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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00147
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098614:00197

Full Text

Welcome Back USS Simpson, HSL-44 and HSL-48 Detachments, Pages 6-7


THE








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NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA


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2008 CHINFO Award Winner_____


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Get Tix For

Navy Ball
The 234th Birthday of
the United States Navy
will be celebrated at the
Hyatt Regency Jacksonville
Riverfront on Oct. 10 from 6
p.m.-midnight.
The Tri-Base Navy Ball
Committee is hosting the
Ball for Naval Air Station
Jacksonville, Naval Station
Mayport, Naval Submarine
Base Kings Bay, as well as
Navy active duty, retired and
reserve Sailors.
To purchase tickets,
contact ABHC Cruz at 270-
6023/697-8244 (lester.
cruz@navy.mil), or ABE1
Caldwell at 270-6023 (hugh.
caldwell@navy.mil).
The uniform for the Tri-
base Navy Ball is service
dress blue's with ribbons.
Dual military, only one active
service member has to wear
uniform. Tickets prices is $20
per person for El E4 and
guest; $30 per person for
E5 E6; $45 per person for
E7 03, CW02-CWO5 and
guest; $55 per person for
04 -Above and non military
and guest. Retirees cost is
equivalent to pay grade.



Base BEQs

Hold Survey
Bachelor Housing will
be conducting the Annual
Resident Satisfaction Survey
starting mid October. This
is the opportunity to let us
know how we are doing
and what you would like to
see. The survey will run for
approximately 6 weeks. All
surveys are confidential.



NOSA Holds
'Jail & Bail'
NOSA (Naval Officers'
Spouses' Association
(NOSA) of Mayport will hold
a "Jail & Bail" to raise money
for local Mayport charities
on Oct. 16. The association
is looking for commanding
officers, executive officer
and command master chiefs
from Mayport's commands
to "arrest" for the fundraiser.
Money will be raised when
the command "bails" out their
shipmate. All participants
are volunteers and will be
held in the alcove at Bogey's
until a minimum of $100 is
raised. NOSA Mayport has
donated more than $124,000
to Mayport area charities
since being established.
Volunteers can email nosa-
mayport@yahoo.com.



Make Up For
Exams Oct. 22
PSD Mayport will hold a
substitute exam for all pay-
grades on Oct. 22 at the
Navy College Office. Report
no later than 7:30 a.m. in
the uniform of the day. Bring
your ID card. Food, drinks,
cell phones and wristwatch-
es are not allowed in the test
site.


-Photo by Paige Gnann
Air Traffic Controller 2" Class (AW) Carlos Sosa of Air Operations talks with Ed Champagne, director of the Mayport USO, at
Mayport's Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) kick off on Oct. 1 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Several local non-profit
agencies were at the event to talk with CFC command representatives about their organizations and how important donations
through the CFC campaign are to their efforts. The 2009 CFC season will run from Oct. 1-Nov. 25. The overall goal for Mayport
and all tenant commands is $400,000.



Navy Highlights Domestic


Violence Awa


From Navy Installations Command
Public Affairs
The Navy is observing
Domestic Violence Awareness
Month in October as an oppor-
tunity to inform Sailors and
Navy spouses about domestic
violence prevention efforts as
well as reporting options for
victims.
Domestic violence cuts
across all age groups and social
classes. It happens to Sailors as
well as spouses; to men as well
as women.
Domestic violence goes
beyond physical abuse. It
includes emotional abuse such
as threats, isolation, extreme
jealousy and humiliation. It
also includes sexual abuse.
Whenever an adult is placed in


physical danger or controlled by
threat or use of physical force
by their spouse or intimate part-
ner, she or he has been abused.
The risk for abuse is greatest
when victims are separated
from supportive networks.
The theme for Domestic
Violence Awareness Month this
year is, "Have you crossed the
line? End domestic violence
before it starts."
"Our goal is to prevent
domestic violence by encour-
aging people to examine their
own behavior and take steps
to learn and practice more
healthy behaviors," Kathy
Turner, of the Fleet and Family
Support Program's Counseling
Advocacy and Prevention
Program, said.


reness
Much is misunderstood about
what happens when a Sailor
or spouse seeks help for their
relationship before domes-
tic violence occurs. All cou-
ples have arguments. Making
an appointment for couple's
counseling does not automati-
cally result in the creation of a
Family Advocacy Program, or
FAP, case. Nor does family or
couple's counseling harm one's
career or security clearance.
The Defense Department
changed the question on its
long-standing security clear-
ance form referencing an appli-
cant's mental health history.
As of 2008, Standard Form 86,
the Questionnaire for National
Security Positions no longer
asks for mental health treatment


Month
details if the care involved only
marital, family, or grief coun-
seling, not related to violence
by the applicant, unless the
treatment was court-ordered.
Another myth is that coun-
seling is only sought by people
who have been arrested or are
filing for divorce. Through
counseling, however, adults can
learn to treat their partners with
compassion and respect and
avoid manipulation and criti-
cism, even during arguments.
Professional services of
licensed counselors are avail-
able free of charge at Fleet and
Family Support Centers. These
are available to active duty and
their family members fi even
Sailors who are unmarried can
See Awareness, Page 3


CFC Fundraiser Begins


Mclnerney Reaches FFG Milestone


By MC2 Sunday E. Williams
Navy Public Affairs Support Element East Detach-
ment Southeast
Family, friends and military gath-
ered aboard Naval Station Mayport
Oct. 5 to bid safe farewell travel to USS
Mclnerney (FFG 8) as they set sail for
their final and milestone deployment.
Mclnerney will be the first gas turbine
propelled ship to complete 30 years of
service during their six-month deploy-
ment. All other ships of this kind have
decommissioned prior to accomplishing
this significant milestone.
According to Mclnerney's Command
Master Chief, CMDCM (SW/AW/SCW)
John T. Lawry this milestone pleases
more than just the ships current crew and
the Navy.
"The pride I feel to have served on a
warship with the history that Mclnerney
possesses is indescribable. This ship was
commissioned before anyone current-
ly serving on her was in the Navy, and
before many of her Sailors were even
born. This accomplishment is a great tes-
tament to all who have sailed on her that
this ship has performed at high levels for
this long," said Lawry.
People not serving aboard Mclnerney
felt that same pride about the ship's
many years of success.
"I have watched this ship pull in
and out of this harbor for years," said
Neptune Beach local, "Buzz" Wilks.
See Mclnerney, Page 8


I-




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;


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--~---~- -


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-Photo by MC2 Sunday E. Williams
USS Mclnerney pulls away from the pier Oct. 5 aboard Naval Station Mayport as they get underway for their final deployment.
Mclnerney will have served the Navy for 30 years by the time they return home, a milestone not accomplished by any other ship
of their kind.


__- -


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DoD



Gives



Home



Help

From Department of Defense
The Department of Defense
(DoD) announced Sept. 30
details for the temporary
expansion of the Homeowners
Assistance Program (HAP).
Using $555 million in funds
from the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act (ARRA),
this program is designed to par-
tially reimburse eligible mili-
tary personnel, surviving spous-
es, and federal civilian employ-
ees whose service to the nation
has required them to relocate
and sell their primary residence
at a loss.
Potential eligible personnel
include:
Active and former service
members of the Army, Navy,
Marine Corps, Air Force, and
Coast Guard;
Civilian employees of the
DoD, Coast Guard, and non-
appropriated fund activities; and
Surviving spouses of both
fallen service members and
civilian employees.
Potential eligible personnel
who have sold a primary home
for a loss or are considering
selling their home are encour-
aged to visit the DoD HAP Web
site http://hap.usace.army.mil to
check specific program criteria,
and if eligible, apply online.
The DoD HAP has been pro-
viding financial assistance to
military personnel and DoD
civilians since 1966, mainly at
base realignment and closure
(BRAC) sites where govern-
ment action caused a decrease
in market home values. While
the HAP expansion is not
designed to pay 100 percent of
losses or to cover all declines
in value, it can help protect eli-
gible applicants from financial
catastrophe due to significant
losses in their home values.
Supporting military families
is one of administration's high-
See Homes, Page 8


A




2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


MCPON Stresses Heritage In Birthday Message


Special from the Master Chief Petty
Officer of the Navy
In recognition of the Navy's
234th birthday on October 13th,
Master Chief Petty Officer of
the Navy, (MCPON) Rick D.
West released the following
message to the fleet:
"Very recently I had the
honor of visiting Mrs. Ima
Black. For those of you who
don't know, she is the widow
of our first Master Chief Petty
Officer of the Navy, Del Black.
In honor of our 234th birth-
day as a service, I'd like to tell


you a little bit about this amaz-
ing lady because she represents
so much that is right about our
Navy and her life so closely
parallels our history.
Ima's eighty-eight-years old,
an honorary master chief, a
proud chief petty officer's wife
and an amazing supporter of
the American Sailor. From the
minute we sat down to lunch
she asked about you, about
our men and women at sea
and about the Sailors serving
in Iraq, Afghanistan and other
dangerous places around the


world.
I told her that I'd never seen
so many men and women in
uniform with so much passion
to serve, so much enthusiasm to
represent our nation. We talked
about today's Navy and she told
me some stories about the Navy
she joined in 1943.
Mrs. Black lives in a retired
community down in Florida, in
a small apartment overlooking
a little lake. She's surrounded
by friends and is quick to point
out that every once in a while
a few Sailors drop by to see


how she's doing. Her apart-
ment is a tribute to our first
MCPON. Pictures, uniform
items, anchorsOall memen-
tos from Del Black's amazing
career. But if you look closely,
you'll see that it's much more.
It's a living history of our Navy.
There are pictures of a young
Seaman Del Black when he was
aboard USS Maryland in Pearl
Harbor, just before the fleet was
attacked December 7th, 1941.
Photo albums hold letters writ-
ten from several more ships
over the course of his career.


One picture shows MCPON
Black, Ima and Admiral Elmo
Zumwalt, the Chief of Naval
Operations from 1970 to 1974.
Look closely at another and
you'll see him at his most com-
fortable, surrounded by Sailors
on the mess decks of a ship.
He took care of Sailors at a
time when our Navy had no
idea what or who a MCPON
was. He went where the fight
was, to Vietnam. And he went
where the fleet was, to our ships
at sea.
On our 234th birthday, I ask


that you remember MCPON
Black and you consider that
there are thousands of men and
women just like his wife Ima
who keep our Navy's history
alive. Seek them out. Talk with
them and your lives will be
richer for it.
Happy birthday shipmates.
You are part of a legacy that
grows stronger each day due to
your effort, your initiative and
your willingness to serve.
HOOYAH Navy."


Chaplain's Comer


Her husband was a golf-
ing extremist... "fanatic" bet-
ter described him. She was
a weekend golf widow. One
morning at the breakfast table
she just let out her feelings:
"I'm sick and tired of being left
alone every weekend! If you
think you're going to play golf
today you've got another thing
coming. And, if you play today
you'll find your bags packed
and waiting for you." "Oh non-
sense," replied the husband, as
he reached for the toast. "Golf
is the farthest thing from my
mind. Now, would you pass
me the nine iron,... I mean the
butter?"
What is it about pleasure that
can drive us to extremes? Some
of us can become immersed in
the pleasures of personal hob-
bies. Our hobbies can become
addictive to the exclusion of


Chaplain Joe Molina
CDS40 Staff Chaplain
other very important things. In
fact, anyone of us can become
totally absorbed in pleasures
to the negation of any sense
of responsibility. Such is the
influence that personal plea-
sures can sway over us.
Epicurus was a Greek phi-


losopher who lived 300 BCE.
He taught that nothing exists
but atoms and space. These
atoms are always in the process
of forming new combinations
or new matter. Epicurus main-
tained that when a person dies
his personality reverts back to
atoms and goes on to form new
combinations. Therefore, he
believed that matter is all that
exists and that this life is all
that counts. Consequently, man
needs to make pleasure and
happiness his chief aim in life.
It would follow, that humanity's
chief aim should be to avoid
pain and indulge in as many
pleasures as possible. "Drink
and be merry, for tomorrow we
die." If death ended it all, why
not indulge the flesh. Indeed,
Epicures may be identified as
the first true hedonist.
Hey, what do you take per-


sonal pleasure in? Does plea-
sure matter to you? It should.
Should a responsible person
indulge in pleasure? Certainly.
The preamble to our
Declaration of Independence,
framed by responsible, God-
fearing individuals, states that
we have been endowed by the
Creator with life, liberty and the
"pursuit of happiness." How
we individually interpret "hap-
piness" or the pursuit of plea-
sure will greatly determine the
extent to which priorities are
made.
It doesn't take much of an
astute observer to notice the
affects of over-indulgence in
our society. In many instances
what constitutes a proper defi-
nition and application of pur-
suing happiness seems to have
run-amok. Is there a balance?
Yes! Can one be responsible


and experience pleasure in
life? Absolutely! To be sure,
experiencing happiness and the
pleasures of this life are totally
compatible with the good life
that the Creator has given to us.
Our freedom in experienc-
ing the pleasures of life must be
seen in the light of responsible
restraint, sensitivity to the needs
of others and a sense of shared
accountability. This means that
in my pursuit of pleasures I am
accountable to you as you are
accountable to me. This needs
to happen within an atmosphere
of mutual consideration and
respect.
Therefore, I am not free to do
whatever will give me pleasure.
We must all examine our indi-
vidual pursuit of pleasure with-
in the parameters of personal
relationships. I submit the fol-
lowing questions to consider


in making decisions regarding
pleasurable pursuits:
*Will my decision in any
way specifically violate God's
intended guidelines for my life?
The answer to this question is
either Yes or No. The 10 com-
mandments is a good place to
start. These commandments are
universal in scope and form the
basis of western jurisprudence.
*Will this decision hurt me
in any way? Consider the
short-term as well as long term
effects?
*How will my decision
impact my neighbor?
*How will my decision glo-
rify God?
In closing, "...do what leads
to peace and to mutual edifi-
cation." (Holy Bible, Romans
14:19) and... celebrate your
freedom!


GJuide to Military Travel


Cooler
By Erica I. Pefia-Vest
Military Travel Columnist
I remember hearing once that
the start of the fall and winter
season bring on depression in
some people.
The colder weather, the lack
of sunlight and the end of our
summer fun makes some people
dread this time of year. Well, I
am the opposite. Maybe it's the
traveler in me but the fall sea-
son represents one very impor-
tant thing to me: off-peak sea-
son in travel! That's right.


Weather Means Grea'


If you were holding back on
your summer vacation because
of crowds and/or money, now
is the perfect time to reconsider
your options.
September brings massive
discount in the travel industry.
Hotels offer off-peak rates, air-
lines offer deep discounts and
you can actually ride the Tower
of Terror at Walt Disney World
without waiting for hours (or
what seems to be hours).
If you visit my website
(www.guidetomilitarytravel.


com) you will find that most
discounts and promotions are
available until the end of 2009.
You can have all the fun that
was waiting for you this sum-
mer but without the crowds!
When my husband and I were
stationed in Jacksonville, we
use to love to visit the amuse-
ment parks in Orlando in the
fall because the crowds are less,
the weather is near perfect and
discounts are plentiful as area
hotels want to keep up their
room occupancy throughout the


'slower' seasons.
What better time to take
advantage of the free and dis-
counted tickets offered by Sea
World, Universal Orlando and
Walt Disney World.
Want to hit the beach but
are afraid of the cooling tem-
peratures? Visit the beaches
in Southern Texas or Southern
Florida. They stay warmer lon-
ger since they don't see much in
terms of winter.
If planned correctly, a fall
vacation for those of you with-


t Travel
out school age children can
prove to be extremely afford-
able, enjoyable and quite relax-
ing.
If you do have school age
children, consider taking an
educational trip to Washington
DC, Boston or San Antonio.
Get your child's school to
allow it for extra credit. If that
doesn't work, use the 'military'
card.
You know the one where
you say "We have to take
vacations at inconvenient times


Deals
because we are slaves to our
(military person's) schedule."
That always works (hey, it's not
like you're lying).
Try getting away this fall sea-
son. Avoid seasonal depression
by getting out, finding some
sun, having fun and saving
money.
If you need advice on where
to go, email me at Erica@
guidetomilitarytravel.com. I'll
help you find somewhere near,
cheep and fun to cure those fall
and winter blues.


Have you seen the 80's sci-
fi comedy Short Circuit star-
ring Ally Sheedy and Steve
Guttenberg and cute robot
named Johnny-Five? Johnny-
Five, through a chance power
surge becomes sentient, escapes
the lab where it was created
and spends the remainder of
the movie seeking "more input"
(information). If you have not
seen the movie, rent it this
weekend it is a fun watch for
the entire family.
I feel like Johnny-Five. We
have been 'selected for orders'
but we don't have orders in
hand. He's tentatively schedule
to separate in five months but
we have no dates, no details.
Will he be gone six months or


14? I confessed last week that
I am a control freak. I am also
a 'planner'. I try to plan life to
live my best life. I am research-
ing options, assessing things
and I need more info! These
GSA orders don't fit the 'norm.'
I need more input!
So where do I start? My
Sailor is busy researching and
so am I. If you are joining my
journey to deployment readi-
ness here is what I have found
so far: We could receive a copy
of the orders at any time but per
instruction we must have orders
within 60 days of transfer.
While we wait there is much we
can do.
If going to a traditional
deploying command head to


-H omefront in Focus
the command's website, learn contains great info. Brows
all you can about the com- the Navy Family Commu
mand with special attention Individual Augmentee Fa
to the "Welcome aboard" and Support for information.
Family Support sections. If you matter what orders you 1
are like me, with GSA orders, Fleet and Family Sup
I have a few websites for you Programs (www.ffsp.o
and the first place to start is Navy Personnel Comm
the 'IA/GSA command known (http://www.npc.navy.
as the Expeditionary Combat CareerInfo/Augmentatic
Readiness Command (www. Military One Source (w
ecrc.navy.mil). This site con- militaryonesource.com),
tains valuable information for MilitaryHomefront (w
you and your Sailor includ- militaryhomefront.dod.mil)
ing downloadable handbooks great information on dep
for both you and your Sailor. ment readiness, family sup
The next informational site and all things military 'life.
is NKO or Navy Knowledge Paperwork is my next ai
Online (https://www.nko.navy. item. Now is the time to r
mil). You can establish you sure I have all the password
own login on this site which our accounts, check expin


se to
nity/
mily
. No
have
port
)rg);
nand
mil/
on/);
'ww.
and
ww.
) has
iloy-
port,

action
make
ds to
nation


dates on vehicle decals, IDs,
vehicle registration, Powers
of Attorney, updates on our
Wills and our 'Family Plan.'
Download one of the many
available readiness checklists
for a more complete list of
paperwork to tackle.
There are a few conversations
to begin during this time as
well. One topic we may not talk
about is life insurance. Many
service members assume that
SGLI is enough to provide for
their families if, God forbid,
something happens to them. But
for many families SGLI will
not assure family stability. Get
some advice, and look at what
you really need in terms of Life
insurance. Sites like USAA's


(www.usaa.com) offer free life
insurance calculators to help
you assess your needs. This
will not 'jinx' your upcoming
deployment but will give both
you and your service member
peace of mind.
Our journey has begun, next
week we'll see if we have
orders yet and talk about reloca-
tion.
Questions and comments
for Beth? Drop her an email
at beth@homefrontinfocus.com.
Check out Navy Homefront
Talk!, Beth's internet talk show
for spouses at www.blogtalkra-
dio.com/nht.


Newsletter Provides

Naval Aviation

Information, Imagery


From Centennial of Naval Aviation
Public Affairs
Commander, Naval Air
Forces announced the start
of the Centennial of Naval
Aviation Newsletter and Web
site Sept. 29.
The Centennial of Naval
Aviation Newsletter is now
ready for view and down-
load by visiting the official
Centennial of Naval Aviation
Web site http://centennial.ahf.
nmci.navy.mil.
Inside the publication is
updated news, event schedules,
feature stories on past and pres-
ent aviation-related topics and
imagery.
The Centennial of Naval
Aviation Task Force plans to
release a new edition quarterly
throughout calendar years 2009
and 2010, then monthly at the


start of 2011. Each issue will be
uploaded to the Centennial Web
site upon distribution.
Honoring the 100th anniver-
sary of Naval Aviation under-
scores a commitment to sus-
taining a Navy, Marine Corps
and Coast Guard that wins
wars, protects the home front
and enables peace. America's
air forces are strong because of
the service members, their fam-
ilies and the democratic public.
By honoring Naval Aviation,
the U.S. honors America and
assures the nation and her allies
that security is maintained
through a strong Navy, Marine
Corps and Coast Guard team.
For more information, please
contact the Centennial Task
Force at 619-545-4147 or cnaf-
pao@navy.mil.


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Swww.boystown.org
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BOYS TOWN.
# National Hottine


Chapel Call
Command Chaplain:
Cmdr. Phil Wyrick
SUNDAY
Sunday School..................9...9 a.m.
Morning Worship............10:30 a.m.
Protestant Baptism.......As requested
TUESDAY
MOPS (Mothers of
Preschoolers)...........9:30 a.m.
(First and third Tuesday of the
month)
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study........9:30 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal................7...7 p.m.
SATURDAY
Men's Prayer Breakfast..........9 a.m.
Youth Group 2, 4...................6 p.m.

Catholic Services:
Friday Masses.................11:30 a.m.
CCD....................8 a.m.-8:45 a.m.

BAPTISMS
Please call 270-5212 to arrange a
Baptism class.
SERVICES
For shipboard and Waterfront
Services, call 270-5403. Personnel of
other faiths seeking contact with spe-
cific religious groups should call the
Chaplain's Office at 270-5212.


Naval Station Mayport
Capt. Aaron Bowman........................... ............................ .......................... Commanding Officer
Cmdr. Mike W atson........... .. ............. .... .. ...................... Executive Officer
CMDCM Deborah Davidson..................................... ............................... Command Master Chief
Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff
Bill A ustin .............................................................................. ........................... Public A affairs O officer
MC1 Heather Ewton.................................. ....................................... Deputy Public Affairs Officer
OS2 Shantae Salmon............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer
OS2 Harold Dudley......................... ......................... Assistant Public Affairs Officer
Paige G nann.......................................................................... .................. ............................. Edito r
The Mrror is distributed without charge throughout Mayport's Navy community, including the Naval Station,
on- and off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies
are also available at the Naval Station's Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1
Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202.
The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles
should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to:
The Mirror
P.O. Box 280032
Naval Station
Mayport, FL 32228-0032
Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 960-7817 Ext. 1012
Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 960-5329
Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net
CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307
This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of
Thu Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department
of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way
connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear-
ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by
the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised.
Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without
regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation,
or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the
responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office.
*NSUAYPORT. FLORIDA


Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to:
Ellen S.Rykert Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Russ Martin Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 FAX: (904) 366-6230


I I


rMi -+




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 3


Preventing Domestic Abuse, Violence


Top Priority Across Navy Region Southeast


By Clark Pierce
JAX AIR NEWS Editor
Commander, Navy Region
Southeast (CNRSE) Rear Adm.
Tim Alexander underscored
his concern for the emotion-
al and physical well being of
Navy families by issuing his
Domestic Violence Awareness
Month proclamation Oct. 1
as managers, counselors and
educators from Navy Region
Southeast Family Readiness
Program looked on.
"Domestic abuse and vio-
lence awareness is vital to Navy
readiness. No one should live
in fear of the person they love,"
said Alexander. "We have
an obligation to be actively
involved in prevention efforts
so our Navy families can raise
children in a safe, nurturing
environment."
Alexander urged people to
learn the warning signs and
descriptions of domestic abuse
and violence.
"First and foremost we're
concerned with protecting our
families from the impacts of
domestic abuse and violence.
We need to convey that as an
organization, we care about
our people and will not tolerate
domestic violence or abuse.
"Domestic abuse is psycho-
logical rather than physical and
is frequently denied or mini-
mized, even though it can leave
deep emotional scars. And all
too often, people deny or don't
recognize signs of possible vio-
lence in a relationship," added
Alexander.
"All citizens should become


-Photo by Clark Pierce
Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Tim Alexander signs his domestic violence awareness proclamation Oct. 1 as he is sur-
rounded by staffers from Navy Region Southeast Family Readiness Program. (From left) Erica Milton, Dianne Parker, Jeannette Werby,
Kandi Debus, Teresa Merrell, Yolanda Munoz, Jane Williams, Hector Sepulveda and Carol Lucius.


involved in supporting their col-
leagues, neighbors and friends
in utilizing resources to prevent
domestic violence. There's no
shame in seeking help when
someone is in an abusive rela-
tionship, whether they are
the aggressor or the victim.
Never hesitate to reach out to
your Fleet and Family Service
Center. There is help available,"
concluded Alexander.


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Domestic Violence

Awareness With FFSC


From FFSCMayport
Domestic violence takes
many forms. It may include
emotional abuse, economic
abuse, and sexual abuse, using
children, male privilege and
intimidation. Women report
and are usually the victims of
domestic violence. However in
the last few years the number of
women perpetrators is increas-
ing.
Fleet and Family Support
Center is committed to pre-
venting family violence in our
military community. Through
education, advocacy, workshops
and intervention programs,
The Center plays a key role in
violence prevention by rais-
ing awareness about the scope,
nature and impact of family
violence, educating the Navy
community about productive
ways to cope with family con-
flict, and by providing support
when abuse occurs.
The Center's Family
Advocacy Program FAP and
Domestic Violence Awareness
Month (October) activities pro-
vide a range of opportunities
to increase awareness and stop
violence. Watch out for upcom-
ing events this month.
Violence prevention is an "all
hands" mission. Individual and
marriage counseling is avail-
able to all active duty service
members and their family mem-
ber dependents. Here's a list
of additional education pro-
grams available at the Fleet and
Family Support Center:
Anger Management
If you want to be able to
break out of the "get angry/get
even" syndrome, come to this
class. Participants learn how

Awareness
have couple's counseling with
their partners.
A variety of courses that
teach healthy relationship skills
are also available at Fleet and
Family Support Centers. These
include anger management and
conflict resolution. These are
also free and available to both
active duty military and spous-
es.
"These services are avail-
able because the Navy believes
so strongly in the importance
of the prevention of abusive
behavior," Turner said.
Turner has a simple message
to those who are considering
asking for help. Don't wait.
"Sailors who succeed with
their careers and their families
have the strength to ask for help
before a problem gets out of
hand," Turner said. "The Navy
knows this, which is why they
provide places to get help."
Help is also available for vic-
tims of domestic abuse.
,., There are two types of report-


anger and judgment are relat-
ed, about irrational beliefs and
faulty self-talk, what "E + R
= 0" means, and the roles of
stress and forgiveness in anger.
Stress Management
This program is designed to
provide participants with an
understanding of what stress is
and how it affects them. It will
also help participants begin to
look at their own lives and ways
they currently cope with stress.
Participants will be challenged
to develop behavior and life-
style changes that will improve
their ability to cope with stress.
What About the Kids?
Children who witness fam-
ily violence are often forgot-
ten as the unintended victims.
A wide range of child adjust-
ment problems has been found
to be associated with exposure
to domestic violence. Parents
need to see and understand the
effects of domestic violence
on children as encompassing
behavior, emotion, develop-
ment and socialization. The
purpose of this program is not
to shame parents for events
that have already happened, but
to instill hope that things can
change. The knowledge that the
violence, which many parents
incorrectly believe is unseen
by their children, is negative-
ly impacting their children's
growth and development may
provide an additional motiva-
tor for ending the violence and
seeking intervention.
For more information, please
contact the Mayport Fleet and
Family Support Center at 904-
270-6600. We are located in
the back of Building One off
Massey Avenue.

From Page 1
ing options, restricted and unre-
stricted. Restricted reports
do not involve military chain
of command or law enforce-
ment. Unrestricted reports will
include some type of investiga-
tion by command and or law
enforcement. Both options
make available to victims the
full range of advocacy, medical
and counseling services.
Speak with a counselor of
victim advocate at a local Fleet
and Family Support Center or
a healthcare provider at a mili-
tary treatment facility about
restricted and unrestricted
reporting options for domes-
tic violence. If you think you
may be a victim of domestic
violence, contact the National
Domestic Violence Hotline at
1-800-799-SAFE or visit your
installation Fleet and Family
Support Center for information
on available resources.


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I




4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


Students who are in their
middle years, ages 11- 15, have
to make some tough decisions.
Do they fall in with the crowd
that they have been warned
about by their parents just to be
accepted by their peers, or do
they make the hard decision to
go in the other direction? They
want to assert their indepen-
dence, but they also want to fit
in with their peers. But they
also want their parents support
and approval.
Now you are the parent, and
although you're not new at this,
there are probably moments you
are as confused as your chil-
dren are in dealing with their
emotions and behaviors. What
are parents to do when their
children suddenly act so differ-
ently? How can we ensure that
our young teens, and our older
teens, will tell us when some-
thing is wrong instead of turn-
ing to peers?
As the parent you want to
know your children better and
have the opportunity to guide
them appropriately. You may
fear you will miss something
your children are experiencing
or even lose them to negative
influences. And why do some
children suffer more emotional
scars than others on the journey
through adolescence? The fac-
tor with the most impact seems
to be the unconditional love
and consistent support from at
least one parent or caretaker.
Another crucial factor is the
child's ability to like himself or
herself.
Preteen and early teen years
are difficult for children, par-
ents, and educators. These
years are hard even in the best
family environment and cir-
cumstances. The three most
important things you can do
to guide your children through
these turbulent times are to
model appropriate behavior, lis-
ten to your children, and really
get to know them.
Model good behavior. From
the beginning of life, children
imitate their parents. This
includes everything from learn-
ing language to developing
values. Modeling appropriate
behavior is probably 90 percent
of parenting. Parents who value
people, the law, the impor-
tance of education and honesty
will most likely have children
who also value these things.
Parental example is one of the
best teaching tools you have.
Adolescents who feel good
about their home life will be
more likely to feel good about
them- selves. If they feel good
about themselves, they are far
less likely to turn to destructive
peer situations.
Listen to your children.
Listen without interrupting.
Listen without judgment. Try
to understand their points of
view even if you don't agree
with them. Validate their feel-
ings. Let them know it is OK to
be confused or angry. Discuss
feelings of anger without judg-
ments. Guide your children
toward appropriate anger-
releasing outlets, such as exer-
cise, sharing with a trusted
adult, or writing in a journal.
Let them know your behavior
expectations. Set realistic rules
to live by, such as bedtimes,
curfews, and completion of
chores. Don't threaten or prom-
ise something that is out of your
control. If the rule is broken,
you need to be able to enforce
the consequence or that behav-
ior will continue.
Know your children. Most
11-15 year olds are a lot of fun
to talk to individually. They
can reason and understand
humor. However, they see the
world egocentrically. It's all
about them so you will need to


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remind them frequently to see know the things that y
others' points of views. Know approve of them doing
how they spend their time when assume they underst
they are not with you. Talk to consequences of these
them about what music they are their age. Encourage
listening to, what books they come to you even if th
are reading, what sports they a mistake.
enjoy watching, and what com- Parenting is a balan
puter games they like to play. from the very beginni
Remember to give encour- providing a good e
agement and support healthy communicating dai
choices and interests. Talk to really knowing your
your children about their friends individuals can make
without being overly criti- ference between you
cal. Make sure the parties and success and happiness
events they attend are appropri- these challenging yc
ately chaperoned and that they may be encouraging


-10/12/09


Sero-a
monthly payments &

interest for *


if paid in full within 12 months on single-receipt purchases
of $299 or more on your Lowe's Consumer Credit Card
10/8/09 10/12/09. See below for details.
*Interest assessed from purchase date if you do not fully pay, within the promotional period, the
promotional purchase and any related optional account protection charges. See below for details.


O0/ SPECIAL
00 ORDER

off FLOORING


' Applies to Special
Order wood, laminate,
tile, vinyl and rugs.
Does not apply to
carpet. Offer applies
to product only.
Discount taken at time
of order. Offer valid
10/8/09 10/19/09.
See store for details.


ou don't
g. Don't
stand the
things at
them to
hey make

icing act
ng. But
example,
ly, and
kids as
the dif-
r child's
s during
ears. It
to know


that parents do remain the big-
gest influence in their children's
lives, even through the teen
years and beyond. Give them
your unconditional love and
guidance and enjoy them.
Judy Cromartie is the School
Liaison Officer for NS Mayport.
If you have questions about
this article or concerns about
an educational issue .o"ijit,. i"i
your child, she can be reached
via email at Judith.cromartie@
navy.mil or by phone at (904)
270-6289X1305.
For More Information:
Connect for Kids -


Guidance for Grown-Ups
www.connectforkids.org
Anti-Bullying Network
www.antibullying.net/par-
ents.htm
Teens Health from Nemours
- Food Issues, Drugs &
Alcohol, Safety
http://websrv01.kidshealth.
org/teen/
Military OneSource
Educational Materials for
Parents of Teenagers
(Booklets, CDs, Articles
about every aspect of the teen
and preteen years)
www.militaryonesource.com


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product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to US locations only, and
are available while supplies last. *CREDIT FINANCING PROMOTION DETAILS: Applies to single-receipt purchases of $299 or more made 10/8/09 through 10/12/09 on a Lowes Consumer Credit Card account. Cannot
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MMMMWA




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 5


Navy College's Distance Learning Open Enrollment


By Susan Lawson
Center for Personal and Professional Development Public

The Center for Personal and Professional
Development's (CPPD) Navy College Program
Distance Learning Partnership (NCPDLP) will
conduct an open enrollment for new college part-
ners from Oct. 15 until Dec. 15.
CPPD will advertise the NCPDLP open
enrollment period in the Chronicle of Higher
Education, on the Navy College Program Web
site, and on the Servicemembers Opportunity
Colleges fi Navy (SOCNAV) Web site.
"The selection of new partner institutions is
intended to continually provide enhanced aca-
demic educational opportunities to Sailors," said
Ron Smith, NCPDLP program manager. "The
newest NCPDLP schools will be selected in early


2010."
The NCPDLP is administered by CPPD, which
also serves as the administrator for the Voluntary
Education (VOLED) program, as well as all 52
Navy College Offices.
NCPDLP colleges offer Sailors degree pro-
grams via distance learning regardless of their
duty stations. These degree programs are
designed to use non-traditional credits from a
Sailor's rating as well as other schools they may
have attended.
"The goal of the NCPDLP is to support both
the Sailor's mobile lifestyle, as well as their edu-
cational goals with a myriad of degree programs.
Courses are offered in a variety of formats,
such as CDROM, videotape, paper, or over the
Internet," said VOLED Director, Dr. Mary Redd-
Clary.


"Our school partners offer degree programs
at the undergraduate level, both associates and
bachelors degrees, that provide great support to
Sailors who are pursuing their college degrees
or professional certifications," said Redd-Clary.
"Though all degree programs are available to
Sailors' in all rates, the NCPDLP's degree pro-
grams are mapped to individual ratings. This
allows Sailors to make the most of their service-
related, college credits and, in turn, it helps them
maximize their Tuition Assistance (TA) benefit."
The NCPDLP currently has 34 members and
continues to expand its number of school part-
ners, when appropriate, to provide Sailors the
greatest academic institution and degree program
selection available. Prospective academic part-
ners are chosen through a very detailed process
and must meet the program's criteria to become


a partner.
Academic institutions interested in becoming
an NCPDLP partner can submit their propos-
als during the open enrollment period. Once the
enrollment period ends, the selection board will
convene to review all proposals, and will work
through a voting process to determine their new
school partners.
The NCPDLP's criteria requires prospective
schools to offer distance-learning degrees; pro-
vide verification of accreditation by an accred-
iting body recognized by the Department of
Education; establish and maintain membership
with the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges
- Navy (SOCNAV); receive SOCNAV approval
for degree programs to ensure academic integrity
and credit transferability; and must be willing to
accept Navy TA for all tuition and course fees.


VA To Provide Emergency Checks


To Students Awaiting Benefits


From American Forces Press Service
Checks for up to $3,000 soon
will be available to students
who have applied for Veterans
Affairs educational benefits and
who have not yet received their
government payment.
The checks will be distrib-
uted to eligible students at VA
regional benefits offices across
the country starting Oct. 2,
VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki
announced Sept. 25.
"Students should be focus-
ing on their studies, not worry-
ing about financial difficulties,"
Shinseki said. "Education cre-
ates life-expanding opportuni-


Navy Add
From Naval Service Training Command
Public. ;
The secretary of the Navy
approved a plan to increase the
active duty Minimum Service
Requirement (MSR) for Naval
Reserve Officers Training
Corps (NROTC) Navy-option
scholarship recipients.
NAVADMIN 257/09 dated
Sept. 5 notes all NROTC Navy-
option scholarship recipients
who sign an NROTC contract
for receipt of undergraduate
educational assistance on or
after July 1, 2010 must obligate
to serve in the Navy for five
years active duty instead of the
previous four years.
According to Naval Service


ties for our veterans."
Starting Oct. 2, students can
go to one of VA's 57 regional
benefit offices with photo iden-
tification, a course schedule
and an eligibility certificate to
request advance payment of
their housing and book allow-
ance. Because some students
don't live near one of those
offices, officials said, VA
expects to send representatives
to schools with large veteran-
student bodies to work with
veteran service groups in help-
ing students with transporta-
tion needs. A list of VA regional
offices is available at http://


s Year to
Training Command, which
oversees the NROTC program,
the reason for the added year
of obligation is to better man-
age the Navy's surface warfare
community stabilization and
nuclear power accessions.
This change will standard-
ize NROTC and U.S. Naval
Academy MSR years and estab-
lish consistency among all unre-
stricted line communities, with
the exception of the longer avi-
ation requirements.
"This brings the (NROTC)
program in line with the Naval
Academy, so everyone has to
stay (on active duty) the same
amount of time," said Cathy
Kempf, a former Navy com-


www.vba.va.gov/VBA/benefits/
offices.asp.
"I'm asking our people to get
out their road maps and deter-
mine how we can reach the
largest number of college stu-
dents who can't reach us," said
Patrick Dunne, VA's undersec-
retary for benefits. "Not every-
one has a car. Not everyone can
walk to a VA benefits office."
Although VA officials said
they don't know how many stu-
dents will request emergency
funds, about 25,000 claims are
pending that may result in pay-
ments to students. The funds VA
will give to students now are


advance payments of the earned
benefits for housing and books,
and will be deducted from
future education payments.
VA officials said students
should know that after this spe-
cial payment, they can expect to
receive education payments on
the normal schedule: the begin-
ning of the month following the
period for which they are reim-
bursed.
More than 27,500 students
already have received benefits
for housing or books under the
new Post-9/11 GI Bill, or their
schools have received their
tuition payments, officials said.


NROTC Obligation
mander, who now heads the ment upon acceptance of edu-
selection and placement depart- cation assistance. This policy
ment for NROTC at Naval change will not affect the MSR
Service Training Command's for Marine Option, Navy Nurse
Officer Development Program, or College Program.
Directorate in Pensacola, Fla. The NROTC program was
"It levels the playing field for established to educate and
junior officers and gives them train qualified young men and
the chance to serve in a staff women for service as commis-
position and as a division offi- sioned officers in the Navy or
cer, where they'll get leadership Marine Corps. The program
experience," she said. "With offers full tuition scholarships,
two different assignments, plus book and lab reimburse-
they'll be better equipped to ment and a monthly stipend at
decide if they want to stay on our nation's most competitive
active duty or not." and elite universities. More than
The revised policy will 1,000 Navy Ensigns and Marine
impact the class of 2014 as they Corps Second Lieutenants are
begin academic studies in fall commissioned annually through
2010 and sign a service agree- the NROTC program.


Scholarships Offered

To Military Families

With Alaska Residency


By Ed Barker
Naval Education and Training
Command
The Navy League and
Naval Education and
Training Command (NETC)
announced on Sept. 17,
requirements for applica-
tions for the Alaska Sea
Services Scholarship for
academic year 2010-2011.
The program awards up
to four $1,000 scholarships
for undergraduate educa-
tion annually to depen-
dent children or spouses of
legal Alaska residents who
are currently serving in the
U.S. Navy, Marine Corps or
Coast Guard (either active
duty or Reserve), retired
from those services, or were
serving at time of death or
missing-in-action status.
Applicants who meet the
residency requirement will
be ranked according to aca-
demic proficiency, charac-
ter, leadership ability, com-
munity involvement and
financial need.
The scholarships are made
possible by funds raised as
a War Bond during World
War II to honor the Sailors
of the USS Juneau (CL 52).
Following the war, the gov-
ernor of the Territory of


Alaska and the secretary
of the Navy agreed that the
bond monies would remain
on deposit until an appropri-
ate use for the fund could
be found. In 1986, the Navy
established the Alaska Sea
Services Scholarship Fund.
The application dead-
line is March 1, 2010 for
the FY-10 selection board,
which convenes in April,
2010.
Applicants must show
acceptance at an accred-
ited college or university
for full-time undergradu-
ate study toward a Bachelor
of Arts or a Bachelor of
Science degree. No more
than two scholarship awards
may be given to any indi-
vidual during pursuit of the
four-year degree.
For complete information
and an application to apply
for the Alaska Sea Services
Scholarship, visit http://
www.navyleague.org/schol-
arship/ or read NAVADMIN
274/09. Interested families
may also contact Cheral
Wintling at (850) 452-3671
(DSN 922-3671), e-mail:
cheral.wu iiiliii u ii\ \.mil or
contact Julie Beaver at (703)
312-1585, e-mail: jbeaver@
navyleague.org.


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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


USS Simpson, HSL-44 Return To Mayport


From USS Simpson Public Affairs
USS Simpson (FFG 56),
commanded by Cmdr. Edwin
D. Kaiser, pulled back into
homeport at Naval Station
Mayport Oct. 5 after a
six-month Counter-Illicit
Trafficking (CIT) deploy-
ment to the Eastern Pacific
with U.S. Coast Guard Tactical
Law Enforcement Detachment
(LEDET) 102, 104 and 108
and Helicopter Squadron
Anti-Submarine Light 44
Detachment 10 (HSL 44 Det
10).
Simpson departed Mayport
on April 5, 2009 en route to the
Eastern Pacific with a brief port
visit to Cartagena, Colombia
before transiting through the
Panama Canal. The primary
mission throughout deploy-
ment was conducting opera-
tions against trafficking of illicit
items. Simpson interdicted sev-
eral tons of cocaine from mak-
ing its way to the United States.
Simpson also maintained a
focus on Theater Security
Cooperation (TSC) through-
out deployment. The ship was
successful in building relations
with partner nations through
engagements of their 230 mem-
ber crew with over 2,000 host
nation members.
In early August, Simpson
detected a go-fast motor ves-
sel off the coast of Costa Rica.
Simpson, along with HSL-44
Detachment 10, pursued the
go-fast and forced it to beach


-Photos by Paige Gnann
Friends and families of USS Simpson's crew cheer as the ship pulls pierside at Naval Station Mayport on Oct. 5. USS Simpson was
deployed since April 5 to support U.S. Maritime Strategy by establishing and enhancing regional partnerships. The Oliver Hazard Perry-
class frigate Simpson, homeported in Mayport, Fla., was deployed to the Caribbean, Central and South America under the operation
control of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, U.S. 4th Fleet, conducting Theater Security Cooperation events and Counter Illicit
Trafficking operations for Joint Interagency Task Force-South. The crew conducted a variety of community relations projects in various
countries throughout the region, including Colombia, Panama, and Peru.


itself trying to evade capture.
Simpson was credited with
the interdiction recovered by


authorities.
In June, Simpson crossed the
equator on their way south to


a port visit in Salaverry, Peru.
The ship held the traditional
Crossing-the-Line Ceremony


and all of the "Wogs" onboard
were indoctrinated as "Trusty
Shellbacks" by the veteran


Shellbacks after a morning of
initiation in this unique Navy
tradition. Seaman Samson
Badejo speaks of his experi-
ence with a tinge of pride in his
voice, "You know it was a long
morning, didn't think it would
ever end but, by Davy Jones'
Ghost, we made it! I'm a trusty
Shellback now!"
Other port visits included
stops in Cartagena, Colombia,
Lima, Peru, and numerous port
calls to Panama City, Panama,
and Guatemala. Cartagena, an
old European-style town set
on the Caribbean Sea, offered
beautiful scenery and beaches
where many Sailors were able
to relax and enjoy liberty. Lima
was a favorite to many of the
crew due in part to an outdoor
shopping center which was built
into the side of a cliff, provid-
ing an overview of the Pacific
Ocean. Panama City acted as a
second home to Simpson's crew
during deployment with four
port visits to the growing city.
The port visits provided
the Sailors with liberty and a
chance to unwind from the rig-
ors of deployment. The Morale,
Welfare, and Recreation
(MWR) team set up numerous
trips for the crew, providing
an opportunity to experience
what other countries have to
offer. Some of the trips includ-
ed all inclusive beach trips in
Cartagena, white-water rafting
trips in Panama, fishing trips,
See Simpson, Page 7


Charity Graves gives first hugs to her returning husband, Chief Sonar Technician Surface Eric Graves Boatswain's Mate Seaman Steven Dow is greeted by his wife, Kayla, after returning with USS
after he meets her pierside after completing a deployment with USS Simpson. Simpson on Oct. 5.


Seaman William Rodriguez is reunited with his wife Danielle and
18-month-old son William, Jr. pierside.


Friends and family members wave at their Sailors during the homecoming of USS Simpson on Monday.




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8,2009 7


T ""Wr 8 S



Ssh


New dad Senior Chief Electrician's Mate (SW) Darrell Johnson gets a good look at his 5-month-old
son Dallas as his wife Kemberly watches the introduction.


Operations Specialist 1st Class Brian Phipps of USS Simpson receives a welcome home kiss from his
wife Gloria after returning with the ship from a six-month deployment to Central and South America


Damage Controlman 3rd Class Charlie Dawson is greeted with a kiss by his wife, Maggie.


ana me Carwbean. Q *
and theCaribbean. Sim pson From Page
and surfing trips in Peru and Panama. areas: damage control and firefighting, media
Simpson Sailors conducted Community cal practices and triage, fuel testing, weapon
Relations (COMREL) projects throughout the maintenance, diesel engine maintenance, out
deployment as a way to build hospitality amongst board motor repair, boarding and search pro
partner nations. Typical projects included paint- cedures, and a leadership exchange. At each c
ing, repairing a playground, and setting up the exchanges a Simpson Spanish translator wa
---a computer network for a school in Panama. present to facilitate the exchange. Each exchange
S .4 -v_ These projects were as rewarding for the was important equally for hearing a specific tech
9Nri; Sailors as they were beneficial for the children. nical proficiency along with sharing common
T ).'j 41 EnsignAntoinette Carter commented on her first experiences from serving in a maritime force. L
S| experience with COMREL projects, "Words can- j.g. David Coco, who took part in a leadership
I4r _S not describe the gratitude shown from these chil- exchange with the Panamanian Navy, had noted
_. p 4- dren over things that I normally take for granted. ing but good words to say. "As a young Junic
It was a blessing to be able to help restore a Officer, I'm still learning how to be an effective
school and make these children more comfortable leader. Interacting with Junior Officers within
while they are being educated." C foreign military was a unique experience; it wi
Along with COMREL projects, Simpson definitely help my progression throughout m
was able to participate in Theater Security career"
r .- Cooperation events along every port. Numerous
S.Simpson, allowing host nation members to min- in Panama City, Panama. Timely and cost-effec
.... .... gle with the crew and discuss ways to improve tive repairs and maintenance were able to b
interoperability. There were multiple Project completed, enabling Simpson to stay combat
Handclasp donations, consisting of medical and ready. This extended time in port allowed th
-hygienic supplies, and a toy donation which was Simpson crew to conduct more events with th
funded by Simpson's crew. Simpson also par- local communities strengthening our ties to ou
ticipated in two Sports day BBQ's where the partners in Panama.
ship was able to build partnerships with host Simpson Sailors achieved success on al
'--"'-- -' ~ -.~ '.. nations maritime forces and local community levels, as a unit and individually. Fourty-tw
_______________while enjoying recreational activities. Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfar
Subject Matter Expert Exchanges (SMEEs) Specialists (ESWS) pins and three officers earne
Crewmembers from USS Simpson disembark the ship after returning to Naval Station Mayport on Subject Matter exellent way thanges (SMEEs) Specialists (ESWS) pins and three officer (SWO) pin du
were another excellent way that Simpson was their Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) pin during
Oct. 5. The ship was on a six-month Counter-Illicit Trafficking (CIT) deployment to the Eastern able to reach out and work with foreign mili- deployment.
Pacific. taries. The exchanges covered several diverse Simpson, an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate.



HSL-48 Detachment 10 Returns To Mayport


6
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From HSL- 48 Detachment 10 Public
Affairs
Helicopter Antisubmarine
Squadron 48 Detachment 10
(HSL-48 Det. 10), "Circus
Freaks," returned to Naval
Station Mayport Oct. 5 after
completing a six-month
Counter Illicit Trafficking (CIT)
deployment.
HSL- 48 Det. 10 was
deployed to the U.S. Southern
Command (SOUTHCOM) area
of focus under operational con-
trol of U.S. 4t Fleet onboard
USS Hawes (FFG 53).
Members of Det. 10 were
welcomed on the Mayport pier
by excited family members and
fellow HSL-48 squadron-mates.
When asked how it felt to
finally be home and see his girl
friend and dog after six months,
Lt. Kevin "Sidecar" Shikuma,
HSL 48 Det 10 Maintenance
Officer, said, "I am so happy
to see them and I can't wait to
take a shower without wearing
shower shoes."
HSL-48 Det. 10 participated
in several multi-national opera-
tions in support of the CIT mis-
sion spanning the duration of
their six-month deployment.
In the early summer months of
2009, Det. 10 was attached to
a multi-national coalition con-
ducting maritime security oper-
ations in support of President
Obama for the 5t Summit of
the Americas Conference.
The conference was hosted in
aoa


-Photo submitted by HSL-48
Members of HSL-48 Detachment 10 celebrate a reenlistment during their deployment embarked with
USS Hawes. The detachment returned to Naval Station Mayport after six months at sea.
Trinidad and Tobago and fea- to the Western Caribbean Sea to Mexico. Three Coast Guard
tured world leaders from the participate in Operation Carib Law Enforcement Detachments,
Americas. Det. 10 flew mari- Shield. During Operation Carib 401, 405, and 408, augmented
time surveillance missions and Shield, Det. 10 flew numerous Hawes and Det. 10 to provide
provided logistical support for missions monitoring merchant a complete law enforcement
the operation, traffic for possible drug traf- capability.
After the conclusion of the picking activity flowing from In mid-summer of 2009, D
5th Summit of the Americas South America to the Northern was reassigned to Operation
Conference. Det. 10 was tasked Caribbean Sea and the Gulf Flying Fish and Operation


Carib Royale, which involved
counter-drug operations in the
Eastern Caribbean Sea. Both
operations were multi-national
and intra-agency collabora-
tions involving the French
Navy, the French Air Force, the
British Navy, and the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Agency. Hawes
was the first U.S. warship to
participate in Operation Carib
Royale. Det. 10 flew maritime
interdiction operations and
brought the Airborne Use of
Force capability to both opera-
tions.
In addition to conduct-
ing counter-drug operations
throughout the Caribbean Sea,
Det. 10 was enjoyed six port
visits. In the early months of
their deployment, Det. 10
visited Dutch Curacao and
Cartagena, Columbia. Several
members of Det. 10 participated
in a community relations proj-
ect in Curacao helping to revi-
talize an aging nursing home.
In the latter half of their deploy-
ment, Det. 10 visited Aruba,
Barbados, Cartagena, and
Jamaica. When asked about
which port was his favorite,
Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd
Class Donald Hackney, Det.
10 Lead Aviation Machinist's
Mate, said, "Barbados was
spectacular; Oystins Bay Fish
Market had the best Mahi Mahi
this mouth has ever tasted!"
In total, HSL-48 Det. 10


flew 430 mishap-free flight
hours in support of both United
States and allied interests in
the Caribbean Sea. Together
with the sailors of Hawes and
several U.S. Coast Guard Law
Enforcement Detachments, the
"Circus Freaks" had a signifi-
cant impact on the counter-drug
mission in the SOUTHCOM
area of focus.
Fourth Fleet is the numbered
fleet assigned to U.S. Naval
Forces Southern Command
(NAVSO), exercising opera-
tional control of assigned
forces. Fourth Fleet conducts
the full spectrum of maritime
security operations (MSO) in
support of U.S. objectives and
security cooperation activities
that promote coalition building
and deter aggression.
As the Navy component
command of U.S. Southern
Command, NAVSO's mission
is to direct U.S. Naval forces
operating in the Caribbean,
Central and South American
regions and interact with
partner nation navies with-
in the maritime environment.
Operations include counter-
illicit trafficking, theater secu-
rity cooperation, military-to-
military interaction and bilateral
and multinational training.


9


,


d JL




8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


Stay Fire Safe: Make Sure Your Exits Are Clear


By Mayport JAXNavy Metro Fire
Rescue
When a smoke alarm sounds
we all know what to do, right?
Find the nearest escape route,
get out and stay out! But if that
exit is blocked, the best escape
plan in the world will not help
you and your families get to
safety.
Items that block doors and
windows in your home could
keep you from escaping in the
event of a home fire. Any emer-
gency can affect one's ability to
think clearly, but during a fire,
smoke and other physical fac-
tors can literally inhibit your
ability to react. Add a blocked
escape route to the equation and
your chances of safely escaping
a fire may decrease even more.
Not only can blocked windows


and doors hinder you and your
family's ability to escape a fire,
but they can also keep firefight-
ers from successfully complet-
ing their rescue attempts.
While many blocked escape
routes are unintentional, such
as large furniture or a pile of
toys, others, like security bars,
serve a purpose. Despite a
downward trend in overall fire
deaths in the United States, the
number of fire deaths related
to the use of security bars has
risen, according to the non-
profit National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA). Most of
these fatal fires occur in low-
income, high-crime neighbor-
hoods. Due to a heightened
fear of crime in these neighbor-
hoods, people take measures
to secure their homes and dis-
r11mm


courage intruders from entering,
thereby, either consciously or
unconsciously, placing a higher
priority on security than on fire
safety. This is particularly dan-
gerous because people living in
high-crime and/or low-income
areas usually face increased fire
risk as well. Increased fire risk,
combined with blocked win-
dows and doors, are most dan-
gerous for young children, older
adults, and people with disabili-
ties, for whom escape might be
more difficult, even under ordi-
nary circumstances.
Whether your home has secu-
rity bars or other items blocking
escape routes, the following tips
can help you to increase your
chances of escaping your home
should a fire occur:
*Use emergency release


-Photo courtesy of HSL-40
Members of HSL-40 bid farewell and thanks to the contract team of Sikorsky for their work with the
helicopter squadron for the past seven and a half years. Sikorsky employees helped the members of
HSL-40 complete nearly 20,000 sorties and 42,000 flight hours.



Sikorsky Workers


Honored At HSL-40
From HSL-40 employees have assisted the ing HSL-40 maintain its track-
HSL-40 celebrated and bid squadron in completing close record of Fleet-leading produc-
farewell to the Sikorsky con- to 20,000 sorties and more than tion amongst all Navy Fleet
tract team that had worked 42,000 flight hours. Altogether, Replacement Squadrons. With
alongside Airwolf Sailors for Sikorsky and Airwolf Sailors their support, the squadron has
more than seven and a half have shared duties to perform trained 696 pilots and 176 air-
years on Aug. 28. more than 60,000 SH-60B air- crewmen who are now in the
HSL-40's Commanding craft launches, recoveries and Fleet supporting our nation's
Officer, Capt. Neil A. Kames, hotpit evolutions. Sikorsky calling.


recognized each of the 61
employees from Sikorsky,
thanking them for their impec-
cable service that allowed HSL-
40 to reach new production
highs in recent years.
Sikorsky began work at HSL-
40 in January 2002. Due to the
impressive results and inspira-
tional safety record, the Navy
extended the initial three-year
contract to the present. Since
2002, the Sikorsky team has
contributed 950,000 man-hours
with zero Occupational Safety
and Health infractions and an
average of only four lost man-
hours each year.
Their real accomplishments
are seen in what the Sikorsky
team has done with the seven
and a half years as vital mem-
bers of HSL-40. Through the
years of ground-breaking,
dedicated service, Sikorsky


employees have completed
more than 1,600 daily and
turnaround inspections and
300 aircraft washes, prepar-
ing squadron aircraft for daily
missions. Additionally, they
shouldered a large portion of
the aircraft scheduled main-
tenance effort, completing
132 Phase Inspections includ-
ing 42 D-Phase Inspections
and 2,300 Special Inspections.
The quality of work produced
was not only noticed on a day
to day basis, but also official-
ly recognized during Aircraft
Material Condition Evaluations,
where aircraft prepared by the
Sikorsky team received an aver-
age grade of 4.4 compared to a
norm of 3.9.
Sikorsky's efforts since 2002
have helped propel the squad-
ron to accomplish its mission
better than ever before, help-


Pregnant

or thinking

about it?








We're here to answer
all your questions.
marchofdimes.com


*arhnL. )of dCJfi.mhes


devices inside all barred doors
and windows. Emergency
release devices enable you to
push the bars open from the
inside, but they don't affect
the security provided outside.
These devices can involve pull-
ing a lever, pushing a button,
stepping on a pedal or kicking
in a lever on the floor. Make
sure everyone in the house-
hold knows how to operate the
release devices.
*Padlocks can be a barrier to
safety. In the event of a home
fire, you'll need access to every
escape route. Remove padlocks
so the door or window can be
used as an escape route.
*When arranging furniture
and other items, make sure
that you're not blocking doors
or windows with televisions,


heavy dressers, tables, couches,
even potted plants. Every room
needs two ways out. Remove
furniture that may be blocking
doors or windows.
*Never nail or paint windows
shut. Opening them could be
crucial in the event of a home
fire. Inspect your windows and
doors. Remove nails or paint
that could prevent using win-
dows for escape.
*A pile of toys or other items
in front of a doorway can block
your escape route and could be
a threat to the safety of you and
your family. Remove toys that
may be blocking doors or win-
dows.
*AND REMEMBER -
Change the battery in your
home smoke detector at least
twice a year. Remember this


Homes
est priorities and includes leadership and engage-
ment by Michelle Obama and Jill Biden. In
February 2009, the Congress provided ARRA
funding for a temporary expansion of the HAP to
address unique economic pressures faced by mili-
tary personnel who are forced to relocate during
these unusually adverse housing market condi-
tions. After conducting an extensive analysis to
determine how best to prioritize the finite funds
available while maximizing assistance to as many
people as possible, the DoD developed specific
eligibility criteria designed to take care of people
in the greatest need. These program details have
been published in the Federal Register and are
now available for public comment.
ARRA funding allows the DoD to temporarily
expand HAP to partially reimburse losses from
the sale of a primary residence in the following
priority order:
1. Homeowners wounded, injured, or ill in the
line of duty while deployed since Sept. 11, 2001,
and relocating in furtherance of medical treat-
ment;
2. Surviving spouse homeowners relocating


McInerney
"I never get tired of watching
ships leave full of Sailors, full
of our countries angels set-
ting out to serve, but nothing
makes me happier than seeing
them return home and this one
is going to come back having
served this great country for 30
years. Now that's really some-
thing."
Lawry said the ship and its
crew have many accomplish-
ments, but he does have one
that stands out.
"The accomplishments of any
warship, let alone one with 30
years of service are so numer-
ous and lengthy that I would
do injustice trying to name
them all. The accomplishment
that stands out most to me dur-
ing my tour would be the first
capture of a SPSS (Drug Sub)
by the crew while on deploy-
ment in 2008. Our combined
efforts resulted in legislation
being created to help stem the
flow of illegal drugs into the
United States and its allies,"
said Lawry.
The SPSS or self-propelled
semi-submersible vessel Lawry
referred to was carrying an esti-
mated $107 million worth of
cocaine that never hit the streets



MAK-(* ISH.
wish.org
............ .:.:E:.E:EE'.:E.E:. :. EE::EE~ :E::E:.:E.:E::.


jingle "When you change
your clocks, change your smoke
detector battery."
In addition to clearing clutter
and unblocking exits, the most
important key to your family's
safety is planning and practic-
ing a home fire escape plan.
Make sure you develop a fire
escape plan that identifies two
ways out of each room and a
family meeting place outside.
Practice using the plan, at least
twice a year. If everyone knows
that everyone else is ready to
exit quickly, no one will lose
precious time trying to help
someone who doesn't need
help.


From Page 6
within two years after the death of their spouse;
3. Homeowners affected by the 2005 BRAC
round, without the need (which existed under pre-
vious law) to prove that a base closure announce-
ment caused a local housing market decline; and
4. Service member homeowners receiving
orders dated on or after Feb. 1, 2006, through
Dec. 31, 2009, for a permanent change of station
(PCS) move. The orders must specify a report-
no-later-than date on or before Feb. 28, 2010, to
a new duty station or homeport outside a 50-mile
radius of the service member's former duty sta-
tion. These dates may be extended to Sept. 30,
2012, based on availability of funds.
Each of these general categories has more
specific eligibility requirements which have
been updated at the DoD HAP Web site (http://
hap.usace.army.mil). The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers executes the program for all the mili-
tary branches and HAP administrators will imme-
diately start processing applications.


of the United States. Lawry said
it is always great to take part
in something so significant but
the goal of every deployment is
always bigger, it's always about
safety.
"If you asked me what the
goal of the deployment is I
would answer that it is to bring
back everyone we left with to
their families and loved ones.
Everything else that we accom-
plish as a team just makes my
job that much more satisfying
- but our primary goal whether
it's for deployment, or just for a
day, is to bring everyone home
safely in the same condition or
better than when we left."
Lawry's pride goes beyond
the accomplishments of the ship
and of its future milestone; his
pride is in the crew.


From Page 6
"It is hard to describe my
feelings for this crew and the
growth they have shown as a
whole during my tour aboard.
We have been faced with so
many challenges in such a short
time it's seriously mind bog-
gling. Watching these young
men work together and put
aside differences to accom-
plish something that was a huge
undertaking is especially grati-
fying. I am proud to serve as
the Command Master Chief of
such a hard working and profes-
sional group of individuals all
who strive to improve and grow
on a daily basis."
As McInerney sets out
to unknown obstacles and
achievements, people walk
away already awaiting their
return.


TIME IS RUNNING OUT


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- 0 0 4 m


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What does HOPE looklike?

Hope looks like Eli and
his mother, Mary Elizabeth.

They are working together to help accelerate
the pace of research to cure diabetes
and its complications. To learn more,
visit www.trials.jdrf.org

SJuvenile
Diabetes
Research
JDFoungdation
International
dedicated to finding a cure


A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.


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10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


NS Mayport Cleans Up Its Coastline


-Photo by Scott Dombrosky
Above, volunteers from Naval Station Mayport Air Ops help out with the International Coastal
Cleanup on Sept. 19. Below, a NROTC student holds up a piece of debris found by a walkover at the
beach.


-Photo courtesy of Terry Parker NJROTC
Nearly 50 cadets and adult volunteers of the Terry Parker NJROTC help pick up trash and debris
during the 2009 International Coastal Cleanup. Below, more than 40 large trash bags were picked up
along the coastline.


By Scott Dombrosky
NS Mayport Environmental
Military and civilian per-
sonnel from Naval Station
Mayport joined with the Ocean
Conservancy and hundreds of
thousands of volunteers around
the world when they hit the
beach and the Jetties for the
2009 International Coastal


Cleanup on Sept. 19.
Volunteers spent two hours
picking up trash and debris
from these areas resulting in
the collection of 42 large bags
of trash in addition to many
other odds and ends that had
washed ashore. The largest
group to turn out for this event
was the nearly 50 cadets and


adult volunteers from the Navy
JROTC at Terry Parker High
School. This group cleared the
beach from the Jetties south to
Hannah Park.
Other organizations rep-
resented by volunteers were
the Security Department,
Environmental, PSD, and the
USS Roosevelt.


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THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 11

Mass Casualty Drill Keeps Mayport Ready
jI-- =


Bill Kennedy of Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Mayport talks
with a volunteer about financial assistance during the drill.


Volunteers from Naval Station Mayport emergency services and support departments stand outside ofBeachside Community Center fol-
lowing a Mass Casualty Drill held at the base last week.











A volunteer participating in a crisis response drill aboard Naval
Station Mayport, explains his injuries at the community support Representatives from FFSC and American Red Cross talk to "vic-
center reception area. times" during the crisis response drill.


-Photos by MC2 Daniel Gay
Volunteers participating in a crisis response drill aboard Naval
Station Mayport, explain their injuries at the community support
center reception area. The reception area is the first stop during
the drill where people's needs will be assessed during a casualty.
The crisis response drills are held periodically to maintain pro-
ficiency in operating the community support center in case of an
actual casualty.


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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


HSL-48 Celebrates 20 Years Of Service


By Ensign Rich Kroeger
HSL-48
The "Vipers" of Helicopter
Anti-Submarine Squadron Light
48 recently gathered in Mayport
with former squadron mates to
celebrate the squadron's 20th
birthday.
Established on Sept. 7, 1989,
HSL-48 was the last of the cur-
rent active duty LAMPS MK III
squadrons established at Naval
Station Mayport. Since its
inception, HSL-48 has deployed
95 helicopter detachments in
support of U.S Atlantic Fleet
ships. Impressively, on any
given day, Vipers stand watch
across the globe, supporting
simultaneous commitments
to five geographic combatant
commanders. In its 20-year
history, the Vipers have flown
more than 131,500 flight hours,
made more than 129,000 ship-
board landings, dropped more
than 400 torpedoes, and fired
more than 40 Hellfire missiles.
On Sept. 10, HSL-48 hosted
a 201h Anniversary Reunion cer-
emony to highlight the Vipers'
20 years of accomplishments.
Six former commanding offi-
cers, three former command
master chiefs, and three former
Maintenance master chiefs were


-Photo by Angie Testa
HSL-48 Viper past present and future commanding officers stand together during the squadron's
birthday celebration. Capt. Russ MacConnell, Cmdr. Donnie Kennedy HSL-48 executive officer,
Capt. Steve Senteio, Capt. Pat Crotzer, HSL-48 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Steve Banta, Cmdr.
Jeffrey Hughes, and Capt. Donald Cuddington.
the special guests of honor. and other previous command- dedication, and good times
The fifth Viper commanding ing officers spoke about the witnessed in the squadron. In
officer, retired Capt. Andrew history of the squadron dur- keeping with Naval tradition,
R. MacConnell, served as the ing their time as "Viper One." the squadron ended the opening
keynote speaker. MacConnell They recalled the hard work, ceremony with the traditional


birthday cake-cutting ceremony.
The oldest and youngest Vipers
in attendance, retired AKCM
(AW) Rafael 0. Santiago, a
plankowner and HSL-48's
first Command Master Chief,
and Aviation Electronics
Technician Airman Apprentice
Bradley Markely, cut the cake.
Following the opening cer-
emony, the Vipers continued
the two-day celebration with a
bowling bash, golf outing, and a
family luau.
Vipers have participated
in and influenced the major
military operations of the last
quarter-century, to include
operations in Bosnia and
Herzegovina, Albania, and
Kosovo; Operations Desert
Storm, Desert Shield, Iraqi and
Enduring Freedom; Counter
Narco-Terrorism operations
in the Caribbean and Pacific;
and anti-piracy operations off
the Horn of Africa. At home,
HSL-48 also played a major
role in the relief efforts after
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
During Katrina relief, HSL-48
helicopters and aircrew were
among the first to respond.
Vipers flew more than 180
hours, rescued 126 people, con-
ducted 37 medical evacuations,


and delivered thousands of
pounds of food and water to the
people of New Orleans.
During the 20 year history
of HSL-48, the squadron has
been recognized by receiv-
ing: two COMNAVAIRLANT
Battle Efficiency Awards, four
Golden Wrench awards, three
CNO Safety awards, two CNO
Ship-Helicopter Safety awards,
10 Capt. Arnold J. Isbell
awards for USW/SUW tacti-
cal Excellence, and 7 Retention
Excellence awards. Active
leaders in the Jacksonville com-
munity, the Vipers have also
received nine Navy Community
Service Personal Partnership
Awards and four city of
Jacksonville Pathfinder/ Beacon
Eddy Awards for its long-stand-
ing partnership with Alimacani
Elementary School.
The Vipers are proudly look-
ing forward to the next 20 years
of faithful service. Former
HSL-48 Vipers are also invited
to re-connect with the squadron
on its Facebook page, "HSL-48
Vipers Past and Present."


-Photo by Lt.j.g. Rich Kroeger


HSL-48 families enjoying the Luau.


-Photo by Lt.j.g. Rich Kroeger
Alexis Haggard takes a time out from all the Luau festivities.


-Photo by Angie Testa
AKCM (AW) Rafael 0. Santiago, a plankowner and HSL-48's first Command Master Chief, and Aviation Electronics Technician
Airman Apprentice Bradley Markely, cut the cake.


-Photo by Angie Testa -Photo by Lt.j.g. Rich Kroeger
HSL-48 past and present Command Master Chiefs reconnect to talk about the squadron's history. Lt.j.g. A.J. Edwards celebrating a gutter ball at the bowling outing.


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THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 13

SERMC Swings Into Action On Vicksburg
By Ensign Jordan Bradford
USS Vicksburg J 4
In an example of the support rendered to operational units by :
'V
Sailors ashore, service members assigned to SERMC worked tire-
lessly in the heat of the Floridian sun to assist USS Vicksburg (CG
69) replace a damaged Allison 501K-17 Gas Turbine Generator
(GTG). Vicksburg's original NR1 GTG suffered damage while 7:4.
deployed in the North Arabian Sea serving as Air Defense
Commander for the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group.
Despite the rushed timeline facing Vicksburg, SERMC deliv-
ered the necessary parts and the expertise to install them, safely
and expeditiously, enabling the ship and her crew to meet the
1OCT underway. Despite being less than a month from the end of
Vicksburg's post-deployment stand down period, SERMC had a
brand new GTG ready on the pier when Vicksburg needed it. The
expertise of the SERMC 31T crew was clearly demonstrated by
their mighty effort, utilizing only eight Sailors to accomplish this
difficult task with impressive speed. From the removal of the dam-
aged component to the installation of the new generator, the entire
process took less than forty-eight hours. Yet, despite this cramped
timeline, the operation still had a negligible effect on Vicksburg's4
intense ship-wide preparation efforts for the upcoming ULTRA S.
The confidence and competency of the SERMC detachment was
also clearly demonstrated by their superb rigging skills and moving
of a nearly $400,000 piece of equipment from the pier, to the ship,.
and down to the engineering spaces that would be its new home.
SERMC's relationship with Vicksburg stands as what is possible
when ships and supporting units work together. Thus, this genera-
tor swap goes beyond a mere engineering operation and manages_
to demonstrate the success the Navy team can achieve when ashore
and afloat assets operate in synergy.
N.2-----


A member of SERMC guides NR1 GTG as it is hoisted through


Main Engine Room Number 1.


T
TI


-Photos by Ensign Marc D. Schron


SERMC's Gas Turbine team prepares NR1 GTG to be lifted offVicksburg.





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14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


Fitness
Surfside Fitness schedule is
as follows:
Monday
7 a.m., Spartan Training
Unconventional training
for the unconventional war-
rior which centers on the
art of developing the body
through refined functional tac-
tics. Spartan Training employs
a combination of kettle bells,
calisthenics, sprint and distance
running, tire flips, sledge ham-
mers, sled drags, and many
other advanced training tech-
niques. Meets behind Surfside
Fitness Center.
9:30 a.m., Resistance
This class will reform the
lower and upper body utilizing
every fitness tool. Your body
shape will take a 360-degree
turn.
10:30 a.m., Broken Hearts
A fitness program for those
who require cardiac rehabili-
tation. Program incorporates
a wide variety of fitness tools.
Blood pressure and heart rate
are monitored while progress is
charted.
11:30 a.m., Step n Kick
Step up the fat bum and kick
down those kcals with this
combo class.
1 p.m., Moms in Motion
A monitored exercise pro-
gram designed for pregnant
women and new moms. This
class helps improve muscle
tone, ease stress, relieve back
pain, and increase energy. All
participants are required to sub-
mit a doctor's release to partici-
pate. Moms can bring babies in
carriers to this class. Held at
Surfside Fitness Center.
4:30 p.m., Zumba
A fusion of hot, sexy and
explosive Latin American and
International dance music.
Caloric output, fat burning and
total body toning are maxi-
mized through fun and easy to
follow dance steps. Come expe-
rience the ultimate dance party
in this high energy, motivating
class that is great for both the
body and the mind.
3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m., Youth
Fitness Factory
5:30 p.m., Yoga
A dynamic blend of breath-
ing, yoga postures, and relax-
ation techniques. This class
increases vitality, energy, calm,
agility, flexibility, mental and
physical strength in the body,
both internally and externally.
Tuesday
7 a.m., Command TRX
(weather permitting) Build
functional strength and muscu-
lar endurance with this suspen-
sion training system developed
by the Navy Seals. Now used
on military installations all
over the world, the TRX is a


space saving, portable tool used
to attain peak operational fit-
ness. Mayport's TRX training
area can be found behind the
Surfside Fitness Center. Meets
behind Surfside. Limited to 28
Active Duty only.
9:30 a.m., Lolmpact
Designed for beginners. Easy
to follow, low impact aerobic
and strength-training moves
provide something different
than just walking on the tread-
mill.
11:30 a.m., Intro TRX
(weather permitting) Build
functional strength and muscu-
lar endurance with this suspen-
sion training system developed
by the Navy Seals. Now used
on military installations all
over the world, the TRX is a
space saving, portable tool used
to attain peak operational fit-
ness. Mayport's TRX training
area can be found behind the
Surfside Fitness Center.
1 p.m., Strength Solutions
This class assists in pre-
venting and overcoming inju-
ries. Ride the road to recov-
ery! Meets at Surfside Fitness
Center lobby.
5:30 p.m., Yoga
A dynamic blend of breath-
ing, yoga postures, and relax-
ation techniques. This class
increases vitality, energy, calm,
agility, flexibility, mental and
physical strength in the body,
both internally and externally.
4:30 p.m., Zumba
A fusion of hot, sexy and
explosive Latin American and
International dance music.
Caloric output, fat burning and
total body toning are maxi-
mized through fun and easy to
follow dance steps. Come expe-
rience the ultimate dance party
in this high energy, motivating
class that is great for both the
body and the mind.
3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m., Youth
Fitness Factory
Wednesday
6:30 a.m., Functional
Flexibility
This class consists of a high-
ly effective flexibility regimen
that will strengthen, stretch and
relax the body. Say good-bye to
tense, tight aching muscles!
9:30 a.m., Intro Mind Body
Mind Body programs focus
on improving flexibility,
strength and balance while
enhancing posture, mental focus
and coordination. Deter injury
and the effects of stress, burn
calories and improve overall
health. Mind Body is a fusion
of Yoga, Pilates and Tai Chi.
10:30 a.m., Broken Hearts
A fitness program for those
who require cardiac rehabili-
tation. Program incorporates
a wide variety of fitness tools.
Blood pressure and heart rate


M WR Sports/Fitness


are monitored while progress is
charted. The Gym Schedule is as f
11:30 a.m., Zumba lows:
A fusion of hot, sexy and Monday
explosive Latin American and 11:30 a.m., Adv. Weig
International dance music. Training for Warriors
Caloric output, fat burning and An adrenaline produci
total body toning are maxi- 1-hour class devoted to bui
mized through fun and easy to ing strength and stamina
follow dance steps. Come expe- active duty personnel. Empha
rience the ultimate dance party is placed on sound, prov
in this high energy, motivating weight training technique
class that is great for both the Topics include squatology, si
body and the mind. plements and muscle grow
1 p.m., Moms in Motion Meets at Gym weight room.
A monitored exercise pro- 2:30 p.m., Comman
gram designed for pregnant Rowbics
women and new moms. This Learn to row on the Conci
class helps improve muscle 2 rower used by Olympic ro
tone, ease stress, relieve back ing teams. The full body rhy
pain, and increase energy. All mic nature of the rower mal
participants are required to sub- it extremely efficient at bui
mit a doctor's release to partici- ing fat with minimal stress
pate. Moms can bring babies in your legs, feet or joints. All:
carriers to this class. Held at ness levels welcome. The co
Surfside Fitness Center. mand version of this class
2:30 p.m., Command/FEP great for Fitness Enhancemi
TRX Personnel. Meets at Gym r:
5:30 p.m., Kids' Clinic quetball court 3.
5:30pm Kickboxing 3 p.m. Victory PRT
Learn basic kicks, punches Want to score Outstanding
and balance moves in this cal- the PRT? Attend Victory P]
orie burning, sweat producing and experience effective, higl
knock out of a work out. motivating PRT oriented wo:
Thursday outs. A variety of training me
9:30 a.m., Walking ods are utilized. Meets at G'
11:30 a.m., Adv. Mind Body basketball court 2A.
Mind Body programs focus 3:30pm 6:30 p.m., You
on improving flexibility, Fitness Factory
strength and balance while 5:30 p.m., atYFF KidsYog
enhancing posture, mental focus Tuesday
and coordination. Deter injury 6:30 a.m., Command Jui
and the effects of stress, burn and Jab
calories and improve overall This class incorporate
health. Mind Body is a fusion jumpin, jabbin and jiven!
of Yoga, Pilates and Tai Chi. prize-fighting workout that v
1 p.m., Strength Solutions roll back time and fight fat f
This class assists in pre- ever! Meets at Gym basketb
venting and overcoming inju- court 1A. Can accommodate
ries. Ride the road to recov- 200+ personnel.
ery! Meets at Surfside Fitness 11:30 a.m., Steel Anch
Center lobby. Training
3:30pm 6:30 p.m., Youth Show your commitment a
Fitness Factory motivation by becoming a St
5:30 p.m., Mommy, Daddy, Anchor. Successful complete


Me
Friday
7 a.m., Beach Bootcamp
(weather permitting) This
Commando PT utilizes various
training techniques to achieve
the highest fitness levels pos-
sible. Meets behind Surfside
Fitness Center. Can accommo-
date 200+ personnel.
11:30 a.m., Spartan Training
Unconventional training
for the unconventional war-
rior which centers on the
art of developing the body
through refined functional tac-
tics. Spartan Training employs
a combination of kettle bells,
calisthenics, sprint and distance
running, tire flips, sledge ham-
mers, sled drags, and many
other advanced training tech-
niques. Meets behind Surfside
Fitness Center.


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ing teams. The full body rhyth-
mic nature of the rower makes
it extremely efficient at burn-
ing fat with minimal stress to
your legs, feet or joints. All fit-
ness levels welcome. The com-
mand version of this class is
great for Fitness Enhancement
Personnel. Meets at Gym rac-
quetball court 3.
2:30 p.m., Conditioning for
Running
Put your best foot forward
and improve your 1.5-mile
time, run a 5K or a marathon.
Meets at Gym in the lobby. Can
accommodate 200+ personnel.
4:30 p.m., Spinning
This 45-minute indoor
cycling class will enhance your
speed and strength and burn
mega calories without compro-
mising joint health. Good for
all fitness levels. Meets at Gym
racquetball court 3.
Thursday
7 a.m., Cardio, Combat and
CORE
In this heart-pounding full
body workout we break a seri-
ous sizzlin' sweat. This fusion
of cardio and resistance train-
ing will max out your exercise
afterburn. Meets at Gym bas-
ketball court 1A.
11:30 a.m., Spinning
This 45-minute indoor
cycling class will enhance your
speed and strength and burn
mega calories without compro-
mising joint health. Good for
all fitness levels. Meets at Gym
racquetball court 3.
2:30 p.m., Intro to Weight
Training for Warriors
An adrenaline producing
1-hour class devoted to build-
ing strength and stamina in
active duty personnel. Emphasis
is placed on sound, proven
weight training techniques.
Topics include squatology, sup-
plements and muscle growth.


Meets at Gym weight room.
3:30pm 6:30 p.m., Youth
Fitness Factory
5:30 p.m., at YFF Mommy,
Daddy, Me
Friday
6:30 a.m., Command
Spinning
This 45-minute indoor
cycling class will enhance your
speed and strength and burn
mega calories without compro-
mising joint health. Good for
all fitness levels. Meets at Gym
racquetball court 3.
9:30 a.m., Intro to Spin
This 45-minute indoor
cycling class will enhance your
speed and strength and burn
mega calories without compro-
mising joint health. Good for
all fitness levels. Meets at Gym
racquetball court 3.
11:30 a.m., Strength
Training Basics for Women
This introductory weight
training class is designed espe-
cially for women and includes
educational material and pro-
gram design. Meets at Gym
weight room.
11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor
Testing
Show your commitment and
motivation by becoming a Steel
Anchor. Successful completion
of a percentage based combina-
tion of the bench press, squat,
and dead lift will win you this
prestigious award. Get your
name on the wall and the cov-
eted Steel Anchor award t-shirt.


of a percentage based combina-
tion of the bench press, squat,
and dead lift will win you this
prestigious award. Get your
name on the wall and the cov-
eted Steel Anchor award t-shirt.
3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m., Youth
Fitness Factory
Wednesday
7 a.m., Command Cardio
Pump
Various training regimens are
used based on attendance num-
ber. Can accommodate 200 plus
participants. Kickboxing, circuit
training and sports drills are just
a few of the fitness enhance-
ment methods used. Discover
how to become a lean, mean
fighting machine! Meets at
Gym basketball court 1A.
11:30 a.m., Rowbics
Learn to row on the Concept
2 rower used by Olympic row-


Liberty Call


The following activities tar-
get single or unaccompanied
Sailors. For more information,
call 270-7788/89 or stop by
Planet Mayport Single Sailor
Center and pick up the monthly
activity calendar with a com-
plete listing of all upcoming
Liberty events.
Oct. 8: Trivia Thursdays.
Pizza, play and prizes starting at
6 p.m. every Thursday at Planet
Mayport. (Free)
Oct. 9-12: Key West Trip.
Prices start as low as $50
(excursions are extra). Trip
departs Friday at 9 a.m. and
returns at approximately 11
p.m. Monday (federal holiday).


Pre-registration required.
Oct. 12: Barracks Break-
In. Pizza and Monday Night
Football starting at 8 p.m. in the
lounge of Barracks Bldg. 2105.
(Free)
Oct. 13: Karate/Self
Defense Class. 7:30-8:30 p.m.
every Tuesday. Cost is $40 per
Oct. 14: Pool Tourney
Wednesday. Pool tournaments
every Wednesday at Planet
Mayport starting at 6 p.m. Sign
up to win prizes. (Free)
Oct. 15: Trivia Thursdays.
Pizza, play and prizes starting at
6 p.m. every Thursday at Planet
Mayport. (Free)
Oct. 16: Birthday Friday.


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Includes Washer / Dryer Rental


Bring In ThisAd To Receive $200 In Move-In Credit

904-241-3855
2760 Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach,
approximately one-half mile north of
Mayport Naval Air Station
Office Open Daily 10:00am to 6:00pm 0


'Happy Birthday' to all the
October birthdays. Stop by
Planet Mayport starting at 4
p.m. for a birthday surprise.
(Free)
Oct. 17-18: Universal
Halloween Horror Nights
Trip. Trip departs on Saturday
at 1 p.m. and returns on Sunday.
Cost is $50. Pre-registration
required.
Oct. 18: Jags vs. St. Louis
Rams. Trip departs at 11 a.m.
Includes transportation and
admission for only $5. Sign up
at Planet Mayport.
Oct. 24: UFC 104 Pay-Per-


View. 10 p.m. at Castaway's
Lounge. (Free) www.ufc.com
Oct. 25: Learn to Fly! Trip
departs at 6 a.m. for a free fly-
ing lesson. Pre-registration
required.
Oct. 30: Fright Night '09:
9 p.m.-1 a.m. at Castaway's
Lounge. Event includes adult
games and prizes, free food, DJ
entertainment, costume con-
tests (Best Dressed Female/
Male, Most Creative Couple,
etc.), and a carved pumpkin
contest (bring in your already
carved pumpkin for this con-
test). (Free)


NAVAL

RESERVE
ACCELERATE YOUR LIFE
When you join the Naval Reserveon a part-time basis, you can remain
connected to everything you hold important in your life. Our ranks
are filled with proud individuals securing better futures by structuring
their lives around family, duty, career and country. To find out more
about the many rewards, benefits and options available to you

For more information,
please email:lptjacksonville@cnrc.navy.mil
or call 1-800-342-8123


The Beaches Freshest!






"Game Day Specials"
Sat., Sun., and Mon.
16" Cheese Pizza or 15 Wings 10.00


Family Restaurant

Try our Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials.

Dine-In, Take-Out or Delivery!
All of our food is made fresh to order on premises-Sauces,
soups, dressings, desserts, breads, Pizza dough and more!!
Military, Request 10% discount-Dine in Only!


Italian & More
Catering Also Available!
Now Delivering to Mayport NS*
(904) 246-9926 www.lapizzaria.net
2158 Mayport Rd #5, Atlantic Beach, FL 32233
$15 minium on Delivery orders. 0




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 15

AM Happenings


Oct. 8: CPO Social Hour (Right Hand Man/
Boss's). 3-7 p.m. at Foc'sle CPO Club with free
hors d'oeuvres 4-6 p.m., drink specials and all-
you-can-drink soft drinks for only $1. Thursday
night is reserved for active and retired Chief Petty
Officers and their guests. For CPO Club activity
information, call AWRC Jon Abell at 850-748-
5941.
Oct. 11: Jaguar Sunday Golf Special. Golf
with cart for only $15 after 1 p.m. at Windy
Harbor Golf Club. 270-5380
Oct. 11: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m.
every Sunday at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost
is $9 per person and includes All-You-Can Bowl
with shoes, spaghetti dinner, music videos, light
show and colored headpin bowling for prizes.



Oct. 11: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m.
every Sunday at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost
is $9 per person and includes All-You-Can Bowl
with shoes, spaghetti dinner, music videos, light
show and colored headpin bowling for prizes.
270-5377


Oct. 16: Youth
Freedom Friday,
Costume Dance.
7-11 p.m. at the Youth
Activities Center for
ages 6-12 (age 5, if in
Kindergarten). Cost is
$7 in advance or $9
the day of (if space).
Early sign up recom-
mended. 270-5680


Fall Fest
Vendor
Opportunities
MWR Mayport
is now accept-
ing applications
from groups and
individuals wish-
ing to participate
in booth sales at
Fall Festival on
Oct. 24 from 2-6
p.m. at Sea Otter
Pavilion. Booth
permits will be
granted on a first
come, first serve
basis. Fee is $25
per booth. For
more informa-
tion, contact Lisa
Wolfe at 270-6012
ext. 113.


1


270-5377
Oct. 12: Columbus Day Holiday.
Oct. 13: 5K Fun Run/3K Walk/Stroller
Strut. 8 a.m. start at the Gym. (Free) 270-5451
Oct. 13: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night.
3-7 p.m. at Foc'sle CPO Club with 35-cent
wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft
drinks for $1. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty
Officers, Officers and their guests). For CPO
Club activity information, call AWRC Jon Abell
at 850-748-5941.
Oct. 16 & 17: Live Band, Neurotic Butterfly.
9 p.m.-1 a.m. both Friday and Saturday at
Castaway's Lounge. All hands welcome. www.
myspace.com/neuroticbutterflyrocks (Free) 270-

Kid

Oct. 16: Teen Center Halloween Costume
Party. 7-11 p.m. at Club Teen for middle and
high school ages. Food and drinks provided. 270-
5680
Oct. 24: Fall Fest. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter


Ff AiLLrUEST

A 1
P9551 MO #91AUB


Fun for the Whole Fawtily!

Free Stuff... Rides Inflatabes


Carnival ames


Clowns


PJ EntertaiMent Face Paintti
Performances by Navy Children

And More...
Take pictures in the pumpkin patch...
or purchase your own pumpkin!

Food & beverages for sale
Various arts & crafts vendors,
baked goodies & more for sale


A

~


top in and show your military I-D

to get akey tag good for a

FREE TACO with any purchase


ANY DAY

OF THE

WEEK!
Offer valid through 12/31/10


Prouesd es Foundation. For more information, please
Forces Families Foundation. For more information, please vis


7205
Oct. 18: Jaguar Sunday Golf Special. Golf
with cart for only $15 after 1 p.m. at Windy
Harbor Golf Club. 270-5380
Oct. 20: Intramural Basketball Meeting. 11
a.m. in the Gym lobby. Intramural and Greybeard
winter leagues begin soon. 270-5451
Oct. 21: Steak Night. 4-8 p.m. at Foc'sle
CPO Club. Cost is $10. Advance ticket purchase
required. All hands welcome. Sponsored by
Fourth Fleet. For tickets, contact AGCS Mike
Smith at 270-7360.
Oct. 24: Fall Fest. 2-6 p.m. at Sea Otter
Pavilion. Free activities for the entire family
include games, rides, clowns, face painting and


more. Food and beverages will be available for
purchase at reasonable prices and pumpkins will
be for sale in the pumpkin patch. Also, various
vendors with homemade crafts, baked goods and
more will be on site selling their items. 270-5228
Oct. 31: Halloween Boo-wling Tournament.
No-tap tournament where nine pins down is a
strike. Bowl anytime between 6-11 p.m. Cost is
$15 for adults ($10 for kids) and includes three
games of bowling and shoe rental. Also featuring
cash and gift prizes for 300 games, high game
scratch and high series scratch for men, women
and children, best costume contest and wheel of
fortune for prizes. Advance registration required
by Oct. 24. 270-5377


Zone


Pavilion. Free activities for the entire family
include games, rides, clowns, face painting and
more. Food and beverages will be available for
purchase at reasonable prices and pumpkins will
be for sale in the pumpkin patch. Also, various
vendors with homemade crafts, baked goods and
more will be on site selling their items. 270-5228
Oct. 31: Halloween Family Boo-wling
Tournament. No-tap tournament where nine
pins down is a strike. Bowl anytime between 6-11
p.m. Cost is $15 for adults ($10 for kids) and


includes three games of bowling and shoe rental.
Also featuring cash and gift prizes for 300 games,
high game scratch and high series scratch for
men, women and children, best costume contest
and wheel of fortune for prizes. Advance registra-
tion required by Oct. 24. 270-5377
Oct. 31: Haunted House. 8-11 p.m. at the
Youth Activities Center. Admission $3 per per-
son. Hayrides $1 per person. Free outdoor scary
movies. Refreshments for purchase. 270-5680


OCEANSIDE ROTARY CLUB FLAG PROJECT
Help create a community of red, white and blue! Be one of the first to participate...
make a neighborhood statement with others on your street to create a corridor of flags.
Your Oceanside Rotary Club, assisted by local youth groups, will place a 3' x 5'
American flag in your front yard for 5 holiday weekends per year and pick it up again
after the holiday. A plastic pipe will be buried in your front lawn, flush with the ground,
to hold the flagstaff. A plastic cap will cover the pipe when not in use.
The flag and staff will remain the property of Oceanside Rotary Club.
All proceeds will support Beaches community and international
Rotary projects. Local youth groups and non-profits will receive a
rebate of $5.00 from each $25.00 subscription.
For $25.00 per year, Rotary will provide and install the pipe and
cap, provide the flag, store it properly and deliver and pick it up
for each of the following holiday weekends:
Memorial Day Flag Day 4th of July Labor Day Veterans Day
^^^^^------------------- -^^ Qp ~---------"---------
OCEANSIDE ROTARY FLAG PROJECT
I Your name Phone
Street address
City _________Zip ______Email_________
Nearest cross street _________
Make $25.00 check payable to Oceanside Rotary Club
Mail to: Rotary Flag Project
1700 Park Terrace East
Atlantic Beach, FL 32233 I
For more information on Oceanside Rotary, go to www.oceansiderotary.org

HI! MY NAME IS


ROBBIE HIGDON


I am your new account executive

for The Mirror.
I am happy to help you meet
all of your military advertising needs.
Call me at 904-359-4680
or contact your Times-Union representative.


NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA


THE


Published by The Florida Times-Union 696660


-Jm


!1k'_ I


vppppp,


ft




16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


Doyle Gives Tour To


Sea Cadets From


Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


-Photo by MC2 Gary B. Granger Jr.
A multi-national naval force, including the San Antonio class-amphibious transport dock ship USS
Mesa Verde (LPD 19), USS Doyle (FFG 39), USCGC Mohawk (WMEC 913), the Colombian navy
frigate ARC Independiente, the Dutch navy auxiliary ship HMNLS Amsterdam, and the Uruguayan
navy frigate General Artigas, underway information as part of Fuerzas Aliadas PANAMAX 2009.
FA


Doyle, DESRON 40 Perform


COMREL In Curacao


By MC3(SW) Patrick
Grieco
DESRON 40
Guided missile frigate USS
Doyle (FFG 39) and Destroyer
Squadron 40 (DESRON 40)
Sailors worked alongside
Airmen from the Hato, Curacao
Airport Detachment conduct-
ing a community relations
(COMREL) project at the Ellis
Juliana School in Willemstad,
Curacao Aug. 31. Sailors and
airman volunteered to help the
local school repaint the school's
roof and conduct minor repairs
throughout the school.
"My first reaction was that I
was very grateful and glad for
their help," said Enid Fambo,
the school's principal. "It has
been 20 years since anyone has
painted our roof and that is why
we are very excited for what
you did for us." Fambo said
three groups of Navy and Air
Force service members visited
the school earlier to survey the
site and interact with the chil-
dren. "I was very glad to have
three groups of people from the
United States here to assist us,"
said Fambo. "The first group
....... ,...... q- :.


came out earlier to play with the
children and I am very happy
for it."
Personnel Specialist 1st Class
(SW/AW) Larry Gizankis,
leading petty officer for Doyle's
Executive division, said the
COMREL was not just about
bettering the lives of the chil-
dren, but also forming stron-
ger bonds with the people of
Curacao and working with the
Air Force personnel that are
temporarily stationed here.
"Aside from the actual physi-
cal work we did at the school,
it's also about building the bond
with the staff and the commu-
nity around us. It shows that
we are helping out as much as
we can and they see that, so it
helps strengthen our bonds with
the nation." Gizankis said he
feels in today's modem world
the U.S. needs its multi-national
allies to face global challenges
that affect us all. "The bonds
we build with these countries
are important in protecting our-
selves and keeping other coun-
tries safe as well. These bonds
will be lifelong and still exist,
long after we're gone and our


children are carrying on our
legacies."
At the conclusion of the proj-
ect, Fambo was presented with
an honorary DESRON 40 candy
jar, and the students took a
group photo with the American
service members. As the pho-
tos were being taken it provided
an opportunity for the Sailors
to interact with the children as
the children asked them ques-
tions about being in the Navy
and what their jobs were. The
interaction with the children
was a fitting end that allowed
the school to thank the Sailors
and Airmen for their hard work.
Doyle is on a six-month
deployment to Latin America
and the Caribbean as part of
Southern Seas 2009 in sup-
port of US SOUTHCOM
Partnership of the Americas
maritime strategy. Southern
Seas focuses on working with
partner nations in the region
conducting exercises, mili-
tary to military engagements,
and theater security coopera-
tion engagements to enhance
interoperability.
... .:, .-.-. .. "7 "


By Ensign Kassandra
Richardt
USS Doyle PAO
Nearing the end of its
Southern Seas Deployment,
USS Doyle (FFG-39) had the
opportunity to visit U.S. Naval
Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
(GTMO).
An increasingly rare site for
dependents stationed there, the
Oliver Hazard Perry Class frig-
ate allowed a group of 14 Sea
Cadets from the Department of
Defense School in GTMO to
experience an American war-
ship firsthand.
"A Sea Cadet is the mid-
dle school version of Junior


Reserve Officer Training Corps
(JROTC). It enables school
children in their early teens to
start becoming interested in
commissioning programs when
in high school," said Lt. j.g.
Travis Rainey, Doyle's training
officer.
Starting with a Recovery
Exercise Torpedo (REXTORP),
Doyle sailors showed the Sea
Cadets how to shoot torpedoes.
Following the demonstrations
the Cadets were given a com-
plete tour of the ship, followed
by a question and answer ses-
sion on the bridge.
"The Cadets seemed really
impressed and excited," said


Ensign Brandon Whigham, the
Repair Division Officer. This
was the first time many of
them had even seen a warship.
Especially to students who are
isolated on a navy base in Cuba
where they can't leave the base,
this was a treat for them."
"This tour was awesome. I
felt like I was in a video game,
but then I realize its not, its real
life! It was really cool meeting
the crew and seeing their day to
day life on a ship," said one of
the Cadets after the tour.
GTMO is Doyle's last port
visit for the remainder of its
Southern Seas Deployment.


CFC Fundraiser Begins


-Photo by Ensign Emily Rhatican
Ten Sailors from USS Carney (DDG 64) enjoyed lunch courtesy of the Daytona Navy League
Sept. 25. Honored at the luncheon were Carney Sailors of the Quarter Ship's Serviceman 31
Class(AW) Victor Nicaragua and Electrician's Mate 1s Class(SW/AW) Jason Nazlerod.




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 17


Former NFL-ers Score Touchdown For Troops


From Operation Homefront
Jacksonville youth are invit-
ed to attend free sports clinic
and learn valuable life skills at
Operation Homefront-Florida
Touchdown For The Troops.
Ten former NFL players
from the organization Athletes
Helping Kids, will travel to
Jacksonville on Oct. 23-25 to
thank the Jacksonville mili-
tary community for their ser-
vice and host area youth age


7 through 17 in a free football
skills clinic. This special event
will be held at Bolles School
on Saturday, Oct. 24 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. and attended by
children from the local military
bases, the YMCA of Florida's
First Coast, the Boys and Girls
Club of Northeast Florida and
Jacksonville's Police Athletic
league.
The players are led by
Naval Academy football star


and former Raiders player
Napoleon McCallum. He will
be joined by Billy Joe Hobert
of Raiders, Ricky Ellis of
Seattle Seahawks, Cephus
Weatherspoon of New Orleans
Saints, Charles Mincy of
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Kirk
Dodge of Denver Broncos,
Don Jones of New York Jets,
Richard Umphrey of New York
Giants, Grady Richardson of
Washington Redskins, Jerry


Robinson of Oakland Raiders.
American needs a strong
military...and the military needs
strong families. Operation
Homefront-Florida addresses
the emergency needs of local
military families by providing
emergency assistance and moral
support.
To introduce Operation
Homefront to the Jacksonville
community and publicize their
services, Operation Homefront-


Florida will host a "Meet the
Players" dinner on Friday Oct.
23 at the University Club.
This event will generate finan-
cial support for U.S. military
families in the region. Ticket
purchases or corporate sponsor-
ships can be made by calling
443-944-4884 or mailing event
coordinator at Christine.camp-
bell@operationhomefront.net.
Operation Homefront pro-
vides emergency and morale


assistance for our troops, the
families they leave behind and
for wounded warriors when
they return home. A nonprofit
501(c)(3), Operation Homefront
leads more than 4,500 volun-
teers in 30 chapters nationwide,
and has provided critical assis-
tance to more than 45,000 mili-
tary families in need.


Workshops Available For Families, Sailors At FFSC


From FFSC
The following classes and activities are offered
by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC)
and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required
and childcare is not available. For more informa-
tion about the classes or to register call 270-6600,
ext. 110. FFSC is located in Building One on
Massey Avenue.
Oct. 8, 9:00 a.m.-1 1:00 a.m., Resume Walk-In
Review Assistance, FFSC
Oct. 8, 9:00 a.m.-ll1:00 a.m., Establishing A
Sound Family Budget, FFSC
Oct. 13, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Resume Walk-
In Review Assistance, FFSC
Oct. 13, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Parenting Class
(6 Week Class), FFSC
Oct. 15, 8:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Anger
Management, FFSC
What does anger do for you? Communicate
for you? Keep people at a safe distance from
you? Keep you in charge? For many people,
anger serves them many uses, but all too often, it
is at a high cost.. .usually of relationships, unhap-
piness in the workplace, and a general feeling of
disdain. If you want to be able to break out of
the "get angry/get even" syndrome, come to this
class. Participants learn how anger and judgment
are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty
self-talk, what "E + R = 0" means, and the roles


of stress and forgiveness in anger.
Oct. 15, 9:00 a.m.-ll1:00 a.m., Resume Walk-
In Review Assistance, FFSC
Oct. 16, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., FAP Key
Personnel Training, BLDG 1 RM 104
Oct. 16, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Credit Report
Review, FFSC
Oct. 19, 1:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m., FERP Starting
Your Own Business, FFSC
Oct. 19-22, 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., TAP
Separatee Workshop, BLDG 1 RM 104 Oct. 20,
9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Parenting Class (6 Week
Class), FFSC
Oct. 20, 9:00 a.m.-ll1:00 a.m., Resume Walk-
In Review Assistance, FFSC
Oct. 21, 8:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Stress
Management, FFSC
Stress is a normal part of everyone's life. It
can be energizing and a factor in motivating us.
But too much stress, without relief, can have
debilitating effects. This program is designed
to provide participants with an understanding of
what stress is and how it affects them. It will
also help participants begin to look at their own
lives and ways they currently cope with stress.
Participants will be challenged to develop behav-
ior and lifestyle changes that will improve their
ability to cope with stress.
Oct. 21, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Smooth Move,


FFSC
This workshop is designed for inexperienced,
as well as experienced military members on per-
manent change of station (PCS) orders. The
Personal Property Shipping Office will provide
information on how to deal with movers and per-
sonal property entitlements. The travel section of
Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) will pres-
ent a section on travel pay and allowances. FFSC
staff will discuss the emotional cycles of reloca-
tion, budgeting for a PCS move and provide some
strategies for families.
Overseas Living is a class designed to prepare
you for living in new and different setting. This
class will provide helpful information about liv-
ing on the economy to dealing with potential
terrorist activities. You will have a chance to
understand the emotional cycles of overseas liv-
ing to making this tour the best part of your Navy
career. Specific information about visas and
absentee voting will be discussed.
Oct. 22, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Resume Walk-
In Review Assistance, FFSC
Oct. 23, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Home Buying
Consideration, FFSC
Oct. 26, 8:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m., FERP Career
And Employment Readiness Class, FFSC
Oct. 26, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m., FERP Federal
Employment Class, FFSC


Oct. 26, 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m., Ombudsman
Assembly, USO
Oct. 27, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Parenting Class
(6 Week Class), FFSC
Oct. 27, 9:00 a.m.-ll:00 a.m., Resume Walk-
In Review Assistance, FFSC Oct. 28, 9:00 a.m.-
11:00 a.m., Sponsor Training, FFSC
Sponsors play a critical role in retaining new-
comers and increasing overall productivity and
morale by making a newcomer's arrival at the
command easier. The Sponsor Program is
designed to help facilitate the relocation of Navy
service members and their families creating a
link between the service member and their new
command. The primary goal is to ease difficulty
and reduce the apprehensions normally associated
with a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move.
Oct. 28, 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m., Indvidual
Augmentee (IA) Family Discussion Group,
USO
Nov. 3, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Parenting Class
(6 Week Class), FFSC
Nov. 10, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., Parenting
Class (6 Week Class), FFSC


Web Site Offers Help For


Military Families In Transition


By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service
Sixteen-year-old Robyn
Lutzkanin loves the military.
As a military child, she said,
she has moved often and enjoys
seeing new places and meeting
new people.
"It really opens your eyes up
to the world," she added.
But she admits to dreading
the transition of moving to that
new place and having to make
new friends.
"Moving is a really big
stress, especially on teenagers.
Because when you move to a
new school, it's like all of these
kids, [and you] don't know
them," she said.
Three national associa-
tions joined forces Sept. 30 to
publish a Web site that offers
help to military families going
through those transitions. The
site, http://www.TimeToTalk.
org/military is a joint effort by
the National Military Family
Association, the Partnership for
a Drug Free America, and the
National Association of School
Nurses. Among other tools, the
site offers a guide for military
parents on how to talk to their



Operation:

Identification
Cancer is one of our children's
biggest enemies, chances of
survival are greatly enhanced
if it is identified early.




Persistent fatigue
Loss of appetite or nausea
Swelling or lumps
Stumbling or falling
Continual pain
Easy and frequent bruising

Call 800-822-6344 or visit
www.stjude.org to learn more.


children during transitions such
as a move or a deployment of
a parent. Talking during that
time is critical, Lutzkanin said,
addressing a crowd gathered
at the U.S. Capitol today to
announce the site's launch.
"The only way to solve a
problem is to talk about it. If
you let it sit there in the back
of your mind, it's going to start
festering in your brain and
be like all on you," she said.
"You've just got to let it out."
Parents are ideal for the
children to talk to, she said,
because they are sharing the
transition.
"[Parents are] there with you
all the time. They can talk to
you about anything. You can
trust them. Kids at school don't
understand you. Your teachers
sometimes don't understand
you," Lutzkanin said.
Joyce Wessel Raezer, exec-
utive director of the National
Military Family Association,
said she hears from families
that they need resources to help
them deal with the issues sur-
rounding moves and deploy-
ments.
"Our military life is full of


transitions. That's one of those
trigger points where mili-
tary families are looking for
resources when they are prepar-
ing to move," she said. "Even
the brightest and the best ...
walk into that new school, walk
into that new town, and think
'Am I going to fit in? How am I
going to find friends?'"
The site also contains infor-
mation for parents on talking
about substance abuse with the
children. And it has informa-
tion on how to educate mem-
bers of the civilian sector, such
as teachers, who are not used to
dealing with problems unique
to military families. But mostly,
the site simply helps to initi-
ate conversations that can help
parents address difficult topics
during difficult times.
"The premise is, 'Let's start
that conversation between par-
ent and child, and here are ways
to help that parent start that
conversation,'" she said.


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FFSC Holds 'Starting Your


Own Business' Seminar
From FFSC
Do you want to become a successful entrepreneur? Come to the Starting Your Own Business semi-
nar at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) on Monday, Oct. 19 from 1:30-3:30 p.m. You will
learn about every stage of business development, including training, mentoring, networking and con-
sulting.
Representatives from the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Jacksonville Womens
Business Center will guide you through the exciting process of business planning and set up.
Military ID card holders and military family members are welcomed to attend the seminar. FFSC is
located in the back of Building One, Massey Ave. (across the street from the Post Office). To sign up
for the seminar, please call 904-270-6600 ext. 1701.


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18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


On Base


Wednesday, Oct. 21
Mayport Military MOPS
(Mothers of Preschoolers)
Invites all moms of children
ages 0-5 to join us for "Life on
Planet Mom." MOPS meets
every first and third Wednesday
at the Mayport Base Chapel
9:15-11:30am. Free Childcare!
No fees. Come see what it's
all about! For more info visit:
www.myspace.com/mayport-
mops
Wednesday, Nov. 4
Mayport Military MOPS
(Mothers of Preschoolers)
Invites all moms of children
ages 0-5 to join us for "Life on
Planet Mom." MOPS meets
every first and third Wednesday
at the Mayport Base Chapel
9:15-11:30am. Free Childcare!
No fees. Come see what it's
all about! For more info visit:
www.myspace.com/mayport-
mops
Wednesday, Nov. 18
Mayport Military MOPS
(Mothers of Preschoolers)
Invites all moms of children
ages 0-5 to join us for "Life on
Planet Mom." MOPS meets
every first and third Wednesday
at the Mayport Base Chapel
9:15-11:30am. Free Childcare!
No fees. Come see what it's
all about! For more info visit:
www.myspace.com/mayport-
mops

Out in Town

Friday, Oct. 9
Come join the Fleet Reserve
Association for a night of
Karaoke at the Branch Home,
390 Mayport Rd. Featured will
be host Doug Bracey, from 9
p.m.-1 a.m. The bar will be
open for drinks and snacks.
Saturday, Oct. 10
Fall Festival & Craft Fair:
Christ United Methodist
Church, 400 Penman Road,
Neptune Beach. Come join us at
the Pumpkin Patch from 9 a.m.-
3 p.m. for this annual event for
family fun, food, games, and
those very special hand-made
gifts and home-made goodies
for the holidays. For informa-
tion, please contact the Church
Office at 249-5370.
The Duval County Extension
Office will have a Horticulture
Open House from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
at the Duval County Extension
Office at 1010 N. McDuff Ave.
Pick up the latest gardening
information, plus get answers
to gardening questions. You
may bring in soil samples for
pH testing, and bring problems/
weeds for troubleshooting. No
registration required.


The Atlantic Beeach
Campout and Fun Day will be
held at the Jack Russel Park
field, 800 Seminole Rd. &
Plaza St. starting at noon. Bring
a chair, blanket and spend the
day! Campsites are available by
reservation at 716 Ocean Blvd,
Atlantic Beach during business
hours. Call 246-5828 for infor-
mation or visit www.coab.us/
events
Come join the Fleet Reserve
Association for a night of
Karaoke at the Branch Home,
390 Mayport Rd. Featured will
be host Doug Bracey, from 9
p.m.-1 a.m. The bar will be
open for drinks and snacks.
Sunday, Oct. 11
Join a park ranger at 2 p.m.
for a discussion on the differ-
ent types of shark teeth that can
be found on the area's beaches.
The program will take place at
pavilion one on Little Talbot
Island. No reservations are nec-
essary and the program is free
with regular park admission.
Join with other fans and cheer
on the Jaguars as they visit
Seattle. Game time is 1 p.m.
The bar will be open and all
drinks are 500 off during the
game.
Monday, Oct. 12
Beaches Photography Club
- The club will meet at the
Beaches Library, 600 3rd St.,
Neptune Beach, from 6-8 p.m.
This month's program is pre-
sented by Will Dickey staff
photographer of the Florida
Times Union. His work has also
been featured in Water's Edge,
Newsweek and Time maga-
zines. People of all ability lev-
els and camera types are wel-
come and encouraged to come
learn more about photography.
For more information, go to
www.beachesphotographyclub.
com.
The Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 290,
invites you to play Bingo at the
Branch Home, 390 Mayport
Rd. Games start at 6 p.m. and
are usually finished by 8 p.m.
Snacks will be available for a
small donation.
Wednesday, Oct. 14
The Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 290,
invites you to participate in
its "Wings-N-Things" from
5-8 p.m., at the Branch Home,
390 Mayport Rd. Snacks
will be available for a dona-
tion of $1.50 to $5. Then stay
and enjoy the music of Doug
Bracey from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Friday, Oct. 16
Come join the Fleet Reserve
Association for a night of
Karaoke at the Branch Home,
390 Mayport Rd. Featured will


be host DOUG BRACEY, from
9 p.m.-1 a.m. The bar will be
open for drinks and snacks.
Saturday, Oct. 17
The Jacksonville
Genealogical Society, Inc.,
will hold their monthly meet-
ing at the Webb-Wesconnet
Branch Library, 6887 103rd
St., at 1:30 p.m. Once again we
are very pleased to have Mr.
Claude Bass as your speaker.
Mr. Bass has chosen the topic,
"Clay Moonshiners." If you
haven't had the good fortune
to hear Mr. Bass speak, then
you should really plan to attend.
Mr.Bass has a great many "sto-
ries" and antedotes that he
passes on to his audience. For
additional information please
contact, Mary Chauncey, (904)
781-9300.
Join a park ranger at 10
a.m. for a walk on the beach
as they explain the importance
of undeveloped beach habitat,
including many interesting facts
about sea creatures and com-
mon shells found in the area.
The program will take place at
pavilion one on Little Talbot
Island. No reservations are nec-
essary and the program is free
with regular park admission.
A "Cool-Season Vegetable
and Herbs Workshop" will
be held by the Duval County
Extension Office on 1-2:30 p.m.
at the Mandarin Library, 3330
Kori Rd. There is no charge for
this program. Pre-registration is
requested, please call Jeannie at
387-8850.
Sunday, Oct. 18
The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 290 is an
active member of the Beaches
Veterans Organization in sup-
porting the USO "No Dough
Dinners". The next Beaches
Veterans Organization event
will be a family cookout from
1-5 p.m. This event is open to
the public and will take place at
the Fleet Reserve Association
Branch 290 Home located at
390 Mayport Rd. The menu
will be hog-roast (pig pick-
in') Carolina style by Keith...
with all the fixin's, for a
donation of only $8. Take out
orders are always welcomed.
All proceeds raised at these
events will benefit the "USO
No Dough Dinners". The FRA
is a Congressionally Chartered
organization representing the
Sea Service community before
the U. S. Congress and is com-
prised of current and former
members of the U.S. Navy,
Marine Corps, and Coast
Guard. Anyone can become
as Associate Member with
these interests. Membership in
the FRA may be obtained by
calling 249-1389 or by visit-
ing the Branch Home at 390


Mayport Rd. Branch meeting
are held the first Thursday of
each month. Full lunches are
served Monday thru Friday,
and Breakfast is served each
Sunday morning. These events
are always open to the public.
Subsequent BVO cookouts will
be hosted by the other mem-
bers every month: American
Legion Post 129, VFW Post
3270, and American Legion
Post 316. For more information
on these events or the Beaches
Veterans Organization, please
call Robin Amig at (904) 246-
6855.Monday, Oct. 19
The Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 290,
invites you to play Bingo at the
Branch Home, 390 Mayport Rd.
Games start at 6 p.m. Snacks
will be available for a small
donation.
Saturday, Oct. 24
Sock Hop at the Soda
Shoppe: Christ United
Methodist Church, 400
Penman Road, Neptune Beach.
Be-bop on over to Flo's Diner
(Fellowship Hall) from 6-9 p.m.
as we go back to 1959 to cel-
ebrate our 50th Anniversary!
Come dressed in your favor-
ite 50's attire and enjoy diner
food at 50's prices, music, hula
hoops and more! $5 admittance.
For more information, contact
the Church Office at 249-5370.
Monday, Oct. 26
The City of Jacksonville
Canning Center in coopera-
tion with the Duval County
Extension Service will offer
a workshop from 9 a.m.-noon
and another from 1-4 p.m.
Take advantage of the fall
apple harvest and learn how to
make spiced apple butter. The
cost is $20 per person, which
includes all materials. You
will take home approximately
2 half-pints. Space is limited.
You must pre-pay to register.
Send your $20 check made
payable to DCOHAC and mail
to Canning, 1010 N. McDuff
Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32254.
Deadline is Oct. 22. Call
Jeannie at 387-8850 to register.
Saturday, Nov. 7
Join a Park Ranger at 10 a.m.
for a presentation and leisurely
guided hike through different
Florida ecosystems on a quest
to characterize tracks left by
an assortment of critters. This
program will take place at the
Ribault Club on Fort George
Island Cultural State Park. No
reservations are necessary and
the program is free. For addi-
tional information on any of
these programs, call the Talbot
Islands Ranger Station at (904)
251-2320. For more informa-
tion about Florida State Parks,
visit www.FloridaStateParks.
org.


Sunday Nov. 8
The St. Johns County
Veterans Council will host a
free Veterans Celebration in the
Flagler College Auditorium,
14 Granada St., St. Augustine,
at 3 p.m. The Celebration will
kick off a week of Veterans
events, at Francis Field and at
the St. Augustine Lighthouse.
The Flagler College Veterans
Celebration will feature a
local documentary, "Korea:
Forgotten War, Remembered
Heroes" featuring the stories of
five local First Coast Korean
War Veterans. This entertaining
event will also have patriotic
singing, dancing, comedy and
the stories of our local veteran
heroes. The Veterans Council
invites everyone to this free
event to honor all our Veterans.
Tickets are not needed, please
invite all your friends.
Old Town Trolley Tours
will be providing a free shut-
tle between the City Parking
Garage and Flagler College
Auditorium and back after the
show. For further information
call Michael Rothfeld (904)
829-0381.
Saturday, Nov. 14
The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Flotilla 14-04 as
a public service is offering a
Safe Boating Program at the
Captain's Club located at 13363
Beach Blvd., between Hodges
and Kernan. The program starts
at 7:30 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m.
The program meets Florida
State requirement for a Boaters
Safety Card and costs $25
including materials. Most insur-
ance companies offer discounts
to program graduates. Contact
Mike at (904)-502-9154 for
more information or to register.
Log onto our website at www.
uscgajaxbeach.com
Sunday, Nov. 15
Join a park ranger at 1 p.m.
and discover the importance
of estuarine systems that sur-
round the inshore sides of bar-
rier islands like those of the
Talbot Islands State Parks com-
plex. This ranger-guided hike
along the salt marsh will help
point out why these areas are
one of the most productive eco-
systems on Earth, the many
roles the salt marsh plays, the
plant and animal life found in


this natural community, and
the impacts humans have on
this system. This program will
take place at the Ribault Club
on Fort George Island Cultural
State Park. No reservations are
necessary and the program is
free. For additional informa-
tion on any of these programs,
call the Talbot Islands Ranger
Station at (904) 251-2320.
For more information about
Florida State Parks, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org.
Saturday, Nov. 21
Join one of our knowledge-
able park rangers at 2 p.m. for
an informative talk on the natu-
ral history of sea islands and
their important role in coastal
ecology. The topics addressed
will include beach erosion,
island migration, island forma-
tion and the natural commu-
nities present on such barrier
islands today. The program will
take place at pavilion one on
Little Talbot Island. No reserva-
tions are necessary and the pro-
gram is free with regular park
admission. For additional infor-
mation on any of these pro-
grams, call the Talbot Islands
Ranger Station at (904) 251-
2320. For more information
about Florida State Parks, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.org.
Sunday, Nov. 29
Join a park ranger at 10:00
a.m. to learn about the many
common species that inhabit
the natural communities of the
undeveloped barrier islands of
northeast Florida. The program
will take place at pavilion one
on Little Talbot Island. No res-
ervations are necessary and
the program is free with regu-
lar park admission. For addi-
tional information on any of
these programs, call the Talbot
Islands Ranger Station at (904)
251-2320. For more informa-
tion about Florida State Parks,
visit www.FloridaStateParks.
org.


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(888) 390-0843


October Is For Breast

Cancer Awareness


From Health Promotion by the Ocean
According to the National
Cancer Institute, breast cancer
is the most common type of
cancer among women in this
country. This year, more than
192,000 American women will
learn they have this disease.
And, approximately 2,000
American men will be diag-
nosed with breast cancer.
On Oct. 16, 10 a.m. noon,
look for nurses from Health
Promotions by the Ocean to be
handing out pink ribbons and
literature at the NS Mayport
Commissary in recognition of
this important topic.
Health Promotion recog-
nizes October as Breast Cancer
Awareness Month. Make a
commitment to yourself to
check your breasts once a
month by self-exam all year
round.
If you notice any changes,
make an appointment and get
seen by your doctor. Women
over 40 should be getting annu-
al physical and mammograms
per direction by their provid-
er. Men also need to perform
monthly self breast exams.
Health Promotion offers show-
er cards that show you how
to complete the monthly self
exams. We are located at 2050
Marshall Couch Drive, next to
the Chief's Club and the Fitness
Center. The phone number is
(904) 270-5251.
Cancer is a term for diseases
in which abnormal cells divide
without control. Cancer cells
can invade nearby tissues and
can spread to other parts of the
body through the blood and


lymph systems.
Breast cancer symptoms vary
widely, from lumps to swell-
ing to skin changes. However,
many breast cancers have no
obvious symptoms at all. A
monthly self breast-exam
should be part of your month-
ly health care routine, and you
should visit your doctor if you
experience breast changes. If
you are over 40 or at high risk
for the disease, you should also
have an annual mammogram
and physical exam by a doc-
tor. The earlier breast cancer is
found and diagnosed, the better
your chances of beating it.
No one knows the exact
causes of breast cancer.
Doctors often cannot explain
why one woman develops
breast cancer and another does
not. They do know that bump-
ing, bruising, or touching the
breast does not cause cancer.
And breast cancer is not conta-
gious. You cannot catch it from
another person.
Research has shown that
women with certain risk fac-
tors are more likely than others
to develop breast cancer. Risk
factors include; age, personal
history of breast cancer, fam-
ily history, race, certain breast
changes, gene changes, and
reproductive and menstrual his-
tory.
More specific information
about breast cancer is avail-
able on the National Cancer
Institute's web site at http://
www.cancer.gov or from NCI's
Cancer Information Service at
1-800-4-CANCER.


THE NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA

m.iii IIIL


OFF-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS
ArnnOflD


I nV ATIfnI


ALLSTATE INSURANCE CO.
AMERICAN LEGION POST
COAST GUARD STATION (EXCHANGE STORE)
COMFORT INN
COMMISSARY (INSIDE RACKS)
DAYS INN
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL(DAILY'S)
FLEET LANDING
FLEET RESERVE ASSOC. BRANCH # 290
FLETCHER HIGH SCHOOL ROTC
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
HOME FINDER'S REALTY
JAX FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE


PAN AM PLAZA MAYPORT RD.
316 ATLANTIC BLVD.
A1A HWY
MAYPORT RD.
MAYPORT RD.
1401 ATLANTIC BLVD.
9115 MERRILL RD./9-A
1539 S 3rd ST
7150 MERRILL RD


PITV


JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX BCH
JAX


13490 ATLANTIC BLVD./SAN PABLO


MAYPORT RD.
390 MAYPORT RD.

1900 MIZELL RD
220A1AN
619A1AN
10970 US 1/SR210
2350 SR 16
463779 SR 200/A1A
3230 EMERSON ST
3938 HENDRICKS AVE
8070 ATLANTIC BLVD
1721 UNIVERSITY BLVD N
5617 BOWDEN RD
570 BUSCH DR
12548 SAN JOSE BLVD
10946 FT CAROLINE RD
1001 MONUMENT RD
10044 ATLANTIC BLVD
4100 HECKSCHER DR
2520 S 3rd ST
319 S 3rd ST
9144 BAYMEADOWS RD
11461 OLD ST AUGUSTINE RD
10455 OLD ST AUGUSTINE RD
9540 SAN JOSE BLVD
1605 RACETRACK/SR13
2550 MAYPORT RD.
664 ATLANTIC BLVD.
3212 UNIVERSITY BLVD S
6135 ST AUGUSTINE RD
11620 SAN JOSE BLVD


JAX
JAX
JAX BCH
STAU
PVB
PVB
STAUG
STAU
YUL
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAXBCH
JAX BCH
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX


LOCATION
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO/BP
KANGAROO/SMOKERS EXPRESS
LA CRUISE GIFT SHOP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
JAX
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
MALLARD COVE OFFICE
NAVY HOUSING APARTMENTS
NEX (OUTSIDE RACKS NEAR ATM)
OTTER RUN OFFICE
RAINBOW CENTER CHILD CARE
RIBAULT BAY COMMUNITY CENTER
SINGLETON'S SEAFOOD SHOP
SOUTHTRUST BANK
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
U.S. COAST GUARD OFFICE
USO MAYPORT
Updated: FEBRUARY 1,2007


ADDRESS CITY
10430 ATLANTIC BLVD JAX
13560 ATLANTIC BLVD JAX
1067 ATLANTIC BLVD ATL BCH
1672 S3rd ST JAXBCH
8379 BAYMEADOWS RD JAX
5295 SUNBEAM RD JAX
11099 OLD ST AUGUSTINE RD JAX
9699 SAN JOSE BLVD JAX
2837 TOWNSEND BLVD JAX
10100 GRANITE PLACE JAX
1031 BEACH BLVD. JAX BCH
1403 N 3rd ST JAX BCH
10910 ATLANTIC BLVD. JAX
2615 ST. JOHNS BLUFF/ALDEN JAX
A1A HWY JAX
9615 HECKSCHER DR.-FT. GEORGE JAX
8804 LONE STAR/MILL CRK JAX
12020 FT. CAROLINE RD./FULTON JAX
13967 McCORMICK RD(MT PLEASANT RD)

5001 HECKSCHER DR. BLOUNT JAX
1310 S. 3rd ST. JAX BCH
A1A HWY /WONDERWOOD JAX
ATLANTIC BLVD / CRAIG FIELD JAX
MAYPORT RD. JAX
ASSISSI LANE JAX
NAVY HOUSING OFF ASSISSI LANE JAX
ASSISSI LANE JAX
A1A HWY JAX
1301 ATLANTIC BLVD. JAX
1202 US-17 YUL
8838 ATLANTIC BLVD JAX
3051 MONUMENT RD/ COBBLESTON JAX
1209 MONUMENT RD./LEE JAX
12743 ATLANTIC BLVD./GIRVIN JAX
301 ATLANTIC BLVD. ATL BCH
2810 SR A1A N ATL BCH
14376 BEACH BLVD./SAN PABLO JAX BCH
300 BEACH BLVD./3rd ST. JAX BCH
1601 PENMAN RD. JAX BCH
A1A HWY JAX
BEHIND 2550 MAYPORT RD. JAX


IPICKUPYOUCPTHMiIRORATANYOFTHEEL


Calendar


One Way 2 Play-
- "" Drug Freel


LUGAI lIul/'im .UII




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday. October 8. 2009 19


Navy News


Equal Base Salary Increases For All Civilians


By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service
Defense Department employees paid
under the National Security Personnel
System will receive the same base sal-
ary increases this year as their General
Schedule counterparts, a Defense
Department official said Sept. 29.
The move comes as senior Defense
Department, Office of Personnel
Management and White House offi-
cials work to determine the future of
the troubled pay-for-performance sys-
tem.
Most under the NSPS last year
actually received about the same pay
increases as they would have under the


general schedule, said Brad Bunn, the
Defense Department's executive offi-
cer for NSPS.
But a report this summer by the
Defense Business Board found the sys-
tem's "pay pool" process complicated
and confusing for most employees.
Employees questioned the assess-
ment and evaluation process and didn't
understand the pay pool process, Bunn
said in at interview at the Pentagon.
Last year, a portion of the money
allotted for base-salary increases was
placed into the overall pay pool, which
is then divided among those in the pool
based on performance ratings.
This year, no money allotted for


base-salary increases will go into the
pool, Bunn said.
Employees under the NSPS system
who receive a satisfactory performance
rating of 2 or higher will receive a sal-
ary increase equal to their GS counter-
parts. Those who receive an unsatisfac-
tory rating of 1 will not receive a base
salary increase.
Defense officials felt this was the
most "prudent course of action," given
the problems reported with the NSPS,
Bunn said.
Because most in NSPS received
about the same raise as they would
have otherwise, this move will not sig-
nificantly reduce the amount of funds


used to reward performance, Bunn
said.
"Most employees were getting [an
equal pay increase], so paying it out
as an across-the-board increase would
not have a huge impact on our ability
to still recognize and reward those high
performers," he said.
Those funds come from pots that
were used for step increases, promo-
tions between grades, and cash bonus-
es under the general schedule. No
changes are planned this year in how
performance-based awards are paid.
Future changes to the NSPS need to
tie an employee's performance rating
more clearly to any subsequent salary


increase, Bunn said.
"It's about making the system bet-
ter -- making it more credible for the
employees," he said.
About 205,000 of the 865,000
Defense Department civilians are in
NSPS. The department stopped the
conversion of GS employees to NSPS
in March. The amount of the base sal-
ary increase will not be known until
the president signs an executive order
implementing the 2010 pay adjust-
ment.


Navy Moves To Meet Information Age Challenges


By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service
The Navy is merging its
information technology, intel-
ligence and communications
operations into one organization
to better address Information
Age challenges, including
threats to computer networks,
the Navy's top officer said Oct.
2.
"If we as a Navy are to
remain dominant in this
Information Age or Cyber
Age, or whatever moniker you
choose to put on it, I think that
we have to take advantage
of the new opportunities that
exist, such as the vast stores
of collected data -information
and intelligence that often lie
at rest, unrecoverable, unavail-
able and untapped," Adm.
Gary Roughead, chief of naval
operations, said during remarks
at a Center for Strategic and
International Studies-sponsored
event at the Washington Hilton
Hotel.
Because the Navy must capi-
talize on its ability to access,


filter, analyze and then dissemi-
nate information to warfighting
commanders for action in real
time, Roughead said, it's con-
solidating its intelligence direc-
torate, communications net-
works and related information
technology capabilities to form
a single new organization: the
deputy chief of naval operations
for information dominance.
The reorganization is slated
for completion by year's end.
The Navy also is stand-
ing up Fleet Cyber Command,
Roughead said, to be oper-
ated by the reconstituted U.S.
10th Fleet. The 10th Fleet was
involved in efforts to thwart
enemy submarines during
World War II. The Air Force
and Army also are standing
up organizations that focus on
information operations and net-
work security.
Fleet Cyber Command will
be a subordinate unit to U.S.
Cyber Command, the forma-
tion of which was directed by
Defense Secretary Robert M.
Gates on June 23.


Cyberspace presents "a huge
potential vulnerability for us
because of our dependence on
the electronic world for com-
munications for everything
we do," Gates said during a
Sept. 16 speech at the Air Force
Association conference at the
National Harbor in Maryland.
It is important, Gates said, for
the Defense Department and the
military services to integrate the
different information technol-
ogy and communications ele-
ments "from exploitation to
defense," to achieve unity of
effort.
Today's Navy requires
"uninhibited access to assured
communication capabili-
ties in cyberspace" to operate,
Roughead said. However, he
added, ever-present online sab-
oteurs with various allegiance
and intent make cyberspace a
daily battlefield.
"We must be prepared to
operate in cyberspace when it's
denied, and then we must also
be able to deny space when it's
required or when it's appropri-


ate," Roughead said.
People are key in cyberspace,
Roughead said, and that's why
the Navy is moving its infor-
mation technology, intelligence,
information warfare, ocean-
ography and space cadre spe-
cialists into a new Information
Dominance Corps.
Now numbering about 44,000
officers, enlisted members and
civilians, the corps is slated to
add 1,000 trained technicians in
the near future, Roughead said.
Military members will retain
their current branches and skill
ratings, he added.
The consolidation of infor-
mation technology, communi-
cations, intelligence and other
assets moves away from the
Navy's tradition of stove-piped
organizations, Roughead said,
which "have really caused us
to sub-optimize our ability to
aggregate combat capability
and the movement of informa-
tion in ways that can maximize
the effectiveness of a fleet, of a
unit or of an individual."
Military officials have found


that new technology has miti-
gated concerns that battlefield
data collected by unmanned
aerial vehicles and other meth-
ods in overseas combat zones
would be overwhelming to
commanders, Navy Vice Adm.
David J. Dorsett, director of
naval intelligence, told reporters
at the Hilton after Roughead's
speech.
U.S. forces in Iraq and
Afghanistan, Dorsett said, have
successfully employed a series
of tools that "enabled opera-
tional commanders, down to the
brigade and, in several cases,
the battalion and that type of
level, to get large quantities of
information."
Another aspect of this tool
set, Dorsett continued, involves
systems that can rapidly "fuse,
synthesize and make sense of
this tremendous volume of
data" by overlaying or sorting
it according to the category of
intelligence, such as technical-
or human-based.
"That overlaying then pro-
vides clarity and leads to opera-


tions against adversaries, insur-
gents, terrorists," Dorsett said,
noting the system has been
"very, very successful" over the
past few years.
The Navy is working with
other agencies to apply these
proven information-technology
tools in the maritime security
environment, Dorsett said.
"We are using the Navy's
intelligence structure and the
Navy's oceanographers, over-
laying information concerning
how pirates operate trends,
activities, etcetera with what
the weather looks like over a
period of time," Dorsett said.
That information, he added, is
shared with U.S. partners to
determine where anti-pirate
forces need to operate.
"And, what we've seen is
fairly significant successes
in putting forces in the right
place -- really over the last few
weeks to counter pirates in
their attempts to hijack ships,"
Dorsett said.


Pirate Attacks On The


Rise Off Somalia Coast


By MC1
Brianna K. Dandridge
Commander U.S. Naval Forces
Central Command/Commander U.S.
5th Fleet
Pirate activity has increased
recently off the coast of
Somalia with four attempted
attacks occurring on motor
vessels in the Gulf of Aden
since Sept. 19.
Three separate unsuccess-
ful attacks occurred Sept. 19
and 20, while the most recent
attack occurred Sept. 26 on
the Panamanian-flagged
Motor Vessel Handy V, in
which seven pirates were
arrested by the Turkish ship
TCG Gediz (F-495), assigned
to NATO's Piracy Task Force.
This brings the total number
of piracy attacks on merchant
vessels in 2009 to 146, 28 of
which have been successful.
In order to coordinate,
deconflict, and maximize the
effectiveness of naval forces
conducting counter-piracy
operations off the coast of
Somalia, naval leaders from
30 nations and international
organizations met today for
a series of meetings held in
Bahrain.
The Shared Awareness
and Deconfliction (SHADE)


meetings provide a working-
level opportunity for navies to
come together to share infor-
mation and deconflict coun-
ter-piracy efforts off the coast
of Somalia.
"By synchronizing and
deconflicting our efforts,
Combined Task Force (CTF)
151, EU, NATO and other
international forces are
making a difference," said
Commodore Tim Lowe, dep-
uty commander, Combined
Maritime Forces.
Last week, CMF warned
mariners of an increase in
piracy off Africa's coast as
the monsoon season has
ended and expectations are
that pirate activity will again
increase as they target passing
ships.
"CTF 151 is ready to coun-
ter these attacks and support
vessels in need," said Rear
Adm. Scott E. Sanders, com-
mander, CTF 151. "We're
not being passive out here;
we're being proactive. We
are creating an environment
in which pirates are not so
bold."
CMF continues to operate
off the coast of Somalia to
enhance the security of com-
mercial maritime routes.


"We make every attempt to
intercept the skiffs with pirate
paraphernalia before they can
attack a merchant ship," said
Sanders.
Multinational forces are on
patrol and prepared to defend
commercial and fishing ves-
sels and keep the area safe for
trade and passage.
According to Sanders, the
maritime strategy is at work
each and every day off the
coast of Somalia and coali-
tion naval forces are ready to
respond to any surge in pira-
cy.
Since August 2008, CTF
151 and other cooperating
naval forces have disarmed
and released 343 pirates, 212
others have been turned over
for prosecution, and 11 were
killed.
The presence of Coalition
naval vessels in the region
demonstrates a commitment
to regional security and sta-
bility. CTF 151 continues to
improve its working relation-
ship with all the naval forces
in the region by coordinat-
ing efforts and streamlining
communication to strengthen
counter piracy efforts.


New PQS Available For


LS, MC And RP Ratings


By MCCS(SW/AW)
Melissa Weatherspoon
Center for Service Support Public
Affairs
The Center for Service
Support in Newport, R.I.,
released new personnel quali-
fication standards (PQS) Oct.
1 for logistics specialists (LS),
mass communication special-
ists (MC) and religious program
specialists (RP) ratings.
A PQS is a compilation of the
minimum knowledge and skills
that an individual must dem-
onstrate in order to qualify to
stand watches or perform other
specific routine duties neces-
sary for the safety, security or
proper operation of a ship, air-
craft or support system.
"These new qualifications
standards reflect what is nec-
essary to be successful in the
fleet for the LS, MC and RP
ratings," said Richard Price, the
CSS PQS manager. "As tech-
nology, requirements and rat-
ings change, we will continue
to update PQS to help the 21st-
Century Sailor stay current and
relevant."
The electronic-only ver-


sions of the PQS booklets are
available on Navy Knowledge
Online (NKO) via the Navy
PQS link found on the Quick
Links tab on the left side of
the main NKO page. From the
Navy PQS page, Sailors should
follow the PQS 43200 Series
link on the left side.
The Center for Service
Support (CSS) is comprised
of active-duty, civilian and
contractor personnel, who
direct the training efforts of
13 learning sites around the
Fleet, including the Defense
Information School at Fort
Meade, Md., and the Naval
Technical Training Center in
Meridian, Miss. The CSS team


ensures curriculum is current,
as each team member works
to develop innovative training
methods aimed at preparing
Sailors in the logistics, admin-
istrative and media ratings to
support the Fleet's warfighting
mission.
CSS was established in
Athens, Ga., on Feb. 7, 2003,
and moved to its new facil-
ity at Naval Station Newport's
Fitzgerald Hall, adjacent to
the Surface Warfare Officers
School on July 8, 2009.


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Navy Establishes CSG1


By Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet Public
Affairs
The Navy formally estab-
lished Carrier Strike Group
(CSG) 1 in San Diego Oct. 1,
2009.
The flagship for CSG 1 will
be the USS Carl Vinson (CVN
70), currently homeported in
Newport News, Va. Carrier
Air Wing (CVW) 17, Destroyer
Squadron (DESRON) 1, USS
Bunker Hill (CG 52) and USS
Lake Champlain (CG 57) will
round out the strike group.
Commanded by Rear Adm.
Ted "Twig" Branch, CSG 1 will
be a San Diego-based opera-
tional command and will report
to Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet.
"We are excited by the oppor-
tunity to establish this new
command and bring the power
of the Carl Vinson Carrier
Strike Group online in support
of our nation's defense," said
Branch. "I'm also very happy
to bring this capability, along
with the men and women who


make it possible, to the great
city of San Diego."
Carrier Strike Group l's first
mission is expected to be a tran-
sit around South America in
the spring of 2010 as Vinson
relocates to its new homeport of
San Diego.
In support of the nation's
maritime strategy, CSG-1 will
help promote regional part-
nerships, deter crisis, project
power, promote maritime secu-
rity, and provide humanitar-
ian assistance or disaster relief
within the U.S. Pacific Fleet's
100 million square-mile area of
operations.
The Navy took redelivery of
Vinson July 11, 2009, follow-
ing the successful completion of
the ship's midlife refueling and
complex overhaul (RCOH).
USS Carl Vinson is the third
Nimitz-class aircraft carrier to
complete RCOH at Northrop
Grumman Shipbuilding-
Newport News and is undergo-


ing a four-month post-refueling
shipyard maintenance period
to prepare for its transit to San
Diego.



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20 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009


0Reaching Out


The following are just a sample of volunteer
opportunities available through NS Mayport and
Volunteer Jacksonville. For more information,
call NS Mayport volunteer coordinator CS1 Terry
Jackson at 270-5373 and AC1 Chandra Chaney
at 270-6130 or Dianne Parker at 542-5380 or you
can immediately sign-up online for opportunities
using www.volunteer gatewayjacksonville.org.
Guardian ad Litem
Be the voice for children abused, neglected,
or abandoned. These children have no ability
to participate in decisions affecting their lives.
When children are removed from their homes,
the courts can appoint a special advocate to
make sure that the best interests of the child is
given appropriate consideration. This advocate is
known as a Guardian ad Litem. In the 4th Judicial
Circuit, which includes Clay, Duval and Nassau
Counties, there are more than 2,000 children
who need an advocate to help them navigate
the Dependency system. As we build our vol-
unteer base we are asking members of our com-
munity to consider being a Guardian as Litem.
These guardians do not provide direct care for
the children; the guardians ad litem visit the child
at least once per month, interview family mem-
bers, gather information from medical, mental
health, and education professionals, and attend
court hearings to ensure the best interests of the
children are maintained. The work is compelling.
To become a Guardian ad Litem, candidates need
a compassionate heart, be at least 19 years old,
complete 30 hours of initial training and undergo
a background check. The process begins with a
screening interview so you can learn more about
this opportunity to make a difference in the life
of a child. If this kind of volunteer opportunity
sounds like something you would like to partici-
pate in, please visit the Guardian ad Litem web-
site, www.guardianadlitem.org, or call 904-630-
1200 to schedule a screening interview.
First Coast No More Homeless Pets
First Coast No More Homeless Pets brand
new high capacity Spay /Neuter Clinic opens
this month. The new facility will be able to help
thousands of pets and owners as well as stray and
feral cats -each year, with free or low cost spay/
neuter and low cost vaccinations. We still need
lots of volunteers for the clinic at the new loca-
tion on Norwood Avenue. No medical experience
needed. For more information, email Debbie
Fields at dlfields@bellsouth.net
Mayport Lions Club Volunteers
The Mayport Lions Club is looking for
Volunteers to help with various projects. If
you are interested (military & civilian), please
contact either Bob Krepps, Senior Chief Petty
Officer, USN(Ret) 509-4945 or Chuck Carroll,
Commander, USN(Ret) 463-2884.
Jacksonville International Airport Volunteer
Ambassador Program
We are looking for volunteer to assist travelers
with locating arrival and departure gates, tele-
phones, baggage claim and ticketing areas. The
Ambassadors provide vital customer assistance
and a lot of smiles to ensure a pleasant and mem-
orable experience while traveling through our
airport. Benefits of being in the Ambassador pro-
gram include gratitude of the passengers served
each day, invitations, to volunteer appreciation


By Lt.j.g. Andrew Clayton
RLSO SE
A newly-enacted federal
law has greatly increased the
rights of tenants living in homes
owned by landlords facing fore-
closure. Previously, under most
state laws, such tenants could
be evicted within a matter of
days or weeks once the foreclo-
sure process was completed.
Now, however, the
Protecting Tenants at
Foreclosure Act of 2009,
signed by President Barack
Obama on 20 May 2009,
allows qualifying tenants to
stay in their home for at least
90 days.
There are three primary
requirements for tenants to
qualify for the protections of
the act:
*The tenant must have
signed the lease before the
landlord received a notice
of foreclosure: Landlords
may hide the fact that they
are facing foreclosure. You
can usually check with your
county's land records office
(the exact procedure may vary
by state) to determine if your
landlord is facing foreclosure
before you sign your lease.
Landlords often require ten-
ants to consent to background
checks before agreeing to the
lease; it makes sense for ten-
ants to check up on their land-
lords as well.
*The tenant must be a
"bona fide" tenant: The lease
must be between un-related
parties and the tenant must
pay fair market value for rent.
Children, spouses, and parents
of the landlord are automatical-
ly barred from protection under
this act. Furthermore, tenants
receiving substantially reduced
coo


events, free parking at the airport, meal voucher
for every four-hour period worked, service rec-
ognition and the opportunity to meet people from
all over the world. Contact Yvonne Pooler at
904-741-2006 or email ypooler@jaa.aero.
Jacksonville Zoo
The Jacksonville Zoo is asking for volunteers.
Volunteers are needed to educate varied audi-
ences about the natural world, teach conservation
messages, beautify the grounds, assist guests
in various areas of the park, input data, lend a
hand in animal care areas, answer questions,
drive trains and enhance guests' experiences.
You provide the interest and enthusiasm, and the
zoo will provide the training. Scheduling is flex-
ible. Volunteers receive special discounts, free
admission, newsletters and special programs only
available to employees and volunteers. Take this
opportunity to meet others who share your inter-
ests in the animal kingdom. New Adult Volunteer
Orientations are held at the Pepsico Foundation
Education Campus. All interested personnel
please call 270-5373 for more information.
YMCA of Jacksonville
YMCA of Jacksonville is looking for volun-
teers for their outreach programs geared towards
males. For more information, contact Terra
Herzberger at 265-1820.
Children's Home Society of Florida
Children's Home Society of Florida is get-
ting ready to permanently place seven or eight
children in loving homes within the next couple
weeks. Seeking children's furniture. Contact
Nick Geinosky at 904-493-7738.
Homeless Pet Shelter
Jacksonville Homeless Pet Shelter seeks vol-
unteers. The new Homeless Pet Shelter is seek-
ing help at a Temporary Clinic on surgery days.
Days and hours vary. Contact dlfields@bell-
south.net.
St Augustine Amphitheatre Seeks Volunteers
St. Augustine Amphitheatre seeks volunteers
to be used as ushers, checking tickets, and point-
ing out seats. As a volunteer, you get to see the
entire show. For more information, contact Lisa
Tomkins at 209-3750.
Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring
Big Brothers Big Sisters is providing an
in-school mentoring program at Mayport
Elementary School. Little Brothers and Sisters
are needed just as much as Big Brothers and
Sisters! If you are interested in this opportunity,
please visit our website for more information:
www.usojax.com
Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society Needs You
The Navy Marine Corp Relief Society is in
need of Volunteers to give a couple of hours of
their time each week to help others in need. The
mission of the Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society
is to provide emergency financial help and edu-
cational assistance to members of the Naval
Services active, retired, and family members
- when in need: to assist them achieve financial
self-sufficiency and to find solutions to emergent
requirements. Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society
firmly believes in personal financial responsibil-
ity. By helping the service member and family
through difficult times and by assisting them to
develop their own problem solving capabilities,
they will achieve financial stability, increase self-


rent from a friend, relative, or
other such person are also not
protected. Tenants receiving
government subsidies, such as
Section 8 housing, however,
are exempt from the fair market
value requirement and will usu-
ally qualify for protection.
*The landlord must have
had a "federally related
loan": This will include the
vast majority of normal loans,
but you may not qualify if
your landlord's mortgage was
with an individual person and
not a bank or credit union.
If a tenant qualifies for pro-
tection under this Act, there
are two main provisions
expanding tenants' rights.
*The new owner usually
must abide by the terms of
the existing lease: Unlike
under previous laws, the
lease continues to have legal
effect after the foreclosure
process. Therefore, the new
owner must generally allow
the tenant to remain for at
least the duration of the lease,
the tenant must continue to
pay rent, and the new owner
must maintain the property as
required of the original land-
lord.
The one exception to this rule
is if the new owner, or someone
to whom the new owner sells,
intends to live in the home as a
single family residence. In such
a situation, the original lease
agreement will no longer con-
trol the tenant's rights.
*The tenant cannot be
forced to move out without at
least 90 days notice: This pro-
tection applies even if tenants
are in a month-to-month lease
or the new owner intends to live
in the home as a single family
residence.


The result of these two pro-
tections is that, if the tenant
qualifies for protection under
the act, the tenant may stay in
the home for at least 90 days,
and possibly for the duration of
the lease.
Tenants living in a home
facing foreclosure have
other rights as well. The
Servicemember's Civil Relief
Act requires banks to fol-
low particular procedures
before evicting active duty ser-
vice members. Furthermore,
the Joint Federal Travel
Regulations Manual currently
authorizes a local Household
Goods Move for tenants forced
to move because of a landlord's
foreclosure.
Landlord/Tenant law has
always been complicated, and
new protections created as a
result of the national foreclo-
sure crises have added an addi-
tional layer of difficulty. If you
rent a home that is being fore-
closed on, consult a legal assis-
tance attorney to make sure that
your rights are protected.
Get help from your local
legal assistance office at
Jacksonville, Florida at (904)
542-2565 ext. 3006; Mayport,
Florida at (904) 270-5445 ext.
3017; Kings Bay, Georgia at
(912) 573-3959. This article
is not intended to substitute
for the personal advice of a
licensed attorney.


worth and reduce the need for future financial
assistance. Without their volunteers, the Society
could not meet the needs of so many. If you are
interested in volunteering and would like more
information, contact Bill Kennedy at 270-5418, 9
a.m.-3:30 p.m., Monday-Friday.
St. Johns County Habitat For Humanity
Needs Volunteers!
Habitat for Humanity is in need for volunteers
every Friday and Saturday to help build homes
in St. Augustine. No skill is necessary. Must be
16 or older. They are starting a new home every
month and need help on the construction site.
Please call 826-3252 ext. 2006 to sign up.
Lea's Place
Lea's Place is a volunteer program, on-
call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help the
Department of Children and Families take care
of children who have been removed from abu-
sive or neglectful situations or who have been
abandoned. Volunteers assist Child Protective
Investigators with feeding, bathing and playing
with the children. They may also assist in the
clothes closet, providing the children with clean
clothing. 360-7091.
NS Mayport Retired Activities Office
Naval Station Mayport is currently search-
ing for committed volunteers to serve the local
retiree community in the Retired Activities Office
(RAO) located in the Fleet and Family Support
Center (FFSC). RAO volunteers maintain the
vital link between the retiree, local military com-
munities and other government and non-govern-
ment agencies. Anyone interested should contact
the FFSC for an application or to get more infor-
mation about the duties and responsibilities of
the RAO volunteers. Call the FFSC at (904) 270-
6600 Ext. 110
I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the Homeless
Volunteering at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center for
the Homeless The I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the
Homeless serves more than 1,000 well-balanced,
nutritious and delicious meals per day, every day
of the year. These meals are prepared and served
with the help of more than 100 civic, religious
and business organizations from the Jacksonville


community. Annually, these Volunteer Meal
Groups provide over one hundred thousand dol-
lars in support and more than 13,000 hours of
volunteer time. Serving meals at the Center is a
fun and feel-good way to give back to the com-
munity. For information about volunteering at
the I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the Homeless call
904.394.1356. Also, see www.imshomelesscenter.
org/volunteers.html
Dignity U Wear
Volunteers are needed to help process cloth-
ing in order to fulfill the needs of our clients.
Volunteers are needed Monday thru Friday 8:30
a.m.-4 p.m. and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday. They
also can help raise awareness of our mission,
introducing us and our cause to their friends.
Contact a Michelle Charron at (904) 636-9455 for
information on volunteering.
Children's Home Society
Children's Home Society (CHS) has been pro-
viding services to children and their families
since 1902. Started in Jacksonville, CHS is a
statewide non-profit agency providing services
such as foster care, adoption, child abuse pre-
vention, group shelters, and mentoring. CHS's
MODEL (Mentors Opening Doors Enriching
Lives) Program matches volunteers with chil-
dren ages 4-18 who have a parent incarcerated in
prison. We are seeking volunteers that will com-
mit to a minimum of one hour per week for one
year with a child. Volunteers need to be at least
21 years old and complete an interview and back-
ground screening. We provide training and ongo-
ing support for all volunteers. Volunteers build a
friendship with a child while engaging in commu-
nity activities such as going to the library, beach,
park, or playing sports. For anyone interested in
additional information or becoming a mentor,
please contact Christine Small at 904-493-7747.


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THE Daily Commuter Puzzle by Jacqueline E. Mathews


ACROSS
1 Slangy reply
5 Persistent
pains
10 Mischief-
makers
14 Roof overhang
15 Erected
16 Ashy residue
17 Uzbekistan's
continent
18 Showy flower
19 JFK's mother
20 Make up for
22 Hit movie for
Liza Minnelli
24 Foot digit
25 Fashion
26 Martian, e.g.
29 Existed
30 Remembered
mission
34 Swiss capital
35 Electrical unit
of resistance
36 Author
37 Pasture cry
38 Child embraced
by a new family
40 Lupino
41 Series of eight
43 Hit a tennis ball
44 Bench piece
45 Fraternity letter
46 Cozy room
47 Book spine info
48 One with an
endless term
50 Ocean
51 J. C. Penney
publication
54 Ecstatic
58 "Once a
time..."
59 Of the city
61 Jacob's twin
62 Crooked
63 Approaches
64 Slender
65 Cruising
66 Thick
67 Morays

DOWN
1 Calendar
period
2 Relaxation
3 Eager


4 Encourage
5 Lower in rank
6 Use bad words
7 Strike
8 Votes into
office
9 Go off course
10 Tel Aviv native
11 Boggy area
12 Sit for an artist
13 "Leave as is," in
printing
21 Long, long time
23 Sound loudly
25 Box of
Whitman's
chocolates
26 Monk's
superior
27 British celebrity
Robin _
28 Furious
29 Which person?
31 Leaning
32 Olympian's
hope
33 Preach
35 "_ to Billy Joe"
36 Internet


THIS WEEKS ANSWERS
S13 3 3SN13G V1 S V


I I Is U V N IN



S7 I Nd V IV






1 OOS 1 I n BAVBA
CSd l I S Ho Vl HV BA


(c) 2009 Tribune Media Services, I
All Rights Reserved.

38 To no _;
futilely
39 2000 pounds
42 City in Georgia
44 Type of cat
46 Student's goal
47 Brewed drink
49 Discovered
50 Perceive


10/8/09


51 Castro's land
52 Gorillas
53 Musical sound
54 Forbids
55 of Wight
56 Tack
57 Chews, though
toothless
60 Prohibit


New Law Protects



Tenants of Homes



Facing Foreclosure




THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 8, 2009 21


Money Orders Good 'Gift Certificates' At DeCA


By Rick Brink
DeCA East public affairs officer
As the holiday shopping sea-
son approaches, commissary
shoppers are reminded that
money orders can be used much
like gift certificates.
"This is the time of year
when chaplains, sponsoring


service organizations, relatives
and friends of service members
want to give 'gifts of grocer-
ies,' and money orders work
just fine in lieu of a gift card
program," said Philip
E. Sakowitz Jr., DeCA direc-
tor and CEO.
Commissaries had accept-


ed CertifiChecks gift certifi-
cates for seven years until the
Dayton, Ohio-based company
ceased operations in February
and filed for Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy in April. DeCA is dili-
gently working on a replace-
ment gift certificate program,
and, in the meantime, is encour-


aging people to use money
orders as a means of giving
gifts of groceries, Sakowitz
said.
"Commissaries don't sell
money orders, but they have
always accepted them. By mak-
ing a money order out to the
Defense Commissary Agency


and giving it to an authorized
commissary patron, people
can be assured that their gift is
being redeemed as they intend-
ed," said Lauren Bands, DeCA's
director of accounting.
Money orders can be pur-
chased at a variety of locations
including post offices, credit


unions and exchanges on mili-
tary installations.
More information about
money orders and how to fill
them out for use at commissar-
ies can be found at this link:
http://www.commissaries.
com/money_order.cfm.


Diet, Lifestyle Tips To


Boost Your
By Lt. Col. Sara Burnett
U.S. Air Force Reserve Dietitian
Your brain, like your body, needs nourish-
ment and exercise and we are learning more
about the diet and lifestyle habits we need
to help maintain memory, mental sharpness
and concentration. Here are some suggestions
to help keep your brain healthy now and for
years to come. And, remember, you can find
the food mentioned here in your local commis-
sary at more than 30 percent savings.
Break the fast
Breakfast refuels your brain after a long
period of overnight "fasting." The brain uses
glucose for fuel and eating a breakfast that
contains complex carbohydrates will help your
brain function better.
Eat more fruits and vegetables
Fruits and vegetables contain nutrients and
antioxidants that stave off brain cell damage.
Vegetables seem to have the edge for mental
benefits, especially green leafy types. Include
at least five to nine fruits and vegetables every
day.
Limit bad fats
Avoid saturated and trans fats since they
are linked to a greater risk of developing
Alzheimer's disease. Replace high-fat meat
and dairy products with lower-fat versions
and avoid processed and junk foods since
they often contain trans fats. Healthy omega-
3 fats may lower the risk of memory loss and
dementia so eat more fish and include in your
diet omega-3-rich plant foods such as walnuts,
flaxseed, soybeans and canola oil.
Lose excess weight
Maintaining a healthy weight as you age
also appears to be protective. Studies indicate
obesity is linked with a greater risk of devel-
oping dementia later in life. This risk is also
greater if you have high blood pressure, high


Brain
cholesterol or diabetes.
Move it, don't lose it
Exercise helps relieve stress, improves
mood, provides cardiovascular benefits and
helps control weight. Research shows it can
improve thinking skills and may help delay the
onset of dementia.
Use your head
Keep your mind exercised by doing activi-
ties or playing games that stimulate and chal-
lenge your brain. People who are more mental-
ly active throughout their lives tend to escape
or have a later onset of cognitive disease.
Stay engaged
Older adults with a network of friends and
who participate in social activities tend to
preserve brain function better than those who
don't socialize. Reach out and connect with
your community.
Alcohol and caffeine
A number of studies show that moderate
caffeine and alcohol intake may play a role
in reducing the risk for cognitive decline but
because they can also have negative effects
on health, it's best to talk with your health
care provider about whether it's appropriate to
include these in your diet.
For more information about making healthy
choices, visit Ask the Dietitian on http://
www.commissaries.com and post your ques-
tions on the DeCA Dietitian Forum. Be sure
to look for other useful information in the
Dietitian's Voice archive. Sign up with the
DeCA Dietitian on www.twitter.com and get
messages sent to your cell phone today. For
delicious recipes, check out Kay's Kitchen.
And to enjoy all your commissary has to offer,
sign up for the Commissary Connection.


By Chris Halagarda
U.S. Navy fitness and performance
enhancement dietitian
Having counseled and
trained many athletes, health
enthusiasts and aspiring health
enthusiasts over the years, I've
noticed that there are many
reoccurring misconceptions
about nutrition. Here are just a
few of the more common ones:
A supplement must be safe
if it's all natural
Many supplement compa-
nies try to prey on the public's
naivety by claiming that their
product is natural, therefore, it
must be safe and effective. This
message assumes that there
is nothing harmful in nature,
right? Not true! Marijuana,
cocaine, penicillin, ephedrine,
tobacco and many other pow-
erful supplements, drugs, and
medications are "all natural" yet
we know how powerful they
are.
Don't be confused by the
good advice to eat foods in their
most "natural" state. Continue
to eat natural foods such as fruit
over processed fruit roll-ups.
Just don't be fooled into think-
ing that consuming "natural"
supplements is risk-free. Better
yet, instead of spending your
hard-earned money on unprov-
en and potentially dangerous
supplements, go to the commis-
sary regularly to stock up on a
variety of fruit and vegetables.
They are the most natural and
powerful foods on earth. It's a
great month to stock up, too.
September is a good harvest-
ing month for farmers and it's
National Fruit and Vegetable
Month.
Nuts are fattening
This statement is nuts! The
truth is nuts are some of the
healthiest foods in the world.
You can buy nuts with all the
nutrients that have been shown
to improve our health at your
commissary while saving
money at the same time. The
"grocery list" of nutrients in
nuts includes amino acids (the
building blocks of protein),
complex carbohydrates, fiber,
dozens of vitamins and minerals
and fats, but the healthy kind of
fats. Nuts have mono- and poly-
unsaturated fats instead of satu-
rated fats or trans fats. Saturated
cooo


fat and trans fat promote clog-
ging of the arteries and are a
main reason why heart disease
is the No. 1 killer in the United
States. Substituting saturated fat
with a healthy alternative such
as mono- and poly-unsaturated
fats can help lower your risk of
developing heart disease.
The only warning with regard
to nuts is that more is not bet-
ter. Nuts are calorically dense,
just like butter and oil. So an
ounce or two of nuts a day is all
that you need. Sprinkle some
almonds or sunflower seeds on
a salad, add sliced walnuts to
vegetables, spread a tablespoon
of peanut butter on an apple or
pear, blend some peanut butter
or whole peanuts into a shake,
or add a scoop of peanut butter
or whole nuts into your morn-
ing oatmeal. Don't limit your-
self to peanut butter either. Try
different types of nut butters
such as almond, macadamia,
pecan, pistachio and sunflower,
or try making your own mixed
nut butter by mixing nuts and
oil in a blender.
Drinking water promotes
weight loss
Unfortunately, water does not
accelerate weight loss. There
may be a small amount of cal-
ories burned when extreme-
ly cold water is consumed,
because the body will burn a
small amount of calories to
warm it to body temperature,
but not a significant amount.
Most of us also know that it is
important to stay well hydrated
because when we are dehydrat-
ed we are weaker and slower
and less efficient at breath-
ing. So, if we are dehydrated
while exercising we will exer-
cise more slowly and will bum
fewer calories during a work-


www. dreamscometrue.org
CFC # 65453


out. Water may also provide
a feeling of satiety or fullness
when we eat a small meal. This
could add up to weight loss
over time. There is also some
thought that when we lose fat
successfully, our adipose tissue
(fat cells) shrinks and releas-
es toxins. Being adequately
hydrated is important for flush-
ing these toxins out of the body
through the kidneys. So be sure
to drink regularly for many dif-
ferent reasons, but don't expect
drinking water to lead to a
shrinking waist.
To ensure you're adequately
hydrated, monitor your urine
color. This is a method used by
firefighters after returning from
a fire and many active-duty
personnel during military exer-
cises. It's also a good habit to
weigh yourself before and after
a workout. Drink about 16-24
ounces of fluid for every pound
lost during your workout. The
weight lost during a workout is
water in sweat, not fat.
For more information about
making healthy choices, visit
Ask the Dietitian on http://
www.commissaries.com and
post your questions on the
DeCA Dietitian Forum. Be
sure to look for other useful
information in the Dietitian's
Voice archive. Sign up with
the DeCA Dietitian on www.
twitter.com and get messages
sent to your cell phone today.
For delicious recipes, check out
Kay's Kitchen. And to enjoy all
your commissary has to offer,
sign up for the Commissary
Connection.
Chris Halagarda is the
Navy Fitness, Performance
Enhancement Dietitian. Contact
him at (202) 433-3472 or Chris.
Halagarda@Navy.Mil.


Dreams Come True is the only locally based
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Keep Leftover Meals Safe


By Kevin L. Robinson
DeCA public affairs specialist
Commissary customers are
saving more money by cooking
their own meals at home and
munching on the leftovers for
days after that initial meal. But
there are limits to a good thing.
The Defense Commissary
Agency is advising customers
to monitor how long they keep
food in their refrigerators to
ensure the items are safe to eat.
"Food Safety at home
revolves around keeping stor-
age areas such as the refrigera-
tor clean and using, freezing or
disposing of leftover foods that
have been held chilled for two
to three days," said Col. David
R. Schuckenbrock, DeCA's
director of health and safety.
"Most items don't hold up well
and begin to spoil if held longer
chilled. Without good rotation
practices, finding a snack in the
refrigerator becomes an adven-
ture with unintended health
risks."
Checking those leftovers
is part of the "Be Food Safe"
campaign developed by the


Partnership for Food Safety
Education to promote proper
food handling techniques at
home clean cooking areas,
separate foods that may cross
contaminate, cook food thor-
oughly and chill leftover food
at the right temperature.
With more food being tucked
into refrigerators after meals,
DeCA's food safety officials
want commissary customers to
remember the following tips on
storing and heating leftovers:
Wash hands with warm water
and soap for 20 seconds before
and after handling food.
Refrigerate cooked leftovers
promptly within two hours.
Use an appliance thermometer
to ensure your refrigerator is at
40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
Divide leftovers into smaller
portions and store in shallow
containers in the refrigerator.
Reheat cooked leftovers to
165 F as measured with a food
thermometer.
When microwaving leftovers,
make sure there are no cold
spots in the food (where bac-
teria can survive). Cover food,


stir and rotate for even cooking.
If the microwave has no turn-
table, rotate the dish by hand
once or twice during cooking.
"Our customers can count
on the commissary to be a
safe food source, but we can-
not safeguard their food once
it leaves the store," said DeCA
Director and CEO Philip E.
Sakowitz Jr. "By following
these guidelines for handling
refrigerated leftover food, our
customers can protect them-
selves from the bacteria that can
make them sick."
For more information on food
safety, go to the DeCA Web
site at http://www.commissar-
ies.com and click on the Food
Safety section to access links to
various consumer safety sites.
The DeCA Web site is also a
good source to find out about
any recalls affecting products
sold in commissaries.


Common Misconceptions


About Nutrition Addressed


"WE BRING THE MILITARY


MARKET To You"
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$450 2/1 $625. 904-745-0450
1110 Caliente Dr.

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Call Monique 904-249-1833
$149.00 pays move in fees.
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walk to A rated schls,
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park membership inci'd.
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3/2 in Wolf Creek immed.
avail. $1075mo. 249-3077
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end unit w/ gar, new
2br/2.5ba w/ bonus rm,
1200sf $925m 904-465-7970
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sec, $995mo. 904-251-4778
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pool, gated,newly painted
$795 mo+dep. 708-6965



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bed, 2 bath, garage.
$995. 904-403-3572
ATLANTIC BEACH, 3
bed, 2 bath, garage.
$995. 904-403-3572
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4 ARGYLE Nice 3/2
home. Very nice &
clean inside. $900m.
Military 1/2 off 1st
month. Call 904-282-0502
Arlington/ Ft. Caroline
4br/2ba, near amenities
$1150mo+dp 904-657-6186
ARLINGTON-walking
dist. to JU, 1800sf, 4/2,
new tile/cpt, detach, gar,
$975m+dp. 904-504-0103
ARLINGTON/Ft. Caroline
2/1, wooded priv. lot-fncd
3880 Townsend Blvd.
$700m+dp. 904-318-2938
41 BEAUTIFUL
HOME for rent
near Oakleaf in
Orange Park, avail.
now. Call 887-2055 for
more info. PCS.
4 FOR RENT 4/2,
2040sf home,
cul-de-sac, fenced
rear, sun room, 2
car garage, $1400m. For
details call 515-867-7799
to view call 904-908-6024
KERNAN- Gated comm
2/1.5 TH, 2-story, 1100sf,
w/d, water & cable incid
$950m Oct. Free 813-4730


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& transp. avail. 343-1324


. fi I I


4 MIDDLEBURG 4/3,
over 1 acres, 2400sf,
short commute
$1000lmo+sec. PCS
291-2534
Neptune Beach- 2/1.5
extra clean, fenced
yard, pets ok, $975/mo.
+1st+Iast+dep 246-9001
NORTHSIDE- 4/2 in
Eagle's Hammock, 3yrs
new. 2,000sf, comm. pool
$1250mo. Call 994-5225
Northside 2 & 4BR
units available starting
as low as $395mo. low
dep, HUD ok 904-813-5501
Orange Park 2/1.5 Duplex
fenced yard, $675mo.
4/2, 2 car gar, $1200mo.
Maxxum Realty 505-6203
4 PCS home for rent.
Kingsland 105
Summerfield Drive.
Call Linda for more
info 912-729-6446
E PENSACOLA, FL
East Hill 3br/2ba,
remodeled, reno-
vated 2200sq. ft.
$1150m. 850-471-2273
SOUTHSIDE 3/2 731 Grove
Park Blvd. 1800sf, 2c gar.
$1155ren $1155 dep. 636-0269
RECESSION
SPECIAL!
Beautiful 3br/1ba
Pool Home in
Arlington Hills. $650m.
New paint, hardwood
firs. Military welcome
904-745-1294
A MANDARIN
3/2+Loft for sale or
rent. Completely
t remodeled inside.
Great yard, neighbors
and schools. $219,900 or
$1400m. 904-287-6486
Westside 3/2 House with
appliances, Ig master,
pool/playground access
& a great view, lake
front $1200 plus deposit
Call Jill (904)226-3575




3/2 Doublewide mobile
home only $650.00 a
month call now and you
will pay only $31.00 for
your 1st months rent
call 904-695-2255.

Beautiful 3/2 mobile
home for rent only
$650.00 call now about
our Oct move-in special
904-781-0441
NORTHSIDE
0 DEPOSIT FROM $395
1 & 2 BR weekly/monthly
904-766-6986
WESTSIDE
2/2 $600mo & 3/2 $625mo
904-655-0457

Westside- 2 months Free
Lot Rent. Only 2 homes
left in a beautiful
gated comm. 783-2460




WESTSIDE- Lrg priv lot
w/ trees, move-on ready
$270mo. Also, another
lot for sale. 904-771-0620



W ORANGE PARK
Furn'd room for
rent. No lease incl's
utilities. $480m.
904-375-1814 for appt
1 ROOMMATE
WANTED
$450+elect. Only
4mi's from NAS
Jax. Call Manuel
904-864-1648
4,Very nice home nr
NAS Base. Room
for rent, furn'd
$400m. 779-4660
WESTSIDE Share
nice 4/2 unfurn'd
room, female over
age 25. $300mo+
until. Donna 904-728-4443


AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade


Curio Cabinet- Thomasville
2pc, Queen Ann table &
chairs, southern pine
antique desk &
bookcase, modern day
10pc living room set &
much more. 399-8899









I


GUITAR- Autographed
Paul McCartney
appraised at $3,150 ask-
ing $400. Also signed
Eagles Guitar appraised
at $2,700 asking $400,
comes w/ COA and
appraisal. Others avail
Call 904-346-3052



4 New Canon MP510
Photo, AII-In-One.
lScan, Print, Copy.
Extra ink car-
tridges. Give-Away for
$50. 904-247-9532 after 1p
, SCHWINN model
103 Exercise Bike.
Computer con-
trolled 12 programs.
Like new condition $100.
Kirk 904-215-5337



Northside
Estate and Yard Sale
8808 Norfolk Blvd.
32208
Wed., Thur., Fri., Sat.
& Sun. 12N 6pm
Plants, shoes,
clothing, furniture,
handbags, and lots







I Pillowtop
I Mattress |
Brand New Factory I
Sealed in Plastic
$110
S9044644-0498

ANTIQUE white
solid wood headbrd,
footbrd, rails, Sealy
posture peadic mat-
tress, boxspring, six
drawer dresser $250obo.
904-491-7996
Bed A Banner Bargain
KING SIZE PT SET $160
904-644-0498




Ai


SOFA SLEEPER I
BEAUTIFUL w ble/ooeat, end
FAIRFIELD table & corner table
LOVE SEAT w/stereo, in excellent earl
condition. Coffee table King
Needlepoint w/storage inside of it &
pattern, excellent the top can be reversed .
from the cushion to a
cond., sold for table top. Love seat has
$1500, asking a recliner. $300obo.
$80. 904-762-5998 904-838-4764 or 573-9872 Movi


BED A BARGAIN
QUEEN SETS $105 MOVIE NG SALE Thi
UKINGS $155 365-0957 eFurniture lawn
dryer, misc. 408 Stand-
DINING ROOM SET- ing Oak Court, Juling- Aih
Contemporary, oak, 6 ton Creek Plantation _
Cabinet $395 nego. Call ARLNGTON(North) ___
Thurs, Fri, Sat. 641-9471 The Cove at Rive
. ..----- St Johns Community
4, HEAVY DUTY Garage Sale Sat Oct 10th
Washer/Dryer from 8am ? University Blvd
S setars.$300obo. N @ Royal Port Dr. ter
Bdrm set-full size. $35. I
Call 882-3026 Baymeadows- Huge Sale:
Antqs, quality furn at o
bLA-Z-BOY Microfi- garage sale prices. All T
ber cream colored must go! Sat. & Sun |
Love Seat/Ottoman. 8a-4p 9077 Cotswold Way
Exc. cond $399o0b0.
Orange Pk 904-891-8460 3. COMMUNITY queC
-----------------. YARD SALE 10/17, Call
, Medium oak end 8-2, Mary, Queen of
tables, glass M.heaven 9401 Staples I
inserts, contempo- Mill Dr. (off Argyle
rary style, rounded Forest Blvd.)
ends, excellent condi-
tion $250. (3 pcs) Intracoastal West rug
H:904-491-7996/C:206-2526 Kensington Community spa $
Yard Sales Sat. Oct 10th
U PIANO Upright at 8am-? On Atlantic
antique solid wood Blvd East of Kernan
walnut, needs tun- www.KensingtonAssocia-
ing, asking $325obo. tion.com and click on
912-729- 232/912-673-6376 Garage Sales for a list of v/pad
ask for Fili z featured addresses. w/pad
Queen EuroTop Ke r n a n/McCormickC k
PILLOWTOPSET $140 Mt. Pleasant Creek
(904) 644-0498 Comm. sale Sat. 10/10, 8a-2
SAMS N G 5 MANDARIN $45.
SATTV 54" Jul/ington Forest tage
Projection TV I12822 Ridgemore
HDTV ready. Exc. Ln. 32258 Oct. 10th
cond. 2002 Model, Sat. 8a 2p. Kitchen _1 r
outstanding Oicture items, clothes, 2 desks,
269-2258 $500 obo. BR set, misc, lots more. L

6 SECTIONAL SOFA, &MULIT-FAMILY $800.
tan leather-6pc., YARD SALE-Furn,
burgundy cloth washer, dryer,
sofa, loveseat, nick-nacks, appis,
lounger, ottoman. Good clothes, exer. naach.,
cond. Moving $550obo. refrig, bdrm. 101 St.
904-491-7996 Johns Place, Mill-Creek cond


mG.


YARD SAL
Bristol Har
across fron
Sch oo 1. 8a
I y birds p
island.
YULEE GA
SALE-Oct. 3r
Heron Isles
Ye llowtai
ing in sale!
ter Rd. Call
GAIN HUNI
GALORE
s Sat & Sun r
jur Garage Sa
e Market Pic
Ramona, 786-



4 Sale, kid
table $30, I
Price digit
era $25, coh
w/case and
Nikki 912-882-
Birdseye I
chest very oI
Vintage curi
net round gi
en Anne leg
269-5883
Disney Prl
Bike $40;
carrier/stl
combo $100
$30; Conca
$10; call 269-4
DRUMS E
$140, retot
trol Firebir
plane $50, gl
e $150, new cc
15x12 $140. 2
Glass smokE
pered differ
sizes $35ea. "
Cotton" Fo0
Seven foot S(
$275. 269-5882
Hot Springs I
new pu m r
selector val\
top good coi
904-825-0045/h
HUFFY Bas
Goal, base
pole, roll v
very g
-moving 904-,


Ba-h


CLASSIFIED INDEX

I r i

Auctions Employment



Real Estate for Rent Merchandise



Financial Transportation



W904-366-6300


ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com

FREE online advertising!

Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online at

no additional charge.


A





MADISON
APARTMENT GROUP










Madison @ Bay Pointe
4500 Bavmeadows Rd.
Jacksonille, FL 32217

866-721-8505
L nocated in Barrineadow Area Off 295


I ) l1S.1- 58 l,.I I '1 *




Barbers &

Cosmetologist

Needed ASAP!

904 -al2-3Ke-%

904-302-1333 N


Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent

I I




Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold




EARN EXECUTIVE
INCOME FROM HOME
Free training and

















Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping

Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design

Avianotion
tCivil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted




t Share my home
62+ drive, house-
keeping companion,
non-smoker room, sal-
ary. 904-388-9001 Lv msg.



CARPENTRY &
free estimate, 15 yrs exp.
904-403-3572



J ATTENTION
WEEKEND
L ) CHILDCARE


I


II




tor rrarng, nas DaT-
41ltery+charger $40,
like new cleats S2,
school uniforms boys
shirts-pants-shorts
$1.50-$2.00-$3.00, sizes
5-6-7, girls pants size 16
new $5.00. Call 282-1057
LEER TRUCK CAP
3yrs old. Like new.
$750. Fits 8' bed.
D Dodge Ram.a
912-843-8281
S PICKET FENCE 6
sections 36x92 $22.00
each. 9 poles 3.5"x5'
$12.00 each. 1 gate
3'x3.5' $6.00. Call
716-4180
& RARE OFFER: Old
Military patches,
hats, plaques,
T-shirts. By appt.
Em: globalmil@aol.com
Global Military Sales
904-731-8728
A STEP LADDER 10'
aluminum. Heavy
duty. Exc. cond. $75
I 268-2482
4 ELECTRIC DRILL
Craftsman 3/8 var
able speed. Exc.
cond. $10. 268-2482



Si Stamp Collections,
cover & old Post-
C cards wanted by
collector 716- 5255




Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted



BOXER PUPPIES AKC
flashy fawns, bry drk
brindles, Irg vet chkd,
h/c, fin. poss. reref. req'd.
$600-$800 904-321-7728/ 7729
CHIHUAHUA Pups (3)
Reduced for quick sale,
no dealers please. Medi-
cal papers. $75 ea.
904-728-8483
CORGI PUPS- Pembroke,
AKC, $500-$600
www.mccartyscorgis.com
English Bulldog Pups AKC
Champion. lines, all colors
avi now. $1300 904-607-4488
French Bulldog, Shiba Inu,
Chihuahua, Puggle, etc.
Starting @ $299. 997-9909
www.pamperedpawsonline.com
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPPIES S-W-HC
$200. 904-507-1119
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS,
AKC, 3 males, 1 female,
7 weeks old, $400.
904-655-2307
LABRADOODLES 9 wk,
blk fluffy, health cert.
$450 386-793-6945
Maltese Tiny M Purebred
904-964-8798/ 364-3958
Miniature SCHNAUZER
Pup Male, CKC, white,
8 weeks old, limited reg-
istration, $750.
904-704-2270
MINI DACHSHUND PUPS
Tan, 1st shots, hlth card,
$200 each. 387-1870
PIT BULLS- Blue nose,
razors edge bloodline,
S&W, papers, regist.
904-864-7784/ 407-953-5033
PIT PUPPIES, (6) 10
weeks, $200 ea. Call
318-9885 or 642-7620
POM PUP CKC 8 wks
s/w, HC, Blue Merle M
Call 246-4241 894-5551
Rat Terrier Pups UKCI,
many colors $250-$450.
www.mccartysratterriers.com
SIAMESE KITTENS-
CFA, Lilac and blue
point. $495. 850-769-7156
or 850-832-7156
YORKIE PUPS CKC
$250 904-612-0556/ 412-4457
Yorkshire Terrier Pups
AKC 3 M & 1 F
$500 obo. Call 314-2579


rVIdLIUII
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease


4 1996 KEY LARGO
Center Console,
50hp Mercury,
trailer, live well
90LB thust trolling
motor, seat, cooler,
great condition $3700.
619-2417
k 2006, G3 LX22FC
Pontoon Boat. 90hp
Yamaha, tandem
trailer, tanning
deck, Garmin Fish
Finder, AM/FM CD,
$22K plus extras.
904-210-6769




A TRAVEL TRAILER
26'Fleetwood 2000.
$5,495-Premium
cond. Last 4yrs
uncover 912-882-6014




t H- D ROADKING
28k mi's, lots of
e extras $12Kobo.
Rich 904-548-1161
SH.D. V-ROD '03
100th Anniv. Edt.
3300mi's, garaged,
extras, like new
$10K. 904-264-1001/349-5573
, HONDA VTX13800
Spec 2 2006-3300mi's
runs and rides, like
new $1 2,000obo.
ARE Good trade car.
904-710-8171
KAWASAKI NINJA
'94-250 CC, black,
15k mi's, $1400obo.
Dennis 904-333-1843
or 904-221-1254
4 CHEVY 1500 Long
Bed, 6cyl., auto-
matic, AC, well
maintained.
$24950b0o. Steve 334-2838
HONDA SHADOW
A.C.E. '03-VT750
Corban seat, wind-
shield bags, blk &
silver, 5000mi's, $2650.
912-496-3246
,t SUZUKI GSX-R600
'06- blk, 7300mi's,
under warr.,
garaged, exc. cond.
will provide 2 helmets &
jacket $5100. 904-505-7078
SUZUKI GSX-R 1000' 07
Great cond, 1,500mi, many
upgrades incI exhaust &
alarm. Asking $8,000
obo. James 904-471-8748
VICTORY VEGAS
2004 7500mi's,
chrome mags, ness
bars, mirrors, per-
formance pipes.
$7000obo. 904-742-4647



S1 8" Slug Black
Chrome Kummo
|wheels and tires
225/40RIB if inter-
ested. Call 262-0973. $750.


1955 REPEAT 1955
OLDS 88 Holiday
Sedan. Power win-
dows. AC. Nearly
restored $3000obo Dennis
904-333- 1843/904-221 -1254

1977
MERCEDES
BENZ 450SEL
FOUR DOOR
SUNROOF
CD PLAYER
over 100K miles
runs good, needs
minor work.
$4000.
or best offer!
Call 904-315-9705



-7 1 AUDI A4 '07
Brand New
Condition $21,980
904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CADILLAC DTS '05
1- Owner Like New
$13,980 904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CHEVY CAMARO
SS '10 400MI Canary
Yellow, Black Stripe
Navi $45,990 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
& CHEVY IMPALA
LS '04 Sport pkg,
sunroof, 3M tint,
n e w ti r e s,
56,245mi's, Ithr, elect,
spooler, private, exc
cond 904-491-7996
y CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER '06 LTD
Only 30,000 Miles
$12,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
t FORD 500 SEL '05
40kmi's, exc cond,
$11k obo. Rich
S904-548-1161
( HONDA CIVIC '08
COUPE Like New
$13,980 904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE


E


1 30m m0pg, $11,800.
Rich 912-843-8281
j LINCOLN TOWN
(yCAR '04 One Owner
Like New $12,980
904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
y MAZDA MIATA '02
SGrand Touring
$15,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
IN NISSAN 350Z '04
Touring Edition
45K Miles $18,980
904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
( ) PONTIAC G5 '08
COUPE $12,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
SATURN ION '07
Low Miles $10,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE

To advertise
in the military
publications dis-
tributed at the
local bases in the
area,
Please call
904-359-4336,
Fax 366 6230

BUICK LESABRE
101- 120kmi's, well
maintained, all
power. $4000.
904-655-0486

y TOYOTA AVALON
LTD '05 Lthr, Sun-
roof, CD, Like New
$19,490 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
I| TOYOTA CAMRY
'08 LIKE NEW!
$17,490 904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE


New Only 25,000 Mi
$20,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
I TOYOTA PRIUS
LTD '09 Nay, Fully
Equpt, 3K Miles
$24,980 904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
7 TOYOTA PRIUS
'08 Navigation
Fully Equip, 24K
mi $21,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
TOYOTA SOLARA
SLE '06 Lthr, CD,
Fully Eqpt, $17,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE




C ACURA MDX '08
Tech Package
Fully Equip $38,990
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
SCADILLAC SRX '05
White/Tan $19,490
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
( FORD F150'07
Only 20,000 Miles
$20,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
FORD RANGER XL '07
FSBO- 4cyl, auto trans,
a/c, all service records,
new tires, 37k mi, exc
cond, $7,995. 282-8094
\ JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE '05
LAREDO, Leather
Sunroof, CD, Fully Eqpt
$14,980 904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
S JEEP
WRANGLER
Sahara '03 Mint
Condition $14,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE


JEEP WRAN-
GLER RUBICON
'08 Only 800 miles
Hard Top, Only 15k mi
Navi, $27,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
( I TOYOTA
4RUNNER'06
Sport White/Tan
Fully Equpt $25,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
TOYOTA SEQUOIA
'08 Limited, Only
15K Miles, $43,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
T TOYOTA TUNDRA
'08 SR5 TRD, 4X4
$25,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE



FORD MUSTANG LX
'89 Hatchback, white,
Carburetor conver-
sion, World Class T-5,
aluminum drive shaft,
373's, head work,
CAM, full fuel system
+ more. Needs some
TLC. Runs great! NO
SMOKE. $2000. CASH.
Private owner, call
Gary 904-334-9401
Middleburg.


ISUZU RODEO '96
Great work vehicle!
Blue, V6, 5spd, COLD
A/C, good on gas
$2000. CASH. Private
owner, callGary
334-9401 Middleburg




CASH FOR JUNK CARS
Alive or Dead 237-1657


650,620



Hours



Besides protecting our country, military

personnel stationed in our communities

donated 650,620 hours of volunteer

service in Northeast Florida and

Southeast Georgia last year. Their time

was given to community organizations,

church groups, youth activities, scouting

and more.



Thank you!



-jax-urNews Mirror Periscope


Eu


Navy

Classified

Ads


THE FLEET

MARKET

ADVERTISING
RULES

Please fill out
this form in
black or blue ink.


DEADLINES


THE

MIRROR


Noon

Friday


Rank/Grade:
Name (please print):


Work Phone #


1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Mayport Naval
Station.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help
qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such
as sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found items, and
garage sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED. ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS
ARE OFFERED FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL
ESTATE ADS WILL BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR
RENT BY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION
(PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST
CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD OTHERWISE
THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be writ-
ten independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, Building 1.
Box 280032, Mayport Naval Station, Mayport, FL 32228-0032,or to The Mirror,
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202


Organization
Signature:


Date Submitted:


6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the
above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or
all ads.
7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
calling 366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed
on an original form.
Select the number of weeks ad is to run: 1 wk J 2 wks J 3 wks J 4 wks
To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to Jax Air News.
NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more
than one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per fam-
ily, per week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.


THE---- IS MAYPO RT. FLORA
-Mirrorn0


One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


U.


w


A i I i I i II III


To list your dealershi

please call


904-359-4321


Before you buy, shop these local dealerships first!


TOM BUSH BMW
JACKSONVILLE
9850 Atlantic Bd.
725-0911

TOM BUSH BMW
ORANGE PARK
6914 Blanding Blvd
777-2500




GARBER BUICK
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

KEY BUICK
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060


JACK WILSON BUICK
2250 US1 South
797-4577



CADILLAC-SAAB OF
ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700
www.cadillacoforangepark.com

CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com




NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com

GARBER CHEVY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


GORDON CHEVY
1166 Blanding Blvd. 272-2200
JACK WILSON CHEVROLET
2255 US1 South 797-4567


JERRY HAMM CHEVY
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036






ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
2330 US1 South 3544421


GARBER CHRYSLER
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com



JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000



RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com






ATLANTIC DODGE
2330 US1 South 3544421


JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000


GARBER DODGE TRUCK
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com


ORANGE PARK DODGE

7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


WESTSIDE DODGE
1672 Cassat Ave. 384-6561




PAl. CLARK FORDMERCURY
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673

GARER FORD-MERCURY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325


MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060


MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673





NIMNICHT PONTIAC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 854-4826

.GARBER GMC TRUCKS
Green Cove Springs
2644.gabeautoma5l.com2
www.garberautomall.com


JACK WLSON PON1AC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577




DUVAL HONDA
1325CassatAve. 899-1900


LOU SOBHN HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300






KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060






ATLANTIC INFNITI
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200






ATLANTIC JEEP
2330 US 1 South 354-4421


GARBER JEEP
Green Cove Springs
264-2416
www.garberautomall.com


JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078



LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantic Blvd. 721-5000


LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 777-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.com




NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN MERCURY
4620 Southside Blvd. 642-4100


MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673




TOM BUSH MAZDA
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911


MAZDA CITY
6916 Blanding Blvd. 779-0600




BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080


MERCEDES BENZ
of ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd. 777-5900



TOM BUSH MINI
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911


MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810 Cassat Ave.
389-3621

MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP
7447 Blanding Blvd. 269-9400


NISSAN OF ST. AUGUSTINE
755 US 1 South 1-866-New-Nissan
www.nissanofstaugustine.com


GOLDEN ISLES NISSAN
912-264-3825
www.goldenislesnissan.com
1-mi. east of 1-95 exit 38
Brunswick, GA




GARBER PONTIAC
Green Cove Spings
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577


NIMNICHT PONTIAC GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy
854-4826




BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10100 Atlantic Blvd. 725-9155




KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circle.
771-9100


ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 Cassat Ave. 389-4561



TOM BUSH VW
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911
OSTEEN VOLKSWAGEN
11401 Philips Hwy. 322-5100



O'STEEN VOLVO
2525 Philips Hwy. 396-5486



GT LEASING
Commenial Leasing Shmce 1
2810 St. Augustine Rd.
398-5000
www.gteasing.com

PROFESSIONAL
AUTO LEASING
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 722-1694







AUTO LINE
A Family owned Business
autolinepreowned.com
2126 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach
904-242-8000

BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
ww.beachblvdautomotive.com
6833 Beach Blvd. 724-3511


BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
10211 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080


LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
PRE-OWNED CENTER
10384 Atlantic Blvd. 998-0012


TOM BUSH BMW
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
9910 Atlantic Blvd. 3714381

TOM BUSH MINI USED CAR
SUPER CENTER
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4877
WORLD IMPORTS CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
www.wordimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992


O'STEEN VW CERII
PRE-OWNED CENT
11401 Philips Hwy.
322-5100


GOLDEN ISLES NISI
912-264-3825
www.goldenislesnissan
1-mi. east of 1-95 exit
Brunswick, GA


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$


The economic impact of the
military in Northeast Florida
and Southeast Georgia is
*7.8 billion.


Local businesses benefit from the military and civilian personnel who
buy and rent homes and who purchase goods and services. Let them
know what your business has to offer by advertising in one or all of
the military publications distributed at the local bases in the area.


For advertising
information,
please call
904-3594336,
Fax 904-366-6230.


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THE M MAYPORT. FLORIDA
Mirror


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