delicious meal.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonMembers of VBSS team prepare to tow a fishing skiff after a boarding in the Guld of Aden. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 5

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FFSC Holds Workshops To Survive HolidaysFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Dec. 8, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 8, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 9, 6-9 p.m ., IA Christmas Party, Bowling Alley Dec. 12-15, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Dec. 12, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Career and Employment Readiness Class FFSC Room 702 Dec. 12, 1-3 p.m., Federal Employment Class, FFSC Room 702 Dec. 13, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Now Parenting Class FFSC Room 607 Dec. 13, 6-7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group Building 1, Room 104 Dec. 13, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Anger Management Building 1 Room 1615 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of rela tionships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Dec. 14, 9-11 a.m., PFM Forum, FFSC Room 719 Dec. 14, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 1615 Dec. 15, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 21, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 27, 2-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Dec. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Saturday, Dec. 10 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This ranger-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 11 Celebrate Christmas at our third annual Cookie Cantata. Homemade cookies will be sold to support our various min istries at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach 11:30 a.m. Crafts and fun activities will be available for children and their families. A visit from the jolly old elf himself will highlight the day. Join us in Wilson Fellowship Hall immediately follow ing the choral cantata during the worship ser vice. Call the church office at 249-5370 for informa tion. Saturday, Dec. 17 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 18 Christ United Methodist Church will host a Live Nativity from59 p.m. on the front lawn of the Church on Sunday Evening at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 24 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the difference between a conch and a whelk, or a cockle and a clam? Discover how to identify many of the frequently found shells that wash up on the Talbot Islands State Parks shores. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Please join Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach at 11:30 a.m. as they celebrate the birth of our Savior. Two services will be available to bring your family and friends to usher in Christmas morn ing at 7 p.m. Childrens Christmas Eve and Candle Lighting Service 11 p.m. Traditional Candlelight Communion Service. Services will be held in the sanctu ary at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 31 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Jan. 7 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. The program will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. Saturday, Jan. 14 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a discussion on the different types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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CNRMC Holds Maintenance-Related MeetingsNavy Regional Maintenance Center Public AffairsCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) held a series of maintenancerelated meetings dur ing his trip to Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) on Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla. Nov 28-29. During his two-day visit at both locations, Rear Adm. David Gale, CNRMC, held All Hands sessions with military and civilian employees, met with area port engineers and conducted a round table discussion with local ships commanding offi cers (COs). These face-to-face meetings are invaluable to me. They offer me unique insights into our communitys accomplish ments and challenges, and ultimately help frame the reality of the day-today work that takes place within the surface ship domain, said Gale. With Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) staffs, Gale dis cussed the importance of Integrated Project Team Development (IPTD) efforts, the revitaliza tion of the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) within the RMCs, and the stan dardization of main tenance training and qualification practices for surface ship mainte nance personnel through CNRMCs development of its Workforce Development Program (WFDP), designed for civilians and military alike. The meetings with the port engineers, and later with the ships COs, both centered on the ways CNRMC could provide senior-level support to help revise policies and practices that result in counterproductive results and unnecessary increas es in the cost and dura tion of maintenance avail abilities. I use these discussions to determine how I can best serve the needs of the fleet and the maintenance community, said Gale. From the lost operation al days that concern fleet commanders, to the sup port, advocacy and over sight the RMCs need to effectively navigate ships maintenance availabilities and perform at peak lev els, I have found we col lectively make the most progress when we work to understand one anothers unique requirements and constraints, and develop agreed upon strategies for success. Gale held similar meet ings in San Diego on Nov. 14-15, and will continue to meet with maintenance professionals across the RMCs into the new year. For more information about CNRMC, visit: www.navsea.navy.mil/ CNRMC DoD Warns Of USAA Phishing ScamFrom DoDIn early November, USAA members began receiving email claim ing to be from USAA with the subject line: USAA Protection Alert. In an elaborate scheme, the email informs members about a failed usaa. com login attempt and to click on a link to update their identity. Clicking on the link directs the mem ber first to a counter feit website to log on. Logging on produc es the second web site, asking for a PIN. Clicking Next pro duces another website asking for the member to set up security ques tions and after clicking Next again, a final website opens, ask ing for the members sensitive information including: Card Holders Name* Card Number Expire Date* Card Verification Code* Billing Address* Billing Zip Code* Billing Phone Number* Email Address* Email Password* Although the e-mail includes a USAA logo and appears to be from USAA, it is not. This is a phishing scam targeting USAA Members / Military Personnel. Recently Joint Base Lewis-McChord per sonnel have reported receiving this phishing scam. If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial informa tion, do not reply. And dont click on the link in the message, either. Legitimate companies dont ask for this infor mation via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization men tioned in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the companys correct Web address your self. In any case, dont cut and paste the link from the message into your Internet browser phishers can make links look like they go to one place, but that actually send you to a different site. DES OPSEC Officer is Michael Chesbro @ 253-966-7303.Shipmate To Workmate To Transition MilitaryFrom NAVSEANow that the Navy has begun notifying the more than 3,000 sailors impact ed by Enlisted Retention Boards, six major Navy commands have started a program to aid transitioning Sailors in competing for job opportunities as federal civilians. The Shipmate-toWorkmate program managed jointly by the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Facilities Command, Naval Supply Systems Command, Commander, Naval Installations, Space and Naval Warfare Command and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations will provide information about career opportuni ties available at partner ing commands and help Sailors prepare job applications and resumes. The participating com mands will steer sepa rating Sailors, command career counselors and transition assistance coor dinators to a dedicated Shipmates-to-Workmates website to facilitate par ticipation. This website will serve as a one-stop shop for Sailors seeking Navy-related employ ment. Finding out that you are being separated from the Navy will be a signifi cant blow, said NAVSEA Deputy Commander Rear Adm. Clarke Orzalli. The Shipmates-to-Workmates program is an opportu nity to do what we can to soften the blow, as well as continue to utilize their significant skills for the benefit of the Navy. Through the website and other outreach pro grams, the effort will attempt to demystify the government service hir ing process, match job supply to demand, link existing Navy and Defense Department transition support, and assist quali fied Sailors with local hir ing processes. The Shipmates to Workmates program is simply good leadership this program demon strates our commitment, as leaders, to our Sailors by assisting those being involuntarily separated, said Cmdr. Pat Sanders, NAVSEAs lead for the program. Each of the participat ing commands will par ticipate in job fairs and other hiring events for transitioning Sailors. The first event is a career forum that will be held Dec. 3 from 1100 to 1400 at NSA Bethesda in the Fleet & Family Support Center, Bldg. 11, room 109. Future forums are scheduled at fleet concentration areas throughout the country, including a Dec. 6 forum in Norfolk. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program as well as a full sched ule of upcoming career forums, please visit the Shipmates-to-Workmates website at http://jobs. navair.navy.mil/sm2wm/. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 7

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DeCA Scholarships For Military Children OpenDeCA marketing and mass communications specialist2011 Scholarships for Military Children recipi ent Jordan Cherry said receiving extra money for college lightened her financial load. This scholarship defi nitely decreases the finan cial burden of school, which we all know is a big benefit, she said. Applications for the 2012 Scholarships for Military Children Program will be available starting Dec. 1 at commis saries worldwide as well as online through a link on http://www.commis saries.com and directly at http://www.mili taryscholar.org. Awards will be based on funds available, but the program awards at least one $1,500 scholar ship to a student at each commissary. Scholarships are funded by donations from commissary ven dors, manufacturers, bro kers, suppliers and the general public. Every dol lar donated goes directly to funding scholarships. No taxpayer dollars are expended on the scholar ship program. If there are no eligible applicants from a particu lar commissary, the funds designated for that com missary are used to award an additional scholarship at another store. The scholarship pro gram was created to rec ognize military families contributions to the readi ness of U.S. armed forc es and the commissarys role in the military com munity. Since the pro gram began in 2000, it has awarded more than $9.3 million in scholarships to 6,069 military children from 62,000-plus appli cants. While these numbers are impressive, whats even more impressive is what past scholarship recipients are doing with their education, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. Many recipients have entered a wide range of career fields such as teaching, busi ness, law and military ser vice to name just a few. Many others have earned advanced degrees. They are making their way in this world, and they are making a difference. To be eligible for a scholarship, the student must be a dependent, unmarried child, no older than 21 or 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a college or university of a service member on active duty, reservist, guards man, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retir ee. Eligibility is deter mined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System data base. Applicants should ensure that they, as well as their sponsor, are enrolled in the DEERS database and have a cur rent military ID card. The applicant must also be planning to attend or already attending an accredited college or uni versity, full time, in the fall of 2012 or be enrolled in a program of stud ies designed to transfer directly into a four-year program. Applicants must sub mit an essay on a topic which will be available Dec. 1 on http://www. militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 24, 2012. The scholarship pro gram is administered by Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to service members and their families. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarshipmanagement services organization, evaluates applications and awards these scholarships. If students have questions about the scholarship program application, call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers. com.Tis The Season To Visit Commissary For SavingsDeCA marketing and mass communications specialistHoliday savings on top of everyday low prices are plen tiful in December for com missary customers, said the Defense Commissary Agencys sales director. Any time of the year our customers know to make their commissary their first shop ping stop if they want to enjoy the savings theyve earned, said Chris Burns, sales director. And, during the holidays, they will see shelves stocked with discounted groceries and other household products to make this time of year even merrier. Throughout December, DeCAs industry partners will host many in-store promo tions and provide extra savings focused on the holiday season. Overseas stores may have sub stitute events for certain pro motional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for the following super sales events: Coupon for free Coca-Cola product. Commissary and mili tary exchange customers can download an Internet coupon for a free 20-ounce Coca Cola product redeemable only on Dec. 16 and 17 at a commissary or military exchange. This pro motion celebrates the 125th and 70th-year anniversaries of the Coca-Cola Company and USO, respectively, as well as these organizations historic relation ship with the U.S. military. To access the coupon go to http:// www.uso.org/coca-cola/. Holiday recipe contest. Through midnight Dec. 31, DeCA and the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, also known as the Exchange, are offering shoppers opportunities to win shopping sprees just by entering their favorite holiday recipes. To enter, go to http:// www.shopmyexchange.com/ Community/patriotfamily/ contests.htm for contest details and a link to an email address to send recipes. There are three categories: main dish, side dish or dessert. Participants must submit a description of the recipe, 50 words or less, or the origin of the recipe. Recipes must include specific ingredient measurements and preparation directions. Limit two entries per immediate family. There will be four winners for each cat egory 12 chances to win. Firstplace winners in each category receive a $500 Exchange gift card and a $500 commissary gift card donated by DeCAs indus try partners. Holiday Helping recipe book. ConAgra will offer a Holiday Helping recipe book with $10 in coupon savings on brands such as OrvilleRedenbacher Popping Corn, Poppycock, Swiss Miss Cocoa, Wesson Oil and Reddi-Whip, just to name a few. Customers can find additional commis sary coupons at http://www. conagracommissarydeals.com. Dear Santa. J.M. Smucker Company will offer its 2nd annual Dear Santa promotion featuring savings on in-store product displays and a contest to win commissary gift cards. Some of the products on sale include Folgers Classic Roast Coffee, Pillsbury Coffee Cakes, Pillsbury Cake Mix & Frosting, and Hungry Jack Pancakes & Syrup. These companies will also donate $5,000 in coffee to the troops deployed overseas. Believe in Heroes. Acosta continues this event in sup port of the Wounded Warriors Project, offering flyers with high-value coupons. The Wounded Warrior Project raises awareness and enlists public aid to help severely injured service members. For more information, go to http:// ww.woundedwarriorproject.org and http://ww.believeinheroes. org. Huddle to Fight Hunger. Commissary shoppers will see in-store displays, flyers, recipe books and tear pads, special pricing and coupons on Kraft products related to the compa nys Huddle to Fight Hunger campaign to help provide 25 million meals to families across America. For more details, go to http://www.Facebook.com/ KraftFightHunger. Our commissary staff and industry partners wish all our customers a very happy, safe holiday season! Burns said. We hope you enjoy your time with your families, and remember commissaries can also help you save on New Years Eve party goodies. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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SBR Celebrates Thanksgiving At SeaFrom USS Samuel B. Roberts USS Samuel B. Roberts celebrated Thanksgiving at sea on November 22. The ships culinary spe cialists cooked up a memorable feast for the crew while they continue their six month deployment in the Africa/Mediterranean region. It was a chance for the crew to relax, enjoy the holiday and celebrate their successful mission to Africa Partnership Station. Sammy Bs Culinary Specialists cooked 14 turkeys, 18 hams and an assortment of side dishes and desserts. It took nearly 24 hours of cooking and prepara tions to ready the event. The meal was a huge suc cess and morale booster for the crew. Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Joseph Scott said, It turned out very well and I think the crew enjoyed it. He stated further, We worked many hours pre paring and making sure the crew enjoyed the meal. It means a lot for the crew to have a nice meal on Thanksgiving, said Lt. Bert Phillips, the ships supply officer. He also said, The crew has worked so hard dur ing this deployment and being away from fam ily during the holiday I think a good meal can strongly increase a Sailors morale. Petty Officer 1st Class Jonas Joe praised the meal by saying, It didnt feel like I was eating a meal on a ship. It felt like a home cooked meal away from home. He said the turkey was his favourite part of the meal. The Sailors of the Sammy B enjoyed a holi day routine the entire day to observe Thanksgiving. A holiday or Sunday rou tine is a relaxed day at sea where Sailors are able to enjoy some down time from the day to day stress es of ship life. They are able to write home, watch movies, play video games or just catch up on much needed rest. Sammy B is wrapping up its six-month deploy ment in the region. The ship has spent over five months on the east coast of Africa and Mediterranean Sea in support of Africa Partnership Station. Africa Partnership Station is a US-led ini tiative developed by the United States Naval Forces Africa for the pur pose of improving and promoting maritime security and stability in the region. USS Samuel B. Roberts Sailors enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving meal on the mess deck while deployed thanks to a team of culinary specialists aboard the ship. Below, culinary specialists aboard Sammy B stand in front of their Thanksgiving feast, including a cornucopia made of bread. Culinary Specialist Second Class Joseph Scott is one of several culinary specialists on board USS Samuel B. Roberts who cooked Thanksgiving dinner for the ships crew. The crew has been deployed for almost six months off the coast of Africa and in the Mediterranean Sea. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 9

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De Wert Helps Children Of Dar es Salaam Sailors from USS De Wert (FFG 45) participat ed in a community relations project cleaning and painting classrooms at Makongo Primary School, Nov. 26, during their port visit to Dar es Salaam. After celebrating their Thanksgiving at sea, many Sailors from USS De Wert chose to express their thanks by using their lib erty time in port to help improve a school in the impoverished country of Tanzania. The Sailors left the ship early in the morning for the hour drive through Dar es Salaam, conclud ing up a hilly dirt road leading to the schools campus. The Sailors were welcomed by dozens of excited children with big smiles, greeting their guests in Swahili with, Jambo! Thanks to the work of Seabees from the Maritime Civil Affairs Team and the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam, paint and sup plies were ready and wait ing for the Sailors. After cleaning the classrooms and prepping the walls for paint, the De Wert Sailors got to work. Within minutes the children were eager to help out. Side by side, the Sailors and students painted, laughed and made improvements to the learning environment of the school. When not painting, the students taught the Sailors some basic Swahili phrases and the Sailors taught the children basic words in English. They also had a chance to play soccer and other games together. The Sailors were grateful for the chance to inter act with the students and make their school a little nicer. Navy Counselor 1st Class Nathaniel Barnette said, I wanted to come out here to play with the kids and have fun. Im glad we got to play with the kids and make their school house a little bet ter. Gunners Mate 1st Class Luiggi Baldo added, It was good to do something for society. These kids dont have a lot of money and it was good to be able to make their school a lit tle nicer. The ships Command Master Chief, CMDMC LaDon Washington, wrapped up the senti ments of the crew noting that, It has been beneficial for all of us to develop the friendship between the United States and Tanzania. It was mean ingful to give of our abun dance to others who are less fortunate. It has been beneficial not only for our country but also for our Sailors to give of our time, expertise and to share our love with a local com munity. Hopefully it will open more dialogue and friendships between our cultures and communi ties. The Makongo Primary School enrolls between 80 and 160 children per class. The school consists of 7 classrooms and has 28 teachers on staff. With 42 percent of Tanzanias population under the age of 15, improving the school plays a key role in providing space for children to learn and develop the future leaders of the country. USS De Wert is on a sev en-month deployment to deter and disrupt piracy in the Indian Ocean and off the Horn of Africa. USS De Wert is operat ing as a member of the SNMG-1. -Photos courtesy of USS De WertSailors from USS De Wert stand with students from Makongo Primary School. USS De Wert Sailors and students from Makongo Primary School work together on a community relations project. CMDCM LaDon Washington and students from Makongo Primary School work on soc cer skills. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 11

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Dempsey Shares Observations On Defense BudgetSubmarine Squadron Light 44. He deployed with USS Thomas S. Gates (CG-51), USS Carr (FFG-52), USS Harry S Truman (CVN-75), and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). Simpson has served ashore at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 40 as an FRS instructor and at U.S. Strategic Command as Branch Chief of Nuclear Command and Control Systems Support. He is a 2007 graduate of the U.S. Naval War College and a Joint Qualified Officer. Simpson has flown more than 2,000 flight hours in seven different rotary-wing aircraft. Cmdr. Eric J. Bower assumed the duties as HSL-48 executive offi cer. Bower, a native of Berwick, Penn., graduated the United States Naval Academy in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. He was designated as a Surface Warfare Officer and served onboard USS Stump (DD-978) until lat eral transferring to Naval Aviation in 1997. His first operational flying tour in 1999 was with Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 42 in Mayport, Florida, where he com pleted deployments onboard USS Hawes (FFG-53) and USS Yorktown (CG-48). In 2003 he was select ed to serve ashore at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 40 as an FRS instructor pilot, the CNAL Search and Rescue Officer and later assumed the duties as the FRS Squadron Maintenance Officer. Bower began his department head tour as Officer-in-Charge of HSL-48 Detachment 10 in 2005. Embarked USS Elrod (FGG-55), he deployed in support of the Standing NATO Maritime Group One and Operation Active Endeavor. Upon return he served as the Squadron Maintenance Officer and was named HSL-48s Officer of the Year for 2007. In 2009, after attending the United States Naval War College and receiving a Master of Arts Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies, he reported to the Joint Staff, Director for Operations (J-3). He served as Assistant Deputy Director for Operations and Strike Advisor on National Joint Operations and Intelligence Center Team Four in the National Military Command Center. He provided worldwide politico-mil itary monitoring, stra tegic and emergency action functions and cri sis response in support of the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff, Secretary of Defense, and the President of the United States.HSL-48From Page 1for wear on commercial travel such as airlines, railways, or buses in the continental United States. However, they may be worn on military and government-contracted flights between military airfield installations, as well as commuter trans portation such as city and commuter buses, sub ways and ferries. The uniforms may also be worn at the Pentagon Metro and Pentagon commuter slug lines. The NAVADMIN also outlines the manner of wear for the NWU off base. The shirt/blouse is required to be worn at all times. Commanders also must ensure grooming standards are enforced. Trousers must be bloused and the only head gear authorized is the eight point cover and the parka hood must be stowed unless being used. The fleece with chest rank tab is also authorized as a stand-alone outer gar ment. Regional commanders will stipulate the wear of the NWU for official cer emonies and functions, such as Fleet Week, cel ebrations and parades, and sporting events with media interest. NAVADMIN 259/11 wear rules for these uni forms outside of the continual United States remain in effect. Go to www.npc.navy. mil to read the complete wear rules in NAVADMIN 366/11.NWUFrom Page 1American Forces Press ServiceThe chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said he understands that ser vice members are ner vous about looming bud get cuts, but will have to be patient as the process moves forward. Speaking in an inter view on his way back from meetings with British officials in London, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said the Defense Department is pledged to $450 billion in cuts over the next 10 years. The fiscal 2013 defense budget submitted in February 2012 will answer many of the questions troops have, he said. That budget, Dempsey said, will take the depart ment out to fiscal 2017. It shouldnt be lost on anybody that we were handed this bill this reduction about two months ago, the chair man said. What weve been doing is revising our strategy, he said, because you cant just take cuts and do the same things weve been doing. Fiscal planners are weighing the impact of cuts on the national security strategy and consulting with the ser vices, combatant commanders, defense sec retary and people at the White House and Office of Management and Budget, Dempsey said. Concurrently, we are doing the mind-numbing work of weighing program cuts and putting a budget together, he said. Congress, which under the Constitution is charged to raise and support Armies, and to provide and maintain a Navy, must be consulted, he noted. I know theres a lot of anxiety in the force. Im anxious, Dempsey said. But weve got to follow the existing process. If we werent hav ing a discussion among ourselves about find ing $450 billion worth of reductions, wed still be having the conversation about implementing the changes we have made in response to 10 years at war, he added. We have learned. Even if Congress were to give the department all it asks for, the military still would have to exam ine the strategy, consider threats and make chang es, Dempsey said. Any budget discussion would look to reinforce changes that improved capabili ties, add funding to bridge gaps, and eliminate fund ing for capabilities no lon ger needed. The discus sions also would include considerations of how much capability is need ed. The budget were pre paring ... has to account for those lessons, Dempsey said. In the analysis about what has happened to the military during 10 years at war and anticipating what type of military will be needed in 2020, he said, clearly, some capa bilities must be resourced. Counterterrorism is a big portion of the budget, he said, and cyber must be addressed, as the country is vulnerable to state or non-state actors operating in this new domain. Could that mean con ventional forces could be pressured by this budget? Yes, Dempsey said. But were going to find that balance between capabil ity and capacity -what do we need to do and how often do we need to do it. One thing I will assure you of is no one is going to write off the possibil ity of any particular form of conflict, the chairman continued. You cant say, I dont think well have a conflict with a near-peer competitor, so lets just ignore North Korea for the next five years and hope for the best. Thats impos sible. So weve got to sus tain our high-end conventional capability. Having the capabil ity to wage convention al-style warfare remains an important deterrent, Dempsey said. Weve got to have capability along the spec trum, he said, but some of the capacity is going to be changed, without question. Keeping Torch Burning -Photo by Bill AustinNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, answers questions from members of the Youth Activities Center Torch Club, sponsored through the Boys and Girls Club of America. The Torch Club is a leadership and service club for boys and girls focusing on character development. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Pearl Harbor Survivor Recounts Experience Defense Media Activity-NavyUSS Oklahoma (BB 37) sank in Pearl Harbor dur ing the Japanese attacks Dec. 7, 1941, taking more than 400 crew members with her. Seaman Apprentice Gene Dick was one of 32 Sailors who survived the sinking. He was perform ing routine tasks in sick bay that Sunday morn ing when the battle alarm sounded and the officer of the deck announced that it was not a drill. Dick was preparing to assist injured personnel at his battle station in triage when the first tor pedo hit. [It] just picked that ship up, and shook it like that, and slammed it down into the water, said Dick. By the time he had picked himself up from the ground, the second torpedo hit and shook the ship again. When the water started pour ing in, Dick and another Sailor left their station and headed aft in order to reach the open deck and escape the ship. They made it to a supply berthing, where they were about to make it outside the skin of the ship, as it continued to roll. When we got about three people from the door, water started pour ing in through the hatch and just knocked us over and over and over, said Dick. Dick said he then began climbing bunks to escape the rising water. By that time the ship had turned completely over, said Dick. I didnt know it, of course. I was absolutely disoriented. It felt like hours later, but it wasnt that long, I ended up in an air pocket between the deck and the bulkhead. Temporarily safe, Dick said he then took in his surroundings to figure out what to do next. Full of salt water and fuel oil; and I couldnt see a thing, said Dick. It was black, black, black, dark, dark. There were bodies floating all around me. Then I saw a light back in the back. Someone had found a battle lantern, and Dick could hear some voices so he swam in that direction. They started talking about how to get out. We didnt even know which way was up, said Dick. We just knew we were in an air pocket. Somebody found a port hole. Still disoriented, the Sailors did not know if the porthole went inside or outside the ship. I decided by then I didnt care, said Dick. I was going to go through that porthole, because I was just as dead out there as I was in here. Some people made it through the small port hole easily, while others needed help. Dick was fifth in line to get out. Wed been down there for about four hours then, said Dick. We didnt know it. We were scared to death, you know. He attempted to exit the porthole feet first, but his clothing got caught and he came back in to try again. I said well Ill try to go out head first, said Dick. I took off my skivvy shirt and headed down. I got down. I could get one shoulder through, then the other shoulder through. I took a deep breath and got down and started through, and my shorts caught. It was only a 21 inch porthole, but I got my hands on the outside and pushed; the guys pushed on me. And finally my shorts ripped off, said Dick. Dick said as soon as he hit the open water he began swimming upward. We were down about 50 feet deep in the depths of Pearl Harbor, said Dick. I swam and swam and swam and finally got to the surface. There was burning fuel oil all around me. Dick was rescued by a motor whaleboat crew who picked him up from the water and took him to get medical care. Dicks day started in sick bay, where he was caring for others, but ended in the hospi tal, where he was one of many receiving treatment. He finished his Navy career 22 years later as a chief warrant officer in the medical service. He said he is grateful for every moment he has had since Pearl Harbor. So Ive been living on borrowed time for about 70 years, said Dick. In honor of the 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, additional stories, photos and videos are available at http://www. navy.mil/ph70.Navy Announces Results Of ERBFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsA total of 12,261 Sailors reviewed by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) were selected for retention, the Navy announced Dec 2. Additionally, a total of 125 Sailors not selected for reten tion by the ERB were able to stay Navy after qualifying for a rating conversion. Conversion waivers were introduced in NAVADMIN 160/11 to increase options for ERB eligible Sailors. Conversion applications were held until the ERB had complet ed deliberations. Only Sailors not selected for retention in-rate by the ERB were con sidered for conversion and all applicants had to satisfy eligi bility requirements to be con sidered for the limited number of vacancies in undermanned career fields. The decision to establish the ERB was made after careful consideration, said Vice Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel. Our Sailors have served honorably and we are committed to doing all we can to help them transition. The ERB was announced earlier this year after record high retention and low attri tion among active duty Sailors left the Navy overmanned. The purpose was to help the Navy rebalance the force in terms of seniority, experience and skills. The ERB reviewed the records of nearly 16,000 selected third class petty officers through senior chief petty officers from 31 overmanned ratings, who had greater than seven, but less than fifteen years of cumulative service as of October 2011. The quota-based board was held in two phases. Phase I convened in late August and reviewed the records of 7,625 Sailors in pay grades E4 and E5. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase I, 5588 were selected for retention. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase I, 1,922 Sailors were not selected for retention. The second phase convened in September and reviewed the records of 7,761 Sailors in pay grades E6, E7 and E8. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 6673 were selected for reten tion. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 1,025 were not select ed for retention. An additional 53 Sailors who were not selected for reten tion had their ERB results vacated in accordance with NAVADMIN 129/11, after they were advanced in rate from the September 2011 Navy advance ment examination cycle. These Sailors will remain in their cur rent rate. Navy is taking an active role in helping the Sailors not select ed for retention through this transition. Specifically, Navy is offering employment outplace ment services and enhanced transition benefits for ERB affected Sailors who will not be able to serve out the duration of their contract. Sailors transitioning from Navy through ERB will also have access to Navys transition assis tance programs, are eligible for involuntary separation pay, and will retain commissary and Navy Exchange privileges for an additional two years after sepa ration. Navy Personnel Command (NPC) established a transition assistance information Web Page providing Sailors and lead ership a central location to find transition assistance informa tion and resources. For more information visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www. npc.navy.mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC customer ser vice center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC (1-866-827-5672) or email cscmailbox@navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 13

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Midshipman Selects Uniform Patch To Honor Friend In 2011 Army-Navy Game Defense Media Activity NavyMidshipman 1st Class Jon Teague knew ahead of time at least one of the uniform patches he would select Nov. 22 for the 2011 Army-Navy football game. The Hickory, N.C., native selected an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6 patch to honor a shipmate and friend from the same town whos already trav elled far in service to his country. [Lt.] Brad Penley is a buddy of mine. Hes actu ally in a different unit, but while his patch isnt available, I want to represent the EOD commu nity, because hes a part of it and hes done a lot, Teague said. Penleys second deploy ment to Afghanistan destroying and disman tling improvised explo sive devices as part of an eight-man platoon aired on television in the 10-part miniseries Bomb Squad: Afghanistan. He graduated from my high school, said Teague, the teams kicker. Hes got two younger brothers, Micah and Craig, who are also in the armed forces. Craigs in the Army and Micah graduated from here last year. Theyre real good family friends and I just wanted to represent him in a way. Teague and his Navy football teammates selected unit patches sent from around the world to wear during the upcom ing game Dec. 10, con tinuing a tradition that has lasted far longer than the Midshipmens ninegame winning streak against the Army Black Knights, according to Scott Strasemeier, Naval Academy associate athlet ic director for sports infor mation. And Teague said tradition is what brought him to the academy. My brother Adam played basketball here; he was the senior cap tain when I came in as a freshman, Teague said. When I was getting recruited, ultimately I saw the success my brother was having, I saw the suc cess of the Navy football team, and I came up here because I knew it was a very historic program, I knew that the guys put in their all and they wanted to win games. I came up here to be a part of the program to follow in my brothers footsteps. Its something Ill have for life, playing Navy foot ball. Its such a storied program that Im really happy to be a part of. As a senior, Teague earned the right to choose a second patch for this years game. Since he aspires to become a Marine Corps fixed-wing pilot, he decided to rep resent the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron 86 as well. He said wear ing each patch is a privi lege. The guys out there are working their butts off and its cool to repre sent them, Teague said. I hope they see it on TV and it brings a smile to their face. Teague said that along with his family and girl friends family, his friend and shipmate, Penley, will be in attendance at the game, and his brother will be watching on television. Theyll root on his team in hopes of a tenth straight victory over Army during his final game alongside his fellow future naval officers in the rivalry he calls the biggest in col lege sports. Armys the biggest game. You could be a part of a program that loses every game and if you beat Army, itd still be worth it, Teague said. Were going to work our butts off to win this game. Thats our Super Bowl. The Navy Midshipmen take on the Army Black Knights in the 2011 Army-Navy game in Washington, D.C. Dec. 10. For more information on the game, visit www. armynavygame.com. -Photo by MC1 Dustin Q. DiazMidshipman 1st Class Jon Teague and his Navy football teammates select unit patches to wear on their uniforms during the 2011 Army-Navy game. Teague will wear the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 6 patch to honor Lt. Brad Penley, a friend and EOD tech from his hometown of Hickory, N.C., who stars in the television show "Bomb Patrol: Afghanistan." Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., CORE Fusion 5:30 p.m., Zumba 5:30 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 3 p.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness For FEP 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics 5:30 p.m., Yoga Thursday 7 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 5 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 1:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT II Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT II 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 4:30 p.m., TRX Thursday 11 a.m., HIT I 11:30 a.m., TRX 2:30 p.m., FEP Bootcamp 4:30 p.m., HIT II Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT II The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 7 a.m., Command Cardio & Pump Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning CHILD SUPERVISION is provided at Surfside Fitness Center on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 2-4 p.m. for ages 3 months (12 weeks) to 5 years old. Reservations are required. Reservations are made the day of and are accept ed from 5 a.m. until 10 a.m. Walk-ins will only be available based on adult to child ratios and are not guaranteed. For reserva tions, call (904) 270-7718 or 7719. MWR Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Dec. 10: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 2705451. Dec. 10: UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from 5%-50%. Snacks and bev erages will be served. 2705380 Dec. 14: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by MWR A-Team. For tickets, call (904) 270-5228. Dec. 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bingo Special 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double Payouts on all hand cards, 3 extra $1000 games, food provided by MWR and more. 2707204. Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bash featuring Lift 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Reservations Required. 270-5377 MWRDec. 8: Magical Christmas: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Childrens games and crafts, Kids Performances and a Special Appearance by Santa. 270-5680 Dec. 9: Teen Center Presents The Grinch. 4 p.m. at the Teen Center. Tickets cost $3; includes play, spaghetti dinner, bread and drink. Tickets must be purchased by Dec. 6. 246-0347. Dec. 16: Teen Holiday Party & Movie Night. 4:30-11 pm at the Teen Center. Enjoy a cook ie station, art station, Christmas challenges from 4:30-6:30 p.m. followed by a holiday movie. 246-0347 Dec. 20: Teens on the Go: Avenues Mall Christmas Shopping 1:30-6 p.m. Permission slip required. Bring money for shopping. 2460347 Dec. 21: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. Dec. 28: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. KID The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 8: Avenues Mall Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Dec. 9: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 10: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 2705451. Dec. 10: UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Dec. 11: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. Cost $5. Dec. 14: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by MWR A-Team. For tick ets, call (904) 270-5228. Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from 5%-50%. 270-5380 Dec. 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 15: St. Johns Town Center Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Dec. 16: St. Augustine Amphitheater Trip Enjoy ice skating, sleigh rides, ice slides & more. Please bring cash. Van Departs Liberty Center 4 p.m. FREE Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and laser show. Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 17-18: Holiday Matsuri Convention in Orlando. Convention includes video games, anime, sci-fi, celeb rity guests & more. Cost is $50; includes hotel & convention ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 17-18: Universal Studios Island of Adventure Trip Cost is $65; includes hotel & theme park ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 20: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 15

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No Dough Dinner Looking for a great night with the family? Dont want to cook/clean up? Come to the Mayport USO Center on Dec. 12 from 5-7 p.m. The vol unteers will serve Pizza, salad and dessert. This dinner is free to active duty service members and their immediate families. Come on out and enjoy food and friends. THANK YOU to Navy League! K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileges as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licens es; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training With Red Cross train ing, you will master fun damental academic and social skills necessary to be a successful nurse assistant. You will gain new-found indepen dence. And as a Red Cross nurse assistant, youll be an important part of a health care team that works together to pro vide compassionate care for nursing home resi dents and patients. Its a job where you make a difference. The Northeast Florida Chapter of the American Red Cross is extending full scholar ships to Florida resi dents for participation in Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) for eligible appli cants through a grant from the Florida BrAIve Fund established at The Community Foundation in Jacksonville. For more information, please call the SAF Mayport Service Center at 904-246-1395. Greater Jacksonville USO has partnered with Coastal Cab to get you great rates on rides to and from the Airport, Mayport, Cecil Field and areas in between. Coastal Cab is happy to give a 15 percent discount from the meter to all addresses and locations not listed for all passengers that show their Military ID cards. To set up a ride or for more information please call 904-779-9999 (NAS Jax & JIA) or 904-246-9999 (Mayport). Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is now on Facebook. Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an indi vidual annual pass and $30 on a family annual pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addi tion, honorably dis charged veterans who have service connected disabilities, and surviv ing spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifications and nec essary forms to receive these discounts, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org The USO and RocketLife have part nered to deliver a heartwarming opportunity for the men and women of the armed forces and their families. The Personal Photo Book program enables troops serving abroad and their families to create 20-page personal photo books and ship them to any APO/FPO address for free. These full-color, customized photo books are small enough to fit in a soldiers cargo pockets yet can hold more than 60 photos of loved ones. RocketLife prints the books for free, and the USO pays for the ship ping. To get started, visit http://uso.myphotoproducts.com. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has a new online form, Application for Health Benefits, which will make it easier and faster for vet erans to apply for their health care benefits. This revised online application form (10-10EZ) provides enhanced navigation fea tures that make it easier and faster for veterans to use. The new version also allows veterans to save a copy of the com pleted form for their per sonal records. The most significant enhancement allows veterans to save their application to their local desktop and return to the application at any time without having to start over. Previously, vet erans had to complete the form in a single ses sion. This updated online form, along with the revised VA Form 10-10EZ, reduces the collection of information from veter ans by eliminating some questions. In addition, there are minor changes to simplify the wording of questions and provide clarity in the instructions. Further enhancements to the online application are expected to be delivered in increments throughout 2010. Veterans may also contact the VA at 1 (877) 222-VETS (8387) or visit the VA health eligibility website at www.va.gov/ healtheligibility United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deploy ment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOThe following are just a sample of volunteer opportunities available through NS Mayport and Volunteer Jacksonville. For more information, call NS Mayport volunteer coordinator CS1 Terry Jackson at 270-5373 and AC1 Chandra Chaney at 270-6130 or Dianne Parker at 542-5380 or you can immediately signup online for opportuni ties using www.volunteer gatewayjacksonville.org. Guardian ad Litem Be the voice for chil dren abused, neglected, or abandoned. These children have no ability to participate in decisions affecting their lives. When children are removed from their homes, the courts can appoint a spe cial advocate to make sure that the best interests of the child is given appro priate consideration. This advocate is known as a Guardian ad Litem. In the 4th Judicial Circuit, which includes Clay, Duval and Nassau Counties, there are more than 2,000 chil dren who need an advo cate to help them navigate the Dependency system. As we build our volun teer base we are asking members of our commu nity to consider being a Guardian as Litem. These guardians do not pro vide direct care for the children; the guardians ad litem visit the child at least once per month, interview family mem bers, gather information from medical, mental health, and education professionals, and attend court hearings to ensure the best interests of the children are maintained. The work is compelling. To become a Guardian ad Litem, candidates need a compassionate heart, be at least 19 years old, complete 30 hours of ini tial training and under go a background check. The process begins with a screening interview so you can learn more about this opportunity to make a difference in the life of a child. If this kind of volunteer opportunity sounds like something you would like to partic ipate in, please visit the Guardian ad Litem web site, www.guardianadlitem.org, or call 904-6301200 to schedule a screen ing interview. Jacksonville Zoo The Jacksonville Zoo is asking for volunteers. Volunteers are needed to educate varied audi ences about the natural world, teach conserva tion messages, beautify the grounds, assist guests in various areas of the park, input data, lend a hand in animal care areas, answer questions, drive trains and enhance guests experiences. You provide the interest and enthusiasm, and the zoo will provide the training. Scheduling is flexible. Volunteers receive special discounts, free admission, newsletters and special programs only avail able to employees and volunteers. New Adult Volunteer Orientations are held at the Pepsico Foundation Education Campus. All interested personnel please CS1 Hopkins or call 270-5373 for more information. Limelight Theatre Limelight Theatre of St. Augustine is looking for energetic and enthu siastic volunteer ush ers, who play a huge role in the theatres success. Ushering is a fun, lively volunteer opportunity in a creative atmosphere surrounded by great people--both audience and behind the scenes! Ushers attend to a variety of tasks including seating guests, answering ques tions and bartending and enjoy many benefits including complimen tary and discounted tick ets. For complete details, please contact Limelight Theatre House Manager Joyce Hayes at (904) 82511-64 or limelightushers@ gmail.com. Childrens Home Society of Florida Childrens Home Society of Florida is get ting ready to permanently place seven or eight children in loving homes within the next couple weeks. Seeking childrens furniture. Contact Nick Geinosky at 904-493-7738. Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Big Brothers Big Sisters is providing an in-school mentoring program at Mayport Elementary School. Little Brothers and Sisters are need ed just as much as Big Brothers and Sisters! If you are interested in this opportunity, please visit our website for more information: www.usojax. com Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society Needs You The Navy Marine Corp Relief Society is in need of Volunteers to give a couple of hours of their time each week to help others in need. The mis sion of the Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society is to provide emergency finan cial help and educational assistance to members of the Naval Services active, retired, and family members when in need: to assist them achieve financial self-sufficiency and to find solutions to emergent requirements. Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society firmly believes in personal financial respon sibility. By helping the service member and family through difficult times and by assisting them to develop their own prob lem solving capabilities, they will achieve finan cial stability, increase self-worth and reduce the need for future financial assistance. If you are interested in volunteer ing and would like more information, contact Bill Kennedy at 270-5418, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., MondayFriday. Leas Place Leas Place is a volun teer program, on-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help the Department of Children and Families take care of children who have been removed from abusive or neglectful situ ations or who have been abandoned. Volunteers assist Child Protective Investigators with feeding, bathing and playing with the children. They may also assist in the clothes closet, providing the chil dren with clean clothing. 360-7091. NS Mayport Retired Activities Office Naval Station Mayport is currently searching for committed volunteers to serve the local retiree community in the Retired Activities Office (RAO) located in the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). RAO volunteers maintain the vital link between the retiree, local military communities and other government and non-government agencies. Anyone inter ested should contact the FFSC for an application or to get more information about the duties and responsibilities of the RAO volunteers. Call the FFSC at (904) 270-6600 Ext. 110 REACHING 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011



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Wear Rules For NWU ExpandedFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced expanded occasion for wear and updated policies for the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I, II and III in NAVADMIN 366/11, released Dec. 2. There has been a lot of interest throughout the fleet regarding expanding the locations that Sailors can wear the Navys working uniform. Several weeks ago the CNO asked Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Rick West to take a look at the Navy Working Uniform policy. Following their review, I am proud to report that we are extending the wear policy of the working uniform to improve the practicality while ensuring pro fessionalism and maintaining its value, said Greenert. I want my shipmates to look sharp, be uniform and have the quality they deserve. The NAVADMIN expands the authorized stops for which NWUs may be worn when commuting to and from home and work, and to allow wear of the NWU during selected events when authorized by regional commanders or commanding officers. These policies will take effect Jan. 1 for all continental United States, Hawaii and Guam com mands. NWU wear is authorized for commuting and all normal tasks, such as stops at child care centers, gas stations, off-base shopping, banking, at the DMV, and dining before, during and after the workday. Since NWUs are not a liberty uniform, con sumption of alcohol while offbase in the NWUs is not permitted. Area or regional commanders may further restrict this policy within their geographic limits. Additionally, the NWU Type I, II and III are authorized Jan. 1 for wear at all locations with the exception of sev eral National Capitol Region (NCR) locations. These include inside the Pentagon build ing and the National Mall area bounded by Capitol Hill and surrounding senate and house staff offices, the White House and executive office build ing, State Department and all monuments and memorials. Slides depicting NCR prohib ited areas can be found at the Navy Uniform Matters website at http://www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/uniforms/ Pages/default2.aspx. The ser vice uniform and service dress uniform will remain the uni form of the day at these NCR locations. Additionally, the NWU Type I is authorized for wear by all Commander, Navy Recruiting Command (CNRC) recruiters in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam. NWUs are not authorized See NWU, Page 12 -Photo by Lt. Justin CooperIncoming Commanding Officer of HSL-48, Cmdr. Tyrel Simpson, shakes hands with the outgoing Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Donald Kennedy, during the squadrons change of command ceremony held at HSL-48s hangar on Nov. 30.New CO For HSL-48 HSL-48 PAOThe World Famous Vipers of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron (Light) 48 held a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Mayport on Nov. 30 in the HSL-48 Hangar at 10 a.m. Cmdr. Tyrel Simpson relieved Cmdr. Donald Kennedy as commanding officer of the squadron. During Kennedys command tour, he deployed seven fully combat-ready detachments support ing operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, antipiracy, and counter nar co-terrorism operations. His aggressive pursuit of operational excellence with an unwavering commitment to safety resulted in more than 8,500 total mishap-free flight hours and 11,500 shipboard landings. The Vipers led HSMWINGLANT in tactical proficiency, 13 anti-piracy engagements resulted in four pirates terminated and 38 cap tured suspected pirates, as well as more than 120 civilian mariners res cued. Additionally, HSL48 scored above fleet average during the 2011 Commander Naval Air Forces aviation mainte nance inspection, with 19 programs receiving zero discrepancies. Under his leadership, HSL-48 exceeded overall Navy retention averages by more than 25 percent and promoted seven Sailors to Chief Petty Officer, seven to Senior Chief Petty Officer, and 91 Sailors to Petty Officer, meet ing or exceeding the fleet advancement rates in every category. Simpson, a native of Nebraska, is a 1993 graduate of the United States Naval Academy and was designated a naval aviator in February 1996. Seagoing assign ments include service in Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 48, Carrier Strike Group 2 staff, and Helicopter Anti-See HSL-48, Page 12Wrapping Up -Photo by MC2 Brian M. BrooksLt. Nicole Scherer, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 46, Detachment 4, keeps track of pallets received inside the landing safety officer shack aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68) during a vertical replenishment at sea with The Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2). Anzio, with embarked air squadron HSL-46, is deployed in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation efforts. HSL-46 Det Four returns to Mayport today along with USS Gettysburg (CG 64). See the full story in next weeks edition of The Mirror. Essay Winner Tells Why Shes ProudEditors Note: Fleet and Family Support Center hosted a Month of the Military Family Essay Contest last month. The subject was Why are you grateful to be a member of a mili tary family. Prize for the essay included a free Thanksgiving turkey from Whitz Pitt and publication in The Mirror Congratulations Keana! I am grateful to be a military family for two reasons. The first reason is because my dad is a hero! He protects me, my friend and this country. I know he has to leave, but when hes gone I know he is doing a great thing. My class is writing letters and making a package to send to my Dad and all his Navy friends on the USS Gettysburg for Veterans Day and Thanksgiving. Everybody is thankful for the job they do. The second reason I am grateful to be a military family is the real reason why my Dad is in the Navy. I have Muscular Dystrophy. That means my muscles dont work as good as other peoples muscles do. So I need lots of stuff to help me. I need a wheelchair, a stander, a gait trainer, a lift, surgeries, special medicines, therapy, special doctor appointments and a house with ramp and lots of room to get around. The Navy pays a lot of money to help me. If my dad wasnt in the Navy, it would be a lot harder. I have friends at school whose mom or dad is not in the Navy and they cant afford to buy wheelchairs or the stuff they need. But the Navy helps them too, because when I grow out of something I find someone who needs it and give it to them. Even though its hard that my Dads gone a lot, it means a million to me and my friends for us to be a Navy family. Keana Altis, 8-Photo by Lauren Waltin FFSC Essay Contest Winner Keana Altis and mom, Katie, proudly show their military family pride by wearing USS Gettysburg jer seys, the ship Keanas father is currently stationed aboard.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror On Tuesday, Nov. 29, N.S. Mayport and NAS JAX joined with Duval County Public Schools in a partnership designed to connect students with military personnel. This collaboration will provide positive role models for students and demonstrate commitment, service to others, character, and discipline. While part nerships between com mands and individual schools have been facili tated in the past, this is the first time that a whole base partnership with the school district has been initiated. The kick-off fea tured base command ers Captain Douglas Cochrane, N.S. Mayport, and Captain Jeffrey Maclay. Duval schools were represented by Ed Pratt-Dannals, Superintendent of Schools; Betty Burney, Board Chairman/ School Board District 5 Representative; and Paula D. Wright, School board District 4 Representative. Dr. Alvin Brennan, Principal, Forrest High School, emceed the pro gram. The presentation of colors was performed by the Forrest High School Air Force JROTC and was followed by the National Anthem performed by the U.S. Navy Band. James M. Stevens, JROTC Cadet, led the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance. Following greetings by the superintendent, Mrs. Wright, whose district includes Ribault Middle School, remarked on the importance of this new partnership. Mrs. Burney, representing the Board and NS Mayports other partner school George Washington Carver Elementary School, brought greetings from the Board. Capt. Douglas Cochrane, commanding officer of NS Mayport, gave an impassioned speech on dreamers and how they have changed the world. He shared with the Kick-Off audience, which included Forrest High students and stu dents from Ribault Middle and Stilwell Middle, that this partnership with the Navy community, the district, school staffs, and parents will not let them fail! That they must dare to be dreamers like the Wright Brothers, Captain Scott Spiker a Forrest High graduate, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He reminded them of Dr. Kings statement that the function of education is to teach one to think critically. Intelligence and char acter: those are the goals of education. He gave a special shout-out to teachers, another group of dream ers, who give nothing but 100% from the first day they stepped into this school. He reminded the audience that while teachers dont get paid well commensurate with the effort they put into your well-being. They dont get the accolades that he and Captain Maclay routinely receive. But, they too are world changers. . They dream of a better world just like Dr. King. Capt.Cochrane emphasized that this better world will come because of you and their efforts on your behalf. The partnership fea tures a collaboration between NS Mayport and Ribault Middle and George Washington Carver Elementary Schools whose princi pals were also in atten dance. Edward Robinson is the principal of Ribault Middle and Timothy Warren is Carvers principal. SERMC will be working with Ribault Middle and NAVSTA will assist Carver Elementary. NAS Jax will partner with Forrest High School and Stilwell Middle. Their principals Dr. Alvin Brennan, Forrest, and Catherine Barnes, Stilwell, were also in attendance. The commands at both bases will focus on providing positive role models for the students. Additionally they will assist their schools with ship activities, and The year of activities will conclude with field trips to their respective bases. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 ext. 1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Project N.A.V.Y. Kicks Off At Forrest H.S.Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer This year was a spe cial Thanksgiving. It was marked with good food, family football and some special memories. A year ago, I was deployed. I enjoyed Thanksgiving with service members and contractors on the island of Diego Garcia, in the British Indian Ocean Territory. After a years deployment, it is good to be back home. Many of our service men and women are away from their families and friends. Yet we are still a unique adopted fam ily where-ever we may be. As a young Sailor, I was reminded that the most important attitude that we can nurture or exhibit, is the attitude of thanks giving. Whatever chal lenges we face, whatever burdens we carry, the Lt. Tom Bingol Surface Force Ministry CenterThanksgiving Is Bridge Between Good, Hard Times HOMEFRONTShipmates, Tuesday we welcomed Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., Commander, Navy Region Southeast to Naval Station Mayport. Each stop during the day look-see of the base, Admiral Scorby got a firsthand look at the pride and professionalism each of you bring to the table each day. Special thanks to everyone involved in showing the boss around, and a huge thanks to the crew of USS Independence (LCS2) for showing Admiral Scorby your extremely sharp and stealthy littoral combat ship. Yesterday more than 200 veter ans and Florida Lt. Governor Jennifer Carroll participated in a remembrance ceremony with the men and women of USS Underwood (FFG 36) for the service members lost during the 1941 attack at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 70 years ago. Sponsored by the Mayport Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290, this annual commemorative service has been a Mayport tradition since 1966. Guests from various veterans organiza tions throughout the State of Florida and beyond are attending this years service. Special thanks to Lt. Gov. Carroll for attending, Cmdr. Pete Mirisola for host ing and each one of the men and women of USS Underwood for your duty and dedication. Spending a day with our veterans will be something you wont forget. Take in their memories they will no doubt share, they are living proof of Americas greatest generation. Huge day today as we welcome USS George W. Bush (CVN 77), USS Anzio (CG 68), USS Mitcsher (DDG 57), USS Truxton (DDG 103) and more than 1,300 Tigers who will board CVN and make the trek back to Norfolk tomorrow evening. Harbor Operations, Security, Public Works, MWR and a host of others will certainly have their hands full. Please drive safe as you make your way around the base...there will be some extra folks out and about to say the least! Also happening today is the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) as they make their way back from the Mediterranean and six months away from family. I wish each and every one of you on board a happy holiday and welcome back. Last week I had the pleasure of talking with a room full of great kids from the on base Youth Activity Center Torch Club. They were all armed with great questions as they sat at the table in the executive conference room and conducted one of the best interviews I have ever had! Special thanks to School Age Counselors Yvonne Beisser and Shawanna Anderson for bringing the kids in and making my day. It was awesome. And last, but certainly not least, please watch over your shipmates. There is no problem big or small that we cant fix together. I realize that holidays are often times when we see a spike in suicide and other problems both financial and domestic, and YOU NEED TO KNOW that we have a host of counselors, financial specialists and your own leadership that can guide you through anything. We are a team. We are a family. Thanks to each of you for bringing your hard work and professionalism each day through our gates. Be safe, and keep sending those sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them at douglas.cochrane@navy. milCapt. Doug Cochrane CAPTAINSload seems lighter when we put each day into perspective. We often have many more blessings than we are willing to count. Coming to know the DG-21 contractors, many from the Philippines, whose meager wages helped to support their families back home exemplified a true attitude of being thankful, of being grateful. This week, we stand between the joy of Thanksgiving Day and the shadow of Pearl Harbor Day. My grand father served in the U.S. Navy after World War I; his eldest son, my uncle, served as a Marine in World War II. I am pre paring for our celebration of Pearl Harbor Day, marking the 70th anni versary of a day that was filled with sacrifice, loss, and grief. But I offer that same sense of gratitude for those who rose to the challenge of defending our nation in its darkest hour. Paul, in his letter to the Philippians, says, Make your petitions known. Pray to God for what concerns you, what troubles you, what you desire; but, in everything, give thanks. I have not always been the first to demon strate that attitude of Thanksgiving, but I strive to thankful each and every day. I have met with sail ors who are facing the Enlisted Retention Boards and Perform To Serve announcements. For all who have served our Navy in every generation, I extend a heartfelt Thank You. For all who are facing the challenges of not knowing what tomorrow brings, please know that our Chaplains are stand ing with you. May God cultivate in each of us, an attitude of thanksgiving in what we do and what we say, even as lifes challenges gather around us. In the shadow of December 7th, I hope that you were able to offer a moment of silence and remembrance for the battle of Pearl Harbor. Perhaps you will meet a WWII veteran, and offer a simple word to them. Thank You. CHAPLAINS Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 10 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 3rd Friday at Chapel 7-10:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information or other worship opportunities and religious organizations in Jacksonville, call 270-5212. Poverty in America: Our nations most profound moral failingA CFC participant. Provided as a public service Is Your Child 2012 Military Child Of Year?From Operation HomefrontOperation Homefront announced the open ing of the 2012 Military Child of the Year Award nomination period. The award will be given to an outstanding military child from each Service Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The winners, who each will receive $5,000, will be flown with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for special recogni tion ceremony on April 5, 2012. Nominations are being accepted online until Jan. 15, 2012 at www. OperationHomefront.net/ MCOY. Ideal candidates for the Military Child of the Year Award demonstrate resilience and strength of character, and thrive in the face of the challenges of military life. They demonstrate leadership within their families and within their communities. Nominees must: tary ID or currently be enrolled in DEERS ages of 8-18 to Washington, D.C., for the ceremony on April 5, 2012 Finalists must have a background check to confirm the information in the nomination and must provide references. Recipients of the 2011 awards are profiled in the book Our Youngest Heroes, available through Amazon.com.

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Keep Mental Health In Mind During Holidays Naval Hospital Jacksonville Mental Health Department psychologist While its a myth that the suicide rate jumps around the holidays, the stress of the holidays can lead to neglecting the basic things that help people feel good: diet, exercise, rest and peace of mind. During the holidays, its easy to neglect men tal health, along with diet, exercise and sleep. Not taking care of ones self leads to stress, irritability, fatigue, sleep problems, indulgent eating, loss of enthusiasm and feelings of detachment and angst. Stressed-out people have a hard time enjoying things, because theyre preoccupied and some times just going through the motions. Its hard to feel like this is the most wonderful time of the year, when people are worrying about money, finances, family, travel, cooking, shopping and other activities that come with the season. An American Psychological Association survey shows that the number one stressor dur ing the holidays is finan cial stress. Coming in at number two is the pres sure of gift-giving. Plus, the family get-togethers can resurrect old con flicts. And negotiating family obligations and visits can make travel more stressful. Here are some simple steps people can take to make this time of year less stressful: Take time. Spend just 10 minutes without dis tractions to get refreshed. Go for a walk, look at holiday lights, take a bath or unplug! Get organized! Its easy to feel overwhelmed. Make a list, check it twice and be sure things are correctly prioritized. Try to separate the control lable from the non-con trollable. Dont forget diet and exercise. Overeating or neglecting fitness can lead to feelings of guilt or poor body image. Dont skip meals. Being hungry can make people irritable and prone to overeating. Eat healthy snacks to help stay sharp. Reach out. If feeling isolated, seek out community, spiritual or other social eventssuch as volunteeringto lift spir its. If a to-do list is too long, delegate and ask for help. Get some sleep. Skimping on sleep can lead to problems, from irritability and dangerous driving to an increased susceptibility to illness. Ward off germs. With the increased travel, colder weather and stress, be sure to wash hands or use hand sanitizer. Get a flu shot. Stay hydrated. Be sure to keep an eye on shipmatesthis com mon Navy expression reminds people to watch out for friends, colleagues and loved ones. And dont forget people who have loved ones deployed or away from home dur ing the holidays, or who recently experienced a loss like divorce or death. Its important to help those who show warning signswhich include irritability, fatigue, sleep dis orders, indulgent eating, loss of enthusiasm and feelings of detachment and angst. But remem ber that people who are very stressed can some times feel like they have to maintain appearances when theyre really falling apart inside. Reaching out to help someone can be their first step to get ting back on track, during the holidays or anytime. For help, military members and their families can make use of ser vices at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles mental health clinic (542-3473), Fleet and Family Support Center (542-5745), base or hospital chaplain, Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 or www. militaryonesource.mil or Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273-8255 (or text to 838255), or families can contact TRICAREs Value Options at 800-700-8646 for mental health care in the civilian community. The hardest part can be asking for help; theres a tremendous amount of help out there waiting to be found.Share Your Energy-Conserving Tips OnlineChief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness DivisionThe director of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy & Environmental Readiness Division released a video pod cast for the 2011 holiday season. In the podcast, Rear Adm. Phil Cullom reminds viewers that while decorative lighting is an enjoyable part of celebrat ing the holidays, it presents two avoidable factors that can degrade Navy readiness: the energy intensity of outdated lighting and safety issues that can result from these systems. Cullom presents challenges in the categories of lighting, recycling, and safety. He rec ommends upgrading to energy efficient holiday lights by using solar lighting to decorate out doors, employing lighting tim ers to reduce holiday lighting energy consumption, and using recycled materials to wrap gifts. Year round, he suggests turning off computers at the end of the work day to conserve energy. From a safety standpoint, he encourages personnel to exer cise caution with space heaters and avoid overloading electrical circuits. Cullom invites Sailors and civilians to post holiday energysaving and safety tips from their ships and bases on the Navys Task Force Energy Facebook page, http://www.facebook. com/NavalEnergy. This presents a great opportunity for Navy personnel to share their knowledge and hands-on experience to improve readi ness, conserve energy, and safely celebrate in the holiday spirit. The complete video mes sage can be viewed at http:// youtu.be/9rtIXx7p7Js, and a written transcript is avail able on the Navys Energy, Environment, and Climate Change website at http://greenfleet.dodlive.mil/files/2011/11/ NavyEnergyHolidayTranscript1. pdf. This and other podcasts, articles, and stories are available on the Navys Task Force Energy Facebook page at http://www. facebook.com/NavalEnergy. For additional information about the Navys energy, envi ronment, and climate change initiatives, please visit http:// www.greenfleet.dodlive.mil/ home. For more news from Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division, visit www.navy.mil/ local/n45/. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 USS Carney Halfway Carneyval Celebration USS CarneyDuring the week of Nov. 14-21, USS Carney executed their Halfway Carneyval Celebration. Among the many events coordinated by MWR during the week of Carneyval was a Carneys Got Talent Talent Show, a Treadmill/Elliptical/Bike Triathlon Competition, a Skeet Shoot, an Ultimate Fire Fighting Challenge, the Bite My Hook Fishing Competition, and an extremely competitive Corn Hole competition. Although the seas were too rough for a swim call, Carneyval was a great success and an awesome way to celebrate the half way mark of a 7-month deployment. -Photo by Ensign Amalie ShafferCarneys Halfway Celebration cake made by Culinary Specialist Third Class (SW) Joshua Tucker. The crew gathered on the mess decks for a cake and ice cream social. -Photo by Ensign Lily PowersBoatswains Mate Second Class (SW) Dustin Foster and Operations Specialist Chief (SW) Bruce Dokey compete in the Cornhole Tournament on the aft VLS deck. -Photo by Ensign Jessica CurryMembers of the Auxiliaries Division, or A-Gang smile for the camera after taking first place in the Triathlon. From left to right, Ensign Amalie Shaffer, Engineman Fireman Apprentice Dustin Leonard and Engineman Second Class (SW) Juan Gomez. -Photo by ITC(SW) Willie Wilkerson The crew enjoys a thanksgiving meal on the mess decks while in port in Bahrain.Crew Enjoys Activities

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-Photo by Ensign Lily PowersHull Technician 2nd Class (SW) Christopher Colafati competes in the Carney Ultimate Fire-Fighting Challenge. -Photo by Ensign Amalie ShafferLt.j.g. Andrew Ashby, left, and Skeet Shoot Winner, Command Master Chief (SW) Alton Smith, pose with a Mossberg Rifle. -Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonBoatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Dustin Foster directing a helo during flight opera tions.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonGunners Mates 2nd Class (SW) Anthony Collins instructs another Sailor with the M240.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonGas Turbine Technician (Electical) 3rd Class Can Ngo troubleshoots fuel console.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonCulinary Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Katherine Ledford works in the galley preparing a delicious meal.-Photo by ITC(SW) Willie WilkersonMembers of VBSS team prepare to tow a fishing skiff after a boarding in the Guld of Aden. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 5

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FFSC Holds Workshops To Survive HolidaysFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Dec. 8, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 8, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 9, 6-9 p.m ., IA Christmas Party, Bowling Alley Dec. 12-15, 8 a.m.4 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop Building 1, Room 1616 Dec. 12, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Career and Employment Readiness Class FFSC Room 702 Dec. 12, 1-3 p.m., Federal Employment Class, FFSC Room 702 Dec. 13, 9-11 a.m., Active Parenting Now Parenting Class FFSC Room 607 Dec. 13, 6-7 p.m., Exceptional Family Member Support Group Building 1, Room 104 Dec. 13, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Anger Management Building 1 Room 1615 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it is at a high costusually of relationships, unhappiness in the workplace, and a general feeling of dis dain. If you want to be able to break out of the get angry/get even syn drome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Dec. 14, 9-11 a.m., PFM Forum, FFSC Room 719 Dec. 14, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Car Buying Strategies FFSC Room 1615 Dec. 15, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 15, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 21, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 22, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Dec. 27, 2-4 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 702 Dec. 28, 3-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group FFSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 1:30-3 p.m., Conflict Resolution For Women, FSC Room 702 Dec. 29, 9-11 a.m., Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Saturday, Dec. 10 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. and discover the importance of estuarine systems that surround the inshore sides of bar rier islands like those of the Talbot Islands State Parks complex. This ranger-guided hike along the salt marsh will help point out why these areas are one of the most produc tive ecosystems on Earth, the many roles the salt marsh plays, the plant and animal life found in this natural community, and the impacts humans have on this system. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 11 Celebrate Christmas at our third annual Cookie Cantata. Homemade cookies will be sold to support our various min istries at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach 11:30 a.m. Crafts and fun activities will be available for children and their families. A visit from the jolly old elf himself will highlight the day. Join us in Wilson Fellowship Hall immediately follow ing the choral cantata during the worship ser vice. Call the church office at 249-5370 for informa tion. Saturday, Dec. 17 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Sunday, Dec. 18 Christ United Methodist Church will host a Live Nativity from59 p.m. on the front lawn of the Church on Sunday Evening at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 24 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the difference between a conch and a whelk, or a cockle and a clam? Discover how to identify many of the frequently found shells that wash up on the Talbot Islands State Parks shores. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Please join Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach at 11:30 a.m. as they celebrate the birth of our Savior. Two services will be available to bring your family and friends to usher in Christmas morning at 7 p.m. Childrens Christmas Eve and Candle Lighting Service 11 p.m. Traditional Candlelight Communion Service. Services will be held in the sanctu ary at 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Saturday, Dec. 31 The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural history that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. Saturday, Jan. 7 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. The program will take place at the multi-use trail pavil ion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. No reservations are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. Saturday, Jan. 14 Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. for a discussion on the different types of shark teeth that can be found on the areas beaches. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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CNRMC Holds Maintenance-Related MeetingsNavy Regional Maintenance Center Public AffairsCommander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) held a series of maintenancerelated meetings dur ing his trip to Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) on Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla. Nov 28-29. During his two-day visit at both locations, Rear Adm. David Gale, CNRMC, held All Hands sessions with military and civilian employees, met with area port engineers and conducted a round table discussion with local ships commanding offi cers (COs). These face-to-face meetings are invaluable to me. They offer me unique insights into our communitys accomplish ments and challenges, and ultimately help frame the reality of the day-today work that takes place within the surface ship domain, said Gale. With Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) staffs, Gale dis cussed the importance of Integrated Project Team Development (IPTD) efforts, the revitaliza tion of the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) within the RMCs, and the stan dardization of main tenance training and qualification practices for surface ship mainte nance personnel through CNRMCs development of its Workforce Development Program (WFDP), designed for civilians and military alike. The meetings with the port engineers, and later with the ships COs, both centered on the ways CNRMC could provide senior-level support to help revise policies and practices that result in counterproductive results and unnecessary increas es in the cost and dura tion of maintenance availabilities. I use these discussions to determine how I can best serve the needs of the fleet and the maintenance community, said Gale. From the lost operation al days that concern fleet commanders, to the sup port, advocacy and over sight the RMCs need to effectively navigate ships maintenance availabilities and perform at peak lev els, I have found we col lectively make the most progress when we work to understand one anothers unique requirements and constraints, and develop agreed upon strategies for success. Gale held similar meet ings in San Diego on Nov. 14-15, and will continue to meet with maintenance professionals across the RMCs into the new year. For more information about CNRMC, visit: www.navsea.navy.mil/ CNRMC DoD Warns Of USAA Phishing ScamFrom DoDIn early November, USAA members began receiving email claim ing to be from USAA with the subject line: USAA Protection Alert. In an elaborate scheme, the email informs members about a failed usaa. com login attempt and to click on a link to update their identity. Clicking on the link directs the mem ber first to a counter feit website to log on. Logging on produc es the second web site, asking for a PIN. Clicking Next pro duces another website asking for the member to set up security questions and after clicking Next again, a final website opens, ask ing for the members sensitive information including: Card Holders Name* Card Number Expire Date* Card Verification Code* Billing Address* Billing Zip Code* Billing Phone Number* Email Address* Email Password* Although the e-mail includes a USAA logo and appears to be from USAA, it is not. This is a phishing scam targeting USAA Members / Military Personnel. Recently Joint Base Lewis-McChord per sonnel have reported receiving this phishing scam. If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial informa tion, do not reply. And dont click on the link in the message, either. Legitimate companies dont ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization men tioned in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the companys correct Web address your self. In any case, dont cut and paste the link from the message into your Internet browser phishers can make links look like they go to one place, but that actually send you to a different site. DES OPSEC Officer is Michael Chesbro @ 253-966-7303.Shipmate To Workmate To Transition MilitaryFrom NAVSEANow that the Navy has begun notifying the more than 3,000 sailors impacted by Enlisted Retention Boards, six major Navy commands have started a program to aid transitioning Sailors in competing for job opportunities as federal civilians. The Shipmate-toWorkmate program managed jointly by the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Facilities Command, Naval Supply Systems Command, Commander, Naval Installations, Space and Naval Warfare Command and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations will provide information about career opportuni ties available at partner ing commands and help Sailors prepare job applications and resumes. The participating com mands will steer sepa rating Sailors, command career counselors and transition assistance coordinators to a dedicated Shipmates-to-Workmates website to facilitate par ticipation. This website will serve as a one-stop shop for Sailors seeking Navy-related employ ment. Finding out that you are being separated from the Navy will be a significant blow, said NAVSEA Deputy Commander Rear Adm. Clarke Orzalli. The Shipmates-to-Workmates program is an opportu nity to do what we can to soften the blow, as well as continue to utilize their significant skills for the benefit of the Navy. Through the website and other outreach pro grams, the effort will attempt to demystify the government service hir ing process, match job supply to demand, link existing Navy and Defense Department transition support, and assist qualified Sailors with local hiring processes. The Shipmates to Workmates program is simply good leadership this program demon strates our commitment, as leaders, to our Sailors by assisting those being involuntarily separated, said Cmdr. Pat Sanders, NAVSEAs lead for the program. Each of the participat ing commands will par ticipate in job fairs and other hiring events for transitioning Sailors. The first event is a career forum that will be held Dec. 3 from 1100 to 1400 at NSA Bethesda in the Fleet & Family Support Center, Bldg. 11, room 109. Future forums are scheduled at fleet concentration areas throughout the country, including a Dec. 6 forum in Norfolk. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program as well as a full sched ule of upcoming career forums, please visit the Shipmates-to-Workmates website at http://jobs. navair.navy.mil/sm2wm/. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 7

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DeCA Scholarships For Military Children OpenDeCA marketing and mass communications specialist2011 Scholarships for Military Children recipi ent Jordan Cherry said receiving extra money for college lightened her financial load. This scholarship defi nitely decreases the financial burden of school, which we all know is a big benefit, she said. Applications for the 2012 Scholarships for Military Children Program will be available starting Dec. 1 at commissaries worldwide as well as online through a link on http://www.commis saries.com and directly at http://www.mili taryscholar.org. Awards will be based on funds available, but the program awards at least one $1,500 scholar ship to a student at each commissary. Scholarships are funded by donations from commissary ven dors, manufacturers, bro kers, suppliers and the general public. Every dollar donated goes directly to funding scholarships. No taxpayer dollars are expended on the scholar ship program. If there are no eligible applicants from a particular commissary, the funds designated for that com missary are used to award an additional scholarship at another store. The scholarship pro gram was created to rec ognize military families contributions to the readiness of U.S. armed forc es and the commissarys role in the military com munity. Since the pro gram began in 2000, it has awarded more than $9.3 million in scholarships to 6,069 military children from 62,000-plus appli cants. While these numbers are impressive, whats even more impressive is what past scholarship recipients are doing with their education, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. Many recipients have entered a wide range of career fields such as teaching, busi ness, law and military service to name just a few. Many others have earned advanced degrees. They are making their way in this world, and they are making a difference. To be eligible for a scholarship, the student must be a dependent, unmarried child, no older than 21 or 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a college or university of a service member on active duty, reservist, guards man, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retiree. Eligibility is deter mined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System data base. Applicants should ensure that they, as well as their sponsor, are enrolled in the DEERS database and have a cur rent military ID card. The applicant must also be planning to attend or already attending an accredited college or uni versity, full time, in the fall of 2012 or be enrolled in a program of stud ies designed to transfer directly into a four-year program. Applicants must sub mit an essay on a topic which will be available Dec. 1 on http://www. militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 24, 2012. The scholarship pro gram is administered by Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to service members and their families. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarshipmanagement services organization, evaluates applications and awards these scholarships. If students have questions about the scholarship program application, call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers. com.Tis The Season To Visit Commissary For SavingsDeCA marketing and mass communications specialistHoliday savings on top of everyday low prices are plen tiful in December for com missary customers, said the Defense Commissary Agencys sales director. Any time of the year our customers know to make their commissary their first shop ping stop if they want to enjoy the savings theyve earned, said Chris Burns, sales director. And, during the holidays, they will see shelves stocked with discounted groceries and other household products to make this time of year even merrier. Throughout December, DeCAs industry partners will host many in-store promo tions and provide extra savings focused on the holiday season. Overseas stores may have sub stitute events for certain pro motional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for the following super sales events: Coupon for free Coca-Cola product. Commissary and military exchange customers can download an Internet coupon for a free 20-ounce Coca Cola product redeemable only on Dec. 16 and 17 at a commissary or military exchange. This promotion celebrates the 125th and 70th-year anniversaries of the Coca-Cola Company and USO, respectively, as well as these organizations historic relation ship with the U.S. military. To access the coupon go to http:// www.uso.org/coca-cola/. Holiday recipe contest. Through midnight Dec. 31, DeCA and the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, also known as the Exchange, are offering shoppers opportunities to win shopping sprees just by entering their favorite holiday recipes. To enter, go to http:// www.shopmyexchange.com/ Community/patriotfamily/ contests.htm for contest details and a link to an email address to send recipes. There are three categories: main dish, side dish or dessert. Participants must submit a description of the recipe, 50 words or less, or the origin of the recipe. Recipes must include specific ingredient measurements and preparation directions. Limit two entries per immediate family. There will be four winners for each cat egory 12 chances to win. Firstplace winners in each category receive a $500 Exchange gift card and a $500 commissary gift card donated by DeCAs indus try partners. Holiday Helping recipe book. ConAgra will offer a Holiday Helping recipe book with $10 in coupon savings on brands such as OrvilleRedenbacher Popping Corn, Poppycock, Swiss Miss Cocoa, Wesson Oil and Reddi-Whip, just to name a few. Customers can find additional commis sary coupons at http://www. conagracommissarydeals.com. Dear Santa. J.M. Smucker Company will offer its 2nd annual Dear Santa promotion featuring savings on in-store product displays and a contest to win commissary gift cards. Some of the products on sale include Folgers Classic Roast Coffee, Pillsbury Coffee Cakes, Pillsbury Cake Mix & Frosting, and Hungry Jack Pancakes & Syrup. These companies will also donate $5,000 in coffee to the troops deployed overseas. Believe in Heroes. Acosta continues this event in sup port of the Wounded Warriors Project, offering flyers with high-value coupons. The Wounded Warrior Project raises awareness and enlists public aid to help severely injured service members. For more information, go to http:// ww.woundedwarriorproject.org and http://ww.believeinheroes. org. Huddle to Fight Hunger. Commissary shoppers will see in-store displays, flyers, recipe books and tear pads, special pricing and coupons on Kraft products related to the compa nys Huddle to Fight Hunger campaign to help provide 25 million meals to families across America. For more details, go to http://www.Facebook.com/ KraftFightHunger. Our commissary staff and industry partners wish all our customers a very happy, safe holiday season! Burns said. We hope you enjoy your time with your families, and remember commissaries can also help you save on New Years Eve party goodies. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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SBR Celebrates Thanksgiving At SeaFrom USS Samuel B. Roberts USS Samuel B. Roberts celebrated Thanksgiving at sea on November 22. The ships culinary spe cialists cooked up a memorable feast for the crew while they continue their six month deployment in the Africa/Mediterranean region. It was a chance for the crew to relax, enjoy the holiday and celebrate their successful mission to Africa Partnership Station. Sammy Bs Culinary Specialists cooked 14 turkeys, 18 hams and an assortment of side dishes and desserts. It took nearly 24 hours of cooking and prepara tions to ready the event. The meal was a huge success and morale booster for the crew. Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Joseph Scott said, It turned out very well and I think the crew enjoyed it. He stated further, We worked many hours pre paring and making sure the crew enjoyed the meal. It means a lot for the crew to have a nice meal on Thanksgiving, said Lt. Bert Phillips, the ships supply officer. He also said, The crew has worked so hard dur ing this deployment and being away from fam ily during the holiday I think a good meal can strongly increase a Sailors morale. Petty Officer 1st Class Jonas Joe praised the meal by saying, It didnt feel like I was eating a meal on a ship. It felt like a home cooked meal away from home. He said the turkey was his favourite part of the meal. The Sailors of the Sammy B enjoyed a holi day routine the entire day to observe Thanksgiving. A holiday or Sunday rou tine is a relaxed day at sea where Sailors are able to enjoy some down time from the day to day stresses of ship life. They are able to write home, watch movies, play video games or just catch up on much needed rest. Sammy B is wrapping up its six-month deploy ment in the region. The ship has spent over five months on the east coast of Africa and Mediterranean Sea in support of Africa Partnership Station. Africa Partnership Station is a US-led ini tiative developed by the United States Naval Forces Africa for the pur pose of improving and promoting maritime security and stability in the region. USS Samuel B. Roberts Sailors enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving meal on the mess deck while deployed thanks to a team of culinary specialists aboard the ship. Below, culinary specialists aboard Sammy B stand in front of their Thanksgiving feast, including a cornucopia made of bread. Culinary Specialist Second Class Joseph Scott is one of several culinary specialists on board USS Samuel B. Roberts who cooked Thanksgiving dinner for the ships crew. The crew has been deployed for almost six months off the coast of Africa and in the Mediterranean Sea. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 9

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De Wert Helps Children Of Dar es Salaam Sailors from USS De Wert (FFG 45) participat ed in a community relations project cleaning and painting classrooms at Makongo Primary School, Nov. 26, during their port visit to Dar es Salaam. After celebrating their Thanksgiving at sea, many Sailors from USS De Wert chose to express their thanks by using their lib erty time in port to help improve a school in the impoverished country of Tanzania. The Sailors left the ship early in the morning for the hour drive through Dar es Salaam, conclud ing up a hilly dirt road leading to the schools campus. The Sailors were welcomed by dozens of excited children with big smiles, greeting their guests in Swahili with, Jambo! Thanks to the work of Seabees from the Maritime Civil Affairs Team and the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam, paint and sup plies were ready and waiting for the Sailors. After cleaning the classrooms and prepping the walls for paint, the De Wert Sailors got to work. Within minutes the children were eager to help out. Side by side, the Sailors and students painted, laughed and made improvements to the learning environment of the school. When not painting, the students taught the Sailors some basic Swahili phrases and the Sailors taught the children basic words in English. They also had a chance to play soccer and other games together. The Sailors were grateful for the chance to interact with the students and make their school a little nicer. Navy Counselor 1st Class Nathaniel Barnette said, I wanted to come out here to play with the kids and have fun. Im glad we got to play with the kids and make their school house a little bet ter. Gunners Mate 1st Class Luiggi Baldo added, It was good to do something for society. These kids dont have a lot of money and it was good to be able to make their school a little nicer. The ships Command Master Chief, CMDMC LaDon Washington, wrapped up the senti ments of the crew noting that, It has been beneficial for all of us to develop the friendship between the United States and Tanzania. It was mean ingful to give of our abundance to others who are less fortunate. It has been beneficial not only for our country but also for our Sailors to give of our time, expertise and to share our love with a local com munity. Hopefully it will open more dialogue and friendships between our cultures and communi ties. The Makongo Primary School enrolls between 80 and 160 children per class. The school consists of 7 classrooms and has 28 teachers on staff. With 42 percent of Tanzanias population under the age of 15, improving the school plays a key role in providing space for children to learn and develop the future leaders of the country. USS De Wert is on a seven-month deployment to deter and disrupt piracy in the Indian Ocean and off the Horn of Africa. USS De Wert is operat ing as a member of the SNMG-1. -Photos courtesy of USS De WertSailors from USS De Wert stand with students from Makongo Primary School. USS De Wert Sailors and students from Makongo Primary School work together on a community relations project. CMDCM LaDon Washington and students from Makongo Primary School work on soccer skills. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 11

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Dempsey Shares Observations On Defense BudgetSubmarine Squadron Light 44. He deployed with USS Thomas S. Gates (CG-51), USS Carr (FFG-52), USS Harry S Truman (CVN-75), and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). Simpson has served ashore at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 40 as an FRS instructor and at U.S. Strategic Command as Branch Chief of Nuclear Command and Control Systems Support. He is a 2007 graduate of the U.S. Naval War College and a Joint Qualified Officer. Simpson has flown more than 2,000 flight hours in seven different rotary-wing aircraft. Cmdr. Eric J. Bower assumed the duties as HSL-48 executive offi cer. Bower, a native of Berwick, Penn., graduated the United States Naval Academy in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. He was designated as a Surface Warfare Officer and served onboard USS Stump (DD-978) until lateral transferring to Naval Aviation in 1997. His first operational flying tour in 1999 was with Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 42 in Mayport, Florida, where he com pleted deployments onboard USS Hawes (FFG-53) and USS Yorktown (CG-48). In 2003 he was select ed to serve ashore at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 40 as an FRS instructor pilot, the CNAL Search and Rescue Officer and later assumed the duties as the FRS Squadron Maintenance Officer. Bower began his department head tour as Officer-in-Charge of HSL-48 Detachment 10 in 2005. Embarked USS Elrod (FGG-55), he deployed in support of the Standing NATO Maritime Group One and Operation Active Endeavor. Upon return he served as the Squadron Maintenance Officer and was named HSL-48s Officer of the Year for 2007. In 2009, after attending the United States Naval War College and receiving a Master of Arts Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies, he reported to the Joint Staff, Director for Operations (J-3). He served as Assistant Deputy Director for Operations and Strike Advisor on National Joint Operations and Intelligence Center Team Four in the National Military Command Center. He provided worldwide politico-mil itary monitoring, stra tegic and emergency action functions and cri sis response in support of the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff, Secretary of Defense, and the President of the United States.HSL-48From Page 1for wear on commercial travel such as airlines, railways, or buses in the continental United States. However, they may be worn on military and government-contracted flights between military airfield installations, as well as commuter trans portation such as city and commuter buses, sub ways and ferries. The uniforms may also be worn at the Pentagon Metro and Pentagon commuter slug lines. The NAVADMIN also outlines the manner of wear for the NWU off base. The shirt/blouse is required to be worn at all times. Commanders also must ensure grooming standards are enforced. Trousers must be bloused and the only head gear authorized is the eight point cover and the parka hood must be stowed unless being used. The fleece with chest rank tab is also authorized as a stand-alone outer gar ment. Regional commanders will stipulate the wear of the NWU for official cer emonies and functions, such as Fleet Week, cel ebrations and parades, and sporting events with media interest. NAVADMIN 259/11 wear rules for these uni forms outside of the continual United States remain in effect. Go to www.npc.navy. mil to read the complete wear rules in NAVADMIN 366/11.NWUFrom Page 1American Forces Press ServiceThe chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said he understands that ser vice members are ner vous about looming bud get cuts, but will have to be patient as the process moves forward. Speaking in an inter view on his way back from meetings with British officials in London, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said the Defense Department is pledged to $450 billion in cuts over the next 10 years. The fiscal 2013 defense budget submitted in February 2012 will answer many of the questions troops have, he said. That budget, Dempsey said, will take the depart ment out to fiscal 2017. It shouldnt be lost on anybody that we were handed this bill this reduction about two months ago, the chair man said. What weve been doing is revising our strategy, he said, because you cant just take cuts and do the same things weve been doing. Fiscal planners are weighing the impact of cuts on the national security strategy and consulting with the ser vices, combatant commanders, defense sec retary and people at the White House and Office of Management and Budget, Dempsey said. Concurrently, we are doing the mind-numbing work of weighing program cuts and putting a budget together, he said. Congress, which under the Constitution is charged to raise and support Armies, and to provide and maintain a Navy, must be consulted, he noted. I know theres a lot of anxiety in the force. Im anxious, Dempsey said. But weve got to follow the existing process. If we werent hav ing a discussion among ourselves about find ing $450 billion worth of reductions, wed still be having the conversation about implementing the changes we have made in response to 10 years at war, he added. We have learned. Even if Congress were to give the department all it asks for, the military still would have to exam ine the strategy, consider threats and make chang es, Dempsey said. Any budget discussion would look to reinforce changes that improved capabili ties, add funding to bridge gaps, and eliminate funding for capabilities no longer needed. The discus sions also would include considerations of how much capability is need ed. The budget were pre paring ... has to account for those lessons, Dempsey said. In the analysis about what has happened to the military during 10 years at war and anticipating what type of military will be needed in 2020, he said, clearly, some capa bilities must be resourced. Counterterrorism is a big portion of the budget, he said, and cyber must be addressed, as the country is vulnerable to state or non-state actors operating in this new domain. Could that mean con ventional forces could be pressured by this budget? Yes, Dempsey said. But were going to find that balance between capabil ity and capacity -what do we need to do and how often do we need to do it. One thing I will assure you of is no one is going to write off the possibil ity of any particular form of conflict, the chairman continued. You cant say, I dont think well have a conflict with a near-peer competitor, so lets just ignore North Korea for the next five years and hope for the best. Thats impossible. So weve got to sustain our high-end conventional capability. Having the capabil ity to wage convention al-style warfare remains an important deterrent, Dempsey said. Weve got to have capability along the spec trum, he said, but some of the capacity is going to be changed, without question. Keeping Torch Burning -Photo by Bill AustinNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Doug Cochrane, answers questions from members of the Youth Activities Center Torch Club, sponsored through the Boys and Girls Club of America. The Torch Club is a leadership and service club for boys and girls focusing on character development. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Pearl Harbor Survivor Recounts Experience Defense Media Activity-NavyUSS Oklahoma (BB 37) sank in Pearl Harbor during the Japanese attacks Dec. 7, 1941, taking more than 400 crew members with her. Seaman Apprentice Gene Dick was one of 32 Sailors who survived the sinking. He was performing routine tasks in sick bay that Sunday morn ing when the battle alarm sounded and the officer of the deck announced that it was not a drill. Dick was preparing to assist injured personnel at his battle station in triage when the first tor pedo hit. [It] just picked that ship up, and shook it like that, and slammed it down into the water, said Dick. By the time he had picked himself up from the ground, the second torpedo hit and shook the ship again. When the water started pour ing in, Dick and another Sailor left their station and headed aft in order to reach the open deck and escape the ship. They made it to a supply berthing, where they were about to make it outside the skin of the ship, as it continued to roll. When we got about three people from the door, water started pour ing in through the hatch and just knocked us over and over and over, said Dick. Dick said he then began climbing bunks to escape the rising water. By that time the ship had turned completely over, said Dick. I didnt know it, of course. I was absolutely disoriented. It felt like hours later, but it wasnt that long, I ended up in an air pocket between the deck and the bulkhead. Temporarily safe, Dick said he then took in his surroundings to figure out what to do next. Full of salt water and fuel oil; and I couldnt see a thing, said Dick. It was black, black, black, dark, dark. There were bodies floating all around me. Then I saw a light back in the back. Someone had found a battle lantern, and Dick could hear some voices so he swam in that direction. They started talking about how to get out. We didnt even know which way was up, said Dick. We just knew we were in an air pocket. Somebody found a port hole. Still disoriented, the Sailors did not know if the porthole went inside or outside the ship. I decided by then I didnt care, said Dick. I was going to go through that porthole, because I was just as dead out there as I was in here. Some people made it through the small port hole easily, while others needed help. Dick was fifth in line to get out. Wed been down there for about four hours then, said Dick. We didnt know it. We were scared to death, you know. He attempted to exit the porthole feet first, but his clothing got caught and he came back in to try again. I said well Ill try to go out head first, said Dick. I took off my skivvy shirt and headed down. I got down. I could get one shoulder through, then the other shoulder through. I took a deep breath and got down and started through, and my shorts caught. It was only a 21 inch porthole, but I got my hands on the outside and pushed; the guys pushed on me. And finally my shorts ripped off, said Dick. Dick said as soon as he hit the open water he began swimming upward. We were down about 50 feet deep in the depths of Pearl Harbor, said Dick. I swam and swam and swam and finally got to the surface. There was burning fuel oil all around me. Dick was rescued by a motor whaleboat crew who picked him up from the water and took him to get medical care. Dicks day started in sick bay, where he was caring for others, but ended in the hospi tal, where he was one of many receiving treatment. He finished his Navy career 22 years later as a chief warrant officer in the medical service. He said he is grateful for every moment he has had since Pearl Harbor. So Ive been living on borrowed time for about 70 years, said Dick. In honor of the 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, additional stories, photos and videos are available at http://www. navy.mil/ph70.Navy Announces Results Of ERBFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsA total of 12,261 Sailors reviewed by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) were selected for retention, the Navy announced Dec 2. Additionally, a total of 125 Sailors not selected for reten tion by the ERB were able to stay Navy after qualifying for a rating conversion. Conversion waivers were introduced in NAVADMIN 160/11 to increase options for ERB eligible Sailors. Conversion applications were held until the ERB had completed deliberations. Only Sailors not selected for retention in-rate by the ERB were con sidered for conversion and all applicants had to satisfy eligi bility requirements to be con sidered for the limited number of vacancies in undermanned career fields. The decision to establish the ERB was made after careful consideration, said Vice Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel. Our Sailors have served honorably and we are committed to doing all we can to help them transition. The ERB was announced earlier this year after record high retention and low attri tion among active duty Sailors left the Navy overmanned. The purpose was to help the Navy rebalance the force in terms of seniority, experience and skills. The ERB reviewed the records of nearly 16,000 selected third class petty officers through senior chief petty officers from 31 overmanned ratings, who had greater than seven, but less than fifteen years of cumulative service as of October 2011. The quota-based board was held in two phases. Phase I convened in late August and reviewed the records of 7,625 Sailors in pay grades E4 and E5. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase I, 5588 were selected for retention. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase I, 1,922 Sailors were not selected for retention. The second phase convened in September and reviewed the records of 7,761 Sailors in pay grades E6, E7 and E8. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 6673 were selected for reten tion. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 1,025 were not select ed for retention. An additional 53 Sailors who were not selected for reten tion had their ERB results vacated in accordance with NAVADMIN 129/11, after they were advanced in rate from the September 2011 Navy advancement examination cycle. These Sailors will remain in their cur rent rate. Navy is taking an active role in helping the Sailors not selected for retention through this transition. Specifically, Navy is offering employment outplace ment services and enhanced transition benefits for ERB affected Sailors who will not be able to serve out the duration of their contract. Sailors transitioning from Navy through ERB will also have access to Navys transition assistance programs, are eligible for involuntary separation pay, and will retain commissary and Navy Exchange privileges for an additional two years after separation. Navy Personnel Command (NPC) established a transition assistance information Web Page providing Sailors and leadership a central location to find transition assistance informa tion and resources. For more information visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www. npc.navy.mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC customer ser vice center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC (1-866-827-5672) or email cscmailbox@navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 13

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Midshipman Selects Uniform Patch To Honor Friend In 2011 Army-Navy Game Defense Media Activity NavyMidshipman 1st Class Jon Teague knew ahead of time at least one of the uniform patches he would select Nov. 22 for the 2011 Army-Navy football game. The Hickory, N.C., native selected an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6 patch to honor a shipmate and friend from the same town whos already trav elled far in service to his country. [Lt.] Brad Penley is a buddy of mine. Hes actually in a different unit, but while his patch isnt available, I want to represent the EOD commu nity, because hes a part of it and hes done a lot, Teague said. Penleys second deployment to Afghanistan destroying and disman tling improvised explo sive devices as part of an eight-man platoon aired on television in the 10-part miniseries Bomb Squad: Afghanistan. He graduated from my high school, said Teague, the teams kicker. Hes got two younger brothers, Micah and Craig, who are also in the armed forces. Craigs in the Army and Micah graduated from here last year. Theyre real good family friends and I just wanted to represent him in a way. Teague and his Navy football teammates selected unit patches sent from around the world to wear during the upcom ing game Dec. 10, con tinuing a tradition that has lasted far longer than the Midshipmens ninegame winning streak against the Army Black Knights, according to Scott Strasemeier, Naval Academy associate athletic director for sports information. And Teague said tradition is what brought him to the academy. My brother Adam played basketball here; he was the senior cap tain when I came in as a freshman, Teague said. When I was getting recruited, ultimately I saw the success my brother was having, I saw the success of the Navy football team, and I came up here because I knew it was a very historic program, I knew that the guys put in their all and they wanted to win games. I came up here to be a part of the program to follow in my brothers footsteps. Its something Ill have for life, playing Navy football. Its such a storied program that Im really happy to be a part of. As a senior, Teague earned the right to choose a second patch for this years game. Since he aspires to become a Marine Corps fixed-wing pilot, he decided to rep resent the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron 86 as well. He said wear ing each patch is a privi lege. The guys out there are working their butts off and its cool to repre sent them, Teague said. I hope they see it on TV and it brings a smile to their face. Teague said that along with his family and girl friends family, his friend and shipmate, Penley, will be in attendance at the game, and his brother will be watching on television. Theyll root on his team in hopes of a tenth straight victory over Army during his final game alongside his fellow future naval officers in the rivalry he calls the biggest in col lege sports. Armys the biggest game. You could be a part of a program that loses every game and if you beat Army, itd still be worth it, Teague said. Were going to work our butts off to win this game. Thats our Super Bowl. The Navy Midshipmen take on the Army Black Knights in the 2011 Army-Navy game in Washington, D.C. Dec. 10. For more information on the game, visit www. armynavygame.com. -Photo by MC1 Dustin Q. DiazMidshipman 1st Class Jon Teague and his Navy football teammates select unit patches to wear on their uniforms during the 2011 Army-Navy game. Teague will wear the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 6 patch to honor Lt. Brad Penley, a friend and EOD tech from his hometown of Hickory, N.C., who stars in the television show "Bomb Patrol: Afghanistan." Naval Station Mayport has updated its fitness classes effective immedi ately for Surfside Fitness and the Gymnasium. The new Surfside Fitness class schedule is as follows: Monday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing 4:30 p.m., CORE Fusion 5:30 p.m., Zumba 5:30 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps Wednesday 6:30 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., 20/20/20 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women 3 p.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness For FEP 4:30 p.m., Zumba Basics 5:30 p.m., Yoga Thursday 7 a.m., NOFFS Nutrition & Fitness Series 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba 1 p.m., Strength Solutions & Flexibility FixUps 5 p.m., Kickboxing Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba 11:30 a.m., Yoga Mayport Sandbox Monday 7 a.m., HIT 1 11 a.m., HIT 1 1:30 a.m., TRX Tuesday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 9:30 a.m., Bootcamp Basics 11:30 a.m., HIT II Wednesday 7 a.m., HIT II 11:30 a.m., HIT for Women 4:30 p.m., TRX Thursday 11 a.m., HIT I 11:30 a.m., TRX 2:30 p.m., FEP Bootcamp 4:30 p.m., HIT II Friday 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11:30 a.m., HIT II The new Gymnasium class schedule is as fol lows: Monday 7 a.m., Command Cardio & Pump Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 11:30 a.m., Rowing 101 Friday 6:30 a.m., Spinning CHILD SUPERVISION is provided at Surfside Fitness Center on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 2-4 p.m. for ages 3 months (12 weeks) to 5 years old. Reservations are required. Reservations are made the day of and are accepted from 5 a.m. until 10 a.m. Walk-ins will only be available based on adult to child ratios and are not guaranteed. For reserva tions, call (904) 270-7718 or 7719. MWR Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Dec. 10: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 2705451. Dec. 10: UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida. 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from 5%-50%. Snacks and beverages will be served. 2705380 Dec. 14: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limit ed tickets available at the door. Sponsored by MWR A-Team. For tickets, call (904) 270-5228. Dec. 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 2707205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bingo Special 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double Payouts on all hand cards, 3 extra $1000 games, food provided by MWR and more. 2707204. Dec. 31: New Years Eve Bash featuring Lift 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 31: New Years Eve at Mayport Bowling Center. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $15 per adult, $10 per child ages 9-4, chil dren 3 and under free. Reservations Required. 270-5377 MWRDec. 8: Magical Christmas: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Childrens games and crafts, Kids Performances and a Special Appearance by Santa. 270-5680 Dec. 9: Teen Center Presents The Grinch. 4 p.m. at the Teen Center. Tickets cost $3; includes play, spaghetti dinner, bread and drink. Tickets must be purchased by Dec. 6. 246-0347. Dec. 16: Teen Holiday Party & Movie Night. 4:30-11 pm at the Teen Center. Enjoy a cook ie station, art station, Christmas challenges from 4:30-6:30 p.m. followed by a holiday movie. 246-0347 Dec. 20: Teens on the Go: Avenues Mall Christmas Shopping 1:30-6 p.m. Permission slip required. Bring money for shopping. 2460347 Dec. 21: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. Dec. 28: Youth & Teen Cosmic Bowling Trip 1-3:30 p.m. Two games for $4. Bring extra money for snack bar. Permission slip required. 270-5680. KID The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Dec. 8: Avenues Mall Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Dec. 9: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. Dec. 10: Army Navy Football Party. Free tailgating. Flag football behind the gym. 12:30 p.m. Mayport vs. Army. 1:30 p.m. NAS JAX vs. Army. Army vs. Navy College Football Game at 2:30 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. 2705451. Dec. 10: UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida 9 p.m. at Castaways. FREE Dec. 11: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers Van Departs Liberty Center 11 a.m. Cost $5. Dec. 14: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle CPO Club. Cost is $10 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; lim ited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by MWR A-Team. For tick ets, call (904) 270-5228. Dec. 14: Windy Harbor Balloon Sale & Open House. Stop by Windy Harbor Golf Club and choose a free balloon containing discounts at our pro shop from 5%-50%. 270-5380 Dec. 14: Just For Fun Wednesdays. Every Wednesday at Mayport Bowling Center. Its not about how good you bowl, its about how much fun you can have! $1 Colormania Bowling, drink specials, request your favorite music all day long and more. 270-5733 Dec. 15: St. Johns Town Center Trip. Van departs 4 p.m. Transportation Only. FREE Dec. 16: St. Augustine Amphitheater Trip Enjoy ice skating, sleigh rides, ice slides & more. Please bring cash. Van Departs Liberty Center 4 p.m. FREE Dec. 16: Xtreme Bowling. 8 p.m. to Midnight every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and laser show. Dec. 16: Bread and Butter Band. 9 p.m. Live at Castaways. FREE. 270-7205 Dec. 17-18: Holiday Matsuri Convention in Orlando. Convention includes video games, anime, sci-fi, celeb rity guests & more. Cost is $50; includes hotel & convention ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 17-18: Universal Studios Island of Adventure Trip Cost is $65; includes hotel & theme park ticket. Van departs Liberty Center at 7 a.m. Dec. 20: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. LIBERTY THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011 15

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No Dough Dinner Looking for a great night with the family? Dont want to cook/clean up? Come to the Mayport USO Center on Dec. 12 from 5-7 p.m. The vol unteers will serve Pizza, salad and dessert. This dinner is free to active duty service members and their immediate families. Come on out and enjoy food and friends. THANK YOU to Navy League! K9S For Warriors K9sforwarriors is locat ed in Ponte Vedra Beach and they specifically offer service dogs for warriors medically diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress. If you or someone you know would greatly ben efit from having a canine companion, please visit www.k9sforwarriors.org for more information. Smiles Over Miles Smiles Over Miles gives all active duty mili tary service members the opportunity to send video messages back home for free, easily from any computer with an inter net connection and web cam. The technology also comes with built in secu rity, so messages are kept private and delivered via secure transmission. Signup now via the following link: http://smilesover miles.com Special For Military Hunting And Fishing License Active-duty and retired military Florida residents can get a low cost ($20) Military Gold Sportsmans License. The license cov ers hunting, freshwater and saltwater fishing and a variety of associ ated permits at a greatly reduced cost. The Military Gold Sportsmans License is available at tax col lectors offices only. Applicants must present a current military ID card plus a Florida drivers license or orders show ing they are stationed in Florida as proof of eli gibility. Military Gold Sportsmans License (includes same privileges as Gold Sportsmans License, Listed Below) Available to Florida resi dents who are active or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Armed Forces Reserve, Florida National Guard, Coast Guard or Coast Guard Reserve; upon submis sion of a current military identification card and proof of Florida resi dency. Gold Sportsmans License includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster per mits. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training With Red Cross train ing, you will master fun damental academic and social skills necessary to be a successful nurse assistant. You will gain new-found indepen dence. And as a Red Cross nurse assistant, youll be an important part of a health care team that works together to pro vide compassionate care for nursing home resi dents and patients. Its a job where you make a difference. The Northeast Florida Chapter of the American Red Cross is extending full scholar ships to Florida resi dents for participation in Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) for eligible appli cants through a grant from the Florida BrAIve Fund established at The Community Foundation in Jacksonville. For more information, please call the SAF Mayport Service Center at 904-246-1395. Greater Jacksonville USO has partnered with Coastal Cab to get you great rates on rides to and from the Airport, Mayport, Cecil Field and areas in between. Coastal Cab is happy to give a 15 percent discount from the meter to all addresses and locations not listed for all passengers that show their Military ID cards. To set up a ride or for more information please call 904-779-9999 (NAS Jax & JIA) or 904-246-9999 (Mayport). Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is now on Facebook. Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members will receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a Florida State Park annual pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an individual annual pass and $30 on a family annual pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addi tion, honorably dis charged veterans who have service connected disabilities, and surviv ing spouses of military veterans who have fallen in combat, will receive a lifetime family annual entrance pass at no charge. For information on qualifications and necessary forms to receive these discounts, visit www.FloridaStateParks. org The USO and RocketLife have part nered to deliver a heartwarming opportunity for the men and women of the armed forces and their families. The Personal Photo Book program enables troops serving abroad and their families to create 20-page personal photo books and ship them to any APO/FPO address for free. These full-color, customized photo books are small enough to fit in a soldiers cargo pockets yet can hold more than 60 photos of loved ones. RocketLife prints the books for free, and the USO pays for the ship ping. To get started, visit http://uso.myphotoproducts.com. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has a new online form, Application for Health Benefits, which will make it easier and faster for veterans to apply for their health care benefits. This revised online application form (10-10EZ) provides enhanced navigation fea tures that make it easier and faster for veterans to use. The new version also allows veterans to save a copy of the com pleted form for their per sonal records. The most significant enhancement allows veterans to save their application to their local desktop and return to the application at any time without having to start over. Previously, vet erans had to complete the form in a single ses sion. This updated online form, along with the revised VA Form 10-10EZ, reduces the collection of information from veter ans by eliminating some questions. In addition, there are minor changes to simplify the wording of questions and provide clarity in the instructions. Further enhancements to the online application are expected to be delivered in increments throughout 2010. Veterans may also contact the VA at 1 (877) 222-VETS (8387) or visit the VA health eligibility website at www.va.gov/ healtheligibility United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOThe following are just a sample of volunteer opportunities available through NS Mayport and Volunteer Jacksonville. For more information, call NS Mayport volunteer coordinator CS1 Terry Jackson at 270-5373 and AC1 Chandra Chaney at 270-6130 or Dianne Parker at 542-5380 or you can immediately signup online for opportuni ties using www.volunteer gatewayjacksonville.org. Guardian ad Litem Be the voice for chil dren abused, neglected, or abandoned. These children have no ability to participate in decisions affecting their lives. When children are removed from their homes, the courts can appoint a spe cial advocate to make sure that the best interests of the child is given appro priate consideration. This advocate is known as a Guardian ad Litem. In the 4th Judicial Circuit, which includes Clay, Duval and Nassau Counties, there are more than 2,000 chil dren who need an advo cate to help them navigate the Dependency system. As we build our volun teer base we are asking members of our commu nity to consider being a Guardian as Litem. These guardians do not pro vide direct care for the children; the guardians ad litem visit the child at least once per month, interview family mem bers, gather information from medical, mental health, and education professionals, and attend court hearings to ensure the best interests of the children are maintained. The work is compelling. To become a Guardian ad Litem, candidates need a compassionate heart, be at least 19 years old, complete 30 hours of ini tial training and under go a background check. The process begins with a screening interview so you can learn more about this opportunity to make a difference in the life of a child. If this kind of volunteer opportunity sounds like something you would like to partic ipate in, please visit the Guardian ad Litem web site, www.guardianadlitem.org, or call 904-6301200 to schedule a screening interview. Jacksonville Zoo The Jacksonville Zoo is asking for volunteers. Volunteers are needed to educate varied audi ences about the natural world, teach conserva tion messages, beautify the grounds, assist guests in various areas of the park, input data, lend a hand in animal care areas, answer questions, drive trains and enhance guests experiences. You provide the interest and enthusiasm, and the zoo will provide the training. Scheduling is flexible. Volunteers receive special discounts, free admission, newsletters and special programs only avail able to employees and volunteers. New Adult Volunteer Orientations are held at the Pepsico Foundation Education Campus. All interested personnel please CS1 Hopkins or call 270-5373 for more information. Limelight Theatre Limelight Theatre of St. Augustine is looking for energetic and enthu siastic volunteer ush ers, who play a huge role in the theatres success. Ushering is a fun, lively volunteer opportunity in a creative atmosphere surrounded by great people--both audience and behind the scenes! Ushers attend to a variety of tasks including seating guests, answering ques tions and bartending and enjoy many benefits including complimen tary and discounted tick ets. For complete details, please contact Limelight Theatre House Manager Joyce Hayes at (904) 82511-64 or limelightushers@ gmail.com. Childrens Home Society of Florida Childrens Home Society of Florida is get ting ready to permanently place seven or eight children in loving homes within the next couple weeks. Seeking childrens furniture. Contact Nick Geinosky at 904-493-7738. Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Big Brothers Big Sisters is providing an in-school mentoring program at Mayport Elementary School. Little Brothers and Sisters are need ed just as much as Big Brothers and Sisters! If you are interested in this opportunity, please visit our website for more information: www.usojax. com Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society Needs You The Navy Marine Corp Relief Society is in need of Volunteers to give a couple of hours of their time each week to help others in need. The mis sion of the Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society is to provide emergency financial help and educational assistance to members of the Naval Services active, retired, and family members when in need: to assist them achieve financial self-sufficiency and to find solutions to emergent requirements. Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society firmly believes in personal financial responsibility. By helping the service member and family through difficult times and by assisting them to develop their own prob lem solving capabilities, they will achieve finan cial stability, increase self-worth and reduce the need for future financial assistance. If you are interested in volunteer ing and would like more information, contact Bill Kennedy at 270-5418, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., MondayFriday. Leas Place Leas Place is a volun teer program, on-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help the Department of Children and Families take care of children who have been removed from abusive or neglectful situations or who have been abandoned. Volunteers assist Child Protective Investigators with feeding, bathing and playing with the children. They may also assist in the clothes closet, providing the chil dren with clean clothing. 360-7091. NS Mayport Retired Activities Office Naval Station Mayport is currently searching for committed volunteers to serve the local retiree community in the Retired Activities Office (RAO) located in the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). RAO volunteers maintain the vital link between the retiree, local military communities and other government and non-government agencies. Anyone inter ested should contact the FFSC for an application or to get more information about the duties and responsibilities of the RAO volunteers. Call the FFSC at (904) 270-6600 Ext. 110 REACHING 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, December 8, 2011