Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098614/00129
 Material Information
Title: Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Publication Date: August 13, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098614
Volume ID: VID00129
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00008-13-2009 ( PDF )


Full Text





Mayport Gets Ready For Back To School, Page 4


NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA


THE jg







_-- "008 _
T- UE





2008


i
...=- Awar Winn

=--[I; "-- "-


__---



CHINFO Award Winner


S SS aaSS S *A A ge


Get


Your Grub


On


17





Speicher

Memorial

Detailed
The city of Jacksonville
Military Affairs, Veterans
and Disabled Services
Division (MAVDSD) will
host a memorial ceremony
for Capt. Michael "Scott"
Speicher at the Veteran's
Memorial Wall, 1145 E.
Adams St., to honor the
life and sacrifice of Captain
Speicher. Friday, Aug. 14 at
9:45 a.m.
A memorial procession
for Captain Scott Speicher
will leave Naval Air Station
Jacksonville at 9 a.m. on
Friday, Aug. 14. It will pro-
ceed to the Jacksonville
Veterans Memorial Wall
before continuing to a num-
ber of other locations signifi-
cant to Captain Speicher.
The remains of Capt.
Scott Speicher will arrive at
NAS Jacksonville Aug. 13,
2009, at 3 p.m. This arrival
is not open to the public.
Capt. Speicher's casket
will proceed from the Air
Terminal to All Saints Chapel
aboard NAS Jacksonvile. All
Saints Chapel will be open
to all personnel with base
access who wish to pay their
last respects until Aug. 14,
at 7 a.m.
A musical prelude at the
Veterans Memorial Wall
will begin at 9 a.m. with
a posting of the colors by
the Jacksonville Fire and
Rescue Department at 9:15
a.m. It is anticipated that
the procession will pass
the location at between
9:15 and 9:45 a.m. The
Jacksonville Sheriff's Office
will conduct a 21-gun salute
and play taps to conclude
the ceremony. The public is
invited to attend. Free park-
ing available.
Other locations planned
by the family along the
route include Forrest High
School, Lake Shore United
Methodist Church and Cecil
Field. The procession will
be recognized by groups at
these locations respectively.
In addition, at the request of
the family, MAVDSD is col-
lecting the bracelets worn
by those who supported
the Speicher family over
the years as they hoped
for Captain Speicher's safe
return.
For additional informa-
tion, contact Bob Buehn
or Harrison Conyers in the
Military Affairs, Veterans and
Disabled Services Division
at 904-630-3680.


Meeting With

Health Promo
The Naval Station
Mayport "Health Promotion
Representative" meet-
ing will be held on Aug. 19
at Building 2050, Marshall
Couch Drive from 9:30-10:30
a.m. Mayport command fit-
ness leaders are welcome to
attend. Health Promotions
will address information on
commands obtaining the
Blue H award and other
health promotion issues.
Call 270-5251 for more infor-
mation.


Oasis Galley Implements New Menu Initiatives


By Paige Gnann
Editor
Hungry? Naval Station
Mayport is implementing sev-
eral new initiatives designed
to tempt the tastebuds of its
Sailors, according to the new
C ho"% Boss, CWO3 Martinez
Miller.
First on the list, Miller said
are new menu items for the
speed line.
"We're trying to cater to a
younger crowd," he said. "The
changes started on Aug. 3 and
it's actually going pretty well.
We need to provide a service to
them that noone else can. Out in
town, they pay $8-9 for a meal.
I can provide them variety for
$4.25."
On Mondays and
Wednesday, the speedline will
feature grilled cheeseburgers,
hot dogs with chili and cheese,
hot wings, baked beans and
french fries. On Tuesdays and
Thursday, the Galley will offer
"Build Your Own" submarine
sandwiches. Meats available
include turkey, ham, roast beef
and meatballs, as well as hot
wings and assorted chips avail-
able.
The salad bar has also gotten
an upgrade to include fresh and
imitation crab meat, snow peas,
letils, endive, sunflower seeds
and more. They have also added
a Pepsi Cola machine.
The changes are a direct
result of a survey the Galley
conducted earlier int he sum-
mer, a long with just going out
and talking directly to the cus-
tomers, he said.
The initiatives include more
than just food items, Miller
said. There is also a change in
the way the Sailors get their
food.
"At breakfast we're going
to have make your on waffles.
They can get pancakes off the
grill to order and french toast


Above, a Sailor gets fried chicken and french fries off of the speed
line, part of a new initiative at the Galley. Right, the salad bar
has been remodeled to include fresh crab meat, prepared salads,
endives, sunflower seeds and more.I


to order," he said. That way
everything is hot coming off the
grill."
Next, Miller said the Galley
will begin to offer a Mongolian
BBQ once a quarter and every
second Wednesday of the
month, will be a special lunch
meal for Sailors celebrating a
birthday. The next meal will
be on Sept. 9. Identification is
required.
Miller said he is also plan-
ning to set up a VIP line that


will celebrate a different com-
mand throughout a specified
week.
"Say you're a part of
NavSta," he explained. "You
will have a separate line for that
week that will feature things
like shrimp, steak, baked pota-
toes, lobster tail. Only people
from that command will be able
to go through the line to get
those items.
On Sept. 1, he said that the
See Galley, Page 4


Energy


Project


Equals


Savings
From Naval Faciities Engineering
Command Southeast Public. i
Naval Facilities Engineering
Command (NAVFAC)
Southeast awarded a Utility
Energy Services Contract
(UESC) July 1 for work to be
done at Naval Station (NS)
Mayport that will provide an
annual energy cost savings of
$100,000.
"This project is just one
example of several energy
conservation initiatives that
we are currently working on,"
said Capt. Aaron Bowman, NS
Mayport commanding offi-
cer. "We look forward to find-
ing ways of reducing operating
costs while continuing to pursue
energy reduction policy initia-
tives."
The project, valued at
$904,000, was awarded to
Peoples Gas of Tampa, Fla. and
will reduce electrical energy
usage by providing lighting ret-
rofits at the water and waste-
water treatment plants; water
plant variable frequency drives
and new motors for pumps; and
wastewater plant positive dis-
placement blowers and auto-
See Energy, Page 3


_- -_

4- .....C.Z


-Photos by Paige Gnann


Housing Phase One Complete
- "- -..C/. "-- .-_, -- - ;- -=--- ;- --.---T-=____.- --- --C=-'- _-- -- -_ 7- -
-----C
-- -., -- -,._ -
.- -_ --- -.-- --
--.----


-Photo by Paige Gnann
Members of the Balfour Beatty Communities, Naval Station Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Mike Watson, and CMDCM
Debra Davidson stand with new residents CWO2 Kevin Holland, wife Lisa, and children Madison, 9, Lance, 7, and Tyler, 5. The
Hollands moved into the last home accepted in Phase One of on base housing renovations. The Hollands moved into the residence
from Bennett Shores West and transferred to the lastADA home. The home will also accommodate their daughter who has cerebral
palsy.


1111111111111~


3;= T ~ _I~
I;C


-~1.







2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


Chaplain's Corner


Who can forget the remark-
able exploits of Lucy and
Charlie Brown? In one classic
encounter we find Lucy chas-
ing Charlie Brown and shouting
at the top of her voice: "I'll
get you, Charlie Brown! I'll
catch you and when I do I'm
going to knock your block off!"
Suddenly, Charlie Brown, who
is somewhat of a philosopher
and student of human behav-
ior, screeches to a halt. He
whirls around and says to Lucy
"Wait a minute. If you and I, as
relatively small children with
relatively small problems can't
sit down and talk through our
problems in a mature way...
how can we expect that nations
of the world to..." POW!!
Lucy slugged him. After hitting
him Lucy said: "I had to hit


Chaplain Joe Molina
CDS40 Staff Chaplain
him quick...he was beginning
to make sense!"
Well, maybe just maybe, we
can identify with either Lucy
or Charlie Brown's dilemma.
That is, as the one clobbered or
the one doing the clobbering.


Indeed, winning the peace is
many times more difficult than
winning the war. Peace is hard-
er to keep than war is to fight.
Recorded history speaks elo-
quently to this reality. It is the
reconstruction, reconciling pro-
cess after a confrontation that
can make one painfully aware
of the bitterness left behind.
Troubled times bring new
opportunities to rediscover an
inner peace and perhaps mend
torn relationships and past mis-
understandings. In a world that
is anything but peaceful we can
set a personal standard for a life
of inner peace that is character-
ized by a spirit of forgiveness
and reconciliation. However,
when it comes to finding per-
sonal peace, how do you do it?
After all, peace must be internal


before it can be external.
For starters, I believe that
peace must be pursued. It must
be worked-at. One has to strive
for inner peace. Go after it.
Chase it, vigorously! Seek out
reconciliation and eliminate the
roots of any bitterness or inner
turmoil. Even if your overtures
for peace are rejected you can
have the inner peace that comes
from knowing that you have
sincerely tried to make things
right. The consequences for not
pursuing this inner peace will
rob you of much needed energy.
Lack of inner peace will dissi-
pate you and rob you of oppor-
tunities to develop your life in
positive ways. Inner turmoil
can put you in a Sui\ I\ al"
mode and can make you bitter
about life and its experiences.


When bitterness takes hold
it becomes easier to rationalize
choices that are immoral and
unethical, and sometimes ille-
gal. When bitterness controls
our emotions we may start to
walk a very thin line between
the truth and a lie. We can
become "double-minded" giv-
ing up long term gains and pur-
sue immediate choices that will
not produce good fruit.
A story is told of three men
adrift at sea who find a bottle
with a genie in it. Naturally,
the genie grants each one a
wish. One selects a condo in
the Bahamas and the other a
chateau on the Riviera. They're
both granted their wish. The
third man requested the follow-
ing with great bitterness: "My
neighbor has a goat but I am


just as good a man as he is and I
have no goat. I want you to kill
his goat!" Imagine that! This
man faces possible death and
he still struggles with bitterness
in his heart. Moral of the story:
Bitterness can pursue us to our
deathbed.
In Robert Fulghum's excel-
lent book All I Really Need
to Know I Learned in
Kindergarten (Villard Books,
1988), there is a timeless quota-
tion: "Peace is not something
you wish for; it's something
you make, something you do,
something you are, and some-
thing you give away!"
Here's an even more timeless
and timely quote for times of
conflict: "Make every effort to
live in peace with all men" (The
Holy Bible, Hebrews 12:14).


Navy Task Force Assesses Changing Climate


By Bob Freeman
Special to American Forces Press
Service
Rapidly diminishing sea ice,
melting glaciers, rising sea lev-
els, increased storm severity -
all are possible consequences
of a climate that mounting evi-
dence suggests is changing sig-
nificantly.
As the scientific community
works to understand the chang-
ing climate, the chief of naval
operations has created a task
force, headed by Rear Adm.
David Titley, the Navy's senior
oceanographer, to better under-
stand and evaluate its implica-
tions for maritime security.
"Task Force Climate Change
was initiated ... to assess the
Navy's preparedness to respond
to emerging requirements, and
to develop a science-based
timeline for future Navy actions
regarding climate change,"
Titley explained in a July 28
interview on Pentagon Web
Radio's audio webcast "Armed
with Science: Research and
Applications for the Modern
Military."
"Because the Arctic is chang-



Navy El

By Bob Coble
Navy Enterprise Resource Planning
Program
The Navy's Enterprise
Resource Planning (ERP)
Program reached another suc-
cessful milestone with the
completion of the evaluation
of the Follow-on Operational
Test Agency Evaluation Report
(OT-D1A).
The purpose of this report
was to assess the operational
effectiveness and operational
suitability of Navy ERP System
Release 1.0 to provide a field-
ing recommendation.
"Navy ERP System Release


F


ing faster than any other place
on the planet, our first deliver-
able will be a strategic roadmap
proposing actions for the Navy
regarding the Arctic region,"
Titley said.
This may include an assess-
ment of how maritime strategy
applies to the Arctic region,
potential improvements in
infrastructure, and recom-
mended investments in force
structure and capabilities to
prepare for the challenges pre-
sented by the changing cli-
mate, he explained. Titley was
interviewed while staying in
Barrow, Alaska, the northern-
most city in the United States,
located 350 miles north of the
Arctic Circle, where he was
joining Rear Adm. Nevin Carr,
chief of naval research, for a
visit to the Coast Guard Cutter
Healy, an icebreaker supporting
scientific research in the Arctic
Ocean. The visit was intended
to observe retrieval of several
bottom-moored buoy sensors
funded by the Office of Naval
Research.
"Observations from these
buoys will give us a better



RP Prog

1.0 is operationally effec-
tive and operationally suitable
and I recommend full fielding
in accordance with the cur-
rent schedule" said Rear Adm.
David Dunaway, commander,
Operational Test and Evaluation
Force (COMOPTEVFOR).
The Department of Defense
Operational Test and Evaluation
office concurred with the
COMOPTEVFOR finding in a
subsequent memorandum to the
Under Secretary of Defense for
Business Transformation.
The Navy ERP system stan-
dardizes and modernizes the
Navy's business practices. It


science-based and fact-based
understanding of what is
going on in the Arctic," Titley
explained.
Global climate change may
present many challenges to
national security, Titley said.
Rising sea levels from the melt-
ing of glacial and sea ice are of
specific interest to the Navy due
to the coastal location of many
of its bases. "We need to under-
stand what it will take to protect
these valuable investments," he
said. Increasing ocean tempera-
tures may compound the prob-
lem.
"As the ocean temperature
warms, thermal expansion may
be a significant ... and under-
estimated component of sea
level rise," Titley commented.
"We are also very interested
in the distribution of extreme
weather events," Titley said,
explaining that while the mean
global temperature may be ris-
ing, some regions may expe-
rience extreme heating while
others are seeing colder-than-
normal temperatures.
Titley explained that chang-
ing ocean currents and precipi-


station patterns may produce
regional droughts and floods
that could have severe conse-
quences for stressed and poor
populations, who have the least
ability to adapt to a quickly
changing environment. "This
could result in an increased
potential for large-scale human-
itarian assistance and disaster
relief efforts," he noted. The
Arctic already is experiencing
dramatic changes.
"Since satellite observations
began in 1979, we have seen a
40 percent decrease in perenni-
al, or multiyear, sea ice," Titley
said.
This decline in sea ice, he
added, is opening up the Arctic
for more human activity,
including resource exploration
and ecotourism in the near term,
and the potential for increased
commercial shipping and fish-
ing in the decades to come. "As
the climate changes and the sea
lanes start to open, the United
States Navy has a role to play
in maritime security, work-
ing with our Coast Guard and
international partners to ensure
the sea lanes remain open and


navigation is free for all," Titley
said. Titley discussed the intri-
cate dynamics of ocean currents
influencing the changes that are
occurring in the Arctic.
"The more I learn about the
complex Arctic environment,"
he said, "the more I realize that
we still have significant aspects
of the basic oceanography to
understand before we are going
to be able to accurately forecast
and model these interactions."
The Navy has a long histo-
ry of polar operations, Titley
noted, and the earliest indica-
tions of decreasing ice thick-
ness were reported by Navy
submarines in the 1990s. Since
then, he added, the Navy has
funded various scientific
studies there in collabora-
tion with other federal agen-
cies and numerous partners
in the world of academia and
research. Titley pointed out that
another example of collabora-
tion is the National Ice Center,
a joint operation among the
Navy, the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
and the Coast Guard. The cen-
ter charts sea ice worldwide for


safety of navigation and opera-
tions, and their measurements
have been crucial to quantify-
ing the changes that are occur-
ring in the Arctic, he said. Titley
said the Navy has many assets
that can assist in understand-
ing the changing climate. From
a wide array of data-gathering
sensors and platforms to super-
computing facilities that pro-
cess the data and create predic-
tions, Navy assets continuously
work to provide comprehensive
knowledge of the physical envi-
ronment.
"The naval oceanography
program exists to provide envi-
ronmental information to the
operating fleet, allowing it to
operate more safely and effec-
tively," Titley said. "I like to
say that we are operating in
nature's casino; I intend to
count the cards," he quipped.
(Bob Freeman works in the
Office of the Oceanographer of
the Navy.)


ram Takes Major Step Forward


provides commanders a signifi-
cantly enhanced visibility into
financial, program, workforce,
and material management infor-
mation across their areas of
responsibility. The Navy ERP
system is currently being used
by more than 35,000 individu-
als in three major Navy systems
commands.
The Naval Air Systems
Command and the Naval
Supply Systems Command are
currently operating their busi-
ness activities using Navy ERP
as their financial system of
record. The Space and Naval
Warfare Systems Command


is using the system for train-
ing and preparation for an Oct.
1, Go-Live. The current Navy
program of record calls for the
SPAWAR implementation to
begin October 2009, and the
Naval Sea Systems Command
implementation to begin
October 2010.
"This evaluation is a major
step forward for the program
and the Navy," Dr. Jennifer
Carter, Navy ERP program
manager. "What has been a
promise in development for
several years is now an operat-
ing, functioning management
system that is saving money


and providing better informa-
tion right now to Navy com-
manders so they can efficiently
provide the support Navy warf-
ighters must have. These ben-
efits will continue to increase
as we implement the system in
more Navy commands."
When the current deploy-
ment scheduled is complete, the
Navy ERP system will support
more than 64,000 users and be
used to manage more than 53
percent of the Navy's total obli-
gation authority, the money it is
authorized to spend. The Navy
directed the implementation of
an ERP system as part of efforts


to transform its business affairs
to more efficiently support
warfighter readiness, part of the
Navy's maritime strategy. ERP
systems integrate management
functions enabling all aspects
of a business operation to use
the same information, aligning
activities and speeding informa-
tion availability.
The Navy ERP program
is part of the portfolio of the
Program Executive Office for
Enterprise Information Systems.


What Th

By MCC(SW) Maria Yager
Navy Personnel Command Public

The Navy announced the
establishment of the Career
Transition Office (CTO) July
30 to assist Sailors transitioning
between the Navy's active and
Reserve components.
"The overall goals of the
Career Transition Office are to
ease the transition of person-
nel into active duty and Reserve
billets, decrease transition pro-
cessing times and error rates,
and increase Reserve affiliation
among qualified Sailors leav-
ing active duty," said Vice Adm.
Mark Ferguson, chief of naval
personnel.
The CTO was established
under the Navy's continuum of
service initiative. It is designed
to develop flexible service
options to meet Sailors individ-
ual career objectives.
"The Navy Reserve offers
excellent opportunities for
Sailors to continue their Navy
careers while pursuing their
goals in the civilian world. By
reaching out to those Sailors
leaving active duty, the Career
Transition Office will help them
make informed decisions about
the options available to them
in the Navy Reserve. Navy
Reservists often claim they
have the best of both worlds,"
said Vice Adm. Dirk Debbink,
chief of Navy Reserve.
According to NAVADMIN
229/09, the first of three spi-
rals is to be phased in over the


e Navy Wants

next 14 months. The CTO is four-year additi(
focusing on the 1,700 officers Forces service req
who depart the Navy annually. the Navy Reserve.
The CTO seeks to increase the The Navy Rese
number of departing officers two-year deployme
who affiliate with the Reserves for Sailors who joi
which will further fortify the within six months
Reserve component with expe-
rienced Navy veterans.
Spiral two will address
enlisted personnel transi-
tions, integration with Career
Management System Interactive
Detailing and Sailors separating
due to Perform to Serve. Spiral
three will address Reserve com- Roman Cathc
ponent to active component Sunday 9
flow. Monday-Friday
"We are reaching out to offi- Confessions: bef
cers every day. We talk to offi- mass or upon
CCD: Sunday 1
cers in Iraq, Japan, Germany, Baptisms: class 3
and on deployment at sea. month
Regardless of where you are in Protestant V
the world, we can help you," Sunday 10:3
said Ensign Andrea Fallas, a Sunday school
Reservist recalled to work as a Baptism: For in
transition assistant assigned to contact your
the CTO.
Benefits for Reserve affilia- Women's Bib
tion include inexpensive medi- Wednesday 9
cal and dental coverage for Protestant
Reservists and their families,Wednesday
up to a $20,000 Reserve reen- Interdenomin
listment bonus, up to $75,000 MOPS (Mot
in special pay for officers, and Pre-Schoc
additional training if rating con- 1st & 3rd Tuesdays
version is offered. Reservists 9:15 a.i
also maintain base MWR, For more informal
exchange and commissary priv- MOPS coordinate
ileges. rtmops@yah
Additionally, Sailors depart-Marria
ing after six years of active duty Contact Chapla
who are eligible for the Post- prior. PREP is
9/11 GI Bill may be eligible
to transfer education benefits For more inform
to their spouse or children by 270-521
incurring and completing the


You To Know Before You Go


onal Armed
quirement in

:rve offers a
;nt deferment
n the reserve
of leaving the


lic Mass
a.m.
11:30 a.m.
ore & after
request
10:30 a.m.
rd Sunday of
h
Worship
0i a.m.
9:15 a.m.
[formation
chaplain

le Study
:30 a.m.
choir
7 p.m.

national
:hers of
lers)
each month
n.
ition contact
or at maypo-
oo.com

ge
n 6 months
required

ration, call
12.


active component. Sailors who
affiliate with the reserve after
six months, but within one year
of leaving active duty, qualify
for a one-year deferment from
involuntary mobilization.
Future program plans for


the CTO include managing all
enlisted personnel by direct-
ing active to reserve transi-
tions, centralizing administra-
tive actions in processing and
streamlining non-mobilization
Reserve-to-active-duty transi-


tions.
For more information, read
NAVADMIN 229/09 and visit
the CTO Web site at http://
www.npc.navy.mil/CareerInfo/
Transition/.


NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA

r, rr ji
Naval Station Mayport
Capt. Aaron Bowman .................................. ............................. Commanding Officer
Cm dr. M ike W atson........................................... ................................................ Executive O officer
CMDCM Deborah Davidson................................................. .................... Command Master Chief
Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff
Bill Austin ................... ........... .....................................Public Affairs Officer
MC1 Heather Ewton.................................. ................. Deputy Public Affairs Officer
OS2 Harold Dudley ................................... ................. Assistant Public Affairs Officer
OS2 Shantae Salmon.......................... ........ ................. Assistant Public Affairs Officer
Paige G nann.............................................................................................................................Editor
The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayport's Navy community, including the Naval Station,
on and off base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies
are also available at the Naval Station's Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1
Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202.
The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles
should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to:
The Mirror
P.O. Box 280032
Naval Station
Mayport, FL 32228-0032
Commercial: (904)270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 960-7817 Ext. 1012
Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 960-5329
Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net
CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1 800-270-6307
This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of
The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department
of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way
connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear
ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by
the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised.
Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without
regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation,
or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the
responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office.



Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to:
Ellen S.Rykert Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Russ Martin Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 FAX: (904) 366-6230






THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 3


FRCSE AIRSpeed Working Toward


Intermediate-Depot Merger


By AT2 (AW/SW) Reche
Publc.;" Office
Fleet Readiness Center
Southeast (FRCSE) continues
on the cutting edge of improve-
ments in aircraft maintenance
repair and overhaul with the
recent merging of six work cen-
ters.
In December 2006, Aircraft
Intermediate Maintenance
Departments (AIMD) and
Naval Aviation Depots were
combined into one organization,
known as FRCSE, merging
depot-level artisans and inter-
mediate level Sailors into one
all-star force for aviation main-
tenance.
In the past, AIMDs or Level
II repairs were handled pre-
dominantly by Sailors because
it mainly involved repairing
relatively minor repairs on com-
ponents, and the Depot level,
which is essentially the deep-
est and most attentively detailed
level of maintenance, was han-
dled by civil service and civil-
ian contractors, most of whom
are former service members.
As a result of the integration,
Sailors and civilians are now
working side-by-side to provide
comprehensive aviation mainte-
nance for Warfighter readiness.
FRCSE continues to improve
as a result of the integration and
leads the way in organizing the
methods in which repairs are
performed, and increasing in
maintenance capacity and capa-
bilities.
The most recent merg-
er of Avionics, Hydraulics,
Production Control, and Supply,
allows Sailors and artisans to
continually improve on their
collaboration of redefining
naval aviation maintenance for
the benefit of the Warfighter.
"Combining these shops
couldn't happen overnight,"
said Sara Branch, an Electronic
Mechanic Work Leader. "As
you can imagine, we've faced a
few obstacles. There were sev-

Energy From Page 1
mated aeration controls.
Many of the existing light-
ing fixtures in these build-
ings utilize older florescent
and incandescent technolo-
gies. Retrofitting these fixtures
with compact florescent light
(CFL) bulbs and new ballasts
will increase lighting efficiency,
reduce energy consumption and
provide improved working con-
ditions for system operators.
Operational efficiencies
will be obtained at the Water
Treatment Plant by install-
ing variable frequency drives
(VFD) and new motors for
the existing pumps. The exist-
ing configuration of the pumps
are either "on" or "off," which
require approximately five to
seven times the normal cur-
rent as the motor gains rota-
tional speed. This configura-
tion creates excessive electri-
cal demand and motor-wind-
ing heating. VFDs permit the
pumps to operate at slower
speeds. Since slower speeds
equate to lower capacities, the
pumps can be adjusted to main-
tain the distribution pressure at
a more consistent pressure.
Operators of the wastewa-
ter treatment plant currently
use manual methods to control
the level of dissolved oxygen
(DO) in the aeration tanks.
This method of operation is
labor intensive and much less
responsive to changing condi-
tions in the treatment process.
Installation of a more efficient
VFD-controlled blower and
motor, and automating the DO
controls, will enable the opera-
tors to maintain DO concentra-
tion levels within tighter control
limits and thus improve plant
efficiency and effluent quality.
"This project is just one more
example of the leadership, dedi-
cation and hard work involved
to implement our regional com-
mander's energy conservation
priorities and national energy
policy reduction goals," said
Ralph Crist, Public Works
Department Mayport Utilities
and Energy supervisor.
Upon construction comple-


tion, the Navy will see a reduc-
tion of 3,900 million BTUs and
will contribute to the reduction
of greenhouse gas emissions
by eliminating 16.4 pounds of
methane, 790 tons of carbon
dioxide and 2,800 pounds of
nitrogen oxides per year.
The expected completion date
for all work on this contract is
January 2010.


eral factors to consider before
implementation, including pol-
icy changes, cultural and orga-
nizational differences, and bud-
gets," she continued.
Many of the successes at
FRCSE can be attributed to
using the continuous process
improvement methodology
known as AIRSpeed.
The process was used for
this current project to minimize
and eliminate difficulties, and
improve turn around time and


repair efficiencies among the
shops. By restructuring under
this program and merging the
work centers, it allowed FRCSE
to combine assets that per-
form the same functions into
one area, making way for more
effective use of time and man-
power. The overall objective
is to provide a sharp reduction
in maintenance time and cut
excessive costs. This has prov-
en very beneficial for the com-
mand as it allows an accurate


deadline for finishing sched-
uled work based on customer
demand.
"We are half way moved
in and ready at the Depot,"
said Lieutenant Commander
Win Peregrino, Hangar 1000
Airspeed Division Officer. "The
Hydraulics shop has moved
into its new space, and with the
exception of a few electrical
issues, has gotten situated rather
quickly," he continued.
According to Peregrino, the


Avionics shops are relocat-
ing between Hangar 1000 and
Building 101U. "Our charter
mandates that we complete all
moves by October, and I am
pleased that we are ahead of
schedule," says Peregrino.
The merger provides a bet-
ter balance, not only in man-
power, but customer satisfac-
tion. Thanks to the dedicated
workforce at FRCSE, the future
of naval aviation is bright.


-- --







VIr 'mitss othervis; Let's Buif
--"- --- ---


I


VALSPAR 2000


PAINT a i valspar'. i
PAINT Via rEp9 g E
Includes all 1-allon and -gallon sizes. E NT
Offer valid 8/12/09-8/17/09. Discount 0
taken at register. See store for details. "


I1I


Selection may vary by market. I W

now now now
$512 was $57 was $228 was
$5 2 552 each 2 7 $2 each 8 $241 each
7/16" x 4' x 8' 2" x 4" x 8' 2" x 4" x 92-5/8"
OSB Sheathing Treated Lumber Kiln-Dried Whitewood
*Used for wall and roof *#2 prime grade lumber Select Stud
sheathing applications #12212 #46905 #6003
Pricing for commodity items may vary due to market conditions we reserve the right to limit quantities.


II Is 1M


LIQUID NAILS HEAVY-
DUTY CONSTRUCTION
ADHESIVE




Applies to items #44906 and #220849.
Offer valid 8/12/09 8/17/09. Discount
taken at register. See store for details.


Il


ALL IN-STOCK
OWENS CORNING
FIBERGLASS
INSULATION


Offer valid 8/12/09 8/17/09. Discount
taken at register. See store for details.


now
$34 was

$34 "6497 each
100' 12/3 Contractor
Outdoor Extension Cord
*15 amp rating #68056;71664


41


ALL IN-STOCK
AND SPECIAL
ORDER GARAGE
DOORS

Offer valid 8/12/09- 8/17/09.
Discount taken at time of order.
See store for details.


1/2" X 3'X 5'
DUROCK #11729
Available through Special Order in
some markets. Offer valid 8/12/09 -
8/17/09. Discount taken at register.
See store for details.


L


ALL KOBALT
AIR TOOLS
AND AIR
COMPRESSORS
SKOBALT
Offer valid 8/12/09 8/17/09. Discount
taken at register. See store for details.


now
$14 29 was
$149 each
5/8" x 5-1/2" x 6' Treated
Dog-Ear Fence Picket
*Pressure-treated for long life
#202922


With purchase of $499 or more of
in-stock 30 year Oakridge shingles.
Limit one per customer. Offer valid
8/12/09 817/09.
See store for details.


U41


ALL 4.75 3ALLUN
ELASTOMERIC ROOF COATINGS
** I
r )


Appies to items #139929, #139941,
131370. Items and brands may
vary by market. Offer valid 8/12/09-
8/17/09. Discount taken at register.
See store for details.


now
$249 was
6-Gallon Air Compressor
Nailer Kit
*3-tool kit included #253002


now V
$69
was $95
8' Fiberglass Stepladder
*250 lb. load capacity
#98195


iZ m.


now
$24 wa39
120' Tuff-Grip Fish Tape
#11960
25' Fish r 1/
Tape now was
#07529 $6 $11.97


Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 8/17/09 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 8/6/09 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy. See
store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. "Ask for 10% Off your first single-receipt in-store purchase charged to your new Lowe's Accounts Receivable or Lowe's Business Account
when you open your new account in any Lowe's store and make your first purchase between 8/12/09 8/17/09. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase and cannot be used in conjunction with any other coupon or
discount. This coupon is good for a single receipt purchase of any in-stock or Special Order merchandise only up to $5000 (Maximum discount $500). Coupon is not redeemable for cash, is nontransferable and cannot be
replaced if lost or stolen. Void if altered, copied, transferred, or sold through any on-line auction. Limit one coupon per household or business. Not valid on sales via Lowes.com, previous sales, purchase of services or gift
cards. Offer must be requested at the time of purchase. Offer is subject to credit approval. Coupon valid for one time use only. Offer is not valid for accounts opened prior to 8/12/09. Excludes Lowe's Consumer Credit
Accounts, Lowe's* Project CardSM Accounts, and all Lowe's VISA Accounts. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to
US locations only. 2009 by Lowe's. All rights reserved. Lowe's and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF, LLC. (090891)
001/090891/021


Dog Houses,
Shadow Boxes
Made to order
Manuel Bello
Woodworking


DEWALT

TOOLS AND
ACCESSORIES


Offer valid 8/1209 8/17/09.
Discount taken at register.
See store for details.


------------ ---;----~--- ----- ------ ---- ---- --- ---- ------


IIIII:






4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009




Getting




Jax Principals


Tour Mayport


By Seaman
Daleth Darrington
Contributing Reporter
Nine principals, one Duval
County School board member,
and one U.S. Navy school liai-
son officer from Jacksonville
and one U.S. Navy Regional
School Liaison Officer were
treated to a luncheon, and a
series of tours on Naval Station
Mayport and USS Halyburton.
The tours gave the educators
a small glimpse of what many
of their student body's family
members engaged in everyday.
The gathering was in support
of building better ties between
both the schools and the Navy,
according to Naval Station
Mayport Commanding Officer,
Capt. Aaron Bowman.
"We are trying to better
understand the Navy, and get
a little information on what a
U.S. Sailor is," said Debbie
Appelman, assistant principal of
Keman Trail Elementary.
School administrations repre-
sented duringfor the tour event
included Alimacani Elementary,
Joseph Finegan Elementary,
Jacksonville Elementary,
Mayport Elementary, Mayport
Middle School, Fletcher Middle
School, Fletcher High School,
and a member from the Duval
School Board District 2 Nancy
Broner. District 2 includes the
Beaches and east Arlington
schools.
Starting with a meet and greet
with Bowman, he explained


some of the goals and missions
of NS Mayport. Lunch was
held at the Oasis Galley, where
the guest had the chance to
enjoy some of the Navy's cui-
sine. Guests also took a tour of
the newly-renovated barracks
rooms, giving them an insight
on how young, single Sailors
live. One of the highlights was
a tour aboard Halyburton.
Crossing the brow on to
the flight deck the guests'
were greeted by Halyburton's
Executive Officer, Cmdr. Eric
Lindfors, and Boatswain's
Mate 2nd Class Eric Richardson.
"Boats" explained some of the
evolutions that took place on
the flight deck.
Retired Navy officer, now
Fletcher Middle School princi-
pal Don Nelson, said he knew
all too well what was presented
to him. He remininsced how
he once landed on Halyburton
while serving on active duty.
The tour then followed up
to the boat deck, then to the
focs'le where Mayport Middle
School Principal, retired Air
Force officer Katrina McCray,
said she enjoyed the informa-
tion being presented. The tour
then ended in the Wardroom,
where they had the chance to
talk with Lindfors about Navy
life aboard a ship.
"One of our goals is to make
sure that all students have the
same opportunities during their
time in the school system,"


Back


To School


IP


-Photo by SN Daleth Darrington
Boatswain's Mate 2"d Class Eric Richards of USS Halyburton explains evolutions performed on thefoc'sle to a tour group of area Duval
County school principals. The principals spent the day at Naval Station Mayport talking with Sailors to get a better understanding of


the needs of military families.
said Bowman. Dozens of kids
that have military parents are
not likely to spend most of their
required 12 years of school in
the same school system.
"Family is the most impor-
tant," added Appelman.
Appelman explained some of
the different ways that parents
abroad keep in touch with their
children with the help of the
schools.
"Blogging is a helpful way


for parents to keep in tune with
what is being instilled in the
children," she suggested.
She also explained one devot-
ed parent stationed in Bahrain
often called the school dur-
ing school hours to get up to
date progress reports on his
child. Considering that Duval
County is home to two major
Navy bases, most schools are
prepared to cope with deploy-
ments, homecomings, and con-


stant transfers.
"Last year we did a survey
on the families in our school
and out of about 1,000, 100 are
associated with the military,"
said Principal Kathy Stalls of
Alimacani Elementary.
Stalls also mentioned how
her school is associated with
HSL-48. Throughout the year,
military personnel from the
squadron come and help out
with mentoring programs. In


November, the squadron partic-
ipates in the school's Veterans
Day ceremony, including a heli-
copter flyover and display.
The day was a success and
the educators got a good idea
on what is behind the gates.
The ongoing goal is to continue
to build stronger ties between
the military and the education
system and to remember that
"Family" is important, the prin-
cipals agreed.


New Base School Liaison Officer


Advocate For M

By Paige Gnann W
Editor .
Have a child going to school r
and you don't know who Judith
Cromartie is?
You should get to know her. .H i
Cromartie is the new School
Liaison Officer (SLO) for
Naval Station Mayport and it's
her job to be an advocate for the i "
military parent and students. .
A 42-year veteran of the
Duval County Public School
system, Cromartie came to
Naval Station mayport on June
1 to provide a link between
the base and the school sys-
tems of the surrounding coun- .
ties, including Duval, St. Johns, . '.
Clay and Nassau.
Her background includes 27
years as an English teacher, six
years as a school counselor at
Mandarin High School and nine
years as District Supervisor
for Guidance with the Duval
County School Board.
"I started with the Navy on
June 1, because I knew that Judith Cromartie
there would be a lot of parents School Liaison Officer


itary Students, Parents


that needed information for the
upcoming school year," she
said.
As a SLO, Cromartie is sup-
posed to be a link between the
base, military families and local
schools including public, pri-
vate, home schools and online
schools.
The role of a SLO is to act
as primary advisor to the com-
mand on matters relating to
schools, serve as an expert on
education issues for youth and
parents as well as help develop
solutions with schools to over-
come hinderances, according
to the SLO pamphlet. Those
hinderances could include spe-
cial education, state require-
ments, graduation requirements,
course sequencing, school
schedules,deployment support,
extracurricular activities, record
transfer and school quality.
"I just try to hook people up
and help with whatever they
are having a problem with," she
said. "It could be transportation
or free back packs."


The role of a School Liaison
Officer is also a role Cromartie
said she is thrilled to fill.
"When I was working for
the school board, I was always
known as an advocate for the
parent and children," she said.
No\\ I have a new client and
it's the military child and mak-
ing sure they receive equitable
access and services [to educa-
tion]. I think I've died and gone
to heaven. This is what I enjoy
doing."
A lot of the questions that
Cromartie has answered so far
include what a parent needs
to do to enroll their child for
the upcoming school year. She
said a great tool for any mili-
tary parent to access is Duval
County School Board website,
www.duvalschools.org. Military
OneSource is another great
website, she said. That web
address is www.militaryone-
source.com.
"A lot of initial questions can
be answered there," Cromartie
said. But she is always just a


phone call away even for a
parent who might still be trans-
ferring from San Diego, Calif.
"I can lead them in the right
direction, she said. "If they are
concerned with the school sys-
tem or their child won't get cer-
tain services, I can help them."
To speak with Cromartie, or
to find out more about the SLO
program, call her 270-6289 ext.
1305; email judith.cromartie@
navy.mil.
Cromartie will hold an
upcoming child and youth pro-
grams parent workshop at the
Youth Activities Center at 6:30
p.m. on Sept. 29. The workshop
will be "The College Admission
Process." Parents can learn
what schools offer and what
they are really like. Get answers
to questions such as, "What
majors/programs are offered?"
"What is the admission criteria,
like SAT,ACT and high school
GPA?" "How much does it real-
ly cost?"


Officials Urge Parents


To Check Students'


Immunization Records


By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service
Department of Defense
Education Activity officials are
reminding parents to review
their children's immunization
records to ensure they're up
to date by the first day of the
school year.
"Updating students' immuni-
zations is an important part of
back-to-school preparations,"
said Mary Patton, chief of the
activities' Pupil Personnel
Services branch. "We want all
students to be ready to learn,
and in order for them to be
ready to learn, they need to be
healthy.
"Requiring children to be
immunized protects the rest of
the school, and the staff and
other families as well," she
added.
All the usual childhood vac-
cinations are required includ-
ing those used to protect against
measles, mumps and rubella,
polio and diphtheria, tetanus


and pertussis.
The DoDEA Immunization
Requirements Form, avail-
able on the activity's Web
site, includes a list of required
immunizations for students
enrolled in an activity school.
"The one vaccine that we
don't require right now ... is
the HPV [to prevent] cervical
cancer," Patton said. "The rea-
son for that is pretty simple. It's
not a communicable disease in
schools."
If a school nurse notifies a
principal that a student is not
up to date on immunizations,
the principal will send a letter
to the student's parents inform-
ing them. Students won't be
allowed to attend school until
they have received the needed
immunizations or an appoint-
ment is scheduled to receive
them.
Military treatment facilities
provide students with needed
immunizations, and parents can
coordinate with their child's


physician to obtain the required
vaccinations prior to the start of
the school year. If required vac-
cines are temporarily unavail-
able, the military treatment
facility will notify the school
superintendent, and students
will be allowed to attend school
until the vaccine becomes avail-
able.
Students may attend school
without being immunized due
to religious beliefs.
"Parents can write a let-
ter," Patton said. "They don't
have to give us their religious
beliefs, but [just say] that they
do believe it is against their reli-
gion."
The minute there's a outbreak
of anything, though, children
who have not been immunized
have to be sent home, she
added. The same is true of those
children who have a medi-
cal waiver for immunizations,
Patton said.


Registration In Progress


For Fall Before, After


School Care
From MIWR
MWR Mayport is currently accepting regis-
tration for Fall Before and After School Care
at the Youth Activities Center, located in on-
base housing. The Before and After School
Care Program at Naval Station Mayport (also
known as School Age Care, or SAC) is nation-
ally accredited and open to children in kinder-
garten through fifth grade. Fees are based on
total family income and a fee scale.
The program is held Monday through
Friday during regular school weeks and opens
each morning at 6 a.m. and closes at 6:30


Galley
Galley will also start serving
speedline items on the patio for
Sailors that are in PT gear who
could not normally come inside
the Galley.
And when football season
gets into full swing, don't be
surprised to see a Culinary
Specialist wearing his or her
favorite team jersey or ball cap.
It's another new item the Galley
is bringing to the table atmo-


With MWR
p.m. In addition, the program is open on non-
school days and early release days during
the school week (closed federal holidays).
Seasonal camps are available during school
breaks.
Transportation is available to and from both
Finegan and Mayport Elementary Schools.
Some additional elementary schools in the
local area provide transportation to the base
Youth Activities Center. For more informa-
tion on this program, call the MWR Youth
Activities Center at 270-5680.


sphere.
"Atmosphere makes a big
difference," Miller said. "We
want the Sailors to feel com-
fortable, want to come in to the
Galley."
Miller said his team is plan-
ning to go all out decorating the
Galley for college and profes-
sional teams.
And the ideas don't stop
there. Miller said he is con-


From Page 1
stantly looking from input from
his Galley team and its patrons.
He is holding a food show
next month for customers to
be introduced to possible new
menu items, as well as looking
for participants with the month-
ly Menu Review Board.
To find out more, or to par-
ticipate in the board, contact
Miller at 270-5373.


I







THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 5


Damage Control Fireman Thiele off USS Hue City h
The ship hosted a recent tiger cruise forfamily member


Damage Control Fireman helps a tiger get ljt Id for a I


USS Hue City Hosts Tigers For Day




































-Photos courtesy of USS Hue City Damage Control Fireman helps a tiger geltli
elps a tiger put on Fire Fighting Ensemble.
rs.




































Fire Fighting Ensemble. Capt. A. W. Swain offers advice to the Navig
cue chicken.


Capt. Scott Speicher Search Details Announced


.-U.S. Marine Corps Photo
Marines from Task Force Personnel Recovery (TFMP) ofMulti-National Force-West conduct recov-
ery efforts at the crash site of U.S. Navy Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, whose F/A-18 was shot down
over Anbarprovince, Iraq, Jan. 17, 1991.


Marines from Task Force Personnel Recovery (TF MP) of Multi-National Force-West conduct recov-
ery efforts at the crash site of U.S. Navy Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, whose F/A-18 was shot down
over Anbar province, Iraq, Jan. 17, 1991.


From the Department ofDefense
The Navy announced Aug. 7
additional details regarding the
recent discovery of the remains
of Navy Capt. Michael "Scott"
Speicher in Iraq.
Speicher was shot down fly-
ing a combat mission in an
F/A-18 Hornet over west-cen-
tral Iraq Jan. 17, 1991, during
Operation Desert Storm.
Acting in part on informa-
tion provided by an Iraqi citi-
zen in early July, Multi National
ForcefiWest's (MNF-W) per-
sonnel recovery team went to
a location in the desert, which
was believed to be the crash site
of Speicher's jet. The Iraqi, a
Bedouin, was 11 years old at
the time of the crash and did not
have direct knowledge of where
Speicher was buried but knew


.,.-



III


Marines from Task Force Personnel Recovery (TF MP) of Multi-
National Force-West conduct recovery efforts at the crash site of
U.S. Navy Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, whose F/A-18 was shot
down over Anbar province, Iraq, Jan. 17, 1991.


of other Bedouins who did. He
willingly provided his informa-
tion during general discussion
with MNF-W personnel and
stated he was unaware of the
U.S. government's interest in
this case until queried by U.S.
investigators in July.
The Iraqi citizens led MNF-
W's personnel recovery team
to the area they believed
Speicher was buried. The area
where the remains were recov-
ered was located approxi-
mately 100 kilometers west of
Ramadi, in Anbar province.
There were two sites that teams
searched. One site was next to
the downed aircraft that was
discovered in 1993, and the
other site was approximately
two kilometers away. The sec-
ond site was where Speicher's


remains were recovered.
The recovery personnel
searched two sites July 22-29.
The personnel recovery team
consisted of approximately 150
people, mostly Marines and
other forces under MNF-W.
The recovered remains
include bones and multiple
skeletal fragments. Based
on visual examination of the
remains and dental records at
the site, a preliminary assess-
ment was reached that the
remains were that of Speicher.
After searching the site another
day, no further remains were
recovered.
On July 30, the remains were
turned over from the recov-
ery team to MNF-W mortuary
affairs at Al Asad. The remains
were then transported to Dover


Port Mortuary at Dover Air
Force Base, Del. They were
examined by the Armed Forces
Institute of Pathology's (AFIP)
Armed Forces medical exam-
iner who positively identified
them as those of Speicher Aug.
1.
Positive identification by
AFIP was made by comparing
Speicher's dental records with
the jawbone recovered at the
site. The teeth were a match,
both visually and radiographi-
cally. AFIP's DNA Lab in
Rockville, Md., confirmed the
remains to be Speicher on Aug.
2 via DNA comparison tests
of the remains by comparing
them to DNA reference samples
previously provided by family
members.


ll'd for a Fire Fighting Ensemble.


kator and Chief Engineer on how to prepare the barbe-


-


. j ..,_
r ,-;; f * .. ^ ,







6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


^^i Happenings
MA VyCORT 77


Aug. 13: CPO Social Hour (Right
Hand Man/Boss's Night). 3-7 p.m.
at Foc'sle CPO Club with free hours
d'oeuvres 4-6 p.m., drink specials and
all-you-can-drink soft drinks for only
$1. Thursday night is reserved for
active and retired Chief Petty Officers
and their guests. For contest informa-
tion, call AWRC Jon Abell at 850-748-
5941.
Aug. 13: Karaoke Night. 8 p.m.-12
a.m. at Castaway's Lounge. All Hands
welcome. (Free) 270-7788


Aug. 14: Spades Tournament. 6
p.m. at Castaway's Lounge. (Free)
270-7788
Aug. 14: Live Band Hith. 9 p.m.-
1 a.m. at Castaway's Lounge. (Free)
www.myspace.com/hith
Aug. 14: Summer Outdoor Movie
(Daddy Day Camp, PG). Start time
is at sunset, or approximately 9 p.m.
every Friday at Sea Otter Pavilion.
Light refreshments available for pur-
chase. Bring your lawn chairs or blan-
kets and bug spray, just in case. (Free)


270-5228
Aug. 15: Texas Hold 'Em
Tournament. 6 p.m. at Castaway's
Lounge. (Free) 270-7788
Aug. 15: Live Band Hith. 9 p.m.-
1 a.m. at Castaway's Lounge. (Free)
www.myspace.com/hith
Aug. 16: Bowling Family Fun
Night. 5-8 p.m. every Sunday at
Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $9
per person and includes All-You-Can
Bowl with shoes, spaghetti dinner,
music videos, light show and colored


headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377
Aug. 18: Indoor 3 V 3 Soccer
Meeting. 11 a.m. in the Gym lobby.
270-5451
Aug. 18: CPO Selectee Steak
Night. 4-8 p.m. at Foc'sle CPO Club.
Steak dinner $10; kid's hotdog meal
$3. Tickets must be purchased in
advance. All hands welcome. Deadline
is 4 p.m. Aug. 17. Contact AWRC Jon
Abell for tickets at 850-748-5941.
Aug. 20: CPO Social Hour
(Spouse/Better Half Night). 3-7 p.m.


at Foc'sle CPO Club with free hours
d'oeuvres 4-6 p.m., drink specials and
all-you-can-drink soft drinks for only
$1. Thursday night is reserved for
active and retired Chief Petty Officers
and their guests. For contest informa-
tion, call AWRC Jon Abell at 850-748-
5941.
Aug. 25: Deadline for Dusk
to Dawn Softball Tournament.
Tournament is Sept. 4 starting at 6 p.m.
until dawn Sept. 5. Cost is $225 per
team. Register at the Gym. 270-5451


Liberty Call


The following activities tar-
get single or unaccompanied
Sailors. For more information,
call 270-7788/89 or stop by
Planet Mayport Single Sailor
Center and pick up the monthly
activity calendar with a com-
plete listing of all upcoming
Liberty events.
Aug. 13: Karaoke
Thursday. 8 p.m.-12 a.m.
every Thursday at Castaway's
Lounge. (Free)
Aug. 14: Spades
Tournament. 6 p.m. at
Castaway's Lounge. (Free)
Aug. 15: Texas Hold 'Em
Tournament. 6 p.m. at
Castaway's Lounge. (Free)
Aug. 16: Beach Clean-Up


Volunteer Opportunity. 8:45
a.m. Call 270-7788 for details.
Aug. 17: Barracks Break
In. Free food and a movie in the
lounge of Barracks Bldg. 2105
starting a 6 p.m.
Aug. 18: Free Nacho Day. 6
p.m. at Planet Mayport (FREE,
while supplies last).
Aug. 20: Jacksonville Suns
Baseball Game. 6:15 p.m.
departure from Planet Mayport.
(Free)
Aug. 21: Comedy Zone Trip
Featuring Pauly Shore. 6 p.m.
departure from Planet Mayport.
Cost is $15. Sign up early.
Space is limited.
Aug. 22: Kayaking Trip.
7 a.m. departure to Guana


Reserve. Cost is $35. Sign up at
Planet Mayport.
Aug. 23: Deep Sea Fishing
Trip. Cost is $65. Call 270-
7788 for trip departure time.
Aug. 24: Drowning Pool
Concert. Drowning Pool,
Cold, Andy Griggs and Colt
Ford performing live at NAS
Jacksonville. Free transporta-
tion provided.
Aug. 25: Girls Gone
Golfing. Free girls only
golf outing at Windy Harbor
Golf Club. Sign up at Planet
Mayport.


K id Zone


Aug. 14: Freedom Friday,
Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth
Activities Center for ages 6-12
(age 5 if completed kindergar-
ten). Cost is $7 in advance or $9
the day of, if space. Early sign
up is recommended. 270-5680
Aug. 14: Teen Center
Extended Hours (Water
Wars). 7-10 p.m. at Club Teen
for middle and high school
ages. (Free) 270-5680
Aug. 14: Summer Outdoor
Movie (Daddy Day Camp,
PG). Start time is at sunset,
or approximately 9 p.m. every
Friday at Sea Otter Pavilion.
Light refreshments available
for purchase. Bring your lawn
chairs or blankets and bug


spray, just in case. (Free) 270-
5228
Aug. 16: Bowling Family
Fun Night. 5-8 p.m. every
Sunday at Mayport Bowling
Center. Cost is $9 per person
and includes All-You-Can Bowl
with shoes, spaghetti dinner,
music videos, light show and
colored headpin bowling for
prizes. 270-5377
Aug. 18: Teen Adventure
Landing Water Park Trip.
9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. for ages
12 and older. Cost is $12 per
person plus money for lunch.
Permission slip required. Sign
up at the Youth Activities
Center. 270-5680
Aug. 22: Teen Lock-In.


7 p.m. Saturday until 7 a.m.
Sunday. Cost is $12 in advance
or $15 the day of, if space.
Permission slip required. 270-
5680
Aug. 24: First Day of
School. Before and After
School Care offered for grades
Kindergarten through Fifth at
the Youth Activities Center.
Limited space remaining. 270-
5680
Aug. 29: Youth Fall Bowling
Early Registration. Register
11 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mayport
Bowling Center for USBC Fall
Youth Bowling League. League
meets Saturdays at 10 a.m.
starting Sept. 12. 270-5377 or
223-5935 (ask for Beth)


CADDY AUCTION 24 AUG 0900-1200 at Beachside Community Center
Registration open NOW To help us plan for this event, please register early.
Registration closes out Thursday, 20 August. LIMITED TO 120 GOLFERS
0630 Breakfast at Bogey's
0700 Putting Challenge on the Putting Green $5.00
0830 Shotgun Start
-1330 Lunch... Jack Daniel's BBQ at the CPO Club
-1430 Awards Presentation and Giveaways

Packages
BRONZE $10 includes Lunch at CPO Club
SILVER $40 includes Bronze package plus Breakfast, Range Balls,
Greens Fee, Cart and Gift Bag
GOLD** $50 includes Silver package plus JD/CPO Shirt


The Navy, nor any part of the federal government, does not officially endorse any company, sponsor, or
their products or services. Your friends at Jack Daniel's remind you to drink responsibly.


M WR Sports/Fitness


Sports
A 3v3 Indoor Soccer
Organizational meeting will be
held Aug. 18 at 11 a.m.
A Dusk to Dawn one-day
softball tournament will be held
Sept. 4 starting at 6 p.m. until
dawn. Cost is $225 per team
Sign up by Aug. 25.
Fitness
The Surfside Fitness schedule
is as follows:
Monday


7 a.m., TRX with Ruthie and
Emily
10:30 a.m., Broken Hearts
11:30 a.m., Step nKick
1 p.m., Moms in Motion
4:30 p.m., Zumba
Tuesday
7 a.m., IA Training
9:30 a.m. Lo Impact
11:30 a.m., Lunch Crunch
1 p.m., Strength Solutions &
Flexibility Fix-uups
3 p.m., TRX
Wednesday


6:30 a.m., Functional
Flexibility and Stress
Management
10:30 a.m., Broken Hearts
11:30 a.m., Zumba
1 p.m., Moms in Motion
5:30 p.m., Kids Clinic
5:30 p.m., Kickboxing
Thursday
11:30 a.m., Mind, Body
(Yoga, Pilates, Tai Chi)
1 p.m., Strength Solutions &
Flexibility Fix-ups
2:30 p.m., Command Yoga


Friday
7 a.m., Beach Bootcamp
11:30 a.m., IA Training
The new Gym schedule is as
follows:
Monday
6:30 a.m., Weight Training
for Warfighters
11:30 a.m., Circuit Senations
2:30 p.m., Command Row-
bics Tuesday
6:30 a.m., Command Cardio
Pump
11:30 a.m., Resistance


3 p.m., Conditioning for
Running with LaPlace
4:30 p.m., Spinning
Wednesday
7 a.m., Cardio, Combat and
CORE
11:30 a.m., Row-bics
2:30 p.m., Victory PRT
Thursday
7 a.m., Command Jump and
Jab
11:30 a.m., Spinning
Friday
6:30 a.m., Command


Spinning
11:30 a.m., Strength Training
Basics for Women with Traci
Water Aerobics schedule for
the Base Pool is as follows:
Monday
9 a.m., Aqua Aerobics
Wednesday
9 a.m., Aqua Aerobics
(Regular & Deep Water)
Thursday
9 a.m., Aqua Aerobics
Friday
9 a.m., Aqua Therapy


Mayport Cruisers


Bowl To Win


From MWR Bowhng Center
The Mayport Cruisers Youth
Bowling League traveled to
Port St. Lucie in June to par-
ticipate in the 44t Florida State
USBC Youth Tournament.
The Cruisers had 40 bowl-
ers entered in all divisions
and brought home 10 awards.
Jeremy Morosetti was the
big winner with first and sec-
ond place awards. Other win-
ners included: Alexus Hubert,
Jacob Lubas, Jazmyn Simmons,
James Simmons, Paige Lyman,


Ryan Sessoms, Rashaud
Sessoms and Kylie Sharp.
The Youth Winter League
begins on Sept. 12 at Mayport
Bowling Center with registra-
tion at 9 a.m. Participants may
pre-register on Aug. 29 from
11 a.m.-2 p.m. For more infor-
mation on Youth Bowling
Programs at Naval Station
Mayport, please call Bess
Lachowicz at 223-5935.


HelpA Child!

Be a Foster Parent
Foster Parents receive:
Comprehensive, Ongoing Training
24/7 Professional Support
Competitive Stipend
Flexible Scheduling
If you have a passion to help children,
foster parenting at Boys Town can be the
career of a lifetime.

Call 1-877-639-6003 today!

BOYS T W N, ACFC participant -
BOSwing TOWNn .u pic as
SAlng Chinren leaUng Famiies public service


L


YOREDUIMION. ,

Call only if you're ready to make it happen.


NAVAL

RESERVE
ACCELERATE YOUR LIFE
You know where you want to go in life. The Naval Reserve can help you
get there. In exchange for a part-time commitment, you'll receive numerous
benefits and opportunities that will help advance your career and enhance
your life. To learn more about proudly serving in our force

Please Email or Call:
Iptjacksonville@cnrc.Navy.Mil or call 1-800-342-8123
494464


tShare the
Power *
9?Wish.


4LIj


MAUW-WS,






THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 7

Officials Look To Solve Social Network Risks


By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service
As Pentagon officials weigh
the benefits and risks of social
networking sites such as Twitter
and Facebook, they hope to
craft a policy that shores up
security vulnerabilities without
requiring a ban.
Meanwhile, the Marine Corps
has clarified its guidelines on
social networking, and offi-
cials said they would consid-
er the findings gleaned in the
Pentagon policy review due out
in late September.
Defense officials have said
the policy review will attempt
to balance the pros of social
networking such as its value
for recruiting, public affairs and
communication between troops


and their families against the
potential security risks they cre-
ate, which include violations
of operations security, network
vulnerability and bandwidth
drain.
Asked if the Pentagon is lean-
ing toward a policy that doesn't
require a departmentwide ban,
Pentagon spokesman Bryan
Whitman replied, "I think cer-
tainly it is."
"We need to do this compre-
hensive review, determine what
the vulnerabilities are, match
that against the benefits we
receive from being able to use
these new tools and capabili-
ties, and then try to establish a
policy that will accommodate
all of that," Whitman said in an
interview yesterday.


Defense Secretary Robert
M. Gates is slated to receive a
report on the threats and ben-
efits of Web 2.0 tools before
the end of the month, and a
departmentwide policy is due
in late September. Both Gates
and Navy Adm. Mike Mullen,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, have embraced the new
technologies.
The Pentagon's chief infor-
mation officer is taking the
lead on the review, which was
prompted by concerns raised at
U.S. Strategic Command, offi-
cials said. Stratcom is respon-
sible for overseeing the use of
the "dot-mil" network.
For many junior-ranking
troops, Youtube, MySpace and
Facebook are more than mere


IAll Hands Welcome


4-8PM


TUESDAY,

AUGUST 18


FOC'SLE CPO CLUB, NS MAYPORT

Steak Dinner $1. per person
Steak, baked potato, corn on the cob, side salad and a dinner roll


Tickets must be purchased in advance...
Deadline to purchase tickets: 4pm Monday, Aug. 17

AWRC Jon Abell (HSL 46)
850-748-5941 or jonabell@me.com


K d]m~

wodo


diversions; they are the primary
means through which young
servicemembers communicate
with friends and families while
on deployments. They also rep-
resent avenues for recruiting
efforts and dialogue between
commanders and military per-
sonnel and families, Whitman
said.
"So it is a part of our soci-
ety; it is pervasive," he said.
"But we also have to be mind-
ful that we don't do things that
will impede our ability to do
our core missions here."
Concern for maintaining
operations security exists in
cyberspace as it does in other
social arenas, Whitman said. He
added that the military's opera-
tions security training regimen
- which emphasizes practic-
ing security at the source also
translates to social networking.
Whether I'm communicating
over the Internet or I'm talking
to somebody at a local estab-
lishment socially," he said, "I
should be mindful of [opera-
tions security] and what I say,
and whether or not it's going


to compromise any aspect of a
military operation." ,
In the midst of underlying
tension between social net-
working's pros and cons, the
absence of a standing Defense
Department policy has led to
differing interpretations of how
to mitigate threats, Whitman
said.
"It's an unevenness in the
way in which people have
applied locally policies
associated with how they have
assessed the threat," he said.
"And it reflects the tension that
exists between wanting to use
these social networking tools
and wanting to protect our net-
works.
"I think that tension ... is
important for us to resolve at a
department level so that com-
manders have some guidance
when they're looking at how
to use these tools, as well as
how to protect the networks,"
he added.
No departmentwide directives
ban the use of social network-
ing and other Web 2.0 appli-
cations. But the Marine Corps'


block on social networks under-
scores the unevenness Whitman
described.
Since early 2007, the Corps
has blocked Marines from
accessing sites such as Twitter,
Facebook and YouTube through
the Marine network. While
Marines at home and abroad
may use the sites on nonmili-
tary networks, only those with
a waiver are exempted from the
standing policy, Marine Corps
officials said.
"Right now, the [Defense
Department] has yet to come
up with a policy on this," said
Ray Letteer, senior informa-
tion assurance official for the
Marine Corps. "So we ... are
just maintaining what has been
the policy since 2007."
The Marines this week issued
a statement clarifying the ser-
vice's policy on social net-
working sites and spelling out
guidelines for obtaining waivers
in cases where access to such
social networks is essential for
a Marine's military job.
As the Defense Department
strives to find the right balance
in its policy, the Corps also
seeks to find harmony between
security concerns and the Web
capabilities' legitimate use.
"We want to balance that
security to protect our Marines
on the network [and] at the
same time start looking into
using this new technology, this
exciting capability of commu-
nication," Letteer said, "but do
it in a way ... where we move in
smartly, carefully and do it the
right way the first time."
He added that the Marines
also will strive to balance the
Defense Department's study
results with its own social net-
working policy.
"As with all directives from
the Department of Defense, we
will have to adapt and take a
look at the impacts on this and
be able to execute it in a way
that will meet with what the
[Defense Department] wants us
to do," Letteer said, "and still,
of course, meet our Marine
Corps mission."


STEAK Nli! HT


----------------------

17vrWANNIMVERSlRYSWlAIE

WB VIsco Latex/Memorv Foam Mattress

compare to
S' +TEMPUR-PEDIC,


^P B^ ^'^.- ""'.-* A' ^ A>K /^


Expir'es ~~'
8126109
I3 Beach Blvd 4 m
'BEDROOM 4.
1 >JUN mieeast of 9A, across from VyStar Bank)
Lo .641-5823 _


0 ave
', 0


ASSOCIATE'S, '


BACHELOR'S,


AND MASTER'S


DEGREES


I O N IN ,eLA SR O M 'O CD -R M


A TRADITION OF MILITARY SERVICE
Saint Leo University is a major global provider of higher education
to the military. We offer affordable academic excellence with
superior academic counseling to active duty military, veterans,
and civilians.

* Conveniently located at Mayport,
Building 460

* Programs designed to fit your schedule
* Small class sizes, online, or CD-ROM

* Approved for VA Benefits/GI Bill SAIN T LE
UNIVERSITY
* SLU is a participating member of What you need for where you're going.
the Yellow Ribbon Program and Founded in 1889
Navy Partnership
Saint Leo University admits students of any race, color, religion and national or ethnic origin.


I
- I


VAA







8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


FFSC Mayport Classes Workshops Available


From FFSC
The following classes and
activities are offered by the
Fleet and Family Support
Center (FFSC) and are free
of charge. Pre-registration is
required and childcare is not
available. For more information
about the classes or to register
call 270-6600, ext. 110. FFSC
is located in Building One on
Massey Avenue.
Aug. 13, 9-11 a.m., Resume
Walk-in Review Assistance,
FFSC
Aug. 13, noon-4 p.m.,
Leadership & Life Skills (E4
& Below), TBD
Aug. 14, 9-11 a.m., Credit
Report, FFSC
Aug. 17-20, 8:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m., SAVI Training, NAS
Jacksonville Chapel
Aug. 18, 9-11 a.m., Resume
Walk-in Review Assistance,
FFSC
Aug. 18, 9-11 a.m.,
Parenting Class, FFSC
Aug. 19, 8-11:30 a.m., Stress
Management, Wellness Center
Stress is a normal part of
everyone's life. It can be ener-
gizing and a factor in motivat-
ing us. But too much stress,
without relief, can have debil-
itating effects. This program
is designed to provide partici-
pants with an understanding of
what stress is and how it affects
them. It will also help partici-
pants begin to look at their own
lives and ways they currently
cope with stress. Participants
will be challenged to develop
behavior and lifestyle changes
that will improve their ability to
cope with stress.


Aug. 19, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottletyme Playgroup, USO
Parents and children together
meet to share parenting con-
cerns, ideas, and fun! The
group invites professionals to
address specific areas of con-
cern such as nutrition, toilet
training, etc. We even take
field trips several times a year
to local parks, museums and
playgrounds. This group is
designed for moms new to the
area or moms who want their
child to interact with other
children their child's age. All
children age four and below are
invited to attend.
Aug. 20, 9-11 a.m., Resume
Walk-in Review Assistance,
FFSC
Aug. 20, 8-11 a.m., Anger
Management, FFSC
What does anger do for you?
Communicate for you? Keep
people at a safe distance from
you? Keep you in charge? For
many people, anger serves them


many uses, but all too often,
it is at a high cost...usually of
relationships, unhappiness in
the workplace, and a general
feeling of disdain. If you want
to be able to break out of the
"get angry/get even" syndrome,
come to this class. Participants
learn how anger and judgment
are related, about irrational
beliefs and faulty self-talk, what
"E + R = 0" means, and the
roles of stress and forgiveness
in anger.
Aug. 20, 1-4 p.m.,
Leadership & Life Skills (E7
& Above), TBD
Aug. 21, 9-11 a.m.,
Establishing A Sound Family
Budget, FFSC
Aug. 22, 8-11:30 a.m.,
Smooth Move, FFSC
This workshop is designed
for inexperienced, as well as
experienced military members
on permanent change of station
(PCS) orders. The Personal
Property Shipping Office will


'Family Matters Blog

Offers Support to

Military Families
From American Forces Press Service
American Forces Press Service has launched a military
blog called "Family Matters" dedicated to helping military
families deal with the challenges and situations unique to a
military lifestyle. The blog features tips from experts, useful
resources and timely responses to comments and questions.
Upcoming topics include back-to-school tips, education
benefits, dealing with deployments, childcare and more.
Read "Family Matters" at http://afps.dodlive.mil/categorv/
family-matters/.


provide information on how to
deal with movers and personal
property entitlements. The trav-
el section of Personnel Support
Detachment (PSD) will pres-
ent a section on travel pay and
allowances. FFSC staff will
discuss the emotional cycles of
relocation, budgeting for a PCS
move and provide some strate-
gies for families.
Aug. 24, 9-11 a.m., What
About The Kids?, FFSC
Children who witness fam-
ily violence are often forgot-
ten as the unintended victims.
A wide range of child adjust-
ment problems has been found
to be associated with exposure
to domestic violence. Parent's
need to see and understand the
effects of domestic violence
on children as encompassing
behavior, emotion, development
and socialization. Parents need
to understand that there is an
intergenerational cycle of vio-
lence and they may be creat-
ing a legacy for their child of
learned violent behavior. The
purpose of this program is not
to shame parents for events
that have already happen, but
to instill hope that things can
change. The knowledge that the
violence, which many parents
incorrectly believe is unseen
by their children, is negative-
ly impacting their children's
growth and development and
may provide an additional moti-
vator for ending the violence
and seeking intervention.
Aug. 24-27, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.,
TAP Separatee Workshop,
Building 1, Room 104
Designed for Military per-


sonnel within 180 -90 days of
leaving the military. The semi-
nar focuses on benefits for ser-
vice members and their family
members. Participants receive
help in translating their mili-
tary acquired skills into civil-
ian language and are exposed
to the civilian job market and
how to successfully compete
in the civilian employment
arena; learning about resumes,
employment interviews and
marketing themselves. If you
are within a minimum of 180
days of leaving the military
see your career counselor for a
quota for this highly successful
program.
Aug. 25, 9-11 a.m., Resume
Walk-in Review Assistance,
FFSC
Aug. 25, 9-11 a.m.,
Parenting Class, FFSC
Aug. 26, 6-7 p.m., IA Family
Discussion Group, USO
Aug. 26, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottletyme Playgroup, USO
Parents and children together
meet to share parenting con-
cerns, ideas, and fun! The
group invites professionals to
address specific areas of con-
cern such as nutrition, toilet
training, etc. We even take
field trips several times a year
to local parks, museums and
playgrounds. This group is
designed for moms new to the
area or moms who want their
child to interact with other
children their child's age. All
children age four and below are
invited to attend.
Aug. 27, 9-11:30 a.m.,
Sponsor Training, FFSC
Sponsors play a critical role


On Base
Wednesday, Sept. 2
Mayport Military MOPS
(Mothers of Preschoolers)
Invites all moms of children
ages 0-5 to join us for "Life on
Planet Mom" beginning Sept.
2. MOPS meets every first and
third Wednesday at the Mayport
Base Chapel 9:15-11:30am.
Free Childcare! No fees. Come
see what it's all about! For more
info visit: www.myspace.com/
mayportmops
Wednesday, Sept. 16
Mayport Military MOPS
(Mothers of Preschoolers)
Invites all moms of children
ages 0-5 to join us for "Life on
Planet Mom" beginning Sept.
2. MOPS meets every first and
third Wednesday at the Mayport
Base Chapel 9:15-11:30am.
Free Childcare! No fees. Come
see what it's all about! For more
info visit: www.myspace.com/
mayportmops

Out in Town

Saturday, Aug. 15
The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 290 is
hosting a Chicken-Fried Steak
Dinner from 5-8 p.m, at the
Branch Home at 390 Mayport
Rd. Dinners will include
mashed potatoes and a veg-
etable. A donation of $8 is
requested for each dinner.
Carry out orders are accepted.
The public is always invited to
dinner. Starting at 9 p.m. the
music of DOUG BRACEY will
entertain until 1 a.m. Happy
hour precedes the dinner from
4-6 p.m., all drinks are 500 off.
Christ United Methodist


Church invites the communi-
ty to an old-fashioned fish fry,
hosted by the United Methodist
Men, from 4-7 p.m. Dinners
will include fish, chips, hush
puppies, cole slaw, beverages
and dessert. Dinners are $7 for
adults and $4 for children ages
12 and under. The fish will be
jumping onto your plates from
4-7 p.m., so meet us in front of
the church to reel yours in! 400
Penman Road, Neptune Beach.
Need info? Call the church at
249-5370.
Sunday, Aug. 16
Join a park ranger at 10
a.m. and discover the impor-
tance of estuarine systems that
surround the inshore sides of
barrier islands like those of
the Talbot Islands State Parks
complex. This ranger-guided
hike along the salt marsh will
help point out why these areas
are one of the most productive
ecosystems on Earth, the many
roles the salt marsh plays, the
plant and animal life found in
this natural community, and
the impacts humans have on
this system. This program will
take place at the Ribault Club
on Fort George Island Cultural
State Park. No reservations are
necessary and the program is
free. For additional informa-
tion on any of these programs,
call the Talbot Islands Ranger
Station at (904) 251-2320.
For more information about
Florida State Parks, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org.
Monday, Aug. 17
The Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 290,
invites you to play Bingo at the
Branch Home, 390 Mayport
Rd. Games start at 6 p.m. and
are usually finished by 8 p.m.


C calendar

Snacks will be available for a tions are nece
small donation, and the bar will gram is free
be open. admission. F(
Wednesday, Aug. 19 nation on a
The Fleet Reserve grams, call t
Association, Branch 290, Ranger Stati
invites you to participate in its 2320. For E
"Wings-N-Things" from 5-8 about Florida
p.m., at the Branch Home, 390 www.FloridaS
Mayport Road, Atlantic Beach, The F 1
FL. Snacks will be available Association B
for a donation of $1.50 to $5. ing a Spaghet
Then stay and enjoy the music p.m. at the Bi
of Doug Bracey from 9 p.m. to Mayport Rd
1 a.m. include garlic
Saturday, Aug. 22 A donation
The Jacksonville ed for each
Genealogical Society, Inc., orders are a
will hold their monthly meet- hour precede
ing at the Webb-Wesconnett 4-6 p.m., all
Branch Library, 6887 103rd The public is
Street, Jacksonville, Fl., at 1:30 dinner. Star
p.m. We are extremely pleased music of Bi
to have as our speaker Mr. entertain unti
James Mitchell Brown, MA. Monday, A
Mr. Brown's program will be The Fl
"Federal-Land States and Their Associatiol
Land Records." These records invites you tc
often contain critical evidence Branch HoE
that can be used in serious Rd. Games
genealogical investigation." are usually f
MBrown will have a power- Snacks will
point presentation and provide a small donation
detailed syllabus. For additional be open.
information please feel free to Saturday,.
contact Mary Chauncey, (904- The Ladies
781-9300). Fleet Reser
Join one of our knowledge- Unit 290, wi
able park rangers at 2 p.m. for to the gamb
an informative talk on the natu- Canaveral, Fl
ral history of sea islands and the Fleet Re
their important role in coastal Mayport Rd.
ecology. The topics addressed a.m. The co
will include beach erosion, son, and inch
island migration, island forma- to and from tl
tion and the natural commu- drinks on the
nities present on such barrier on the ship.
islands today. The program will made in adva
take place at pavilion one on Friday, Aug
Little Talbot Island. No reserva- Ruth Tenn at


essary and the pro-
with regular park
or additional infor-
any of these pro-
:he Talbot Islands
ion at (904) 251-
nore information
a State Parks, visit
StateParks.org.
eet Reserve
ranch 289 is host-
tti Dinner from 5-8
ranch Home at 390
. The menu will
c bread and salad.
of $8 is request-
dinner. Carry out
accepted. Happy
:s the dinner from
drinks are 500 off.
Always invited to
ting at 9 p.m. the
11 Bissonett will
S1 a.m.
Lug. 24
eet Reserve
n, Branch 290,
, play Bingo at the
me, 390 Mayport
start at 6 p.m. and
finished by 8 p.m.
be available for a
*n, and the bar will

Aug. 29
s Auxiliary of the
rve Association,
ill host a bus trip
ling ship at Port
la. The bus leaves
serve Home, 390
, promptly at 6:30
ist is $43 per per-
udes transportation
he Port, snacks and
bus, and the fare
Payment must be
dance, on or before
S21. Please call
249-0931, or tick-


ets are available at the Fleet
Reserve Branch Home.
Sunday, Aug. 30
Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to
learn about the many common
species that inhabit the natural
communities of the undevel-
oped barrier islands of northeast
Florida. The program will take
place at pavilion one on Little
Talbot Island. No reservations
are necessary and the program
is free with regular park admis-
sion. For additional informa-
tion on any of these programs,
call the Talbot Islands Ranger
Station at (904) 251-2320.
For more information about
Florida State Parks, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org.
Saturday, Sept. 5
Join a park ranger at 2
p.m. and learn about the life-
cycle of the sea turtle and the
importance of these creatures.
The program will take place at
pavilion two on Little Talbot
Island. No reservations are nec-
essary and the program is free
with regular park admission.
Sunday, Sept. 13
Join a Park Ranger at 10
a.m.for a leisurely paced hike
to discover the island, natural
communities. Participants are
encouraged to bring bug spray
and bottled water. This program


will take place at the Ribault
Club on Fort George Island
Cultural State Park. No reser-
vations are necessary and the
program is free.
Sunday, Sept. 20
Join a park ranger at 2 p.m.
for an intriguing presentation
and gain insight into the spider,
world. The program will take
place at pavilion one on Little
Talbot Island. No reservations
are necessary and the program
is free with regular park admis-
sion.
Sunday, Sept. 27
Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to
learn about the many common
species that inhabit the natural
communities of the undevel-
oped barrier islands of northeast
Florida. The program will take
place at pavilion one on Little
Talbot Island. No reservations
are necessary and the program
is free with regular park admis-
sion.

quideDog)4
:F foundation
For The Blind, Inc."

1-800-548-4337
www.guidedog.org
a CFC participant
Provided as a public service.


$49 per Hour) Relief from...
all military& HEADACHES STRESS
dependents with ID e TENSION PAIN


Cody Haslett, LMT
License No. MA53989


NEVER QUIT
* Maintain your rank Part-time service
* Retirement benefits in your community
* Up to 100% tuition Switch to a new
assistance available career field


NATIONALGUARD.com
1-800-GO-GUARD


Florida
NATIONA.I

cs Hill


The Air Force Reserve
is offering part-time
opportunities for Medical
Professionals with excellent
benefits, including choice
of home base, education
assistance, secure employment
and competitive pay.


Continue to build close
friendships, serve your country
and participate in experiences
unique to the military.
Accomplish extraordinary things
while you achieve your
personal goals.


Choose your home base and
you will not be transferred.
Receive low cost TRICARE health
insurance. Maintain retirement
benefits. In most cases you can
retain your rank. Specific jobs
come with signing bonuses.

:11 BDBBB-


in retaining newcomers and
increasing overall productivity
and morale by making a new-
comer's arrival at the command
easier. The Sponsor Program
is designed to help facilitate
the relocation of Navy service
members and their families cre-
ating a link between the service
member and their new com-
mand. The primary goal is to
ease difficulty and reduce the
apprehensions normally associ-
ated with a Permanent Change
of Station (PCS) move.
Aug. 27, 9-11 a.m., Resume
Walk-in Review Assistance,
FFSC
Aug. 27, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Leadership & Life Skills (E5
& E6), TBD
Aug. 28, 9-11 a.m., Home
Buying, FFSC
Aug. 31, 8 a.m.-noon, FERP-
Career & Job Readiness
Class, FFSC
Aug. 31, 1-2:30 p.m., FERP-
Federal Employment Class,
FFSC
Learn how to do an effective
job search to find the "perfect
job!" Topics presented are:
Career Exploration, Job Search
Strategies, Resume Writing,
Interviewing Skills, Self-
Employment and the Federal
Employment System.
Aug. 31, 6-7 p.m.,
Ombudsman Assembly, USO
Sept. 1, 9-11 a.m., Parenting
Class, FFSC
Sept. 8, 9-11 a.m., Parenting
Class, FFSC
Sept. 15, 9-11 a.m.,
Parenting Class, FFSC
Sept. 22, 9-11 a.m.,
Parenting Class, FFSC


The Beaches Frhehest!
.M.ro-tL


Chicken Par h r/ B d drink $5.99
2 Pizz R l4 ; l l B or $1.99
Hun any lunch!


Fa On ant

Try our Specials.

Dine-I very!
All of our food is made fresh to order on premises-Sauces,
soups, dressings, desserts, breads, Pizza dough and more!!
Military, Request 10% discount-Dine in Only!


Italian & More

Catering Also Available!
Now Delivering to Mayport NS.
(904) 246-9926 www.lapizzaria.net
2158 Mayport Rd #5, Atlantic Beach, FL 32233


I










USS Carney Sailo


998





. .3
n -' -



, '-_ _


rs Fly

By Ensign Emily Rhatican
USS Carney PAO
Four USS Camey (DDG 64)
Sailors had a unique opportuni-
ty to cross-deck for the day and
enjoy a flight in a P-3 Orion,
hosted by the VP-30 "Prosnest"
training squadron.
Camey routinely trains with
P-3 Orions while conduct-
ing anti-submarine warfare
training missions, and Ensign
Ryan Branham, Ensign Patrick
Amundson, Sonar Technician
2nd Class Nathan Dunlap, and
Operations 2nd Class Kevin
Boxer were the lucky Carney
Warriors to observe the anti-
submarine warfare platform
from a new angle.
The flight was especially


THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 9


With VP-30


pertinent training for Boxer,
who is one of Carney's Anti-
Submarine Tactical Air
Controllers (ASTAC). As an
ASTAC, OS2 Boxer controls
the anti-submarine air assets
under Carney's tactical con-
trol, including the employment
of weapons and sonobuoys on
board P-3 Orions, as well as
SH-60B Seahawks.
Boxer had an "amazing expe-
rience. It was fascinating to get
the viewpoint of the pilot in the
cockpit and to see how they line
up on the runway for landing."
In addition to the cockpit,
Boxer surveyed other stations
in the P-3 to observe all the dif-
ferent jobs of the flight crew,
including radar operation, nav-


igation, tactical coordination,
piloting, acoustic operation,
sonobuoy handling, electrician,
and engineer.
Boxer noted that, much like
Camey, the P-3 "requires many
people doing various tasks to
come together as one."
After flying with the P-3,
Boxer is better equipped to con-
trol and direct its anti-subma-
rine warfare capabilities.
"I'm a better ASTAC now
because I have a better under-
standing of how P-3 personnel
operate," he said.
"I am better prepared to give
the flight crew the most per-
tinent information that will
enable both them and us to
complete the mission."


-Photo courtesy of USS Carney
Carney Sailors enjoy flight with the VP-30 "Prosnest" training squadron.


Single-Coat, Rapid-Cure



Tank Coating Authorized


By Frank Shay
Naval .. Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet
Mechanical Engineer
Thanks to the approval of a
single coat paint system now
authorized for use Sailors will
spend less time performing
the challenging and decidedly
un-fun task of painting tanks
and voids. The new system
also cures faster than previ-
ously used systems, requiring
less down time for the spaces in
question.
In the past, ultra-high solid
coating systems used in tanks
and voids required a three-coat
system (i.e., prime, stripe, and
top coats) taking about 24 hours
between coats and seven days
for final curing before they
could be placed back in service.
The total time could be 10 or
more days.
That process added a signifi-


cant amount of time to already
tight production schedules and
increases costs due to man-
power, dry dock time, materi-
als, equipment, application sup-
plies, inspection and rework.
Missed overcoat windows and
loss of adhesion between coats
can lead to failure. The current
process slows production and is
costly to the shipyards and the
Navy.
The new single-coat, rap-
id-cure tank coating system
combines the three coating
steps (prime, stripe, and top
coats) into a single evolution.
Application during a single
coating evolution in a tank, the
cure time is four hours before
touch-up and eight to 24 hours
before service. Tanks coated
with single-coat, rapid-cure
technologies are ready for ser-
vice within 48 hours after the


initial application, thus drasti-
cally reducing production time.
Time in dry dock will be greatly
reduced, and manpower and
material costs will be mini-
mized.
Single coat has been autho-
rized in accordance with
NAVSEA 05P letter 05P/294
of 11 Sept 08 Technical
Authorization to Install "Single
Coat" Paint Systems on New
Construction and In-Service
Ships and Submarines,
NAVSEA 05P letter 05P/416
of 11 Dec 08 Technical
Authorization to Install "Single
Coat" Paint Systems in Fuel
Tanks and Compensating Fuel
Tanks on New Construction
and In-Service Ships and
Submarines and NAVSEA
Standard Item 009-32, FY10
CH-1, dated March 9, 2009.


D-R-Horton is America's largest builder and wants to help America's
Heroes build a solid foundation for their future. Start living your
dream today in one of 4 communities convenient to Mayport!


Payments from PLUS take advantage


$725 of up to $8000

I in TRUE Tax Credit!*

Per Month!* THIS IS NOT A LOAN!


EAGLES HAMMOCK /
VICTORIA LAKES
New Homes from the $150's!
904-751-3614 I Yellow Bluff Rd. North or Alta Dr. & 9-A


* Minutes from 9-A, 1-95, JIA, great
shopping, dining & entertainment at
the brand new River City Marketplace
* Family oriented community pool,
tennis courts & playground
* Excellent location, convenient to
Kings Bay & Mayport


PRITCHARD POINT
New Homes from the $120's!
904-378-9859 | Imeson Rd. just South of Pritchard Rd off 1-295


* Less than two miles from 1-295, 15
minutes from NAS Jacksonville
* Less than one mile from 13 mile
Baldwin Rail Trail jogging/bike path
* Community pool with Cabana and
playground








A -
j --._-_- -." -


I.E


BARRINGTON COVE
New Homes from the $130's!
904-854-0249 | Dunn Ave just West of 1-295 in North Jax
* Beautifully landscaped community .
Large, estate sized lots with lake and "
conservation views available
* Close to schools, shopping, easy
access To 1-95 & 1-295
* Community Playground 4



HERONS LANDING
New Homes from the s130's!
904-223-7208 | Beach Blvd Between Hodges & San Pablo
* Attached Garages with direct entry
to Home
* Only 4 MILES from the beaches!
* 35 restaurants and 4 shopping
centers within 1 mile!--
* 2 miles from boating, water park,
theaters, & community golf course


100% VA Financing!* Historically Low Interest Rates!
Closing Costs PAID When Using Preferred Lender!


It's the place
you call home


S*725/month estimated payment Is based on a Sales Price of $126,990 for the Anastasia In Pritchard Point with Zero Downpayment, VA 30 year fixed rate of 5375% (5.886% APR) with
loan amount of $29,530 which includes a $2540 VA Funding fee. Must have VA eligibility and meet other qualifications to qualify for VA loan. This payment does not include property
taxes, homeowners insurance or HOA fees. Interest rates are subject to change without notice and may vary based on credit score. Not all buyers will qualify. Federal tax credit of up
to $8,000 available to first-time homebuyers who close escrow on or before November 30, 2009. Income imitations apply. Amount of tax credit, If any, Is not paid to buyer upon close of
escrow. Buyer must claim the tax credit on buyer's federal income tax return. Not all buyers will qualify. This information is provided for general guidance only and does not constitute
tax advice. Please consult an accountant or attorney for your particular situation. Visit www.federalhousingtaxcredit.com for complete details Prices, specifications, incentives and
availability subject to change without notice. Please see your New Home Consultant for details and a list of qualifying homes. CBC058997 @ 2009 DR Horton, Inc. All rights reserved.


669615


v* *HO^RIO NYSE
4e~j *


~~n ..








40 _N5. OFF 5 CDC










limted soactfat. orr, bt o arefunds.e ..
Go t ww~noamayortorgto sgn-p &pay







Ths dtsconid ih h YCsFreo rdys-onatYA o inupfr hi


event.



LI


VNVWIrl yport. 00+ donated


I


Drea

liveshere


"






10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


NAVSO Hosts Reserve Admiral

U .


Fourth Fleet FLO Has Ties With Endeavor Crew


By MC1(SW)
Holly Boynton
U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/
U.S. 4 Fleet
Capitan de Fragata Augusto
Ganoza, Armada de Peru,
Foreign Liaison Officer at
U.S. Naval Forces Southern
Command (NAVSO) and U.S.
4th Fleet, shares a special con-
nection with the Endeavor mis-
sion that launched July 31.
Ganoza, a Peruvian naval
officer currently stationed in
Jacksonville, Fla., attended the
U.S. Naval Academy from 1989
to 1993.
For three of his four years at
the Academy, Ganoza shared a
room with Cmdr. Chris Cassidy,
currently in space onboard


the shuttle Endeavor. Cassidy
served as a Navy SEAL for 10
years before joining the space
program.
"He is just in the beginning
of a wonderful career serving
this country," said Ganoza. "He
did as a Seal and now as an
astronaut."
Ganoza recalls his surprise
and pleasure at reconnecting
with Cassidy after many years.
Ganoza returned to Peru fol-
lowing his graduation from
the Naval Academy and only
recently returned to the United
States.
"It is incredible how far
is he getting on his life and
how life brought us together
again during my tour here in


Jacksonville," Ganoza explains.
"We found ourselves as
Commanders now and it seems
just no so long ago that we
were mids at the Academy. We
just spent several days visiting
Chris's family and seeing again
my company classmates during
the launch attempts. It was so
rewarding to see them all and
especially Chris's family."
NAVSO and 4th Fleet have
liaison officers from Brazil,
Chile, Colombia, Ecuador
and Peru on staff who act as
subject-matter experts for their
respective navies and provide
feedback and guidance criti-
cal to the success of NAVSO's
many exercises and operations
with partner nations.


As the Navy component
command of SOUTHCOM,
NAVSO's mission is to direct
U.S. naval forces operating
in the Caribbean, Central and
South American regions and
interact with partner nation
navies within the maritime
environment.
Operations include counter-
illicit trafficking, theater secu-
rity cooperation, military-to-
military interaction and bilat-
eral and multinational training.
U.S. 4th Fleet is the numbered
fleet assigned to NAVSO, exer-
cising operational control of
assigned forces.
U.S. 4th Fleet conducts the
full spectrum of maritime secu-
rity operations (MSO) in sup-


port of U.S. objectives and that promote coalition building


security cooperation activities


and deter aggression.


Children shouldn't have to check
their blood sugar and get insulin
shots every day. Or worry about
the threat of complications like
kidney failure, blindness and
heart disease. But the millions of
children with type 1 diabetes do.
With research and results, we're
moving faster toward a cure.
Call 800-533-CURE or visit
wwwjdrf.org

Mary Tyler Moore
International Chairmani
~IE Diabetes
SResearch
Foundation
dedicated to finding a cure


A I ~I


Provided a 1 phic service


Villages of Bartram Springs
in Southeast Jacksonville
Townhomes from the $120s

* 4 floor plans with 1,445-1,788 sq. ft.
* 2-4 bedrooms, 1- and 2-car attached garages
* only 29 miles from Naval Station Mayport

Enjoy world-class amenities with 2 pools, a gym, a clubhouse,
sports fields and more. Convenient to shopping and dining, and
zoned for highly rated schools. Quick move-in homes available.

From 1-95, exit east on St. Augustine Rd. Turn right on US 1, continue for approx.
4 mi., turn right on Racetrack Rd. and right into community to townhomes ahead
on left. (904) 880-4703


Waterleaf in Intracoastal West

Single-family homes from the $170s

10 floor plans with 1,403-3,385 sq. ft., 3-6 bedrooms
only 8 miles from Naval Station Mayport

This popular family-friendly community offers beautiful homesites
surrounded by a wooded preserve. Waterleaf is located within
close proximity to schools, the beach, shopping and dining.
IEnjoy a pool, waterpark and playground with a low HOA and no
CDD fees.

From 9A, head east on Atlantic Blvd. for approx. 2.2 mi. Turn left on Kernan Blvd.
... .-.... to community 1 mi. ahead on left. (904) 645-6724


Come see how simple and affordable homeownership can be.
After a quick comparison, we think you'll agree there's no place like a home of your own.


Say Good-Bye to Rent

Learn how it pays
to own a home.


888-KB-HOMES


Benefits of Built to Order"

Great value. Smart design.
Your way.


See other side for a complete list of Jacksonville-area KB Home communities.


Broker Cooperation Welcome. 02009 KB Home (KBH). Payment of Broker Co-op requires Broker to accompany and register buyer on first visit and comply with Broker Co-op Agreement. See Built to OrderT options and upgrades offered at KB Home Studio. All options/upgrades require
ro,,h...-~i,,i additional charges, may require ordering at predetermined stages of construction and are subject to change/discontinuation anytime by KB Home. KB Home is not a custom homebuilder and Built to Order only applies to appliances/options available at
pAewHome KB Home Studio. Plans, pricing, financing, terms, availability and specifications subject to change/prior sale without notice and may vary by neighborhood, lot location and home series. Additional charges apply for lot premiums, options/upgrades. Buyer EAR
s ou r e responsible for all taxes, insurance and other fees. Sq. footage is approximate. HOA applies. Continued scope/preservation of wooded areas is subject to change and not guaranteed. Quick-move-in homes may require up to approximately 90 days before .
Nw.om..So-o .m available for closing Photos show upgraded landsca in /o tions and may not represent communities' lowest-priced or quick-move-in homes. See sales representative for details. CRC057509 JAX-80493 VIAMlRI SB r

NAVSO Says Goodbye To SEA

























-Photo courtesy of COMUSNAVSO
Capt. Al Collins, ChiefofStaff U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO), U.S. 4" Fleet,
right, congratulates Senior Chief Quartermaster (SW/AW) Kevin L. Clark, NAVSO, 4t Fleet's
Senior Enlisted Advisor (SEA) after presenting him with the Meritorious Service Medal dur-
ing Clark's end-of-tour award ceremony. Clark was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for
his service as the command'sfirst SEA, where he represented the command's enlistedpersonnel
needs to the commander NAVSO, 4t4 Fleet appointed Clark to SEA to fill in for the command
master chief, who frequently travels throughout Latin America. Clark is scheduled to report
aboard the Mayport-based guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) for his next assign-
ment.


-Photo courtesy of COMUSNAVSO
Commander, Navy Reserve Forces Command, Rear Adm.(lower half) John G. Messerschmidt,
center, visits with Capt. Al Collins, Chief of Staff, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command
(NAVSO), U.S. 4th Fleet, left, and Capt. Gregory S. Parker, NAVSO, 4th Fleet Maritime
Operations Center implementation director, right, during a visit to Naval Station Mayport.
Messerschmidt also met with Jacksonville-based operation support officers and staff members
from Commander, Navy Region Southeast, NAVSO, 4th Fleet, Maritime Expeditionary Security
Squadron (MSRON) 10, and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 40 to discuss reserve support
issues.


kbhome.com


'15






THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 11

Navy Region Southeast Announces 2009 Iron Chefs




-=- ,
.~ ....,1 rI -.


---'K---"




-Photos by MC1 Rebecca Kruck
Food Network Chef Robert Irvine gives Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Andre Keith, assigned to Naval
Hospital Jacksonville, pointers during the cooking portion of the 2009 Commander, Navy Region
Southeast Iron Chef Competition at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Keith's team took second place
during the competition.


By MC1(SW/AW) Rebecca
Kruck
Naval Air Station Jacksonville Public

Naval Air Station Jackson-
ville's Flight Line Caf6 hosted
an iron chef competition July
30 for six culinary specialists
teams from various Command
Navy Region Southeast instal-
lations.
Teams from Naval Station
Mayport, Naval Air Station
Jacksonville, Naval Submarine
Base Kings Bay, Naval Hospital
Jacksonville, Naval Base
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and
Naval Construction Battalion
Center (NCBC) Gulfport par-
ticipated in the competition.
Robert Irvine, a Food
Network chef and a judge for
the competition, judged the
teams on work ethic, ingredi-
ents, presentation and dish taste.
"The Navy does such an
amazing job of training their
culinary specialists and putting
them through the [American
Culinary Federation] program,"
said Irvine. "Anybody that
comes out of the service has a
discipline, they have the focus


and they have the training. If
someone came up to me and
said I was a culinary special-
ist in the Navy, they would be
hired on the spot."
Prior to the competition,
David Bearl, a chef from First
Coast Technical Institute's
School of Culinary Arts, gave
the teams some guidelines to
follow.
"You will need to dem-
onstrate four classical cuts, a
vinaigrette and at least two sauc-
es," said Bearl. "We will also
be looking for sanitation and
safety and organization skills.
We don't want to see you wast-
ing anything. If you waste food,
you waste money."
The competition began at
7:30 a.m. with the revealing
of the mystery proteins, fresh
shrimp and beef tenderloin. The
six teams then had 30 minutes
to write a menu and three hours
to prepare a salad, appetizer,
and main entrEe dish for each
of the four judges as well as for
the presentation table.
Robert Tulko, Winn Dixie's


executive chef, also served as a
judge for the competition.
"One of the entree meats is
a beef tenderloin. You use dif-
ferent cuts of this meat for dif-
ferent dishes. So I want to see
them using it appropriately"
said Tulko. "We're looking for
creativity. They're taking these
ingredients and making some-
thing special."
At the close of the com-
petition, Irvine announced
the winners. Commander,
Navy Region Southeast Rear
Adm. T. Alexander and Naval
Air Station Jacksonville
Commander Capt. Jack Scorby
presented the awards.
Naval Base Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba's team, consisting
of Culinary Specialist 1st Class
Horace Rodney and Culinary
Specialist 2nd Class Victor
Silas, won first place.
"I'm shocked," said Silas. "I
can't believe it!"
"We put 60 to 70 hours in
the kitchen after hours getting
ready for this," said Rodney.
"We prepared a list of 'secret'
ingredients that would go with
any meat, which helped us put


I n& W a ..
Navy Culinary Specialists rush to prepare their dishes before the clock runs out during the 2009
Commander, Navy Region Southeast Iron Chef Competition.


together our menu."
Their menu consisted of a
warm bacon salad, Key West
lemon-grilled shrimp, stuffed
beef tenderloin, German pota-
toes and sweet glazed carrots.


Naval Hospital Jacksonville's
team, consisting of Culinary
Specialist 2nd Class Brandon
Robinson and Culinary
Specialist 2nd Class Derrick
Victor, took home second place.


NCBC Gulfport's team, con-
sisting of Culinary Specialist
2nd Class Brandon Robinson
and Culinary Specialist 2nd
Class Derrick Victor, took home
third place.


Escape to Amelia island

and enjoy the best lodging

deals on the island, created

exclusivelyfor military

personnel. Trom beautiful

beaches to historical charm,

this island getaway will

make your time offthe

best time ever.


U-


Details at www.Amelialsland.com/SeasideSalute


9


seaside salute r our men and women in uniform


4d


;lli~t~l~
:,


i:: : .-.
. ...-"... .
.* = ....:.:::" .:,
* "f a S-::'::: ... :.


ar~'3 ~~CI~~LC~IIL~
7 ;
~i~C";1


Ar/







12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


Six Easy Ways To Stretch Your Food Budget


By Kay Blakley
DeCA home economist
The Military Saves campaign
encourages service members
and their families to develop
financial fitness habits that lead
to personal financial stability,
and ultimately, to mission readi-
ness. To help attain those goals,
there's hardly a better habit
to embrace than choosing the
commissary for all your grocery
and household needs. After all,
"Extending the paychecks of
military members with savings
of 30-percent or more is the
reason the commissary benefit
exists," said DeCA Director and
Chief Executive Officer Philip
E. Sakowitz Jr. So, it should
come as no surprise that No. 1
on our list of six easy ways for
military families to stretch their
food budget is shop the com-
missary!
1. Shop the commissary: We
may look like a retail grocery
store, but we're actually a gov-
ernment agency charged with
delivering a non-pay benefit
for military members and their


families. Commissaries make
no profit you pay the same
price DeCA pays for products,
plus the 5-percent surcharge,
which goes directly to funding
the new construction or renova-
tion of commissaries.
Government agencies aren't
allowed to advertise, so you
won't have a splashy grocery
circular screaming daily spe-
cials at you each time you walk
through the door. Instead, take
note of the red, white and blue
"Savings You've Earned" shelf
signs, or visit the Savings Aisle
at http://www.commissaries.
com to view prices and percent
savings of specific sale items in
the store where you shop.
Consistently shopping the
commissary provides an aver-
age savings of more than
30-percent over retail grocery
store prices. We know this from
database comparisons of com-
missary prices versus retail gro-
cery prices, plus recurring typi-
cal market basket surveys. But
do your own comparisons and
see the proof for yourself.


2. Plan ahead: Sound meal
planning and eating more meals
at home will go a long way
toward reducing your overall
food expenditures. Don't for-
get to include leftovers in your
plan. A large, inexpensive roast
served on Sunday can provide
the makings for sandwiches on
Monday and a protein source in
a chef salad served on Tuesday.
3. Make a list: Having a def-
inite list when you shop helps
avoid impulse buys. If you find
an item on sale that you know
you'll use later, feel free to add
it to your cart. But beware of
pretty displays that don't fit into
your plan, and never shop when
you're tired or hungry. You'll
fill your cart with all kind of
items everything looks good
when you're starving and trying
to hurry.
4. Read labels and compare
prices: When comparing pric-
es of competing brands, com-
pare the number of servings per
container. A cheaper price on
a larger size is only a savings
if you actually use those extra


ounces. It's no bargain if you
end up throwing them away.
Don't automatically assume that
a larger-size container is always
a better buy. Sometimes it is,
but often it's not. Always check
the unit price shelf tag, or do
the math yourself. Sometimes
huge savings can also be found
by comparing the same product
in different forms.
For example, at my local
commissary's prices today,
a half-cup serving of oatmeal
from an 18-ounce box of quick-
cooking oats costs 7 cents,
but from a box of 12 single-
serving packets it costs 26
cents. Serving size and micro-
wave cooking instructions are
exactly the same. The price of
a 12-ounce package of smoked
ham in the cold cuts section
worked out to be $4.61 per
pound. The same product, from
a competing brand, was avail-
able in the deli section for less
than half that price $2.17 per
pound. Plus, I could have it cus-
tom sliced to my satisfaction
and purchase exactly the num-


ber of ounces I needed.
5. Do it yourself: The higher
price for "convenience" items
reflects the labor required to
pre-cook, pre-cut, or pre-mea-
sure. Most of the time, sub-
stantial savings can be had by
making these preparations your-
self. Coleslaw is on my menu
for dinner tonight, so I com-
pared the difference between
buying a head of cabbage (22
cents per pound) and shred-
ding it myself versus buying a
1-pound bag of coleslaw mix
($1.99). What a huge differ-
ence! I can easily spend a few
minutes with my food processor
for that kind of savings. Keep
your math skills sharp and your
calculator close at hand as you
shop, because occasionally,
you'll be surprised. Shredded
cheddar cheese, another item
on my shopping list today,
was exactly the same price per
pound whether shredded or in a
1-pound block. In that case, I'll
take the shredded version and
save myself the extra effort at
home.


6. Redeem coupons:
Coupons and rebate savings can
add up fast. All commissaries
honor Internet coupons these
days, and most commissaries
make paper coupons available
near the store entrance, in the
checkout area or sometimes
attached to the products them-
selves. Keep an eye out for
those you use most often. And
remember, coupons redeemed
in overseas commissaries are
good six months past their
stateside expiration date.
Savings through consistent
shopping in commissaries year
round can also add up fast.
Yearly savings for a family of
four averages $3,400, a fam-
ily of three saves more than
$2,600, a couple more than
$2,100 and a single service
member saves nearly $1,200.
With savings like those you'll
be financially fit and mission
ready in no time.


Commissaries Ask: 'What's In Your Pantry?'


By Millie Slamin
DeCA public specialist
You can plan for a summer
outing, but you can't plan for
a natural or man-made disas-
ter. This month, the Defense
Commissary Agency wants to
help you plan for both.
"Our focus is on delivering
a premier commissary benefit
to our armed services commu-
nity," said DeCA Director and
CEO Philip E. Sakowitz Jr.,
"and we do that by ensuring our
customers have what they need,
whether it is for a backyard bar-
becue or an emergency."
Beginning in June, and con-
tinuing throughout the sum-
mer months, commissaries are
stepping up efforts to promote
disaster preparedness through
DeCA's "What's in Your
Closet" campaign. This initia-
tive prompts customers to check
their medicine and kitchen cabi-


nets, garages, and wherever else
they may keep their Sitl I\ ii
kits," and purchase items that
are missing.
"Our 'What's in Your Closet'
disaster preparedness campaign
is just one of the many ways
in which we enhance our cus-
tomers' quality of life," said
Sakowitz.
"It also serves to reassure
our troops, whether they are at
home or in the field, that we
are not only providing their
families with the finest service
possible, we are also taking the
very best care of them."
During the campaign, com-
missaries will run their
"Summer Water Program," and
offer "Summer Club Packs"
that include disaster prepared-
ness items like nonperishable
foods, toiletry items, flashlights
and batteries.
Sakowitz noted that com-


missary patrons throughout
the United States and overseas
experience a myriad of climate
changes throughout the year
that sometimes cause disasters,
most typically occurring at the
onset of summer.
"It is now hurricane sea-
son for some of our custom-
ers, while others will experi-
ence lightning storms, floods,
tornadoes or earthquakes," he
remarked. "Then, too, there are
the regions where dry summers
bring grass and forest fires.
"Because shifts in weather
conditions can bring about a
natural disaster, it's important
for us to heighten preparedness
awareness and provide custom-
ers with items that will sustain
them during a crisis."
To avoid the risk of not hav-
ing all items on hand, DeCA
recommends that customers
check their emergency pre-


paredness status and use their
commissary benefit to stock up
on emergency provisions at sav-
ings of 30 percent or more.
"With the help of our sup-
pliers, we keep our shelves
fully stocked with products
that can sustain customers who
are coping with a disaster,"
said Charlie Dowlen, promo-
tions manager for DeCA's sales
directorate.
"We are fortunate to have
suppliers who will expedite the
delivery of large quantities of
critically needed items that will
sustain those who have gone
through a crisis."
DeCA recommends custom-
ers have the following items in
their "closet":
*Water at least one gallon,
daily, per person for three to
seven days.
*Nonperishable foods -
canned meats, fruits, vegeta-


bles, dried fruits, nuts, raisins,
cereal, crackers, cookies, ener-
gy bars, granola, peanut butter,
and foods for infants and the
elderly.
*Paper goods writing paper,
paper plates, paper towels, toilet
paper.
*Cooking items pots, pans,
baking sheet, cooking utensils,
charcoal, a grill and a manual
can opener.
*First-aid kit including ban-
dages, medicines and prescrip-
tion drugs.
*Cleaning materials bleach,
sanitizing spray, and hand and
laundry soap.
*Specialty foods diet and
low-calorie foods and drinks.
*Toiletries personal hygiene
items and moisture wipes.
*Pet care items food, water,
muzzle, leash, carrier, medi-
cations, medical records, and
identification and immunization


tags.
*Lighting accessories flash-
light, batteries, candles and
matches.
"Our stores are stocked and
ready with emergency-essential
items, and motivated staffs are
standing by to provide excep-
tional customer service," said
Sakowitz. "So don't wait until
disaster strikes. Visit your com-
missary today, and you will see
that it's worth the trip!"
For more information about
how to best prepare for emer-
gencies and natural or man-
made disasters, visit the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency Web site: www.
fema.gov; the Department
of Homeland Security Web
site: www.dhs.gov; and the
American Red Cross Web site:
www.redcross.org.


'Going Mediterranean' Can Be Good For Your Health
By Lt. Col. Karen E. about diet and lifestyle and bles. Eat five or more servings are low in saturated fats and pasta. Choose whole grain Voice archive. Sign up wit
Hawkins were interviewed regularly for a day to get the antioxidants high in good fats. Add some to breads and pastas for the health th e DeA Diptitian on ww.n


DeCA dietitian
Once again evidence dem-
onstrates that following the
Mediterranean Diet can be good
for your health. A recent study
published online June 24 in
the British Medical Journal is
one of the first to look at links
between foods and longer life.
This study reviewed data from
more than 23,000 men and
women who took part in the
Greek section of the European
Prospective Investigation into
Cancer and Nutrition research.
Those who participated in the
study completed questionnaires


eight and half years afterward.
Participants were asked whether
they smoked, how active they
were, and whether they had
ever been diagnosed with dia-
betes or cancer. One of the most
important findings was that
there was a significant reduc-
tion in deaths among those who
followed a Mediterranean Diet.
So for your good health, you
can buy the following foods
(except for the red wine) found
in the diet at your commissary
where your savings can amount
to 30 percent or more:
Lots of fruits and vegeta-


and fiber. This summer try grill-
ing some vegetables along with
your meat and chicken.
Fish several times a week.
Include fish several times a
week. Certain fish such as salm-
on, trout and albacore tuna are
high in omega-3 fatty acids and
protein, which are beneficial for
heart health.
Olive oil. Virgin or extra-vir-
gin oils are the least processed
oils and have more antioxi-
dants. Try using olive oil mixed
with balsamic oil for salad
dressing and in marinades.
Small portions of nuts. Nuts


While he works to defend our
country, St. Jude works to
save his son from cancer.



800-822-6344 St.JudeChildren's
www.stjude.org Research Hospital


salads and snacks.
Drinking red wine in mod-
eration. Red wine has antioxi-
dants and can help reduce the
blood's ability to clot due to an
aspirin-like effect. No more
than one 5-ounce glass of wine
daily for women (or men over
age 65), and no more than two
5-ounce glasses of wine daily
for men under age 65 are rec-
ommended.
Very little red meat is eaten.
Try to substitute fish or chick-
en for red meat when possible.
Lean red meat is OK to eat.
Whole grain bread and



Ships

1(800) m-SHIP
www.mrcyshipsorg
a CFC participate prnield nsa publk smic



DIVORCE QUESTIONS?
SA Court Certified Divorce Mediator can help
you both get a fair agreement quickly &
inexpensively. All issues settle out of court.
S Enforceable, final, confidential & fair.
No retainer fee Low hourly rate
I Former JAG Officer (05)
25yrs Experience I
Appointments weekends or eves
SMediation avoids litigation and two attorneys
Call DanWarner, Attorney/Mediator
S 737-1949 |l
www.jaxdivorcemediation.com -
FREECONSULTgAT 1I


benefits.
For more information about
making healthy choices, visit
Ask the Dietitian on http://
www.commissaries.com and
post your questions on the
DeCA Dietitian Forum. Be
sure to look for other useful
information in the Dietitian's


2 BDRM

2 BATH

Units


h
17


twitter.com and get messages
sent to your cell phone today.
For delicious recipes, check out
Kay's Kitchen. And to enjoy all
your commissary has to offer,
sign up for the Commissary
Connection.


CONDO MINIU M


904-241-3855
2760 Mayport Road in Atlantic Beach,
approximately one-half mile north of
Mayport Naval Air Station
Office Open Daily 10:00am to 6:00pm


* Residential & Commercial Storage
* Interior Drive-Thru Lane/UnloadingArea
* Covered RV/Boat Parking w/ Electric Access
* Complete Business Center w/ FREE WiFi
* Surveillance Cameras
* Access 7 Days aWeek L-HAU- u
* Month to Month Rentals
* Locks, Boxes & Moving Supplies

9119 Merrill Rd.
Suite 63
Jacksonville, FL 32225
Merrill@bluewaterstoragecenter.com
BlueWaterStorageCenter.com


W4 49661




- - - - - - - I
IM I
Military Discount I
SWith Valid Military I.D. | I




( VTnRaF RFMTFR


FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS YOU ONLY
HAVE UNTIL NOVEMBER 30 TO FIND
A HOME, SECURE FINANCING, AND
CLOSE THE UTRANSACTION.


* New Construction
* Builder's Inventory Close-out
* 4 Units Available For Immediate Occupancy
* Full Appliances
* Be Home For The Holidays
* Pricing In The $120,000s
*eligible buyers must be first time home buyers, eligible for the IRS Tax Credit; must be willing
to file an amended 2008 Tax Return prepared by tax accountant specified by lender. Conquest
C&D are not financial brokers.
%. ___


Contact Dick Chadwell-sits Agent Conquest Realty
904-378-0510 904-699-6229
Spring Pointe Model Hours
Monday Thru Saturday 10:00 To 6:00
Sunday 1:00 To 5:00
or by Appointment
Conquest Realty, Inc. Realtors Welcome
www.conquestcd.com


,g Conauest C&D
I- C corporation
"The QuaI for Bart Liv~ g"
CRC 1328013


-
$^0 uR


,UfA ______ Ready to serve
--$A----A- ~ www.VetDogs.org
866-VETDOGS
VETDO GS 371 E. Main Street
VETERAN'S K-9 CORPS Smithtown, NY 11787

A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.






Drive-Thru Climate storage a U-Haul Rentals


FOR REN

Miitr Seca







THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 13


Au_____st__IataaHealth Beat



August Is Cataract Awareness Month


By Lt. Hristos G. Tsingelis
NBHC Mayport- Health Promotion by
the Ocean
Health Promotion by
the Ocean recognizes the
month of August as Cataract
Awareness month. According
to the American Academy of
Ophthalmology, about 20.5
million Americans age 40 and
older have cataracts. More than
half of all Americans develop
cataracts by age 80.


Cataracts cloud the eye's
clear lens, similar to a window
that is "fogged" with steam.
When the lens becomes cloudy,
light rays cannot pass through it
easily and vision becomes blur-
ry. Cataracts start out mildly
and have little effect on vision
at first. But as the cataract
becomes denser, so does the
impact on vision.
See your eye doctor if you


experience; painless blurring of
vision, sensitivity to light and
glare, double vision in one eye,
poor night vision, fading or yel-
lowing of colors or frequent
changes in glasses or contact
lens prescriptions.
Although cataracts usu-
ally develop as part of the
aging process, they can also
result from other factors too.
Currently, there are no medica-


tions or exercises that will help
cataracts to disappear. When
they do begin to interfere with
daily activities, they can be
treated surgically. According
to the American Academy of
Ophthalmology, cataract sur-
gery is one of the safest and
most frequently performed sur-
geries in the United States, with
more than 1.6 million surgeries
performed each year. After sur-


gery, vision is improved in most
patients.
Remember, cataracts are
detected through a comprehen-
sive eye exam. Early treatment
may save your sight. According
to the American Optometric
Association Clinical Practice
Guidelines for Comprehensive
Adult Eye and Vision
Examinations, people between
the ages of 18-60 should get


an eye exam every two years.
And, people 61 and older
should be screened annually. A
person should see the eye doc-
tor more frequently than the
recommended re-examination
interval if new ocular, visual, or
systemic health problems devel-
op. A comprehensive eye exam
is an important part of your pre-
ventative health care needs!


Psoriasis Health Highlighted In August


By Alexis D. Washington
TRICARE Management Aci vity
Did you know that accord-
ing to the National Institutes
of Health as many 7.5 million
Americans, or 2 percent of the
population, have psoriasis?
Did you know that each year,
one in five people with psoria-
sis report being discriminated
against at a public pool? Also,
did you know that up to 30 per-
cent of people with psoriasis
also develop psoriatic arthritis
and psoriasis is associated with
other serious conditions such
as diabetes, heart disease and
obesity?
TRICARE is using August to
increase awareness about the


disease and inform beneficiaries
that psoriasis is not contagious.
What is Psoriasis?
Psoriasis is a skin disease
that causes itchy or sore patches
of thick, red skin with silvery
scales. They usually appear
on elbows, knees, scalp, back,
face, palms and feet, but they
can show up on other parts of
the body. It occurs when the
immune system sends out faulty
signals speeding up the growth
cycle of skin cells. In a process
called cell turnover, skin cells
that grow deep in your skin rise
to the surface. Normally, this
takes a month. In psoriasis, it
happens in just days because
the cells rise too fast.


The most common form,
plaque psoriasis, appears as
raised, red patches or lesions
covered with a silvery white
buildup of dead skin cells called
scale and it can occur on any
part of the body.
Treatment Options for
Psoriasis
Treating psoriasis is critical
to good disease management
and overall health. Working
with a doctor is key to finding
a treatment-or treatments-to
reduce or eliminate symptoms.
A psoriasis treatment that works
for one person might not work
for another.
Psoriasis can be mild, moder-
ate or severe. According to the


National Psoriasis Foundation,
a moderate case of psoriasis
involves 3 percent to 10 per-
cent of the body's skin. Less
than 3 percent is mild and more
than 10 percent is considered
severe. For example: The palm
of the hand equals 1 percent of
the body's skin.
However, the severity of
psoriasis is also measured by
how it affects a person's life.
Psoriasis can have a seri-
ous impact on daily activities,
even if it involves a small area
such as the palms of the hands
or soles of the feet. Treatment
options for mild psoriasis
include: over-the-counter topi-
cals, topical non-steroids, topi-


cal steroids and light therapy.
Moderate to severe psoriasis
treatment usually involves a
combination of treatment strate-
gies. Besides topical treatments,
a doctor may prescribe light
therapy or phototherapy and/
or systemic or biologic medica-
tions. Light therapy/photothera-
py involves regularly exposing
the skin to light, and systemic
medications are prescription
drugs administered orally or by
injection that work throughout
the body.
Biologic drugs, or "biolog-
ics," are a relatively new class
of treatment for psoriasis and
psoriatic arthritis treatments.
They are given by injection or


intravenous infusion. Biologics
are prescribed for individuals
with moderate to severe cases
of psoriasis and psoriatic arthri-
tis. They are a viable option for
those who have not responded
to or have experienced harm-
ful side effects from other treat-
ments. Some biologics have
also been shown to reduce the
progression of joint damage in
psoriatic arthritis.
For more information refer to
the following link: http://www.
psoriasis.org


Prescription Crosscheck Program


Helps Tr
By Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg
Special to American Forces Press
Service
The Tricare military health
plan is ensuring patient safety
for its 9.2 million beneficiaries
through a revolutionary drug
utilization program, a senior
Tricare official said.
"We cover about 2.2 mil-
lion prescription medication
claims per week that's about
120 million prescriptions
per year," Navy Rear Adm.
Thomas J. McGinnis, chief of
Tricare's pharmaceutical opera-
tions directorate, told "Dot
Mil Docs" listeners Feb. 26 on
BlogTalkRadio.com. "That data
comes into the Pharmacy Data
Transaction System, ... and the
purpose of PDTS is to provide
a safety net via electronic drug
utilization reviews."
McGinnis said the software
notes any new medication com-


icare Beneficiaries


ing into a patient's profile and
compares it to other medica-
tions in that patient's profile.
The software looks for duplica-
tions in therapy or possible drug
interactions.
"If it notes a serious interac-
tion, PDTS sends a message
to the pharmacist, who will
call the prescriber to discuss
what the patient should do,"
McGinnis explained. "Our
ultimate goal here at Tricare
is to identify safety concerns
in our beneficiary population
before the number of serious
adverse events triggers a con-
cern at [the Food and Drug
Administration]."
He added that the Defense
and Veterans Affairs depart-
ments have made great strides
in collecting medical and phar-
maceutical data in a way that
potentially can identify safety
issues quickly. The departments


have formed a partnership with
FDA in a new initiative called
"The Sentinel Network," an
advanced adverse-event surveil-
lance system.
"We also need this capabil-
ity to assess the negative risk
of medications vs. their bene-
fit in the population at large,"
McGinnis said. "Any medica-
tions you take has risks. Our
goal is to assess the risk and
notify the providers and patients
so that they can make informed
decisions about how they
should take their medications."
McGinnis added that the sys-
tem is able to see clinical data,
such as laboratory results, for
patients under the care of a mil-
itary treatment center.
"The military treatment cen-
ters use an electronic medical
record called 'Altha,' but not all
doctors' offices in the private
sector use an electronic medical


The heart and soul in sports
8701 Leeds Road
Kansas City, MO 64129-1680
1-800-289-0909 |FCA.org
Provided as a public service.
a CFC participant


record yet," he added.
But the use of electronic
medical records will increase in
the private sector over the next
five years, he said, and this will
help Tricare to capture data and
to be able to do robust, clinical
studies.
"That's coming soon with a
big push now from the govern-
ment to capture these data in an
electronic medical record," he
said. "That data will not only
flow to Tricare, but it will flow
from Tricare to providers who
see our patients so they can see
what laboratory or radiology
studies were done in the mili-
tary treatment facilities." "We
also plan to provide patients
with this same data in an elec-
tronic 'personal health record'
if they would like to have it," he
continued. "That, too, is coming
soon."


TRICARE Lowers Diabetic Supply Cost


From TRICARE
The Department of Defense
Pharmacy and Therapeutic
committee (DoD P&T) has
reviewed and selected a lim-
ited number of blood glucose
monitor test strips that will save
money for beneficiaries and
DoD.
Four self-monitoring test
strips are included in the DoD
Uniform Formulary. The
Uniform Formulary is a stan-
dardized list of covered pre-
scription medications available
to the 9.4 million beneficiaries
of the Military Health System
(MHS). Co-pays are determined
by "tier."
The four approved test strips
are now available to benefi-
ciaries at a co-pay of $9 (Tier
2). The test strips reviewed
and chosen are: Precision
Xtra, Accu-chek Aviva, Bayer
Contour, Freestyle Lite
Accuracy of blood sample
size, alternate site testing, result
time, memory capacity, manu-
facturer customer support, and
ease of use were some of the
criteria taken into consider-
ation for the review. The pre-
ferred test strips are the newest
technology and the most cost-
efficient according to the DoD
P&T.
"The review by the commit-
tee of all the available glucose
strips, which included a review
of respective meters, allowed
us to select several strips that
we feel meets the needs of our
diverse patient population," said
Army Medical Corps COL John
Kugler, Chairman of the DoD
P&T Committee, TRICARE
Management Activity. "Our
analysis also drives down the


cost to the government by nar-
rowing the number of options
in Tier 2 and moving oth-
ers to Tier 3 on the Uniform
Formulary list."
TRICARE officials are
encouraging beneficiaries
to switch to the preferred
test strips, which offers them
a choice in strips and saves
money for beneficiaries and the
DoD. Additional options for test
strips on Tier 3 are still avail-
able for the $22 co-pay.
Beneficiaries who choose
to use the preferred strips will
have the opportunity to order
a new meter that corresponds
with their test strips. There
is no cost for the new meter.
Beneficiaries who have used
glucose test strips within the
past year should have received
a letter communicating details
of the change. For more on
glucose test strips click the
medication tab, then over-the-
counter medications and sup-
plies at http://www.tricare.mil/
pharmacy. Beneficiaries making
the switch have many options
including contacting a Military
Treatment Facility pharmacy or
clinic for information on how to
receive a new no-cost formulary
meter. To contact the companies
directly:
Bayer Contour meter: to
receive one free meter call
1-800-348-8100 or visit http://
www.bayerdiabetes.com/us. To
receive a free meter using the
Web site click on the "home"
tab then click on "Contour."
Precision Xtra, Freestyle
Lite or Freestyle Freedom Lite
meters: to receive one of these
three meters call 1-800-224-
8892, weekdays from 8 a.m.to


10 p.m. EST; or by E-mail at Accu-chek Aviva meter:


OrderFulfillment@tabbottcus-
tomercare.com; or visit http://
www.meters.abbottdiabetes-
care.com.


to receive one free meter call
1-800-858-8072 or visit http://
www.accu-chek.com.


Nasa Cuny igt Blly Buster Monday!a




followeekly















omcast,
$2.0 gtsa orelae oxset ndal-ouca-et otdosha Ibuges


* Most Insurance accepted
* We accept Dental Insurance for
Active Duty Dependents and
Retired Military & Their Dependents
* In front of Mayport NEX/Commissary


FamI Al Pana
U'= n


PARTICIPANT (904) 249-1302
-Am Plaza Suite 17 2292 Mayport Rd. Jacksonville, Florida 32233
Office Hours Tues. -Fri. 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Sat 8:30-4:00pm


S371 East Jericho Turnpike
Smithtown, NY 11787
u ide o 1-800-548-4337
oundation www.guidedog.org
For The Blind, Inc.' a CFC participant Provided as a public service


----q


IED


r R I C A R E







14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


N avy News




Joint Forces Command Interagency





Experiment Prepares For Crises


By Navy Petty 2nd Class
Katrina Parker
Special toAmerican Forces Press
Service
U.S. Joint Forces Command
and its partners, including
the Department of Homeland
Security, have completed an
experiment designed to enhance
national security by providing
joint force commanders with a
better capability to share infor-
mation with interagency, mul-
tinational and nongovernment
agencies during crisis opera-
tions.
During the Interagency
Shared Situational Awareness
(Limited Objective Experiment,
Joint Forces Command's joint
concept development and
experimentation directorate
conducted a series of experi-
ments last week to address stan-
dards, policies and procedures
involving sharing of informa-
tion over a wide area.


"What we are trying to
do here is create an environ-
ment and come up with a con-
cept of operations that will
enable seamless information
sharing between [the Defense
Department and] interagency
and multinational partners,"
said Navy Cmdr. Chad Hixson,
the project lead. "Often times,
there are policies and proce-
dures that stand in the way of
doing that."
Hixson said that even when
leadership is willing to share
information with agencies, the
people who actually are sit-
ting at the desk might misun-
derstand existing policies or be
impeded by barriers limiting
trust between the organizations,
thus interfering with informa-
tion sharing.
The experiment identi-
fied policies, procedures, cul-
tural and trust issues that
can block information shar-


ing, Hixson said. Participants
included the Joint Staff,
National Guard Bureau, U.S.
Northern Command, U.S.
Southern Command, U.S.
Pacific Command, U.S.
European Command, U.S.
Africa Command, U.S. Special
Operations Command, the
State Department, the Virginia
Emergency Operations Center
and the aircraft carrier USS
Harry S. Truman.
"All the key players in
national security are represent-
ed," said Navy Capt. Timothy
Spratto, the experimentation
directorate's capabilities solu-
tions group lead. "There is a
large coalition of the willing
coalescing around this experi-
ment to explore their informa-
tion-sharing techniques."
Spratto said such operations
and experiments build trust
among participants by provid-
ing first-hand experience in the


value of sharing information
with partners while achieving
their own objectives.
"This experiment is a great
opportunity for those organiza-
tions to get together and look
at the policies and procedures
that impede information shar-
ing," said Navy Cmdr. Gregory
Sleppy, Joint Staff action officer
and observer. "Each organiza-
tion and department has their
own rules on how they share
things, and those rules are not
always the same. We are trying
to figure out what those things
are that impede the progress
and flow of information."
Sleppy cited problems in
2005's Hurricane Katrina
response as an example of
the need to share information
between agencies and govern-
ment to support the people
involved with the disaster relief
effort.
"People may not realize that


right now those organizations
do not operate on the same net-
work and cannot share informa-
tion effectively," Sleppy said.
"There is no common deposi-
tory or situational awareness
between those organizations. As
a decision maker, it is difficult
to make good decisions without
all the information. This experi-
ment pulls all those organiza-
tions together down to the tacti-
cal level to see how we might
come up with solutions for the
future."
The interagency shared situ-
ational awareness experiment
focused on three areas of infor-
mation sharing: geospatial, file
sharing and text chat. It used
computer models and long-dis-
tance virtual connections that
provided participants with a
continuously evolving environ-
ment to simulate a crisis.
"All the agencies who par-
ticipated saw an immediate


improvement in their ability
to share and receive informa-
tion and build better situational
awareness," Spratto said.
An analysis of the informa-
tion gathered will determine
the value of taking this new
approach of information sharing
into the field, he added.
"We will determine if what
we have accomplished is an
improvement on existing
information sharing architec-
tures, methodologies, policies
and processes," Spratto said.
"If there is something we can
deliver directly to present oper-
ators now to put into use imme-
diately, we will look to move
that into theater."
(Navy Petty 2nd Class
Katrina Parker serves in the
U.S. Joint Forces Command
public affairs office.)


Gates Establishes New Cyber Subcommand


By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service
Defense Secretary Robert
M. Gates signed a memo June
23 establishing a subcommand
focused on cyber security,
Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff
Morrell told reporters.
Details about the new U.S.
Cyber Command, which
will report to U.S. Strategic
Command, still are unfolding.
But Gates reportedly plans to
recommend Army Lt. Gen.
Keith B. Alexander, director of
the National Security Agency,
to receive his fourth star and
take on the additional responsi-
bility of commanding the cyber
command.
Initial indications are that the


cyber command will have its
headquarters at Fort Meade,
Md., pending results of an envi-
ronmental impact statement.
"This is not some sort of new
and necessarily different author-
ities that have been granted,"
Morrell told reporters June 24.
"This is about trying to figure
out how we, within this depart-
ment, within the United States
military, can better coordinate
the day-to-day defense, protec-
tion and operation of the depart-
ment's computer networks."
Morrell emphasized that the
new command will focus solely
on military networks.
Deputy Defense Secretary
William J. Lynn III noted the
importance of cyber security to


national defense last week at
the Center for International and
Strategic Studies.
"Just like our national depen-
dence, there is simply no exag-
gerating our military depen-
dence on our information
networks: the command and
control of our forces, the intel-
ligence and logistics on which
they depend, the weapons tech-
nologies we develop and field -
they all depend on our comput-
er systems and networks," Lynn
said. "Indeed, our 21st century
military simply cannot function
without them."
Because cyberspace is criti-
cal to joint military operations,
it's critical that the Defense
Department ensure they're


protected, Air Force Lt. Col.
Eric Butterbaugh, a Defense
Department spokesman, told
American Forces Press Service.
"To do this, the Department
of Defense needs to ensure it
has the right balance of inte-
grated cyber capabilities,"
Butterbaugh said. "We're
increasingly dependent on
cyberspace, and there's a grow-
ing array of cyber threats. To
effectively address this risk
to its networks, the Defense
Department requires a com-
mand possessing the required
technical capability and which
remains focused on streamlin-
ing cyberspace operations."
Morrell called the standup
of Cyber Command an inter-


nal reorganization that will
consolidate and streamline
its cyber capabilities within a
single command. The effort in
no way represents any attempt
by the department to "milita-
rize" cyberspace or take over
the responsibility for defend-
ing civilian networks, he said,
noting that responsibility falls
to the Homeland Security
Department.
"This is part of a holistic,
governmentwide effort to bet-
ter organize and situate our-
selves to deal with this very
real threat," he said. "And it is
a complement to efforts that are
taking place elsewhere within
the United States government."
Marine Corps Gen. James E.


Cartwright, vice chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, indi-
cated during a June 4 address at
the Center for International and
Strategic Studies that a decision
on the new subcommand was in
the works.
"There will be a cyber capa-
bility at the tactical level, and
... we do deploy it forward,"
Cartwright said. "There is an
operational level, which tends
to be based regionally, and
there is a strategic capability.
And we will, over the next few
days, start to roll out the orga-
nizational constructs associated
with that."


Poseidon Rollout Unveils Next Maritime Patrol Aircraft


FromNavalAir .. Command
Public. "
The U.S. Navy and Boeing
unveiled the next maritime
patrol and reconnaissance air-
craft, the P-8A Poseidon, during
a rollout ceremony July 30 at
Boeing's manufacturing facility
in Seattle.
"This is a tremendous day
to recognize the outstanding
efforts of the U.S. Navy, Boeing
and the entire industry team on
ajob extremely well done," said
Rear Adm. Bill Moran, com-
mander, Patrol Reconnaissance
Group. "It has been more than
forty years since the maritime
patrol community has seen a
new aircraft; delivery of this
aircraft cannot come soon


enough."
The admiral said the aircraft's
greater situational awareness,
open systems architecture and
higher operating altitude will
bring a greater punch to the
fight, across all warfare mission
areas and will be a significant
force multiplier.
The Poseidon will replace
the P-3C Orion as a long-range
anti-submarine warfare, anti-
surface warfare, intelligence,
surveillance and reconnaissance
aircraft. It will maximize the
experience and technology of
the Orion but with significant
growth potential, greater pay-
load capacity, advanced mission
systems, software and commu-
nications.


-Photo courtesy Boeing
A Boeing P-8A Poseidon test aircraft T-1 conducts a testflight
April 25. The aircraft completed a series of tests during the 3 hour,
31 minute flight and reached an altitude of 25,000 feet before
landing at Boeing Field in Seattle.


"The P-8A Poseidon pro-
gram is an outstanding exam-
ple of evolutionary acquisi-
tion at work. We have estab-
lished a very solid baseline
for initial operational capabil-
ity, while concurrently mak-
ing upgrade increments for
future insertion as technology
matures," said Maritime Patrol
and Reconnaissance Aircraft
Program Manager Capt. Mike


Moran.
"The team has worked hard
to stay on schedule and with-
in cost in this developmen-
tal effort; we all should be
extremely proud of the results."
Boeing was awarded a con-
tract in 2004 to deliver five test
vehicles. This acquisition phase
provides three flight test air-
craft, one full-scale static loads
test airframe, and one full-scale


fatigue test airframe. The Navy
plans to purchase 117 produc-
tion aircraft.
All five test aircraft are in
various stages of assembly and
ground test; two of the flight
test aircraft have already suc-
cessfully flown as part of a
Boeing relocation and system
flight check process. Testing
on the static loads airframe is
underway and the Navy will


begin formal flight testing later
this year.
In April, the Australian
Department of Defence signed
an agreement with the U.S.
Department of Defense to join
a cooperative partnership in
the development of follow-on
capabilities to be added to the
Poseidon after it enters the fleet
in 2013.


NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA



rr


I nLOATIlN


ALLSTATE INSURANCE CO.
AMERICAN LEGION POST
COAST GUARD STATION (EXCHANGE STORE)
COMFORT INN
COMMISSARY (INSIDE RACKS)
DAYS INN
FCE -SHELL
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL(DAILY'S)
FLEET LANDING
FLEET RESERVE ASSOC. BRANCH # 290
FLETCHER HIGH SCHOOL ROTC
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
HOME FINDER'S REALTY
JAX FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE


I npATIln


AnnFSDE


JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO/BP
KANGAROO/SMOKERS EXPRESS
LA CRUISE GIFT SHOP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
JAX
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
MALLARD COVE OFFICE
NAVY HOUSING APARTMENTS
NEX (OUTSIDE RACKS NEAR ATM)
OTTER RUN OFFICE
RAINBOW CENTER CHILD CARE
RIBAULT BAY COMMUNITY CENTER
SINGLETON'S SEAFOOD SHOP
SOUTHTRUST BANK
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
U.S. COAST GUARD OFFICE
USO MAYPORT
Updated: FEBRUARY 1,2007


YITV


10430 ATLANTIC BLVD JAX
13560 ATLANTIC BLVD JAX
1067 ATLANTIC BLVD ATL BCH
1672 S 3rd ST JAXBCH
8379 BAYMEADOWS RD JAX
5295 SUNBEAM RD JAX
11099 OLD ST AUGUSTINE RD JAX
9699 SAN JOSE BLVD JAX
2837 TOWNSEND BLVD JAX
10100 GRANITE PLACE JAX
1031 BEACH BLVD. JAX BCH
1403 N 3rd ST JAXBCH
10910 ATLANTIC BLVD. JAX
2615 ST. JOHNS BLUFF/ALDEN JAX
A1AHWY JAX
9615 HECKSCHER DR.- FT. GEORGE JAX
8804 LONE STAR/MILL CRK JAX
12020 FT. CAROLINE RD./FULTON JAX
13967 McCORMICK RD(MT PLEASANT RD)

5001 HECKSCHER DR. BLOUNT JAX
1310 S. 3rd ST. JAX BCH
A1A HWY /WONDERWOOD JAX
ATLANTIC BLVD / CRAIG FIELD JAX
MAYPORT RD. JAX
ASSISSI LANE JAX
NAVY HOUSING OFF ASSISSI LANE JAX
ASSISSI LANE JAX
A1AHWY JAX
1301 ATLANTIC BLVD. JAX
1202 US-17 YUL
8838 ATLANTIC BLVD JAX
3051 MONUMENT RD/ COBBLESTON JAX
1209 MONUMENT RDJLEE JAX
12743 ATLANTIC BLVD./GIRVIN JAX
301 ATLANTIC BLVD. ATL BCH
2810 SR A1A N ATL BCH
14376 BEACH BLVD./SAN PABLOJAX BCH
300 BEACH BLVD./3rd ST. JAX BCH
1601 PENMAN RD. JAX BCH
A1AHWY JAX
BEHIND 2550 MAYPORT RD. JAX


PAN AM PLAZA MAYPORT RD. JAX


316 ATLANTIC BLVD.
A1A HWY
MAYPORT RD.
MAYPORT RD.
1401 ATLANTIC BLVD.
9115 MERRILL RD./9-A
1539 S 3rd ST
7150 MERRILL RD


JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX BCH
JAX


13490 ATLANTIC BLVD./SAN PABLO


MAYPORT RD.
390 MAYPORT RD.

1900 MIZELL RD
220A1A N
619A1A N
10970 US 1/SR210
2350 SR 16
463779 SR200/A1A
3230 EMERSON ST
3938 HENDRICKS AVE
8070 ATLANTIC BLVD
1721 UNIVERSITY BLVD N
5617 BOWDEN RD
570 BUSCH DR
12548 SAN JOSE BLVD
10946 FT CAROLINE RD
1001 MONUMENT RD
10044 ATLANTIC BLVD
4100 HECKSCHER DR
2520 S 3rd ST
319 S 3rd ST
9144 BAYMEADOWS RD
11461 OLD STAUGUSTINE RD
10455 OLD ST AUGUSTINE RD
9540 SAN JOSE BLVD
1605 RACETRACK/SR13
2550 MAYPORT RD.
664 ATLANTIC BLVD.
3212 UNIVERSITY BLVD S
6135 ST AUGUSTINE RD
11620 SAN JOSE BLVD


JAX
JAX
JAX BCH
STAU
PVB
PVB
STAUG
STAU
YUL
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAXBCH
JAX BCH
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX
JAX


P^ICKUIOROYOFTEMIRRATISELOATIN


OFF-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS
AnnDRFSS


Iuu lI IUnrUi, AM =IllyilG


LUUM1 lUl muun Ih Il. I






THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 15

N avy News



NETC Advancement Exam Development



Conferences Announced For FY10


By Ed Barker
Naval Education and Training Com-
mandPublc. i-,
The Naval Education and
Training Command (NETC)
announced July 30 the schedule
for Advancement Examination
Development Conferences
(AEDC) for fiscal year 2010
and requested nominations of
subject matter experts (SMEs)
for their respective ratings.
Detailed in NAVADMIN
227-09, the conferences are
held at Naval Education
and Training Professional
Development and Technology
Center (NETPDTC) on board
Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla.
Active-duty chief petty offi-
cers (E-7 to E-9) are encour-


aged to volunteer for the appro-
priate AEDC to serve as the
SMEs in their respective rat-
ings. Temporarily assigned
SMEs from fleet and shore-
based commands will review
and develop rating exam mate-
rials for the next cycles of
advancement examinations.
"Participating in these
advancement examination
conferences gives you a direct
input toward shaping your com-
munity," said Master Chief
Electrician's Mate (SS) Jeromie
Cook, NETPDTC command
master chief. "Your knowledge
provides the relevance and cur-
rency required to construct an
exam that identifies a Sailor
with the right skills to select for


advancement. You will have a
say in who your replacement
will be."
The AEDC schedules for
FY10 are as follows:
Oct. 18-31, 2009: Aviation
Boatswain's Mate Fuel,
Aviation Support Equipment
Technician, Machinery
Repairmen, Fire Control
Technician, Cryptologic
Technician Collection.
Nov. 29-Dec. 12, 2009:
Interior Communications
Electrician, Aviation
Boatswain's Mate
Equipment.
Jan. 24-Feb. 6, 2010:
Culinary Specialist,
Engineman, Construction
Mechanic, Naval Air Crewman


Operator.
Jan. 31-Feb. 13, 2010: Naval
Air Crewman Mechanical.
Feb. 21-March 6, 2010:
Yeoman, Air Traffic Controller,
Naval Air Crewman Tactical
Helicopter, Quartermaster
March 7-20, 2010: Ship's
Serviceman, Builder,
Operations Specialist, Special
Warfare Operator
Mar. 21-Apr. 3, 2010: Naval
Air Crewman Avionics.
Nominations must be
endorsed by the command-
ing officer or officer in charge
as well as the command mas-
ter chief, senior chief or chief
of the boat for submission to
NETPDTC. Six nominees will
be selected for each rating


scheduled during the AEDC.
Careful consideration should
be given to the availability of a
nominee to serve on an AEDC,
including deployment sched-
ules and upcoming tempo-
rary duty or change-of-station
moves. Commanding officers
and chiefs must understand that
once selected, conference duty
is not optional. Selected AEDC
members will not be excused
except in the most extreme
cases.
NETPDTC will coordinate
with respective rating learning
centers and community man-
agers to select the best nomi-
nees. Selections of SMEs
for the AEDCs will be made
45 days prior to each confer-


ence and selectees will be noti-
fied by NETPDTC via e-mail.
Temporarily Assigned Duty
funding will be provided by
NETPDTC.
For more information,
read NAVADMIN 227-09.
Application forms and addition-
al requirements and informa-
tion are available on the Navy
Advancement Center Web site
at https://www2.netc.navy.mil/
advancement.
For more news from Naval
Education and Training
Command, visit www.navy.mil/
local/cnet/.


-Photo by MCSN Oliver Cole
An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Black Jacks of Helicopter Sea Combat
Squadron (HSC) 21 flies over the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS
Rainier (T-AOE 7) during a replenishment at sea. Rainier is conducting a replenishment with
the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area
of responsibility.











7:001" ,


HOT WINGS

COLD BEER

GOOD TIMES


The Legend


has returned to


Mayport Road





D A SPE0 AL 0,,


Introducing Lennar's Hometown Heroes

program featuring a 3% DISCOUNT OFF*

the purchase price of a new Lennar home.

It's our way of giving back to those

who support The American Dream.


HOMES FOR

Hometown




Sr -


*k


*


I


*



*


THIS IS OUR WAY OF SAYING
THANK YOU FOR ALL THAT YOU DO.
For more Community information
\ call 877-746-9830 or visit

\\ LE NNAR.COI M/Jacksonville


CLAY COUNTY DUVAL COUNTY ST. JOHNS ST. JOHNS
*COVENTRY AT *WYNNFIELD LAKES COUNTY COUNTY
OAKLEAF PLANTATION Single-family homes *CHANCELLOR'S RIDGE *WILLOWCO\
Townhome-style Condos From the mid s200s Single-family homes AT NOCATEE
From the s120s 10 miles from From the mid $200s Single-family


15 miles from Jax
Naval Air Station

*HAMILTON GLEN AT
OAKLEAF PLANTATION
Single-family homes
From the 190s
15 miles from Jax
Naval Air Station


Moyport Naval Station

*LEXINGTON PARK
Single-family homes
From the upper $100s
25 miles from
Mayport Naval Station


*THE VILLAS AT
HERITAGE PARK
Designer Townhomes
From the mid $100s


Vh
Homes


From the 3600s
*JOHN CREEK II
Single-family homes
From the $200s


*Offers, incentives and seller contributions are subject to certain terms, conditions and restrictions, which may include use of designated
lenders and closing agents. Offer good for a limited time only. Lennar reserves the right to change or withdraw any offer at any time.
See a Lennar New Home Consultant for further information. Offer is subject to borrower meeting approval guidelines. Prices subject
to change without notice. See a Lennar New Home Consultant for further information. A
Copyright 0 2009 Lennar Corporation. Lennar and the Lennar logo, are registered TL=m U IV l
service marks or service marks of Lennar Crporation and/or its subsidiaries. MAIE aR s UNIVERSAL AMERICANMORTGAGE COMPANY
CGC#1507526, CBC#059530. 7/09


A Sea Hawk Flyover


A Warrior's Welcome


-Photo by MC2 Joshua Valcarcel
Capt. Andrew Cully, Pacific Partnership 2009 mission commander, and Paul Berg, Charge
dl\jjiii, for the United States, receive a traditional warrior's welcome from Malaita Island
villagers during a Pacific Partnership event in the Solomon Islands. Pacific Partnership is a
humanitarian assistance mission in the U.S. Pacific Fleet area of responsibility.


r,

~t~d[L~j
~a~z~-a






16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


New Hull Coatings Cut Fuel Use, Protect Enviro


By Office of Naval
Research Corporate Strategic
Communications
New hull coatings being
developed by the Office of
Naval Research (ONR) are
showing promise in reducing
the build-up of marine crusta-
ceans fi namely barnacles on
ships' hulls, optimizing vessel
performance and dramatically
reducing fuel costs.
Marine growth adds weight
and increases drag reducing a
vessel's fuel efficiency. The
practical problem for ships is
simply that biofilm can add
up to 20 percent drag and bar-
nacles more than 60 percent.
This increases fuel consumption
and green house gas emissions.
ONR-sponsored biofouling
prevention coatings provide an
environmentally safe alternative
for protecting naval ship hulls,
which could also benefit the
commercial shipping industry.
"The ultimate solution is to
stop the barnacle settlement
process before it happens,"


says Steve McElvany, Ph.D.,
program manager for ONRYs
Environment Quality program.
"We are really trying to look
very far forward to get the ulti-
mate solution thatYs good for
the U.S. Navy and the oceans."
The Naval Surface Warfare
Center at Carderock estimates
that biofouling reduces ves-
sel speed by up to 10 percent.
Vessels can require as much as
a 40 percent increase in fuel
consumption to counter the
added drag. For the Navy, that
translates into roughly $1 bil-
lion annually in extra fuel costs
and maintenance to keep its
ships free of barnacles, oysters,
algae and other debris.
High-performance naval
warships and submarines rely
on critical design factors such
as top speed, acceleration and
hydroacoustic stealth. Previous
biofouling prevention methods
used toxic coatings, or biocides,
to clear barnacle colonies from
the ship exteriors. Although
effective in the short-term, bio-
cides exact a heavy environ-


mental burden.
By studying the environment,
researchers are learning from
nature how it beats the "crusty
fouler" naturally. And that's
where ONR's investment in
biofouling prevention technolo-
gies has made significant gains.
On the East Coast, ONR
is funding research at the
University of Florida where
Anthony Brennan, Ph.D., pro-
fessor of material science and
engineering, has been investi-
gating why some marine ani-
mals, such as whales, harbor
barnacles and others, such as
sharks, stay relatively clean.
Brennan discovered that the
unique pattern of shark skin
contributed to its ability to
fend-off microorganisms.
With this insight, Brennan
started modeling shark skin pat-
terns in his lab. The idea led
to the development of a new
biomimetic technology called
Sharklet, which has shown
extremely positive results in
inhibiting marine growth. The
significance of his work really


hit home during a visit to Pearl
Harbor.
"I saw a Navy ship going by
... flowing with green algae,"
Brennan said. "I thought thatYs
why we are doing this research,
to stop that biofouling to give
our Navy the ability to perform
at a higher level."
The biodiversity of differ-
ent ocean environments also
creates unique challenges.
So, across the country on the
West Coast, ONR is working
with Dr. Shaoyi Jiang, Boeing-
Roundhill, professor at the
University of Washington, on
biofouling prevention coatings
that incorporate zwitterionic or
mixed-charge compounds.
"The marine environment is
very complicated," said Jiang.
"It is as complex as the human
body."
Zwitterionic compounds are
stable, alternating perfectly
between positive and nega-
tive charges and easy to han-
dle in both laboratory and field
tests. They've shown excellent
resistance to the attachment


of biomolecules and micro-
organisms. The result is that
naturally occurring proteins,
bacteria, algae, barnacles and
tube worms do not bind to this
unique surface.
ONR's innovation in hull
coatings will optimize ship per-
formance with an eye toward
environmental stewardship.
Inventive biofouling preven-
tion systems will help conserve
fuel, minimize the Navy's car-
bon footprint, reduce the risk
of transporting invasive aquatic
species and prevent toxic bio-
cides from entering surrounding
environments.
While both the Sharklet pat-
tern and Zwitterionic coating
inhibit the settlement of bar-
nacles, they also inhibit the
growth of bacteria. This unique
attribute has applications in
hospitals and high-touch areas
in health care where it is critical
to inhibit the survival and trans-
ference of bacteria to protect
patients from infections.
"This technology spreads
beyond the hull of the ship -


there is a great opportunity to
extend this technology to the
public," said Brennan.
Jiang and Brennan acknowl-
edged the open environment
and multidisciplinary research
approach that the Office of
Naval Research and its program
managers encourage from prin-
cipal investigators.
"The ONR program provides
an excellent environment and
infrastructure for collabora-
tions," said Jiang.
"ONR has brought together
biologists, geneticists, chem-
ists, material engineers, chemi-
cal engineers, physicists and we
end up sharing.
"It says a lot of our Navy to
have that forethought to reach
beyond what everybody sees in
front of them and go for some-
thing new and innovative that
will help the Navy and benefit
the world."


Building Up Southeast To Have Greenest Fleet


By Sue Brink
NAVFAC Southeast Public, i
Officer
Naval Facilities Engineering
Command (NAVFAC)
Southeast started to replace
25 percent of its Federal Fleet
Vehicles July 6 with hybrids
funded by the American
Reinvestment and Recovery
Act (ARRA). The first vehicle,
a Chevrolet Hybrid Malibu, will
be assigned to the "C" pool as
VIP or will replace an older "B"
Pool vehicle on board Naval Air
Station Jacksonville.
Government Services
Administration (GSA) received
$300 million in ARRA funds to
replace agency owned vehicles
with new, more fuel efficient
vehicles. NAVFAC Southeast
will utilize approximately $5
million for fleet vehicle replace-
ment, throughout the southeast.
The vehicles will arrive in
two phases.
"GSA approved replacement


of 58 light fleet vehicles in the
first phase and 201 assets in
the second phase," said John
Joneikis, NAVFAC Southeast
Base Support Vehicles and
Equipment product line coordi-
nator.
The first phase hybrid sedans
and SUVs have started to arrive
while all other vehicles are cur-
rently in production and expect-
ed delivery will begin toward
the end of July.
The new vehicles are all con-
sidered 'green' vehicles and
meet Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) requirements for
28 miles per gallon (mpg) or
better and less green house gas
emissions.
"We will have the most
green' fleet in the Navy,"
remarked Jeff Killian, NAVFAC
Southeast Public Works
Business Line coordinator.
The addition of the new
'green' vehicles to the Navy
fleet will help the Navy in


achieving better fuel economy,
reduced petroleum consumption
and contribute to a cleaner envi-
ronment through green house
gas emission reductions.
This supports the President's
focus on energy conserva-
tion and energy independence.
Executive Order 14323 dated
January 24, 2007 puts forward
the direction "Strengthening
Federal Environmental,
Energy, and Transportation
Management." Requirements
include improving energy effi-
ciency, reducing energy intensi-
ty, reducing water consumption
intensity and acquiring goods
and services using sustainable
environmental practices (ener-
gy-efficient, water-efficient and
recycled-content products), etc.
"We are following the new
policy statement that requires
that commands take prescrip-
tive actions to adhere to the
Navy's Energy Consumption
Guidelines," said Killian.


CNP Discusses Future



Of Navy Personnel


"Our Public Works Officers
are working directly with the
Installation Commanding
Officers (ICOs) to support
them as they implement the
President's newly published
guidelines on energy conserva-
tion."
The Navy is to receive close
to 1,000 Alternative Fuel


Vehicles (AFV) and hybrid
vehicles through GSAs ARRA
stimulus funding to replace
Navy-owned assets.
Existing Navy-owned assets
will be traded for the new vehi-
cles at designated exchange
centers, the old vehicles will
be auctioned off by GSA and
the funding will be used to pur-


Design It.


Freeze It.


Build It.
Design the Drees home you always wanted, enjoy
half-off options and freeze your interest rate!


chase a third round of vehicles
in the July/August timeframe.
ARRA projects are intended
to modernize Navy and Marine
Corps shore infrastructure,
enhance America's energy inde-
pendence and sustain a steady
and robust Maritime Force for
decades.


It's time to make that move and build the new home you
desire exactly the way you want it. From adding an extra
bedroom, to expanding a family room or creating your
dream kitchen. Drees Homes offers endless choices. And,
for a limited time only, every option and upgrade is half-off!
You can even lock-in your interest rate with our Drees Freeze
program. All this plus a wide variety of flexible floor plans!


prees
I HOMES..


dreeshomes.com


From ( of Naval Personnel Publhc, i
In a podcast released Aug. 4, the chief of naval
personnel discussed programs, policies and the
way ahead for Navy personnel next year.
Vice Adm. Mark Ferguson highlighted his key
focus areas to include rewarding performance and
emphasizing learning and development.
"A top priority will remain performance. We
will continue to reward our very best performers
and adjust our incentives and benefits to keep
those with the most critical skills in order to sus-
tain a balanced force, in terms of seniority and


experience, as we move forward to meet new
requirements," said Ferguson.
Ferguson also talks about individual augmentee
assignments and the shift of work from contrac-
tors to in-house government workers, which is
expected to begin in 2010.
To listen to the complete podcast, visit www.
navy.mil/media/audio/cnp/CNP%200N%20
NAVY%202010%20web.mp3.


r
Grill


Early Registration Fee $15.00 (Deadline Sept 16, 2009)
Day of Show Registration Fee $20.00
POC: Adam Boykin 904-412-8876

Mail to: Car Show 879 Majestic Cypress Dr. North Atlantic Beach 32233
Registration: 9:00 AM 10:00AM ONLY Awards Ceremony 1:30PM


Name:

Address:
City/State/Zip:
Vehicle Info:Year Make Model
Signatue:


w-


w


0 _____ o_ 0 0


o 0
em .

*
em









* amom


o




o woao


. --










* O -
Mo


*


I


"Copyrighted Materia
*a


* Syndicated Content



from Commercial News P

-Mb







** ** *


*
-- .
o0 e 6O



*0 4 0 a
eOwo omo


Car, Truck & Bike Show!

I September 26, 2009 M



.U


Top 10 in each class will recieve trophies!


Location: Golden Corral
14035 Beach Blvd.


* 0


Cmm
s-a
omamo


go I d


N
k ^


-1







THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009 17


Protect Yourself From Identity Theft


By Lt.j.g. Roni Beasley
RLSO SE
Imagine being deployed for a year.
During your deployment your sole
focus is your mission, leaving little
time to ponder anything else. Then,
the day finally arrives and you are
scheduled to return home. Upon your
return you are notified that your home
is in foreclosure, your Honda Accord
has been repossessed and you owe
Citibank $10,000 on an outstanding
credit card along with attorney's fees
from the lawsuit in which a judgment
was entered against you. This sce-
nario is very hard for anyone to digest.
Now, just imagine having to digest it
all knowing that you have never owned
a home, a Honda Accord or a Citibank
credit card. Your new reality is that
you are a victim of identity theft.
Identity theft occurs when some-
one uses your name, social security
number, credit card number or other


personal information without your
permission to obtain credit or commit
fraud. According to the Federal Trade
Commission (FTC), at least 9 million
Americans have their identities stolen
each year.
Unfortunately, military members
are more susceptible to identity theft
than members of the general public.
For example, it is easier for someone
to become privy to a service mem-
ber's social security number and other
identifying information. For years the
military has used social security num-
bers as personal identifiers, printing
the number on military and dependant
I.D. cards. Additionally, service mem-
bers are often deployed for extended
periods of time, making it difficult to
closely monitor their credit.
However, the Department of
Defense (DOD) is taking measures
to minimize the risk of identity theft
against service members. For instance,


a plan has been put into play to reissue
all military I.D. cards with only the last
four digits of the social security num-
ber printed on the I.D. Additionally,
DOD has partnered with the FTC to
launch The Military Sentinel (http://
www.ftc.gov/sentinel/military/).
This online complaint system allows
military members and DOD civilian
employees to report identity theft and
other consumer frauds directly to the
FTC.
Identity theft can cost a victim a lot
of time and money, but if you are a
service member having your identity
stolen could cost you your security
clearance or even yourjob. In order to
avoid security clearance issues, careful
steps can be taken to ensure that your
credit and identity do not become com-
promised. First, keep a close watch
on your credit history. Make sure
you take advantage of services that
offer yearly free credit reports such


as, www.annualcreditreport.com. This
is an online service that provides you
with credit reports from Experian, Tran
Union and Equifax.
Second, if you are deploying or are
an active duty service member who
moves around a lot, place an active
duty alert on your credit report. An
active duty alert is effective for one
year and requires creditors to go the
extra mile to verify your identity
before granting credit in your name.
This alert can be obtained by contact-
ing any of the three credit reporting
agencies or other identity protection
services such as TrustedID, Lifelock,
and IdentityGuard.
Finally, be cognizant of everyone
around you and to whom you disclose
your personal information. When I
say disclose, I don't just mean who
you knowingly disclose information
to, also make sure that the persons) or
entities you are disclosing information


to are in fact creditable. Be careful
and check everything you dispose of
and, pay careful attention not to dis-
card anything with identifying infor-
mation. Hence, if you don't currently
own a shredder now is as good a time
to invest because everything from pre-
approved credit cards to bank state-
ments should be shredded before being
tossed into the dumpster.
When it comes to identity theft an
ounce of prevention really is worth
a pound of cure. However, if you are
already past the point of prevention
and have been a victim of identity
theft then file a police report, contact
the credit bureaus and submit a com-
plaint to the FTC. If you have any
other questions your local legal assis-
tance office can be reached at Mayport,
Florida at (904) 270-5445 ext. 3017.
This article is not intended to substitute
for the personal advice of a licensed
attorney.


If One Of Your Loved Ones Is Physically Or


Mentally Disabled, Consider 'Special Needs Trust'


By Lt.j.g. Brent Johnson
RLSO SE
If one of your loved ones is
physically or mentally disabled,
and no Special Needs Trust
is created, did you know that
leaving them an inheritance of
$2,000 or more could possibly
cause them to lose certain gov-
ernment benefits? Worse yet,
did you know that the govern-
ment could require a disabled
adult receiving an inheritance
to spend that money before it
would pay for residential care
or other services?
Assuming you desire to avoid
interfering with public ben-
efits potentially available to a
disabled family member, you
should consider consulting your
local legal assistance attorney
about Special Needs Trusts. A
"Special Needs Trust" (some-
times called a Supplemental
Needs Trust) is a type of trust
designed to hold assets in trust
for a disabled beneficiary and
simultaneously protect that
person's eligibility for public
assistance programs such as
Supplemental Security Income
(SSI) and Medicaid.
SSI is a government program



Scams


providing monthly cash dis-
ability payments to individu-
als who are medically disabled,
have no current Social Security
Disability Income (SSDI),
and have few assets and little
income. Disabled individuals
who receive SSI are automati-
cally provided with Medicaid
health insurance benefits. The
problem generally speaking
is that one loses Medicaid
health insurance coverage
if they lose SSI. The good
news, however, is that a prop-
erly drafted Special Needs Trust
can help you avoid endanger-
ing SSI and Medicaid benefits
for a disabled family member.
Additionally, Special Needs
Trusts can help protect an inher-
itance from being exhausted
on food, clothing and shelter
expenses covered by govern-
ment programs. Equally as
important, trust funds placed in
Special Needs Trusts give your
beneficiaries protection should
they ever be sued in a personal
injury or other lawsuit.
Special Needs Trusts are a
highly complex type of trust.
A trust is essentially a legal
arrangement regulated by state



: Don't I


law in which one party holds
property for the benefit of
another. Special Needs Trusts
are used so that the property
left to a disabled family mem-
ber supplements, not supplants,
impairs, or diminishes any ben-
efits or assistance of any gov-
ernmental entity for which the
beneficiary may otherwise be
eligible or already receiving.
Examples of the kind of
supplemental, non-support dis-
bursements that your trustee
may make for your disabled
beneficiary if you have setup
a Special Needs Trust include:
medical expenses like supple-
mental nursing care, medical,
dental, rehabilitative and diag-
nostic work or treatment for
which there are not private or
public funds available, spe-
cial education, trained medical
assistance staff (24 hours or as
needed), and differentials in
the cost between housing and
shelter for shared and private
rooms in institutional settings.
Furthermore, monies placed in
Special Needs Trusts can help
your loved one enjoy non-
medical expenses. This means
Special Needs Trusts can help


Fall


For The Easy Money


By Lt.j.g. David Welch
RLSO SE
Scenario One: So you're
fresh out of boot camp or
you're a balding middle-aged
man hitting that mid-life cri-
sis. Either way you are looking
for a sweet new ride to impress
your friends. You're cruising
AutoTrader one day when you
see a $25,000 yellow Mustang
GT listed for only $3500. You
think to yourself, "this must
be some kind of mistake, but
man what a deal." You send an
e-mail to find out if this is for
real. Turns out, the person sell-
ing it is going through a divorce
and looking to really get at her
husband. Thankfully, you are
there to help her, all you have
to do is send a $3500 money
order to a friend of hers (she
doesn't want her husband to get
half that money after all) and
the car is all yours. This is a
deal that you can't just pass up,
so an hour later and the money
order is on the way. Two weeks
later, you haven't heard a thing
so you contact the money order
service only to find out that the
money order was picked up and
there is no way to get it back.
Scenario Two: You arrive


home and you check your
mail. A letter from Award
Grant informs you that you've
recently been selected for a
cash grant. Incredible! You
don't even remember apply-
ing for a grant, but who are
you to tell them what to do? It
seems some benevolent bene-
factor that gives billions away
to charities and individuals has
identified you as the kind of
good soul that deserves this free
money. You have in your hand
a check for $4,500.00, with the
guarantee of another, and all
you have to do is cash the check
and pay the broker's "commis-
sion" of $900.00 by going to
their website and providing
your credit card number.
You cash the check. You get
$4,500.00 in cash. You pay the
$900.00. No additional check
arrives, and your bank comes a
calling. It seems the check was
bogus, and you're on the hook
for the $4,500.00 (plus an addi-
tional $900 that you've mailed
away) not to mention the fact
that you've given your credit
card number and other personal
information away.
The thing these scenarios
have in common is, quite obvi-


ously, that they are scams.
Despite the fact that you're
probably saying to yourself, "no
one would fall for that," people
do every day. Not all scams
prey on an individual's greed,
many exploit sympathy. One
woman lost her entire life sav-
ings paying what she believed
to be legal fees for the adoption
of two children whose mother,
she was told, was dying from
AIDS. Neither the mother nor
the children existed, just the
scam artist.
If you were to ask anyone
who has fallen victim to one of
these scams whether they wish
they had consulted with a law-
yer before they got sucked in,
the answer would invariably be
"YES!" The old adage, "If it
sounds too good to be true, it
probably is," holds true today
as much as it ever has. So
before you consider taking "free
money," consider the fact that
as a servicemember you have
the ability to receive FREE
LEGAL ADVICE. Stop by any
base with legal assistance and
run it by a JAG. We're always
free, and we want to help (it's
job security for us).


NEX Web Offers Photo,


Video Sharing Service
From NEXCOM MyPhotoAlbum Inc. offers unlimited photo
Military customers shopping the NEX online and video sharing, personalized online photo
store now have one more service to choose from albums, photo prints and photo keepsakes as well
at the online shopping mall. MyPhotoAlbum
as security, privacy and online storage back-up.
Inc., a photo and video sharing service, is now
available and offering great deals for NEX cus- NEX members receive one free year of
tomers at www.navy-nex.com. MyPhotoAlbum Club membership, a $29.99
"Military families often have to endure long value, with no obligation or credit card required.
separations or live away from loved ones for In addition, NEX customers receive nine cent
an extended period of time," said Phil Austin, photo prints for themselves and their family and
Navy Exchange Service Command's (NEXCOM) 10 percent savings on all photo books, gifts,


Services Specialist. beingg able to snare pno-
tos online is very important so families can stay
connected even when they aren't together. This
photo and video sharing service will allow NEX
customers to do just that stay connected."


prints and posters.
For more information or to sign up for a free
membership, go to the online shopping mall at
www.navy-nex.com.


your loved ones attain the
therapeutic benefits of educa-
tion, vocational training, hob-
bies, vacations, transportation
(including vehicle purchase),
equipment, travel to visit
friends and family, summer or
day camps, and other needs
and/or luxuries the beneficiary
may have to enjoy life to the
fullest.
In sum, Special Needs Trust
can assist you in protect-
ing access to Medicaid health


insurance coverage and other
governmental benefits for a dis-
abled person, improve that per-
son's quality of life, help man-
age their inheritance money,
and provide for their future
security.
Please keep in mind that not
all legal assistance offices will
be able to draft Special Needs
Trusts. Due to their complex
nature, it may be necessary that
you consult a civilian estate
planning attorney. If you are


interested in more information
regarding Special Needs Trusts,
local legal assistance offic-
es can be reached as follows:
Jacksonville, Florida at (904)
542-2565 ext. 3006; Mayport,
Florida at (904) 270-5445 ext.
3017; Kings Bay, Georgia at
(912) 573-3959. This article
is not intended to substitute
for the personal advice of a
licensed attorney.


"WE BRING THE MILITARY


MARKET To You!"


Military Publications reach

LI 81r of the military community







is Military Community

Includes 92, 103 Acdive-

Duty, Reserves, Retirees and
Contractors









Working On Base -




Active-Duty, Reserves, Civilias, Contractors

r r U !njr News .............



Published by
Whe ]Florida kimes-Inion 312B30













18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, 1.... 1i i August 13, 2009


THE


NS MAYPORT, FLORIDA


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE 366-6300
Mon.-Thurs. 7:30a.m.-6:00p.m.
Fri. 7:30a.m.-5:30p.m.

Toll Free 800-258-4637
BY FAX 904-359-4180
IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classified in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).

Deadlines
Ru date Callby Fx b


Thursday Tue, Noon


Tue, 11 a.m.


Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction and
billing adjustments.

Ad Cancellation Normal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. When cancelling your ad, a cancellation
number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.

Billing Inquiries- Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324. To answer questions about payments
or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all advertise-
ments under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of publication.
Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was
incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for
any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbrevia-
tions are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


k The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


Cassifi


CLASSIFIED INDEX

AnoneS ments Instructi5on^^^


Auctions


Real Estate for Rent


Employment


I ea Etae orSae erice


Merchandise


I *I


Financial


Transportation


WM 904-366-6300


ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com

FREE online advertising!

Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online at

no additional charge.


I I ____________________________________________________


mII'-


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment





424-6066 Eric
18 years EXPERIENCE.
B BOY SCOUT
POPCORN
FUND-RAISER in
progress. Contact
Troop 2 1 8,
Kingsland, GA. for pur-
chase at 912-729-6619
Donations also accepted



ABSOLUTE CLOSEOUT
MAKE US AN OFFER
2 NEW BEDROOM 2 BA
JARDIN DE MER UNITS
WALK OF BIKE TO BEACH
All appliances-Attached Garage
Sales Office Open 1PM to 5PM
For Directs & Appt 241-2270



SOUTHSIDE- Lakewood
Estate Owned; 4/3, 2200sf,
repairs needed. Reduced
$65,900 Colliers Dickinson
358-1206 or 223-4986



0 Reduced,
Reduced,
Reduced.
Above
the Rest!!!
3/2 cute brick/
block home. Mins from
NAS. Ceramic/ hard-
wood floors, new roof,
split floor plan, 16x18
inclosed sunroom, big
deck, 1100sf. Priced to
sell $120K 904-735-1330
5145 Saginaw Ave.



HIDDEN HILLS CC-Golf
course view, 4/3.5, 3000sf,
master suite on ground
level, 2nd & 3rd BRs each
w/bath. Gas fpl. 2cgar,
18min's to Atl. Bch. By
owner $359,900. 904-564-2383





$0 DOWN!
Ifyou have land or
own family land, your
land is your CREDIT!!!
LUV HOMES
904-772-8031

'96 FLEETWOOD MH
owner only, 16x60,
stay, $15K. O.P. oc.
Call 904-705-6148


BEAUTIFUL 3/2 D/W
with nice large front
porch only 5% down and
owner will fin. Call
Sandy @ 781-0441


BEST BUY in Portside
West. All newly done 3/2
w/patio. Eat-n-kitchen
incl. new refrigerator,
range & microwave. New
carpet in all bdrms, new
vinyl in bath & kitchen.
New storage shed.
Exc. cond. & comm. pool.
Avail. immed. $17,500.
Call 302-764-9164




KINGSLAND, GA
208 Grassmere St.
in the Meadows.
Attractive 1633sqft
3/2 home for sale.
Open floor plan, over
sized rooms, cobble
stone fireplace, 2 car
garage, fenced backyd,
400sf scrn porch & much
more. Reduced to
$149,900 & motivated!
Call Stacy 912-882-3507
w/questions or schedule
a viewing.


Apartments Furnished
Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Minil-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St. Johns Apartments Furnished
St. Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St. Johns Condominiums
St. Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St. Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St. Johns Houses Furnished
St. Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St. Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St. Johns Lots
St. Johns Roommates
St. Johns Rooms to Rent
St. Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St. Johns Vacation Rental
St. Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St. Johns Wanted to Rent



FURNISHED
STUDIO APT T

incl. Resid. neighbor
hood $450m. 912-729-4103

ST. JOHNS BLUFF lbr,
private cozy $600m0. +
dep. 904-928-3224









1, 2 &3BR Apts & Home
rentals, $550 & Up. 2495611
SPECIALS THISWEEKONLY

Jacksonville BeachE rent. near
Azaocean. 2 Ridge 904-725-8155 unfurn apt






CH&A, water incld. HUD Ok
Ask about our Senior
Discounts Call 764-7805611.
Discounts. Call, 764-7801


We Appreciate You!
P ol. LA ircdit nodown payment-VA approved
FirstTime Home Buyers,
New Construction, Short
y l Sales, Re-Sales, Relocations

Call Dennis Kinkopf 904-868-3252





Laurie Potter (USN Retired)
IV Mortgage Loan Officer
904.256.2051 Direct
904.463.2065 Cell
laurie.potter@bankofamerica.com
Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC
Q Equal Housing Lender 2009
Bank ofAmerica Corporation. Credit and
collateral are subjecttoapprIal.Terms
and conditions apply This is not a cm- BankofAmerica'0
mrinentto lend. Proprams, rates, terns
and onions are subject to change Home Loans
w ith o u t n o t e 1 1 8
613189





M

MADISON
APARTMENT GROUP










Madison @ Bay Pointe
4500 Baymeadows Rd.
Jacksonville, FL 32217

866-721-8505
Located in Baymeadows Area Off295










Jo www.maglp.com


PINES OF MINDANAO
Offers spacious, ver-
sati Ile, sun lit, two
bedroom/one bath
apartments with lots
of closet space and
storage. The Pines,
located at 1700 Mind-
anao in JAX, is in a
park-like setting off of
Atlantic Blvd. Conve-
nient to shops,
beaches, downtown,
port Naval Base. Call
(904) 646-3699 or go to

from $755 to $895. Ask
about our specials.

,ORANGE PK 2/2
APT. F/P, 614-4670/
8860-0506 $700m. 15
amin's from NAS.

WESTSIDE 2/1, CH&A
Clean, quiet in country
setting, water included.
$545MO. 904-783-0288


*NO RENT 1ST MONTH*
Across from ocean 2/1
apt. 103 16th Ave S. Jax
Bch. $995mo.
Jax Beach 1/1 apt,
211 N. 8th St. No dogs.
$650mo0.
All properties 1/2 mo dep.
Broker/ Owner
Call any day 612-4296



JAX AIRPORT
Nice 2/2.5 w/gar, like
end unewit w/ gara nitew,
2 hardwd, stainless,
2mstr stes, $475ea. or
$950. Avi. now 912-322-9288
wvgrbc@tds.net
HODGES near Beach
Nice 2/2,new Lrg 2/2, w/d
lakevie, many amenitclubes,
house $850m 904-504-5559
ORANGE PARK Twnhse
end unit w/ gar, new
2br/2.5ba w/ bonus rm,
1200sf $950m 904-465-7970
SOUTHSIDE- Montreaux
Like new Lrg 2/2, w/d
incid, many amenities,


Southside/Gate Pkwy N.
1/1, w/d, gated, pool,
gym, alarm, porch, lake
view, $950m. 904-534-5397



CLAY COUNTY- 3/2
executive house, fully fur-
nished, community pool,
great schools 410-526-6111



ARLINGTON-4 homes avl
3BR $750, $900, $950 &
$1000mo + $700dep.
Call 696-6944 for info.
Atlantic Beach 4/2
1460sq ft Large
Fenced Yard, Irrig.
$1080/month $1090/deposit
$50 screen fee/adult
Avail, now for rent
Or rent to own
904-241-6568
Atlantic Beach Mayport
3/2, corner lot, Irg
bkyrd, newly refur-
bished, imi from beach,
3mi from base $1095mo
904-327-5925/ 904-247-1049

BAYMEADOWS/East
Hampton Comm.
Exec. 3/2 single fam.
home w/pool & spa.
Close to 9A & 1-95.
Pool & lawn maint.
provided. Comm. svcs
avi-pool, soccer, ten-
nis, playground, bskt-
ball & more. Rental
could be ready as
early as Sept. 15th.
$2550m+1mo damage
dep. All applicants
will be screened. Call
904-363-3111 for appt.

FERNANDINA
B BCH 3/2, $1100mo.
granite, waterview
florida rm, great fam.
neighborhd. 904-556-6119
HOUSE FOR
RENT- $700m. 2/2,
several miles to
NAS/JAX. Home
904-908-8844; cell 422-0309
A ARGYLE 3/2+FL
rm, 1700sf, 2cg, Irg
bkyd, nr schools,
lots of amenities.
$450m-will split btwn


Spacious 3 bedrooms, 2 baths
+ Large A/C office and screened
back porch. Brick house with tiled
living area, kitchen & hallways
S1,500/Month -Available Sep 1st
No pets, and no smoking please
904-616-6480 between 8:00AM & 8:00PM
656130


Navy

Classified

Ads



THE FLEET

MARKET


ADVERTISING
RULES

Please fill out
this form in
black or blue ink.


DEADLINES


THE

MIRROR


Noon

Friday


Rank/Grade:


CHEVY CAVA-
LIER '93- Z24,
convert., good top
& tires, A/C, AT,
no leaks, hi-mi's.
Kevin 874-8941. $2200.
FERNANDINA BEACH
2200sf 3/2, remod DW
mobile home, must see
to believe, hrdwd firs,
ceramic tile, new appls
& frplc, floor to ceiling
windows and loft that
ovrlks 1.3 ac prop.
$1100mo 1st, last & dep
req. Call 206-1162 Iv msg
INTRACOASTAL WEST
3/2 in beautiful Kensing-
ton, wooded yard, comm
pool, tennis & b-ball
$1200mo. + sec. dep.
Call Robert 904-403-1039

NORTHSIDMAYPORT-New house
in Mayport Village
overlooking the run-
way. 3br/2 full 170baths, 2
half baths, 4 car gar,
security Sys., huge
kitchen, balconies off
every bdrm. Annual
lease $2200 6 Sec.
depshly pareqd. Pets can-
sidered. 904-545-5839

NORTHSIDE 3/2 73/1, big
rooms, ch&a, remo55red.,
w/d hkup. $700/mo +
$500dep. HuCall 636-0d ok. 5144872
OAKLEAF- 3/2, 1700sf,
cul-de-sac, all amenities,
$1400m., sc ready for
occupancy. 904-616-9975
Orange Park Country Club
Brick 4/3, 2cg, 2200sf,
freshlant.ed, new car-
pet, $15004o. 904-307-5834
SAN JOSE/ LAKEWOOD
Charming neighborhood!!
I live bikealso. 3BR $845


$1155 dep. Call 636-0269


House, 2000sf, 2cg,
904fncd yd,4970. A/C avail.
125th. PCS $12rn lanai,
906-259-0287 or
757-617-3701
ORANGE PK
Sfurn'd room for

$480Cmm. 904-375-1814 for


T3/2 home on quiet
u I -de-sac. Kids
Side bikes to Ele2m.
School. Large fenced yd.
Reduced! Call Marty
904-571-4970. Avail. Aug.
15th. PCS $1200.
A GREEN COVE
SPRINGS 3/2/2,
1774sf, fpl, dining
r-rm, stainless appis,
fncd yd, 16x20 shed, FL.
rm, $1400m. 904-599-5785
WESTSIDE- 3BR/2BA
$795 + $795 dep, no pets,
2 blocks off Cassat Ave,
Call 904-783-6237, 9a-5p
ATLANTIC BEACH
835 Main St. 2/1.5 TH
$800mo. fncd, yrd srvc
included, 1/2mo dep.
Broker/ Owner 612-4296


t Half Off First
Months Rent.
Townhome $975m
542-9095/278-8343
S St. Johns Co.
gated comm. 2/2.5, lcg,
pool, playground. CR210
nr 1-95, exit 329.





NORTHSIDE
$299 MOVES YOU IN!
1 & 2 BR weekly/monthly
904-766-6986


LIKE NEW 3/2 MH lease
with option to buy.
CALL 695-2255


Large 2 & 3 B/R mobile
homes for rent call now
and ask about our $1.00
A day M/I special. Call
695-2255.








A ARGYLE 3/2+FL
rm, 1700sf, 2cg, Irg
bkyd, nr schools,
lots of amenities.
$450m-will split btwn
mates. 904-302-2286

I need a room-
n mate to split the
rent. Nice house
w/poolI Carpool to
NAS JAX optional
904-744-0577

WESTSIDE Share
nice 4/2, unfurn'd
room, female,
overr age 25,
$300m+ utilities.
Donna 904-728-4443








Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold


HOME BASE BUSINESS
less than $80 start up,
visit: www.2ndplan.com

POOL ROUTE
Orange Park net $40K
+ year, will train and
guarantee accounts $33K
full price 1-877-766-5757
www.poolroutesales.com
National Pool Route
Sales Inc. Broker


Maytag fsoent
Knoade whelet.
moyerwh oper-
ating manual


Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events




A LIVE -IN
CHRISTIAN LADY
wanted 62+ pri-
rva te room, bath,
salary. 388-9001 Iv msg





APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Outstanding opportunity
to work with an autho-
rized service provider
for a Fortune 500 home
improvement company.
We are looking for ener
getic, motivated
appointment setters to
work in retail locations
in NE Florida & Coastal
GA. Applicant must be
drug free & pass a
criminal background
screening.
20-35 hours weekly
$10.00 hourly + bonuses
Work Thu-Sun.
Positions start immedi-
ately. Call 904-224-1085,
email your resume to
hrdept@abmrktg.com,
or fax your resume to
904-268-3170, to set up an
interview





APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Outstanding opportunity
to work with an autho-
rized service provider
for a Fortune 500 home
improvement company.
We are looking for ener-
getic, motivated
appointment setters to
work in retail locations
in NE Florida & Coastal
GA. Applicant must be
drug free & pass a
criminal background
screening.
20-35 hours weekly
$10.00 hourly + bonuses
Work Thu-Sun.
Positions start immedi-
ately. Call 904-224-1085,
email your resume to
hrdept@abmrktg.com,
or fax your resume to
904-268-3170, to set up an
interview


A/C Repair Service
CAC 1815374.
28+yrs exp. If I can't fix
it their is no service
call charge 755-7760


CDL TRAINING



CALL NOW!

FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

APPROVED FOR VETERANS TRAINING


IGAIMASTE





11A


Work Phone #


both $300UUODO. U790-5277



AUCTION Sunday
2:00 till ?? New
merch. 580 East
King St. Kingsland
Call Liz 576-1776





BED- NEW IN PLASTIC
W QUEEN
Pillowtop
I Mattress
Must Sell $95 |
S 904-644-0498


I BEAUTIFUL
FAIRFIELD
SL 0 V E SEAT-
Need Ieepoint pat-
tern, excellent
cond., sold for $1500,
asking $800. 904-762-5998
BED A Banner Bargain
King Size Mattress $180
Call 904-644-0498

IBED A BARGAIN
QUEEN SETS $95
'KINGS $180 365-0957

, ENT.CENTER -
very gd cond., oak
fin, adi. shelves,
holds up to 27" TV
$25. 771-8930
H HEADBOARD-oak
king size w/metal
frame. No mat-
t r e s s $125.
714-6956
LIVING RM SET
Cindy Crawford
denim sofa, chr &
ottoman w/cof. &
end tbl $600.
379-8705
QUEEN MATTRESS &
BOX-PILLOW TOP SET
Brand New $150 644-0498
SOFA-brwn Ithr
sectional w/2
recliners, table &
sleeper. Good
cond. 113xi07.
$700. 714-6956



"Back To School Sale"
Sat. August 15th 9am-lpm
The Nearly New Shop,
the "only" thrift store
located on Mayport
Naval Base, open
to active, retired &
civilians w/base access.
Open every Tuesday &
Thursday of the month.
709A Everglades Ct.
Supported by the Navy
Wife's Clubs of America,
Mayport Chapter #201 a
non-profit organization.
Donations welcome.
904-270-6067.

Thank you!
Besides protecting our
country, military
personnel stationed in
our communities
donated 850,620
hours of volunteer
service in Northeast
Forida and Southeast
Georga last year. Their
time was gven to
community
organizations, church
groups, youth activities,
scouting and more.

HUGE MOVING
SALE 733 Wake-
S mont Dr., 8-until.
Ilndr/Outdr must
sell furn, appls,
collect's, dishes, flat
ware, clothes, tools,
more.
BARGAIN HUNTERS
GALORE
This Sat & Sun Have
Your Garage Sale at
The Market Place!
7059 Ramona, 786-FLEA


ORANGE PARK
2BR/2BA APT
FO R RENT.
904-542-5771 X243
SKW Genera-
ltor Electric
start propane
or gasoline
power, low
hours $375.
Jim 241-1243
INFLATABLE
FOOTBALL
BLIMP: Miller Lite
logo, 4'x23". Great
for parties, 5 new, $5ea.
269-4312
S ZILDJIAN 20
CYMBAT, stan-
dard fir stand,
V twin Ludwig mal-
lets, gd cond., $100
cash. 904-264-6054 after 4p



TICKETS WANTED
Gators Footba l
Call 800-786-8425



BASSETT PUPS CKC
Shots/Wormed 2M/1 F.
$300-$350 call 477-4754
Boston Terrier Pups 11wks
AKC, HC, POP, good temp
$350. 879-1698 / 803-9886
CAIRN TERRIER PUPS
AKC $700
www.mccartysterriers.com
CORGI PUPS- Pembroke,
AKC, Reds & Tri's $500-$600
www.mccartyscorgis.com
English Bulldog Pups AKC
Champion. lines, all colors
avl now. $1350 904-607-4488
FRENCH BULLDOG AKC
Male, 112 yrs old, all
records $1500 obo 384-1080
German Shepard Pups
Sable, 11wks old, $250
904-234-5295
Golden Retriever Pups
AKC Males Only wormed
& shots $250. 229-560-3823
LAB PUPPIES- 4 Choco-
late Males, 1 Yellow
Male $350ea. 904-845-4845
LAB PUPS- M/F
shots/wormed Born 6/3/09
$200. 904-240-6554
MINI SCHNAUZERS
$300 Must sell 786-9613.
POMERANIAN AKC M/VF
breeding pair, all records
$500 for both. 384-1080
PUPPIES
Min Pins $250
Males. Call 229-339-5067
www.ispaws.com
Rat Terrier Pups UKCI,
many colors $250-$450.
www.mrnccartysratterriers.comrn
ROTTWEILER AKC,
Pup's Available 8-12-09,
HC, $500. 272-5850




Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease




Custom Bobber
2 0 0 0 600CC,
15kmi's, compl.
rebuilt, new tires.
904-482-8943.
$40000bo.
HARLEY DAVIDSON
-'04, V-rod, 1600 mi,
$10,000 obo. 237-6841
230-4433


t MOTOR-
CYCLE LIFT
Hydraulic
$275obo. Jim
241-1243

A SUZUKI GZ250 '02
new tires, windshid,
70mpg, saddlebags,
new tires, exc cond.
15kmi's. $1500 obo.
912-222-4720

HARLEY DAVID-
DSON '05-1200 Cust.
Sportster, b I k
/chrome, L8000mi's,
gar., many extras, exc.
cond. $9000 obo .
904-451-3057

, HARLEY DAVID-
SON '96 -1200XL
Cust. Sportster, 75K
mi's, new tires, bat-
tery plugs & wires
$6000obo. George
904-710-8503

SSUZUKI
INTRUDER
S99 VS800,
9400mi's, bur-
gundy, wind-
shield, saddle
bags, custom tandem
seat w/passenger back
rest. $2,999. Jerry
904-491-4272


Thank you!
Besides protecting our
country, military
personnel stationed in
our communities
donated 650,620
hours of volunteer
service in Northeast
Florida and Southeast
Georga last year.Their
time was given to
community
organizations, church
groups, youth activities,
scouting and more.






T CHEVY IMPALA
s'68-org. owner.327
\| super sport, teal
Sw/white hardtop,
run5s great $8000. Patti
635-8766




4 TOYOTA PRIUS
T'06- exc. cond.
|62kmi's need to
sell, still under
war r $1 4 9 00.
912-882-6444 (Red)

FORD ASPIRE '95
S2dr, HT 6K, 5spd,
35mgg city, 41mpg
Hwy, ice cold air,
$1500. 912-882-6444

HONDA CIVIC '00
5spd, 2dr, red, 143k,
exc cond $5000obo.
912-674-9795

0 KIA SEPHIA


great, good
mpg, $2500. Jake
808-780-7825

0 OLDSMOBILE
1994 98
REGENCY
Fully loaded
160k new 3800
V6, runs great,
$2500. Jake 808-780-7825

A SUBARU Impreza
;'06- WRX / STI,
$23K, 4cyl, turbo,
'I 26,500mi, no modi-
fications, adult owned,
extended warranty. Call
Waylon 904-652-6369





CASH FOR JUNK CARS
Alive or Dead 237-1657

WE BUY JUNK CARS
Call 813-1325


Organization


Name (please print): Signature: Date Submitted:

1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military 6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Mayport Naval above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or
Station. all ads.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help 7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such calling 366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
as sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found items, and 8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed
garage sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE on an original form.
ACCEPTED. ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS Select the number of weeks ad is to run: 1 wk J 2 wks J 3 wks J 4 wks
ARE OFFERED FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL
ESTATE ADS WILL BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to Jax Air News.
RENT BY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more
(PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST than one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per fam-
CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD OTHERWISE ily, per week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.
THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be writ- Category:
ten independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue. -M T. FLO.S
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, Building 1.
Box 280032, Mayport Naval Station, Mayport, FL 32228-0032,or to The Mirror, I
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


The BEST Place to START Your
JAX-Area Home Search
Jacksonville's Best Website for
Veterans & Active Duty Military

We have it all:
Cash Rebates to YOU of up to $800!
Search for ALL properties for sale with PHOTOS
NO Money Down & NO Closing Costs Guaranteed!*
Free VA loan pre-qualification NO application fees
Info about your $8,000 1st-time homebuyer credit
and so much more... 997-8064

This is the VERY BEST TIME
to be a VA homebuyer. ass Integrity -
Log on now to get started. Home & Finance, Inc.
Logonnowtogetstarted *Seewebsitefordetails.
It's SIMPLE, FREE & with NO OBLIGATION. ULicensed FL Real Estate
& Mortgage Broker



Miliary~me~yeriico ..


__ I ___ ___ ___ ___ ___


FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE


9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9


I-


I WESTSIDE
B rand New Brookew1AA 0 ve In Specia I**
RHI NO For Rent T ow nhomes:2 & 30BO
57 0 lots of upar a cle.


*Jew t


I:


I :











THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, I .... i,, August 13, 2009 19


VU k-46


"C


I


I I,


v"


"din-









20 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, August 13, 2009


IChrysler's #1 Certified Pre-Owned Store*I


*#1 certified dealer based on 2008 total sales in the northeast business center. Prices on pre-owned cars after 3000 trade equity or cash.


ff AN' m- --


fTl77N" Cs -rMThT6


ATOII I E' II II


To list your dealership,

please call

904-359-4321


Before you buy, shop these local dealerships first!


TOM BUSH BMW
JACKSONVILLE
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
725-0911

TOM BUSH BMW
ORANGE PARK
6914 Blanding Blvd
777-2500



GARBER BUICK
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

KEY BUICK
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060

JACK WILSON BUICK
2250 US1 South
797-4577



CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com



NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com
GARBER CHEVY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com
GORDON CHEY
1166 Blanding Blvd. 272-2200


JACK WILSON CHEVROLET
2255 US1 South 797-4567

JERRY HAMM CHEY
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036




ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
2330 US1 South 354-4421

GARBER CHRYSLER
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com


JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000


RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com




ATLANTIC DODGE
2330 US1 South 354-4421

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

GARBER DODGE TRUCK
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

ORANGE PARK DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500


RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, FemrnBch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com

WESTSIDE DODGE
1672 Cassat Ave. 384-6561



PAUL CLARK FORD RCURY
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673

GARBER FORD-MERCURY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325

MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060

MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673



NIMNICHT PONTIAC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 854-4826

.GARBER GMC TRUCKS
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com
JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577


DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900

LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300





KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060





ATLANTIC INFINm
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200


ATLANTIC JEEP
2330 US 1 South 354-4421

GARBER JEEP
Green Cove Springs
264-2416
www.garberautomall.com
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078


LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantic Blvd. 721-5000

LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 777-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.com




NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN MERCURY
4620 Southside Blvd. 642-4100

MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673





TOM BUSH MAZDA
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911

MAZDA CITY
6916 Blanding Blvd. 779-0600




BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080

MERCEDES BENZ
of ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd.
777-5900


TOM BUSH MINI
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911


MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810 CassatAve.
389-3621

MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP
7447 Blanding Blvd. 269-9400



GARBER PONTIAC
Green Cove Spings
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577

NIMNICHT PONTIAC GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy.
854-4826



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10100 Atlantic Blvd. 725-9155



KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circle.
771-9100

ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 Cassat Ave. 389-4561



TOM BUSH VW
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911
O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
11401 Philips Hwy. 322-5100


O'STEEN VOLVO
2525 Philips Hwy. 396-5486


GT LEASING
Commercial Leasing Since 1955
2810 St. Augustine Rd. 398-5000
ww.gtleasing.comr

PROFESSIONAL
AUTO LEASING
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 722-1694


TOM BUSH MINI
USED CAR
SUPER CENTER
9875 Atlantic Blvd.
371-4877


WORLD IMPORTS
CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
www.woddimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992

O'STEEN VW CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED CENTER
11401 Philips Hwy.
322-5100


BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
www.beachblvdautomotive.com
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511

BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
10211 Atlantic Blvd.
724-1080

LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
PRE-OWNED CENTER
10384 Atlantic Blvd.
998-0012

TOM BUSH BMW
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
9910 Atlantic Blvd.
371-4381


:-foreyoubIyshopthsealcalaeal


PRE-=ED
VE
_7 Hi


'LISTj







YOURI ,


S SUM-"M SALEiEVENTiGOINGIONII




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs