<%BANNER%>
Panache Jamaica (PJM magazine)
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098601/00007
 Material Information
Title: Panache Jamaica (PJM magazine)
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Tricia Williamson
Place of Publication: Kingston, Jamaica
Publication Date: 07-2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098601:00007

Full Text














Ill


.9' ~
H.


ri nI fi


The Hallmark
Caribbean Cui


magazine
"'.. or babic
-
'. l' ~
.. .l


*1M I
t0l


. *1


*I K


.fmr


'I
f


N ii


11


II 1A


eA
BP e R(
Si^^
r;, F;.Lt n c i


- 0v


S '1 H I '" 1 1
liI" l lB L




N.^


~ -
-- S
s r' S


S --


b- '~'q


. f..__ -
.

*- *~r


1A


9~CrSY/i


i
, L


MEi.'
I/**.** *-*****.llw O


IZ( 7i


wtLk






A.
Hf BI


iN
-~ -u


1 I.

'SW.


_---


,,


Il 1


- SeI


















jnAmTT? btTITTTTTTi










SCelebrating

Honouring


mazi our Present and
;AWm Future Leaders.



40AmazingUnder40 is a national pro- Criteria for Nomination:
gramme founded to celebrate and Innovation + Achievement
honour Jamaica's present and future / Vision + Leadership
leaders, through the recognition of 40 / Im'pact
Jamaicans who have attained a Growth + Development
,- Community Involvement +
significant level of success but have Contribution
not yet reached the age of 40.


Anse Symphoni
S vergenze
creativity ded nation sustainability



To be held at:
The Jamaica Pegasus Hotel


2010 Nomination Rules & Guidelines

* Nominee must be between the ages of 18 and 40 and may not
exceed 40 years of age on December 31, 2010.
Nominee must have excelled in their profession and the criteria
listed above.
Nominee must show exceptional service commitment to their
community.
Jamaica 40AmazingUnder40ol National Programme awardees
will be selected from all nominations received. All responses to the
criteria on the official nomination form will be rated by an
independent Board of Advisors selection committee. The 40
Jamaica 40AmazingUnder40TM National Nominees with the
highest average rating will be selected, honoured and celebrated.
Jamaica 40AmazingUnder40TM National Honourees will be
announced; and the People's Choice Awardees will be announced.
All selected Nominees must attend the recognition events
Jamaica 40AmazingUnder40M. National Programme reserves
the right to publish entrants' photos and biographical details.

Please visit: www.40amazingunder40.com


Lead Patron
. *^t UTechSchool of
,a, Graduate Studies,
Research and
Ali Entrepreneurship


Major Sponsor

PEGASUS


Major Supporter

einn V uet I-lome

AA


National Partner LifcStyle Partners



Businessuite
MAGAZINE


National Executive Partners
. e'. JAMAICA
*jr .: . .

,
**- *--


For further information, please contact us at: The Secretariat, UTech School of Graduate Studies, Research and Entrepreneurship
Tel: 927.1680 Ext. 2182, 3204, 3139 / Mobile: 512.2559 / Email: 40under40@ansesymphoni.com or visit us online at www.40amazingunder40.com
r,


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICA|


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010










PANAC HE'JA

Publisher
Panache' Communications Inc., LLC

Editor-in-Chief
TRICIA WILLIAMSON

Director of Photography
ROGER JONES

Design & Layout
TRICIA WILLIAMSON

Contributing Photos & Text
TRICIA WILLIAMSON, ROGER JONES, HAVAIANAS/
WALK GOOD JAMAICA, STACY BETHEL LATOYA
JONES, SASS: SAND AND STREET STYLE, CAROLYN
CORREIA, THE SUGAR MILL RESTAURANT, 1876
WINES, TRACEY SEYMOUR, CHOCOLATE DREAMS,
TACORI, EMIEL MARTENS, AICIRT COLLECTION,
ANARCY CLOTHING,40AMAZINGUNDER40,
CULINARY FEDERATION OF JAMAICA, SILKY RUFF,
REALLY ROOTS, ND CHONG JEWELS INC.

Advertising Sales & Marketing
TASHANYA TRAILE
tashanya@panachej amagazine.com

Subscription
KEMESHA HANSON
kemesha@panachej amagazine.com

For marketing, advertising and other enquiries, contact:
editor@panachejamagazine.com

WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM
KINGSTON, JAMAICA
TEL: 876-448-4565
FAX: 876-749-7061

Panache Jamaica Magazine is published by Panache
Communications Inc., LLC


PJM Digital magazine is powered by Issuu.com


Copyright 2010. All rights reserved.
PJM magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited
material. All intellectual property rights remain with authors
and creators of submissions. All content appearing in PJM
magazine may not be reproduced in any form without written
permission from the Editor-in-Chief.

6
| PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010














UU'6


I

























































Soy Scallion Glazed Scallops with Cardamom Fried Bammy and Blue
Chutney as created by Executive Chef Ravi Anne, Sugar Mill Restaurant


| PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010

















HAVAIANAS WORLD CUP 2010
PANACHE'JA CONTRIBUTORS
BEST FRIENDS
WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM
EDITOR'S NOTE
REALLY ROOTS
PERISCOPE: N. CHONG
TAMI & TESSANNE: MELTING POTS
ENGAGEMENT RING TRENDS FOR 2010
GOURMET PLEASURES OF CHOCOLATE
GREAT WEDDING FAVOURS
JAMAICA'S VISIONARY:::RAS KASSA
AICIRT COLLECTION
'BRUSH UP' ON YOUR SKILLS
HAIRSTYLES FOR THE SUMMER
SAND AND STREET STYLE: CFW 2010
FRAGRANCE FAUX
FOOT PROBLEMS IN WOMEN
NEVER TOO LATE
INTRODUCING.... BB MAGAZINE
FERTILITY TREATMENTS & AUTISM
POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION IN NEW DADS
A SUMMER CELEBRATION OF STYLE
WORLD CUP-WHY YOU SHOULD CARE ...
SOKA BY KAREN DE FREITAS FRASER
TRACEY SEYMOUR
TOP CARIBBEAN ISLANDS FOR 2010
1876 WINES
TASTE OF JAMAICA 2010
TOJ PHOTO HIGHLIGHTS
UNDERSTANDING BELLY FAT


toe cover shoL[E]


ATraile-Blazer
Winner of the Face of Panache
Competition Tashanya Traile. Shot on
location at Devon House, Kingston,
Jamaica and wearing clothes from
Granduer Boutique and Ali Lue Couture.
Editor-in-Chief: Tricia Williamson
Photographer: Roger Jones
Stylist: Michael Atkinson
Makeup & Hair: John Gordon
Model: Tashanya Traile


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICAI


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


































"EVEN THOUGH WE'RE FROM
T\O COMPLETELY DIFFERENT
COUNTRIES AND SPEAK
DIFFERENT LANGUAGES, WE
COULDN'T BE ANY MORE ALIKE.
LOVE HER!"- 1. CHUING


ends


2r 'L
, S
=
2.. ^
~,' ,',



e I
23

N
Em
-0'L


- 0
3 S?
_s
It d~
"S


"I LOVE MY BEST FRIEND: BECAUSEWE
"BAIL" EACH OTHER OUT OF TROUBLE..
NOT TO MENTION..SHE'S MY COUSIN.
C. JAMES-MORRISON


"BEST FRIENDS FOR 24 YEAR........
EVERY SHINING MNIONIENT.
EVERY HEART WRENCHING NIMOIENT,
WITHOUT HER LIFE \WOULD BE ILiST "A"
MOMENT." N. DEPASS-CHONG


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE '10u


Best


























.... O.OOOOS


PANACHE JAMAICA COVERGIRL, TASHANYA TRAILE, THE FACE
OF PANACHE COMPETITION WINNER GETS HER HAIR STYLED
AND MAKEUP DONE BY THE TALENTED JOHN GORDON.


........ 000


How Et1LU


I II

ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


I-
Mi c hi a el I
SAt k i n s on
started out
in the business; as an
assistant to local designer
Mr. Robert Hall.
Working on collections
alongside Hall and
doing fashion shows as
:nI backstage assistant
manager led Nlicheal to
managing fashion shows
independently.

As he continued onork
as a stylist ove tilhe
Nears, a conmpanhI called
"The Group" %as later


@ 0






BY TRICIA WILLIAMSON,
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Choosing the cover was not easy with an
array of top contenders to choose from, each
evoking their own mood with each shot!
However in the end, our decision fell with
the one that truly spoke to the essence of the
issue- a Summer of Flair & Style!

formed and offered fashion serve ices- from
fashion st ling to fashion sho\\ and model
nianagenient, portfolio development and
personal shopping.

His past collaborations have included Kevin
0 Brian out of Paris and niagazines such as
Complex D magazine and Buzzz magazine!


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICAI







WWW.PANACH E IAMAGAZINE.COM


yofur Online Oasis for Caribben TFakion &
Lifettyle

Latest news in fashion, music, entertainment both here and
abroad....stay tuned.

;.Tw j t


V^1


. V "


CARRERA, one of the world's
most prestigious fashion sunglass
and sports eyewear brands, its
inclusion in Rihanna's latest music
video "Rude Boy" the hot summer
single off of the singer's hit album,
Rated R.
"The stylish, playful and
seductive video for "Rude Boy"
contains all of the elements that have
made Rihanna so gravitating since the
beginning of her career. In the video,
Rihanna reveals the complexity of her
personality by displaying her true light-
hearted and pulsating charisma."- AP
From PJM, we say, "David
Bowie to Dancehall's late Bogle.....
they would all be proud!"
We know our gal is Bajan! but is
pere Jamaican influence running this
video straight!!! West Indies to the
world!!!

"We used a lot of color, but also
the costumes were very Jamaican
dance-hall queen-type."- Rihanna
on the Rude Boy video.


Athletics poster boy Usain
Bolt is set to try his hand at
entrepreneurship as he launched
the Usain Bolt's Tracks and
Records sports lounge in Kingston,
Jamaica.
His foray into the entertainment
business is being backed by Kingston
Live Entertainment (KLE), the
company behind the successful
Fiction lounge at Market Place on
Constant Spring Road.
At the launch on Tuesday
night at Fiction, Bolt said, "This
is something big, something new,
something different. This is a reason
to keep working hard and I look
forward to working with KLE in the
future."
Usain Bolt's Tracks and Records
is a US$1-million investment. It will
be located next to Fiction at Market
Place and is scheduled to be opened
in the last quarter of 2010. The design
will reflect that of a stadium and will
boast a mezzanine, multiple bars and
lounges, interactive booth seating and
a retail shop carrying Bolt products.-
AP


I PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


Kamla Persad-Bissessar became
the first female Prime Minister of
Trinidad and Tobago as her five-
party coalition secured a strong
victory in snap elections in the
former British colony.
A subdued Prime Minister Patrick
Manning conceded defeat some five
hours after the close of polls.
"What I do know is that we've
lost the elections," Manning said on
live television. "The people have
spoken."
Meanwhile, jubilant crowds
gathered at the headquarters of Persad-
Bissessar's United National Congress
(UNC), the main opposition party,
which heads the People's Partnership
coalition.
Persad-Bissessar's campaign
tapped into voters' worries about rising
gang violence and corruption scandals
here.
The 58-year-old has promised to
increase pensions and create a multi-
million-dollar fund for sick children in
a campaign focused on change.- AP


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


AI







































You must become the change
you want to see for your
country. It all begins with you.





Tricia Williamson,
Stilettos-in-Chief


r0.


he last page to be written for Panache'
Jaaiiiica is always the Editor's Note. As we
celebrate our fourth anniversary of business
andi amidst all that's happening in my home,
I w wonder where to start, what to say, how to
be the change I want to see for Jamaica and have it
begin with me.

With that said, it starts with a huge THANK YOU to
God, Family, Friends and all the PJM Team, readers
and supporters of our wonderful little piece of the
Caribbean.

We celebrate not just ourselves, but also Kamla
Persad-Bissessar, the first female Prime Minister of
Trinidad & Tobago and wish her and her people the
success and the will to see the changes they want for
the Republic of the twin-island state.

Back home, we have major milestones- the formation
in March 2010 of our new publishing company-
Panache' Communications Inc. LLC, the launch
of BB magazine- Baby Blueprint for babies, the
introduction of the AICIRT Collection- a signature
line of charm bracelets for local charities here in
Jamaica. With evey fashionable piece- you can
AICIRT your support for breast cancer, the homeless,
autism, AIDS awareness, missing children and more!

This issue gives back as much as we have received,
and we trust that from Taste of Jamaica to a
Summer Celebration of Style with our outstanding
Face of Panache winner, Tashanya Traile that you
enjoy every turn and support us as we expand from
a digital magazine into print by going to www.
panachejamagazine.com and subscribing to your
favourite magazine-PJM!

Four years ago when I founded Panache' Jamaica, I
knew it would be a fight, a passion worth the pursuit.
I thank everyone who has supported us over the years
and continue to do so! We sincerely dedicate this issue
to you and look forward to bigger and better things!

r AO
c 00 0


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICAI


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE


Aw )
b


















Yuko Ogawa


o ()ua\\ a.
BrookIl n-
a sed hat
d es i une I
\\as bolrn
and raised
in Osaka, n. As a young
girl, she grew up watching her
mom design and create clothes.
That experience became the
foundation for her work.
Another major influence came
from taking a trip to Jamaica in
1999. There she became deeply
inspired by the vibrant people
and the colorful culture. Soon
after her trip to Jamaica, Yuko
started crocheting and creating
hats inspired with a global
perspective. Her signature hats
are bubbly, fashioned with
lively colored yarns; a mix
of a variety of materials. Her
designs represent a unique and
classy style, that work well for
men and women.
Yuko launched her own


label, "ReallyRoots" in 2002.
She then attended a hat design
course at Osaka Fashion Design
Vocational College in 2004. This
course further sharpened and
honed her design skills.
"ReallyRoots" is an urban
line of handmade hats, purses,
earrings, women's clothing,
gloves and scarves. Her
collections have been showcased
in numerous events, parties and
street fairs, both in Japan and
in the United States. Her most
significant event to date was
a self produced fashion show
at the club KANON in Osaka
in 2007. The show was called
"Perfume: ReallyRoots". Word
spread quickly about ReallyRoots
and her designs throughout the
fashion industry. Yuko now has


I SOON AFTER HER TRIP
TO JAMAICA, YUKO
STARTED CROCHETING
AND CREATING HATS
INSPIRED WITH A GLOBAL
PERSPECTIVE.

a long list of fashionistas waiting in line
for her designs. Her collection can now
be purchased at KIKU & Co. Hatters (3-
5-4 Kitanagasa-dori, Kobe City, Japan)
and at Furaha Clothing website: http://
www.furaha-clothing.com/reallyroots/
reallyroots.html
Please check back as Yuko starts her
own online store soon! you can also check
her collections http://www.myspace.
com/reallyroots.
Yuko is deeply thankful and very
excited by people like you. She is inspired
by the world and through her designs, will
continue to spread PEACE and LOVE.


ReallyRoots.com
Yuko Ogawa


I PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


1





PERISCOPE


what is your muse?
My inspiration derives from just about everything. A
precious gift from God, creativity allows me to see
most everything from different perspectives which;
in turn, paves the way to select from the magnificent
to even the most minute detail as a starting point.
My "Elements" collection consisting of Air, Water, Earth and
Fire all represent women that I have met throughout my life who
have left an inexplicable lasting impression. Their energy and
inner beauty is the inspiration for each individual namesake piece
which creates the vast difference from one piece to the next.
The "Simply Mod" collection is indicative of everything else
around us in this world which is carefully processed and developed
from an unusual perspective.
Finally, the "Mariposa" collection is simply all about the fun,
laughter and love of life through the eyes of little girls. It is a
direct reflection of every little girl's "dress up" moment. I|PJM||


7. ( /foo"I t

11,e ^Ce-

^e-we-


ND Chong Jewels, Inc.
PH: 305-431-7766
Email: nichola@ndchong.com
Website: www.ndchong.com


IIN


r
?;-






t was 2:30 pm
on Wednesday,
March 24, 2010
and I sat comfort-
ably at the Melt-
ing Pot Restaurant
and Lounge at the
Knutsford Court
Hotel in Kingston,
Jamaica. I was
there to interview Tami and
Tessanne Chin. From where I
sat I heard bursts of laughter,
which ushered in the Chin sis-
ters with Mom, Christine, in
tow. I remember smiling to
myself because I knew I would
be in for a fun filled afternoon.
The fact of the matter is Tami
and "Tess" possess a sunny
disposition that is contagious.
Unless you are a sourpuss, you
cannot help but be drawn into
their world that is permeated
with laughter.

With a poise that is befitting
that of a princess, I was greet-
ed by my guests. In a Jamai-
can lilt, Tessanne greets, "Hi
Stacey, how are you? It is so
nice to see you again." And
with a warm embrace, Mom
and Tami followed Tesscanne's
lead. While I have interim\ i\\ ,id
Tess in the past, I anm .i\\h \
in awe at her humility Tlha
day, however, was no dIll'rii'nL
than any other time Lhial our
paths crossed. Just thlini Ti-
mi's request paused mn\ Irjin
of thoughts, "I am so luin.,\
Stacey I am sorry but I lia\ ,. L
get something to eat. \\ luld
that be ok?" I smiled and niid-
dedin approval. Ihad iar.id\
cleared my schedule tO a 1111 -
modate the ladies so I \ jsn I
pressed for time. I ws hli\\ -
ever, impressedby the lai I h1111
she asked.

In Jamaica, female artists
have to work twice as
hard as their male
counterparts to
carve their
niche in
the


male dominated reggae music in-
dustry. Often times, they have to
create alter egos to bring out the
sexy sirens that compete alongside
these male DJs. With only a handful
of female artists, the constant strug-
gle to make and solidify their place
amongst the men is often daunting
and as such relationships, family
time and friends are sacrificed. This
however, does not seem to be the
case with Tami and Tessanne who
have always put family first.

Tami: When it comes to life, that's
where it counts. I think we are re-
ally wealthy in our happiness and





e~i^


our personal lives. What really
matters is how you are feeling and
where you are personally, more
so than where you were. It might
seem to Jamaicans that we are not
conquering big things or selling
out big shows or topping billboard
charts, but we are huge successes
in our personal life which is more
important to me. Tess: Maybe that
is where we are flawed or not, be-
cause Tami and I will never trade
that. And even though music is our
passion, it is a job. At the end of the
day when you are on your death
bed you are not going to remem-
ber anything about music, perfor-


~?~r^A~7


a-
4


by Stacey Bethel,

Entertainment Editor




















"A.





4i
A: i


















XCLUSIVE
P .C H J; .k17
i;Kf "PANACHE IMAICA |






mances or charts that you have topped. You
are going to want your family and people that
love you.

S With the full support of their mom, who is also
S Tessanne's manager, family has always been the
S driving force of their survival in the business. Sta-

/ Christine: Just like being her mother. The difference
is learning the business side of being her manager
whereas all her life I have been her mom. Only now I
have to learn the ins and outs of the business; so that part
can be a little stressful at times. But I am learning and
learning fast.

Stacey: So do you love traveling with Tessanne? Because
I know you do travel with her a lot. Christine: I do, I abso-
lut Lly love it. Stacey: Tess does your mom traveling with you
ia, ,, k missing home a little less? Tess: Yes because she is my
hom iii and I get to travel with a little piece of home. I never lose
La lk of Iwhere I am because my mom is always there with me.
Shl. Ikva.ps me grounded.

And b.ing, grounded is certainly not something that happens over-
mnighL Tiami and Tess have always known that music was their call-
ing',. Tami: Music has always been a part of our lives. I knew I either
\\antld lo bIcome a lawyer or go to a performing arts school. I decided
on lli. laLtt.r. Thereafter, I went to Miami and worked with a bunch of
prlldun- is hI l were looking to work with a new artist such as myself. I
llih n \\inli[ hii k Lo Jamaica to work on my craft and learn the business. Dur-
in.ig hal Iinn 1 -rleased my first single "Rock You" and the rest was history.

Tess: 1 Li .i.I a\\s IknI\\ LhatL iusi \\as in\ piah and was glad that our
pari.nts supported Lhat. \\t \~.nL LIo England \when I was 12 years old,
u lhi h %was a hug' i ullun shio k but ii 11ipnii'd me up a lot musically. Af-
Ler high li' hil 1 a h m i I almi' k Lit laimai aI. I ILntiri.d a competition where the
grand pri/-. \\l Js [i oprn I'r Palli aB ell.. 11 si, happens that I tied with
smi11i.nl ii.nl 1. Is I 'iir, plar ii.1I and Indi up i'p.1ninvin, t1r Pat lie Labelle. I then
iomin'.1d lthi Inii, an Rock Band, "Mil. Hi-lih Tlihri 'al lr, I toured around
thi \, orld. IIr tlihree years with Reggai, I.gnd lin imin Clill Anyone that has
,\ T.r \' 1irk 1,. \\ lth Jimmy Cliff can say their life is never the same. After the
iuir I \ ani.d li do my own things so I teamed up with a bunch of produc-
.r's and mdi. "Hideaway."

State\: Tss \iour most recent single "Are You Gonna" was released last
\ ir Ht\\ did Lhat do? Tess: I got a lot of response from people in Trini-
dId Thli hlird, ore Tessanne fans loved it but I would be lying if I said it
\\ s an ,\plosion. But I love that song it is so real. Because how many
Liinris hali\ \ lound ourselves in siLuatiiions %\h.r,' iL i.s jusL niot \% irlin.,i
ouL Biut thli song was part of the album ltha \\ as niot |i,'h iall\ "rn'li-as'd
A% lit f ltli songs got leaked on th lli ntrnit

State: Nt\\ Tiami, are you also \\i' king n an album Tami: Tlihr, is
mi ii'r.. spa, [Laughter erupts a.s ImL ,a.iss T,,s halibut inL sm lni, ig-
\\indi ,. in i11.r responses]. Yes and n i' ALL.Arisis al. \a\i ,rm m.in' n al-
bumin \\ ,. ni*\ i r stop, itis what wi. d%. Bllt ri'lIht n>,\\ I am I u'i L d I 's i~, inuish
and il an album comes out of it, th.n s1 Ie bi. State\: ,'u dI'l hal\ i singl ,,,
, urr. 'nll il \\ ith newcomer, Tifa Toi.l nai ab, ut tLhat Tami: ThI sin1l. i- I,
.nlill.d -"C.r(ifLid Diva" and we ]ihtrajl\ t. ord.1d Llith sin.', in a Thuris
Jn1dl iin lli Su nday it got mixed and '\ il 1lndJ\ it \ais ,n Ti\ illtrit nit
\'i'nl m aJ/\ Tila and I have alwa\ \ nits li \o ,rl.k tog.Lliihr and I ili ai\
lithiiglht slh \\s very talented and I L i is s 1111 i ia\\, Li a li h Is
g:,i'in g, l1b bg 1!: she is amazing. I
!i-
Ir C- ~






Stacey: I know that people say
that you guys don't do much
shows in Jamaica, such as the
school tour, is that deliber-
ate? Tami: We have done it
a million times and then I am
not always here. But even if I
were, you can't keep doing the
same shows. You keep hitting
the same audience all the time.
I would rather do two or three
big shows for the year. Fur-
thermore, with the type of mu -
sic that Tess and I do, it does i
really fit in with the shows thall
are held. Tess: I do a lot of c tr--
porate or private events hkl,
charities, weddings etc. Whni
it is time to do a big show I
do it. I just did the Coca Cola,
show and had a blast. Bul 1
don't do a lot of shows becau,,
I think there is something sp.--
cial about people wanting Lt,
see and not necessarily seeing,
you at every single show.

Stacey: Do you think that tli,
industry will change to makl,
more room for the type of mu -
sic that you do? Tami: Nit
while I am alive or at least nill
in my lifetime. Tess: I think ii
that were to be the case, I think
we are going to have to be lil,.
ones to do it. And I know it i,
not easy because my music is
not reggae, or rock or dan ,'-
hall and there is no audien,
for what I do.

Stacey: Are you scheduled
to perform on any upcoming
shows? Tess: Yes, I will bh
doing some shows in the U 5'
Tami: No. Ever since I gi'L
married, I took a little time i,'I
to just do other things.

What Tami is referring to is hl r
new clothing line Anuna Ib
Tami and Lubica. Tami team -d
up with Slovakian-born fashi, In
designer, Lubica, to launch I hl
new line. Tami: I am just look-
ing at different aspects of mi
life. I don't want to be singing,
forever you know. Contrary~
to popular beliefs, I don't wanl
to be singing when I am fifl\
I will sing until I don't enjo) il
anymore and when I don't 1

ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 20 !


will stop. And it has been fun taking the time
off and doing other things and just re-charging
my batteries and enjoying my marriage at the
same time.

Tami is married to long time beau, Wayne Mar-
shall who is also a reggae artist. Stacey: Any
children in the near future? Tami: Definitely, I
want six children. But not right now. [Laugh-
ter erupts when I turned to Tess to probe about
her personal life, something she is not comfort-
able divulging. The sisters are very private and
protective of their personal life and people who
lhi.\ shi' llhivir lini. \\ ih ] State\: TT .ss inl ,II
pl'. \ ills intl r'\ \\ I |% \i'all I sk d li \' u \\r, n-
dJiuing 11 \ 'n. 11d \ u 'n.is\\r i l "1 ni dJi uing
Ils-us' [L ,llg s] I1 IrI \ Iu still Jlin ,g Il lsu "'

In li pl> al TLss jLsliion sih l Liing d [lill, sullii t.
i.\ m, kI, i |lakI anld aI' l. ilr. 1 l \\ \\. rn-
Itia in, liia iut Thli T\i tlighi S a',i tand s tare ,\-
i, h nging a l islt-t I "muli'st l ds All-r ln 111111-
llils 1 rii'll 1 ii stllr 11,an d il dn I ins I 1 11I\ t Illd-si ll
andI. brou ,,ig t lit hI I up l State\: Tlss ii ll \ii .
notII[ nsIl \\ .I' 1 Il\ |luis[lioin' Tess: I doln I \\,I n[
Li ,11a k jlabuIllt BuL \ts 1 a 111 dl lllg si111,.111in
and l aIm .L r i\.in h lhapp) Tami: Sh-n l is rx-
Lrardin ril'\ and sih k.nint .l\ lapp\ Stace\: 1s
i1 a n ris r1,1. sei n 1 .11111 n im lIlndius t\ "' ess:
Abslul,.l\ notl and 11 l \\ s I slIll \\ lluldnll I sa\
Staie\: Nil' Tess: Nl1' Staie\: Olk im\ ingl1, on
Or is Ih,.rn s...i.lllnlll \1u, \\.nl li .i dJ' Tess:
No [Laughs]

B\ the time this article went to print. Tes-
sanne Thin and Michael Anthon\ Cuffe Jr.
announced their engagement. PJh sends our
chest \\ishes and heart felt congrllatulaions to
the happy couple!



























































ablp in their owm#tN tr
ia theL\ splk il'h '
tI Uict' h111, 15 ine'lt'heiPri
pirl'Inli it'L s buill is Tr le
tflihdn t Ihdi spe'IkS., V
\\liilI hlippens, froin h
\ on'l kno\\ uniil Itis t
But one thing Lthat fat
LlIat Lhi, sky is.' .

. 111 r


Tessannei tac l I Tmini
l. I ii


"1I~*


Tess.
homp-
." ',I
1 '11


* '" 1


SD 7


*;-
F07;i~~~ L/Lj~

I .
:-: .~













Th1yBNJIp Qi1C~L




m"N


*igr~ -,

"* "i' o 'y'TR '" .'. **'; ,
*^SS 1" ~',\-' ,rt.t;^.
r ;1~ 4-
K -\'m -
j .'^
'? l8S c


Tng Set: Similar to Eternity
\Bands, Ring Sets allow you to
pile several rings on one finger. However,
the beauty of Ring Sets is that there is a
focal point where the diamond is placed,
which typically occurs in the middle
ring. Some options on how you want the
other rings to be included are, to leave
them as sleek bands or to sprinkle them
with small diamonds.

jjfferent Shaped
-Diamonds:Since the main
attraction of rings are the diamonds, set
your ring apart by choosing a different
shape. Though a round diamond is the
most popular, it is by far not the only
shape one can choose to have their
diamond chiseled into. Other shapes
include but are not limited to pear,
princess, oval, triangle.


lit Shanks:Similar
.o the looks of Ring
Set, Split Shanks are when two
ring bands are meshed together
in the back, and unionized with
a diamond in the front. If you're
thinking about getting the classy
solitaire style, perhaps consider
Split Shanks as they have the
elegance and the details to
impress.

r 1ltage:With fashion
Stranding back to the early
years of the twentieth century, it's
no surprise that the rings will have
a similar trend. The main diamond
in vintage rings are usually large
and attention-grabbing, while
surrounding that particular
diamond are sparkles from smaller
diamonds. Vintage rings have the
elegance and the intricacies that


will make your significant other feel
like royalty.

old:Though the slim and
classy solitaire look is
popular and safe, the year 2010 is all
about the big and the bold. Choosing
a ring with a large band and diamond
will definitely draw attention and your
significant other will have a chance to
stand out from the crowd. IIPJM|I





;" e '- '

-*"*


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICAI


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010

























Photography by Roger Jones
Words by Chocolate Dreams


Michelle Smith, Managing Director, Chocolate
Dreams (Photo: Chocolate Dreams)


chocolate
Dreams was
established
as a home
based cottage
industry. In
April 2004,
Chocolate
Dreams expanded its line as
a young company producing
everything in chocolate for every
occasion.

With affordable prices coupled
with superior customer service.
The aim of Chocolate Dreams is to
please because it is that important.
When catering for any function or
event, they have available very
attractive signature boxes and
ribbons. For the corporate client
they can imprint the boxes with
the company logo printed on both
the box and the ribbon. These can
be filled with a wide assortment of
22


chocolates of your choosing.

In 2008, Chocolate Dreams was the
winner of the inaugural NCB Strength
Award in 2008 and in 2009 the
company was the recipient of the Heart
Trust/NTA Female Entrepreneur of
the Year Award. The company is also a
member of the PMCA, an International
Association of Confectioners since
2007.

Clients who have enjoyed their quality
dessert items over the years have
included: the National Commercial
Bank, Terra Nova, Cafe Blue, Chez
Maria, Blue Moon Cafe at the Norman
Manley International Airport, Red
Bones Blues Caf6 and the China
Express. If you are travelling on the
British Airways First Class Cabin you
can also find in your meal tray out of
Kingston, Jamaica a delightful treat
there.


The Chocolate Dreams menu consists
of handmade 100% fresh products
including:

S Gourmet chocolates (centers
and plains)
S Chocolate Truffles
S Utopia Bars
S Flourless Chocolate Cakes
S Triple Pleasure chocolate
S Chocolate Dipped Fruits (e.g.
strawberries)
Imagine tamarind balls dipped in
chocolate you ask we can do it!

Chocolate Dreams Store
Shop 2A, 26 Hope Road
Kingston 10
Tel: (876) 906-1173
E-mail:michelle@
chocolatedreams.com.jm
Tel: (876) 927-9574 or
(876) 946-3043 -4
Fax: (876) 946-3044 (telefax)
www. chocolatedreams.com.jm


I PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010









'ij


Picture This
Chocolate bars adorned with the faces of the bride
and groom are sweet in more ways than one. Choose
a few favorite photos, then print them using an ink-
jet printer or photocopy onto lightweight paper.
(Enlarge or reduce images if needed.) With a paper
cutter, trim so photos are slightly shorter than candy
bars. Remove outer wrappers but not inner foil. Wrap
each candy bar with a photo, and secure in back with
double-sided tape. Adorn with waxed twine tied in a
small bow.


Fruit-Filled Cookie Bags
These containers were made
to look like humble brown-
paper bags, but that's where the
resemblance ends. Sweet and
crunchy, they can hold fruit or
candy and make a great display
on a dessert buffet or as a take-
home favor.


Be inspired
for our bJi
day with
these iamaiz
ideas for yo
wedding,


- GREAT WEfDI



:, FAVOUtS FOM


MARTHA STEI


NM







VARTL


Takeaway Plant Centerpieces
For a takeaway centerpiece that's anything
but garden variety, decorate reception
tables with an array of plants that guests
can gaze at while they dine, then take
home with them at evening's end. The
vessels holding these miniature orchids
are wrapped in fabric for more exotic
appeal.


L.. .......
White Favors
Seed Packets Handmade origami
packets hold a sachet of seeds in
one side and planting instructions
in the other.
"Seed Packets
Handmade
origami packets."


Ula-lime Candy Lups
For a favor that brings out the kid in
guests, turn baking cups into darling
dishes brimming with old-fashioned
hard candies. The cups are normally used
for baking single servings of brioche,
so they're made of stiff paper that can
hold lots of little treats. To package each
favor, add candy to the cup, then wrap
in cellophane. Tie closed with a ribbon
threaded with a printed paper tag.


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICAI


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


;k












7 ,"





ii










AKATHEGURU


WORDS BY EMIEL MARTENS


"IT'S A
IN T
Ras Kassa is one of Jamaica's fore- BU
most mIusic video directors. His
rai\ eneirl anld creative vision has
giveii hliim worldwidee acclaim. Over
the earns lie has worked with many
Janmaican and international artists,
inclhldinlg \)bz Kartel, Lady Saw,
Bouiii3 iller, Elephant Man, Dam-
ian Marley, Gentleman, and Willie
Nelson. Emiel Martens spoke with
Kassa in his studio in Kingston
about the art of directing: "I look at
people for hours."

How did you get involved in music
video production?


PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMIEL MARTENS


BOUT BALANCE... THAT'S ALL WE REALLY NEED
IE WORLD, IN A RELATIONSHIP, FRIENDSHIP,
SINESS, RELIGION, WORIC..JUST BALANCE."


"It kind of happened by chance.
Growing up, I wanted to do music.
I played in a reggae band with some
friends. Then I met Trevor Bailey,
one of Jamaica's first music video di-
rectors. We started to hang out in his
studio, writing and recording songs
and making beats and stuff like that.
One day, Bailey took me on a shoot
and asked me to be his PA [Personal
Assistant]. After that I did a couple
more shoots, just to help him out. I
was introduced to Kevin Lee and we
start working together him directing
and me creating the concepts. One
day, when Kevin was out of town,
T.O.K. approached me to direct this
video called "Chi-Chi Man". I wasn't
really ready for it, but got forced into
it. So we went out there and the video
went through the roof! After this one
video, I did another video, and an-
other one. And I was caught."

ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


How did you learn to
videos?


direct music


"I look at people for hours. I want to
see how people move. I want to see
the reaction of people. I want to see
how they behave when the bus driver
misses their stop and how they get
all angry. I spend a lot of my time
driving around. Or I go to the market
and I sit down for hours. Sometimes
some kids just come up and show me
their homework and we just talk. Or


a man comes and gives me ganja and
we make a spliff."

How do you decide on the theme and
style of a music video?

"My view is always this: A music vid-
eo must look different from a movie.
It must be entertaining and crazy, no
limits. I want my videos to be very Ja-
maican. Now, growing up in the ghet-
to and hearing about Anansi stories,
playing games, going to the market,


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COMI PANACHE JAMAICAI






all these things I bring them back
in my music videos. I bring the feel-
ing of the music to life. I make danc-
ing videos, but I make dancing videos
like it's an African thing. For example,
when you go to market and you see the
older black women walking, they have
a rhythm. I see that. And I capture that
and cut it to the music. I make things
happen to the beat. That's how I do
dancehall videos."

Editing is an important element of mu-
sic videos. How do you operate once
the material is shot?

"I usually lock myself up in my stu-
dio and plug out all the phones and
turn off my cell phone. I tell my peo-
ple: "Look, I'm going to work for the
next two hundred hours. So don't call
or visit me because you're not going
to get me." When I am working like
that, I'm not in the mood to see peo-
ple. I just want to sit on the computer
all day. And then I just get over it and
come outside."

Your most successful music video so
far is "Welcome to Jamrock" by Dam-
ian Marley. How did you come up
with the idea for that video?

"Damian's song is very raw and very
real. The music is so rude, it's rude
bwoy. I wanted to bring Damian back
in the streets, to the people, the foun-
dation of Jamaica. Bring it back home.
So the best place to shoot was Trench
Town. Downtown Kingston is the
birthplace of reggae music. This in-
ner city and this ghetto, this is where
these people come from. The root, the
culture and the look, all that is happen-
ing in Downtown. The energy and the
vibe are right there. This is how we
can define Jamaica visually in a video.
We shot all over Trench Town because
we wanted that from top to bottom, to
create that real vibe."

How real is "Welcome to Jamrock"?
Did you just turn your camera on and
record?

"We went in the community a few


days before, just to scout around and
thing. What I did, I looked at what
people were wearing and took it from
them. I paid them and had them sign
a release form. When I got back, I
put them back in the same clothes,
didn't wash them. Because when you
tell people you coming to do a video,
they are going to dress up because we
are a very proud people. I didn't want
that. I wanted it to be very real. So we
put on back the clothes on the people
them. Most of the shots in the video
are very natural. The kids playing the
marble, they were playing the marble
for real. But we kind of positioned
them, so you can call that a set-up.
And do you remember the dub plate
that was turned upside down? It was
the guy who put it down like that. I
saw it and said: "Shoot that as it is."
He said: "No, let me turn this over." I
said: "No, that's the whole point. Dub
plate upside down." It's so beautiful."

Although the music video of "Wel-
come to Jamrock" was a great hit, you
also received some criticism for your
raw portrayal of Jamaica.

"Yes, some people in Jamaica criti-
cized me, including the Jamaica Tour-
ist Board. They said that the video did
not represent Jamaica. But "Welcome
to Jamrock" is just where I come from,
man. This is what my life looked like.
This is what the life of Damian's fa-
ther looked like. I was just showing
where we're from. That's all I did. But
I got a lot of good press on the inter-
national scene. "Welcome to Jamrock"
is the biggest video for me ever up to
this day and the biggest video out of
Jamaica on an international level. That
video got over one million hits on You
Tube. There's no video on Jamaica
that did that, ever."

You are a Rasta. How does your Rasta
perspective influence your work?

"It's about balance. That's the key
thing. Have a balance outlook in any-
thing, all the time. That's all we really
need in the world, in a relationship,
friendship, business, religion, work,


just balance. I approach making a mu-
sic video with a balance in the sense
that while it might be a very sexual
song, I make it sexy without making it
rude. I strike a balance. My conscious-
ness as a Rastaman make that I can
show sexiness in a video, but tasteful,
so that the family in the living room
understands what is going on. So I ap-
ply the teachings right there so, with-
out it being red, gold, and green. Be-
cause I am not selling Rastafari, that's
my personal business. On the other
hand I want to make sure I maintain
the culture and pass it on."

What are your plans for the future?
What do you want to achieve?

"I want to make proudly three or four
films to put Jamaica out there. Be-
cause since The Harder They Come,
everything has been a copy of that sin-
gle movie. We want to take Perry Hen-
zell's film and make it bigger by mak-
ing something else that is successful,
something that will open doors for the
next set of people or the next film that
I make or whoever else. I have done
some assignment things, which I ap-
proached like I was shooting a feature
film. Now I want to do my own thing
and climb to the next level." I|PJMI|


I PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM








J4% 1










the
thCIRT
COLLECTION
Introducing The Signature Charm Bracelets In Support Of Your Favourite
Jamaican Charities. Be AICIRT-ive in your support!
Coming December 2010





















Lesson 1 of2 2

V 'l Inlliportanllt bilr
oftnll doTnnpla cd
part of milakup
application is the
tools lscd to ap-
pl\ the products
Your 'tools' or lack
hereof have the
ability to make or break the overall fin-
ish of the face. By tools I'm referring to
your brushes and applicators. Invest in
good brushes as they'll really last a life-
time. The best quality makeup brushes
are natural and are made of Pony, Sable
and more recently Badger hair and are
extremely soft to the touch. Synthetic
brushes, though they are cheaper do not
deliver the same results Build ulp i uii
collection one brush at a tin1ie if but\ I''
them in sets is not an option for \ oU Be-
low is a list of brushes and appllcators
and their function \\hilc it is not a nmst
that you own ALL those listed b c\\
unless you have professional Intent is
or are just Inakeup ina\ en. I g'Luara
that with o nerIshilp and practice i
look is sure to improt\ c Enlo\ '

Let's 'face' it...

When applying founldation. I iencoUl
that you be as "hands oln as possi %
Your phalanges (cead fingers) are w
of the best tools for appll ing fo a-
tion. Your body heat actually \\arimsi p11
the product and iakes it moic pliable
and thus easierto spread Just miakc sure
that they're clean bcfoir \ou \ ,o stickin


[i %nm oti fackc
"hiat matti,


A !


See \w i'.)iianiachejiam1agaziiie.coni for pictures o

| PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


or anybody else's for


Foundation c\\dges/sponges. These
S come' in an assortment of colours and
shapes I find these triangular ones to
bc tlhe most practical and ergonomic for
foundation application.

Foundation Brush: Precisely applies liq-
uid and cream foundations. Be sure to
blend properly especially along hair and
jaw line.

Powder Brush: This is used to apply
loose or translucent powder over your
foundation for a flawless finish.

Blush Brtush Very similar to a pow-
der brush but smaller and a little more
talperd 01' routilndd towards the end .
Thro\\ out tlhc oInsc that come as a part
of the actual ipodtuct They're too small
and usually cause strcakilng. Yikes!

our brush Thlu angled brush is
I for sculptinii oi defining cheek-


S Bislh Thlus us Lcd for whisking
S 'Ic shiadlo\\ \ lihen it falls on the
S d Inn, application called: "eye
SI \f fallout (l pcsky and universal
I. ih tli \%oild o\ cr). It has been
s ddoublin_' as a blush brush more
r i vly to place a \ash of colour along
tt .pplcs otf thl chcck

In the nlx\t feature \\' ill look atthe dy-
.. [ namics of thl diffricnt eye brushes and
their uses Linil tihen happy painting!

Sthe tools mentioned here.


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


_ r
'
7i ~
""` t~ . :~~r~ i


;..


wTAJ




























































ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICA]






















r
4A:


MN


V,


;I
r,'


',


MI


I~l


...^.. .


v^Q
V)


v^A
*'I*lk
kA
























e cellophane
wrap. On a well-
made perfume,
e cellophane is
wrapped closely
around the box.
Most counterfeit
products don't have the cellophane
so tightly wrapped. If the cellophane
is messy or moving around the box,
that's a sure sign the perfume's a
fake. -, "b 4

Watch for excess glue or adhesive
tapie If there is a lot of tape or 7,
,-Ic inside the perfume box or on 1 '*" .
the exterior of the packaging, the
perfume is probably a fraud.

Look carefully at the box. If the
perfume's box is made out of very
Ithi material, the product is most
IiclI a fake. Any high-end beauty
manufacturer will use high quality
paperboard when they're creating
a carton for their product. Thin
packaging signals a fake.

R Rcad the print. Watch for an uneven
brand name or any misspelling on the
packaging.

Examine barcodes. Barcodes should ribeanCiu
be at the bottom of the perfume box.
If you see that they are the side of the
bo\. you should be suspicious.

IIPJMII


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010








FooTt Prolteps In



Women: High Heels and



Your Health BY MAYOCLINIC.COM


Shoes are your passion.
You love shopping
for them, trying them
on and most of
all buying them.
High heels are the
mainstay of your professional image
and a highlight of dressing for nights
on the town.

But your feet don't feel so great,
and they look even worse. Forced
too often into the tight confines of the
narrow toe box of your high heels,
your toes have bent into an unnatural
position. As a result, you've developed
bumps and areas of thickened skin that
rub painfully against your shoes. Are
your beloved high heels the source of
your foot problems?

In fact, they probably are. High
heels are one of the biggest factors
leading to foot problems in women.
The other is age. Frequently wearing
high heels, along with the natural
changes in your aging feet, can set the
stage for foot problems.
How aging affects your feet

Over time, your feet become wider
and longer and the natural padding
under your heel and forefoot thins.
Years of standing and walking flatten
your arches and stiffen your feet and
ankles. When you wear high heels -


shoes with a heel 2 inches or higher your foot slides forward in your shoe,
redistributing your weight, creating unnatural pressure points and throwing
your body's natural alignment out of whack.
Foot problems associated with high heels

If you frequently wear high heels or shoes that are too narrow or too short for
your feet, such as the pointy-toed styles that are so often in fashion, you could
be setting yourself up for one or more of these foot problems:

Corns and calluses. Thick, hardened layers of skin develop in areas
of friction between your shoe and your foot. Painful rubbing can occur from
wearing a high heel that slides your foot forward in your shoe or from a too-
narrow toe box that creates uncomfortable pressure points on your foot.
Toenail problems. Constant pressure on your toes and nail beds from
being forced against the front of your shoe by a high heel can lead to nail fungus
and ingrown toenails.
Hammertoe. When your toes are forced against the front of your shoe,
an unnatural bending of your toes results. This can lead to hammertoe a
deformity in which the toe curls at the middle joint. Your toes may press against
the top of the toe box of your shoe, causing pain and pressure.
>> CONT'D PAGE 44


5 Frequently
wearing high
heels, along
with the natural
changes in your
aging feet, can
set the stage for
foot problems. 9


I PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010












"i









ER ON
* '*% ^

\\\d 1/

IJl y Tr T"






T iAerever did
the time
\go? How
Vn many times
have we
asked ourselves this question? Is
there something you always wanted
to do but never did? Bungee jump-
ing, parachuting, deep sea diving
perhaps? For the less adventurous
among us, there must be something
we had a burning desire to pursue
but for some reason or the other,
you didn't. Maybe it was because
of time or obligation or maybe fear.
Fear of being judged, fear of the un-
known or simply fear. Whatever the
reason I'm sure most of us agree
that it is never too late to do that
one thing that will make our spirits
soar. Soar above the ordinary...to
places that we would not normal-
ly visit except in our imagination.


It may be a career, a hobby or fan-
tasy. We can all make our dreams
a reality by removing barriers and
restrictions to our life. Life is made
to be enjoyed to the fullest, unless it
is a behaviour that is risky, immoral
or illegal the world is our oyster for
creation.... to fulfill our innermost
desires. Our inspiration must come
from deep within, from a place that
we treasure, a place that may bring
back memories from childhood or an
earlier blissful period in our life or
maybe a place that we can transform
into something positive. Now is the
time to grasp these opportunities to
accomplish what we thought was
lost in a time and place where we
perhaps prevented ourselves from


living completely, maybe what we
thought was impossible or what we
were told were impossible or unat-
tainable. This may be in the form of
people or situations that place stum-
bling blocks in our lives or obstacles
in our path. We should make every
effort to rid ourselves of these factors
or at least make ourselves immune to
their effects, since after a while they
may become a part of our being un-
til it consumes us... forever thinking
and believing that we cannot. We
should however, bear in mind that
nothing is impossible with a little
perseverance and faith as we have
seen time and time again.

Is there something in your life that
you are not happy with? Why be-
moan your situation or settle for
second best? We can all take steps to
change anything that becomes a bur-
den or sore in our life. Complaining
won't help the situation, but rather
make things worse as it may begin
to fester and multiply into something
that we may no longer be able to con-
trol. Look around and I'm sure you
would see that the successful people
are most likely the ones that have
achieved success through adversity.
The ones that surmounted the ob-
stacles and have made lemonade out
of the lemons that they have encoun-
tered throughout their life's journey.
They are also the ones that are usu-
ally healthier and happier and as a
result, have attracted similar healthy
and happy people and situations to
their life. Therefore it is wise to be
grateful for the stumbling blocks
and adversity for they are all a part


of life. Nothing lasts forever and it makes
us all the more stronger for having expe-
rienced and survived the bad times. More
importantly, it makes us appreciate the
good times even more, for when things are
always pleasant and comfortable we tend
to become complacement and unappre-
ciative of our blessings and good fortune.
Thus, rather than becoming 'stuck in a rut'
or fearful of the unknown, it is important
to remember that the one thing in life that
is constant is change and is necessary for
our future growth and progression.

Time for thinking anything in your life is
impossible should be a phenomenon of the
past, rather it should be inculcated into our
being that each of our dreams are important
and could assist in the transformation of
something bigger. Each of us has a role
to play in this life and each of our lives
touches another without us even knowing.
Therefore it is important that we each live
our life to leave a mark on this world even
if it is by one singular deed or action or
thought.


"We are not powerless specks of dust drift-
ing around in the wind, blown by random
destiny. We are, each of us, like beautiful
snowflakes unique, and born for a specific
reason and purpose."

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross (1926- 2004)


NEVER



TOO LATE

By Carolyn K. Correia
lyncorr@gmail. com


I PANACHE JAMAICA I WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010












Paternity Tests .
Jamaican Jacket Ityhlff

. li "Sdi Lnk Infertf e tyrp

5 F 0
*-I, IP UCT, n
: t(A: ,. ...F
"^ia UtAtt4 0,
.*- t) S'q nN ei'
0 tiatiers cet
^^Wy^OF.
If A 7. WA~9~








Stuides Link Infertility

Treatmenvnts to Auitisn

L. L .. .1i Il I 1 L h i l lh a IL li L I ''' i llIs 1 .h I Il: Ii' .h 1.1- L LJLI LLI i L I li I I ,LS 1 IL S L I' L I'i. 1 Ill ill
Ih. IL I1l. I L ,, ,-,I' 5 ,I L I L1 L I '. L L L [[ Ll i,, l 'I 1 A. (1 I .l llln I. Ii I ILnl l, II, 1'l fl 11 JLIS :IIllI lL ".I I . L

\ SL L i I'I i'. llL Ill . .L mLI l IILll1ll. lll I L.ill .jL -I I I L l liI ILI l.l L I l l. '. I.I 5_'
5,'n, 1. I r1', 1 .LSl L' !LILI L LL L i L LLII LI ii l l i;Il I'iLhi . L 'iILi LILiL L i I LL !n. I l L I
LI'L a.LLI 1- Ll. il 1 'i. i'I {iif ll IIaLi l ll l'.u11iii l l t ill ULI i iiL il .ll I I I'LI'S L'll. iin. 1 .i h ilL i L nI I iisl i Ii i
aiiil Li I Li ,Lu I'i LLI L'. L i i .l l ILSL. IIL Il I'S i .i ,ii li L I ,l 1 L II .. I l' L n II s .:Z ,


"AUtismT was

nearly twice as

common among

the children of

women who were

treated with

the ovulation-

inducing drug."


SL l '-.-'.. L LL .Li SSJ i . Lii'i1 I.L' LL I
L ILd il., .J '1Lr_'S .n 1 -luL L iLf .1I1''L iI'L LI L,',
SL SLL I In Jil I -. '.', SL 1' L Lli. I, L L ,L

*. 'L i 'L |'''i.L Il I IIia n tI L L 1 L .1 11
. in i r iiL i h i I' hLi i ii Li Ljn.it.i. LI h r




dil' Ii' ,l '.h L L i L1 II L I ll .:LS L hLL
LI L II L L ilL Id Ll, IL' IIL

I .I Ii. ll L Ii L L II I. IIi LIiIL '-' LI I dI 1.I

i%(S1 i'S I| l l. I' LI> LI L 'I LI Li 11 Lihi L
iL ii. I' Lii. L l .L. a LIlL


II! SL la I.).i, S I' il I .I. L I -Il j L'd U. 1' i ii ` .IIIl Julisi l I L .. S. i Ii.'iL sLuL ,'. Ill '. i' llII d.iL.iLa I''illi i .. 'Iini O .I IIj ,I)
LiJL 1Llin I .1 L I IT i i II LI L I1 L i i -rL d I 1 '. Iic. i 1l ii i JLil-if i L ii i L'. Ir L i Il L .t iS11. -i l .IILiiSL'l IIII.iid ._'
L, l',Im |''l LL lI i, L1iL ,' 11 1 .1 L 11 'L 1 .1 1n L h ,f ,L l .11" ',L -L,, is S-'-' L 1I 'L j' 'I-,- L, ,L,-, llirlI'l' ili, I iSL---l", --W1" L illl 'f[I: .--,I LI't A lllt Ill. I'---"
1inl L h. L,1" .'1l "i II i LI f.'11- )S S f 1"' L il LI i' L S..I'. L I'S LLLSS L. L ii I nl ii rlli I11 L ic .IiI L hL L 111'i. i I I I lu I'r
I' iL i r L I.L I'.. .. i L L IL l I L .. L f. I I L I -', I L LIF Ii L 5 l 1. .. Ii L L IF Lihi .. h.idI 1 1 I- rL h .. L I'.hLS
I I S 1 L. I 1 .I I. ILLLi 11i IIIIL' f'LIS SI li SL LILiI .. L 1L1 j L "I iiL I I i SI 1 IT l. I lnill. I LhiIui11 L I ja L II. 11 iL li. iL Ii LLS I I I
LiL' .l,'|', ill 11 .I -Wl,- 1-11,m s 1 UL LILIfII1 LIL S ll
I "'iL L1 i l"1'\li, SI K IS[ i .i Ill h d i L i i Ia l i I'L L '. iLiLII ni. SL I L i i ll iuLi IL I I' SLi.I' .L11 SII' LIl. l 11. 1J l i 111 nl
I'. L' I L I L 'k I l L ,. LII.i L i .L ll i Llll iiF Ii11" L .I iLl l l i A Ii i. I' IiL I'a.I\ I'I- i .i i I'S L l i nI.l .ai l-:i ,, ,IIn L ii h ~' el
..Lii I:.. L SliL ,iL i ,, IlL 1 Ll I'' L I i 4 L' I'i''S IIi i Lii iii fii L .1. IL J IT1 I, i L il r L. .i .Iv h jaL
. IL i I L fu If LI i IS L 11i 1 1 I 1'.I 1I1 I1. Ill I IL, L I' rL i s L ll i L .1 1
. LIllII. I" LI' S S L I ,,lln i'









o, -t par tln depression
i, a familiar rite of new
pariinthliood Feelings of
cmptinc--, sadness and
anxict\ Ncttle in after
the birth ot a child, and
in -c' ci ta-c- lat t, r months. It turns
out that this common condition, once
considered the province of the mother,
may affect many new fathers too.

Researchers at Eastern Virginia Medical
School, publishing an analysis of 43 past
studies in the Journal of the American
Medical Association, report that up
to 10% of fathers may experience
postpartum depression (PPD) after the
birth of a child. That figure comes as a
surprise, even to the authors, who had
been studying paternal PPD for several
years, especially because it doubles the
average risk of depression found in the
male population in general which is
only about 5%.

Postpartum in men is an alien concept to
most people.

According to the researchers however
this shouldn't be, since fathers are just
as susceptible to factors that tend to
trigger PPD in mothers especially
in first-time parents. In new moms,
postpartum depression typically stems
from feelings of stress and anxiety
associated with fatigue, lack of sleep,
changes in the marital relationship and
concerns about finances and work.
Fathers experience the same stresses
and the same overwhelming emotions
that accompany the life-changing event
of becoming a parent. While the analysis
does not isolate the specific factors
that were responsible for the feelings
of depression in the studies' fathers, it
theorizes that they mirrored known risk
factors in new mothers and probably
even included others that were unique
to dads.


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


Postpartum Depression in

New Dads: Fathers Get It

Too

In the report, which involved an
analysis of data on 28,004 men around
the world, new fathers were most likely
to score high for depressive symptoms
between the third and sixth months
after birth (that was also found to be
true for mothers) and least likely to have
depressive symptoms in the first three
months postpartum. Interestingly, the
research also found that symptoms
of PPD were more common among
American men than their international
counterparts, a disparity that it
speculates may reflect cultural
differences and varying paternity-leave
policies in the workplace.

It's worth noting that most of the
studies did not track cases of clinical
depression diagnosed by a physician,
but instead recorded the incidence
of depressive symptoms through
questionnaires or interviews. Some
experts believe these measures tend
to overestimate the actual rate of
depression; others believe they are
often a useful harbinger of underlying,
undiagnosed illness.

If more physicians and new parents
could be educated about potential
problems, however hopefully leading
to more open conversations among
couples it may very well help parents
cope better with the new addition to
their family. I IBBI I

"Up to 10% of fathers may

experience postpartum

depression (PPD) after the birth

of a child."
3'
WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM| PANACHE JAMAICA]






I


I I r N I ii


II


, ,,


"'Si


-I'"'
.1..


.1~


PHOTOG RAr
STYLIST: 1\Il
MAKEUP & H
MODEL:
CLOTHES FRONh
FASHION STOi
ON LOCATION


G -Greea L\'S imnsuit
"-Top So30--
.-Green Striped
Tunic S2000
Grey- Haremn Shots
$2Q00

ROGER JONES
EL ATIKINSON
JOHN GORDON
S\NYA TRAIL E
\NDEUR BOUTIQU-JE
UICIA \\ILLIAMXSON,
E\ON HOUSE, I.NGkTOW ,.
SI e .


AI kA


A


J :


T.
"1 :.


-H
HOT


\




.L i






























:1



























'o
. ; .. "






) * ." ,a

































































II

I Il
mu:4t#






. III I


.P Ill















4'


Ib


- *%


~N N
K. Nl


R,







































































IA


n4.t;' !I


S


I- I- -~Y


....... ..li .iiii,,E.'EEE rf E::';EEEii ::"
...... ... m y...... . .


r




0"; ~


r r f


;:I
,; ...








Why you should care

about the World

C up.. By John Vorhaus, The
*** Huffington Post

f you're watching ESPN at all these days, you
can't help noticing their heavy hype for the
upcoming World Cup soccer championship in
South Africa. Of course they're wheeling out
the heavy hype because, yeah, guess what,
they want you to care and they want you to
watch. In this post, I'm going to make a case
for caring and watching, for reasons that have
nothing to do with ESPN's viewership goals.

First, let's dispense once and for all with the notion that
the game we're talking about is called soccer. Well,
we call it that, but we're a tiny fraction of the soccer-
viewing public. The rest of the world calls it football --
sometimes futbol -- and when they want to distinguish it
from our game of football, they call that game "American
football" or "gridiron." Therefore, we live in a world
where billions and billions of fans around the world call
their game football, while we ten or so enthusiasts here
in America call it soccer. Being Americans, and longtime
fans of majority rule, we really need to let the majority
have this one. Never let the word "soccer" pass your lips
again; among your cosmopolitan and foreign friends, if
nothing else, you'll score a point or two.

Now that we've established that football is football, let's
address the question of why we should care. Surprisingly,
it has nothing to do with winning or losing. Yeah, sure,
the U.S. Women's team won the Women's World Cup
in 1999, and that made us a (women's at least) football
power. But that's not the point. The point is, billions
of football fans around the world care passionately --
insanely -- about the World Cup, and that includes people
from places like Switzerland, which has scant chance of
winning, and Russia, whose national team didn't even
qualify. You see, in case you don't know (and hundreds
of millions of Americans simply do not know), the World
Cup is the biggest, most compelling event in world sport.
And if you don't follow the competition, you're letting


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


kZINE.COM






the rest of the world go to the party without you.


So how do we wrap our brains around the World Cup? First of all,
forget about the relative rankings of the teams. Sure, Brazil is a
perennial powerhouse, just like England is a perennial underachiever.
Even ignore strategy. Yes, the Germans will bring their usual highly
disciplined approach to the game, and yes the Italians will promote
passion as the strength of their play. Don't even pay much attention
to underdogs. Can the Ivory Coast emerge from group play with
a chance to play spoiler in later rounds? Can host South Africa
make a decent showing? None of that matters, and I'll tell you why:
Because that's all about outcome, and the World Cup is not about
outcome, it's about story.

I discovered this firsthand in 1998, when I found myself on a flight
from Jamaica to Europe on the same plane as the World Cup-bound
Jamaican National Football Team, the legendary Reggae Boyz. And
I could just tell that, win or lose -- like I could just tell that they
didn't really expect to win -- they were determined to have the time
of their lives, the adventure of a lifetime and, above all, a story to
tell when they came home. Well, this they achieved. They emerged
as the darling of the '98 World Cup, didn't win, but made everyone
fall in love. Down there on a personal level -- my personal level
-- that eight-hour plane flight made it clear to me that something
special was going on in their world, a special thing that I'd never
even known existed. During my next six weeks in Europe, I made
it a point to pay attention to the World Cup. I didn't understand the
rules, barely understood the game, but none of that mattered. By
the time it was over, I had become infected with everybody's -- and
I mean everybody's -- energy. Football wasn't my sport isn't and
never will be my sport but billions of people care enough about it
to put their lives on absolute hold for four weeks every four years.
As a responsible citizen of the world, I feel like that's something I
should pay attention to.

So that's my charge to you, gentle reader. If you've never watched
a football game, watch a World Cup match or two. If nothing else,
you'll see the best practitioners of the sport bringing their best
game, and it never hurts to watch excellence in action. More to the
point, you'll get a taste of something that the rest of the world cares
passionately about. In these troubled and isolated times in America,
it couldn't hurt at all for us to understand the passions of our foreign
friends, competitors, even enemies. Watch the World Cup. Ignore
who wins or loses. Just watch the story unfold. To do so teaches us
all something vital about the world we live in and the people we
share our planet with. Trust me, an America population turned on to
the World Cup won't bring about international harmony and joy, but
it just might be a start. And a pretty damn riveting one at that.


LEGENDARY

REGGAE IOYT



EMERGED At

TUl DARLING

Obg TUE '99

WORLD CUP,



BUT MADE

EVERYONE

FALL IN

LOVE.

Toolbox: How to Be Funny Even if You're
Not. An avid poker player, he has written
several books on that subject, including
the bestselling Killer Poker series and
the poker-world novel Under the Gun. A
veteran creative consultant, he has taught
writing in twenty-four countries on four
continents, most recently running the
writing staff of the Russian version of
Married ... with Children. When not out
making the world safe for situation comedy,
he lives in Southern California, where he
very much appreciates the weather. The
California Roll (Shaye Areheart Books) is
his latest novel.


WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COM PANACHE JAMAICAI


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010








Soka by Karen De



Freitas Fraser


I use my passion and my strong background in the fine arts and love
of fashion as her forte as an apparel designer, founding Soka in 2008.
The name Soka; comes from the monogram of So-Karen and also my
passion for Soca music. Being only 21 and having only started her
fashion life seriously at the age of 17, when i finished community col-
lege, i had some experiences in the fashion field, working under pro-
fessionally trained Caribbean designers both in Martinique in 2007;
where she resided for some time and her homeland St. Vincent tak-
ing all experiences gained and applying them to her work.

I'll describe my life in fashion so far as a journey; from Art, working in
Carnival Mas Camps, apprenticing with alot of people who genuinely
want to help me, to teaching myself everything I could from anything
I can put my hands on; articles on internet, text books etc.

At the moment, I am a secondary school teacher, trying to
make ends meet, and my life right now ill describe as clark kent and
superman, moving from the classroom to the catwalks, it can get tir-
ing, but I'm hungry for success and I do love what I do; so I'm going
hard, everything is only for a season. I'm looking right now to go to
school, because despite my previous exposure in the fashion arena
I see the next step in my development is becoming a professionally
trained designer, because I have been relying purely on raw talent
which is not good enough for industry standard so I really start my
career as a international designer, which has been my dream since
11.

My greatest support is from my mother and friends, but sometimes
I really have to push myself, there is alot of negativity being part of
this industry especially in a small island as mine and it always helps
to pray, which is my back bone.

Even though this is my second year as a designer, my designs
have been featured in local shows in St. Vincent and the Grenadines;
premiering my work publically in July 2007, at a locally produced
show," dubbed; "Carnival Catwalk". Regionally she got exposure at
a Caribbean- produced Arts festival, "Carifesta", in August 2008.
Moreover in 2008 she has showcased at Caribbean regional Fashion
shows, first at the "Virgin Islands Fashion Week", which was held in
the US virgin isle of St. Thomas, in Oct 2008 and in November 2008,
she participated in "Islands of the World Fashion Week" Bahamas.
For 2009, it does not stop for this designer, as she prepares for her
2010 collection and already is featured as one of the; Best Young
designers of the Caribbean, in a fashion show,"SIWOTAGE; Fashion
hits", which took place on the isle of St. Lucia, on the 10th of Janu-
ary, and has showcased at the 11th annual Miami Fashion week, also
CONT'D ON PAGE 57


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010




%A


F7


(A


--..m.-
~L- ~


J o


LA
FT3
VA


;1l

















i .i .,
i *..' ; *


r..J -.


tr


S.
* l;. -
. '* *


I


I.uf


I


'I


'S


\ k


r Ic-


iP


I





























'4
I,








''' It







TOP CARIBBEAN ISLANDS FOR

2010
By Arabella Bowen, Sherman's Travel magazine

The Caribbean is eternally appealing, but now even more so with new nonstop
flights, plum hotels springing up on emerging islands, and unheard-of bargains
at pricey hideouts. From well-trodden sands to blissfully obscure isles, here
are the top Caribbean islands to check out this year.

evokes a tropical Santorini. Highlights
include the spa, two Mediterranean
restaurants serving homegrown fare,
and a delightful beach bar with frosty
cucumber-and-sage martinis.

ANTIGUA
Versatile Antigua has a bit of
everything: historic forts, picturesque
harbors, 365 beaches, and several
4 sumptuous hotels. Nearby lie the
Caribbean islands of Montserrat and
Barbuda, ideal for day trips.

Jumby Bay, on a 300-acre island
2 miles off the coast, happens to
be one of the Caribbean's most
reachable private-island resorts. The
storied retreat is fresh off a revamp
that yielded a new open-air spa, an
oceanfront infinity pool, 40 redesigned
guest rooms, and two fresh restaurants.
Continental and American Airlines fly
nonstop to Antigua from several East
Coast cities, and a private catamaran
deposits guests right at the resort's
dock.

Value: Notable newcomer hotel Sugar
Ridge (www.sugarridgeantigua.com)
opened in late 2009 on a hillside
overlooking Nevis and St. Kitts. Its 60
well-appointed rooms are furnished
with seaview balconies and most have
canopy beds.

Splurge: Colonial-style rooms at
Jumby Bay (www.jumbybayresort.com)
feature four-poster beds, wraparound
terraces, private courtyards, and
outdoor showers. Its new spa offers five
private treatment rooms and dreamy
massages in a hammock.
-j






club perched over the sea. Further east, trailblazer Puntacana Resort & Club
isn't idly standing by: This year it debuts two golf courses, including a Tom
Fazio creation with six oceanfront holes.

Value: The island's only Small Luxury Hotels of the World member, the
50-suite Casa Colonial Beach & Spa Resort (www.casacolonialhotel.com)
near Puerto Plata, still impresses some six years after its launch. Book 15
days in advance to save as much as 40 percent.
Splurge:The family-owned,art-filled Peninsula House(www.thepeninsulahouse.
com), set in a Victorian mansion high above the beach, offers just six junior
suites and warm, impeccable service.

GRENADA
This southern Caribbean island last made U.S. headlines in 1983 when
Ronald Reagan ordered an invasion to quell a Marxist coup. Since then,
mostly Brits have trod its 50-odd beaches, making it a great choice for
SAmerican sunseekers who would rather not run into their neighbors on the
!5 sand.

A nascent resort-spa crop is one reason to visit now; three luxe options have
debuted here over the past two years. Other attractions include Grenada's
capital, St. George's, which cascades down around a handsome port known
as the Carenage, and the island's bustling markets, where one can purchase
some of the dozen-plus domestically produced spices.
The island is also home to the Caribbean's oldest waterwheel-powered .A -
distillery, River Antoine Rum Distillery, whose namesake Rivers Rum is a doozy
152-proof libation too flammable to bring home by plane.

Value: Above-average gratis perks, like spa treatments, one-tank dives, and
even archery and fencing lessons, come standard at adults-only LaSource
(www.theamazingholiday.com), a 100-room resort on Pink Gin Beach.

Splurge: Boho-chic LaLuna (www.laluna.com) has 16 large one- and two-
bedroom cottages, each outfitted with a plunge pool. Guests can meander
between beachfront yoga classes, an open-air lounge for watching sunsets,
and a fab new Balinese spa. Its superb Italian restaurant is also a draw.

JAMAICA
Those who've steered clear of Jamaica because of its spring break vibe
should reconsider. Last fall, JetBlue, Delta, US Airways, and AirTran launched
nonstop flights from various U.S. cities (including New York, Phoenix, Atlanta,
Orlando, and Baltimore), making this Caribbean island more accessible
than ever. Book a cheap fare, ignore the captain's exhorter to "race to the
beach!" and deplane to one of the island's distinctive boutique hotels.

Value: Offering one of the best lodging deals in the Caribbean, Negril's
Rockhouse (www.rockhousehotel.com) presents 34 thatch-roofed units and a
new spa in a terrific cliffside setting.

Splurge: Check out Kingston's new scene from the plush vantage of Strawberry
Hill (www.islandoutpost.com/strawberryhill), a 12-cottage compound run by
Island Outpost on a former coffee plantation in the Blue Mountains beyond
* the capital. I I PJMI I






























a 'LU
LUr










Jr
z oU
7,Rww-- L&






stayl tue ofr











~LU





XLU
mm




ce Z -
I 1~~R'a 'L U




51 FOlin 4_






sights into the world of wine.


1 8 Wines is a mem-
r bership-based
1 8 7I wine club, sourc-
ing fine wines from around the world
and delivering them directly to you. We
focus on high quality wines from small
vineyards at affordable prices. Our wines
are also available in select restaurants in
Jamaica. Our wines are not available in
supermarkets.

For a fixed monthly fee, members receive
6 different bottles of premium wine every
quarter. As a member you also have ac-
cess to our list of over 100 high-quality
wines. We can also source your favourite
wines directly for you by the case.

Wine can be a daunting and complex
subject. Restaurant wine lists and retail
shelves can intimidate connoisseurs and
novices alike. Our belief is that wine is an
experience which should be pleasurable,
sociable, and above all, fun. Our aim is
to provide you with great quality wine,
a pleasant experience, and more knowl-
edge about the world of wine.

In keeping with this aim, 1876 Wines
members are invited to quarterly wine
tasting at no additional charge. These
popular tasting give our members the
opportunity to explore various wine
styles and regions in a relaxed, sociable
setting.

We are passionate about wine, and con-
sistently bring the best wines to Jamaica.
Through our quarterly selections and


ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 2010


our tasting, you will discover superb
wines from every corner of the world.
All wines are tasted and approved by us
to ensure their quality prior to delivery
to your door. We guarantee our prod-
ucts, and you may cancel your partici-
pation in our programme at any time.
Join us now on a wonderful adventure
in the world of wine.

MEMBERSHIP
Three levels of regular individual
membership are available Cork-
screw, for J$3,250 per month, Classic
for J$4,350 per month, and Connois-
seur for J$7,950 per month. While all
our wines are of very high quality, the
higher levels of membership reflect the
exceptional quality of wine these mem-
bers receive.

Members receive:

6 bottles of premium wines
each quarter, delivered to your
preferred Jamaican add ir.-

Tasting notes and SLuggIctl-d
food pairings

Access to all wines cairrid \-
1876 Wines

Invitations to our quarlILtk
wine tasting

Periodic additional win- inl.
wine-related offers

Grapevine, our monthly in-

WWW.PANACHEJAMAG.. I \iE


~6~


Should you wish to receive only red
or only white wines, you may elect
this when you register.

We are, in addition, happy to work
with you to create and fulfill wine
lists, catered events, and special pro-
motions. We offer a wide range of
wines in terms of varietal, quality,
style, vintage and cost.

1876 Wines also carries a variety of
wine accessories for sale, including
corkscrews, preservation systems,
chillers, and books.

PRINCIPALS
Paul Hanworth has resided in Ja-
maica for 11 years and has been a
passionate wine enthusiast for many
more. He continually explores the
world of wines, honing his knowl-
edge of this fascinating industry. Pri-
or to moving to Jamaica he worked
for 9 years in the wine and spirits
trade in the USA and South Africa.
With the creation of 1876 Wines, he
has fulfilled a long-standing desire to
concentrate a significant proportion
of his time and energy on wine and
wine education.

Adrian Garforth MW is one of only
260 Masters of Wine in the world, a
qualification recognized globally as
the highest level of wine education.
He has had an extensive career in the
wine industry, and has worked in the
UK, France and South Africa. Adrian
is the founder of BljkRock, a UK-
ba .d w ine i m, ,l 1 l nd." diti bLiut
Adl[aln I s L- I I


L P. IM
W h I i'.II
ii\a~i i


















(Left to right) Executive Chef Ravi Anne, Chef Steve Sowa
and Chef Daniel Schweitzer- the members of the Planning
committee for taste of Jamaica 2010.


Taste of Jamaica 2010


n the bright sunny
summer afternoon of
May 16th, 2010, the
Cullinary Federation
of Jamaica (CFJ) held
its annual Taste of
Jamaica competition at the Montego
Bay Community College (MBCC) in
Jamaica's tourism mecca.
Chefs came from far and wide
and converged to do battle for the
honour of being crowned Chef of 2010
(Senior, Junior and Pastry categories),
plus Bartender of the Year and earn
a place on the national team to the
regional leg of the Competition- the
Taste of the Caribbean to be held in
Puerto Rico in September 2010.
The day was gruelling and had
participants working in two separate
kitchens. In the first kitchen, it was
a true culinary orchestra at work
through the sounds of knives chopping
against board, the grating of food
against the shredder, the sizzling of oil
in frying pans above red hot flames,
and the occasional drop of a metal
pot here and there all filled the air. For
these chefs, several secret ingredients
were presented on the day and they
all had to prepare original dishes on
spot within a few hours.


With the sands of time
working against them as well,
and in very humid conditions in
the second kitchen, the pastry
chefs who prefer the cooler
environment, had to remain
focused as they created delicate
edible works of art.
Once the creations were
done and plated, then came
judging. There was a team of
judges that assessed each dish
individually, assigning marks
in areas of taste, originality,
presentation, and how well
it brought out an essence of
Jamaica.
While this was underway,
several booths were also
hosting demonstrations such as
Executive Chef Kenrick Stewart
of the Runaway Bay Heart Hotel
who gave loads of advice on a
variety of topics ranging from
food science, the plating of
dishes to proper wine pairing.
His audience though quite
youthful was also very much
engaged which was reflected in
the vibrant question and answer
sessions.
For a wonderful escape


to "rum" heaven, with cranberry
cocktails and their best reserve-
Appleton Estate was a crowd
favourite for obvious reasons. While
you enjoyed your drink (done to
order) the beverage competition
was fortunate to offer the audience
the opportunity to see the various
cocktails being prepared firsthand.
By 5p.m. all the judging had
been deliberated and by 6 p.m. it
was left to the cocktail party where
specially invited guests and the press
'chilaxed' with sumptuous cocktails
from Push Cart and Technicolor
Smoked Line of meats.
At the stroke of 7p.m., it was
awards time and after two grueling
days the night belonged to the chefs.


And the Winners Are:

Special Awards-Bar Tending
Most Creative Rum Drink: Fitzgerald
Haughton, Half Moon, Rose Hall
Most Creative Vodka: Shane Reid,
Hilton Rose Hall
Most Creative Non-Alcoholic Drink:
Noel Anderson, Rock House, Negril
Most Innovative Drink Over All-
Carolyn Innis, Rock House


II~ _





II


II


Bartender of the Year: Fitzgerald Haughton,
Half Moon, Rose Hall
Special Awards: Junior Chef of the Year
Junior Chef of the year: Burgman Davies,
Super Clubs
Spirit of the Competition: Marvalyn
Fjaagesund, MBCC
Special Awards: Pastry Chef of the year
Winston Murdock, Couples Tower Isles, Ocho
Rios
Special Awards: Chef of the year
Chef of the Year: Michael Dannecker, Hilton
Rose Hall
Other Awards
Most Creative use of Pork: Michael
Dannecker, Hilton Rose Hall (Presented by
Goddard Catering Ltd)
Viost Creative use of Tilapia: Dwayne Gilzene
(Presented Best Dressed Foods)
Most Creative use of Sea food: Andre
Fowles, Round Hill (Presented by Rain forest
Seafood)
Most Creative use of Fish: Morice Lewis
(presented by Brian Lynton-Ocean Seafood
ltd)
Hans Schenk Award for the most Innovative
use of Caribbean Ingredients
Brian Lumley, French Embassy (Presented by
Gloria Schenk)
n his closing remarks, Chef Ravi Anne thanked
all the chefs, who were the true spirit of
:he competition and hailed the event as the
highlight, the hallmark of the Caribbean.
vent Sponsors included:
National Meats and Foods
(HartHill Orange Juice),
Heart Trust NTA, Appleton
Rum, Best Dressed Chicken,
Reggae Jammin', WISYNCO,
Round Hill Hotel, Half Moon,
:aribbean Producers, Jencare Pharmacy and
father sponsors. I I PJM I I


II


II


VS i4


ds by Tricia Williamson,
Williamlson,4ll
or-in-Chief
photography by Roger Jones, .:
Photography Director
- 7 ^SK.


/


\


r-






^/- ^1a


P o.amaica b20IiygRer Jo Hih


__r


*YLLY~* ~~?I'
t--- I


Alm w Im --qmpmw


































































* e .. 0 S. .*. I
S *



i Coer"- Pa Dce I m gzn ,








or aging-related weight gain, many women
notice an increase in belly fat as they grow older
and especially after menopause. Gaining
fat in your abdomen is particularly unhealthy
when compared with other locations in your body. Excess belly fat
increases your risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and certain
types of cancers. The good news is that a few lifestyle changes and
some targeted abdominal exercises can help you battle your belly
bulge.

As you age and your metabolism slows down, the amount of fat in
your body slowly increases. Women experience an even greater fat
percentage increase than men do. Then after menopause, your body
fat distribution tends to shift less in your arms, legs and hips, and
more in your abdomen.

You may think belly fat is limited to the stuff out front that you can
grab with your hand but it's the fat you can't see that's really
a cause for concern. Visceral fat lies deeper inside the abdomen,
surrounding the abdominal organs. Gaining this type of fat has been
linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other health problems.
Subcutaneous fat, located between the skin and the abdominal wall,
is more visible but also less likely to be a health risk.

While a slowing metabolism and decreased physical activity
contribute to overall weight gain as you age, those factors don't
influence visceral fat accumulation directly. Heredity may be the
culprit you may simply have inherited a tendency to gain weight
in your midsection. Hormones also play a role. Hormonal changes
after menopause may change the way that your body breaks down
and stores fat, leading to more fat accumulating in your belly.

Some women even experience a widening waist without gaining any
weight. Although you may not be gaining extra fat, your abdominal
fat is increasing as limb and hip fat decreases. Even in women of
a normal weight, too much fat concentrated in the midsection is
unhealthy.
The midsection matters

Gaining weight in your abdomen does more harm than simply
making your waistband too tight. While putting on weight in general
can have negative effects on your health, abdominal weight gain is
particularly unhealthy. Too much belly fat increases your risk of:

Heart disease
Breast cancer
Diabetes
Metabolic syndrome
Gallbladder problems
High blood pressure
Colorectal cancer

I PANACHE JAMAICA WWW.PANACHEJAMAGAZINE.COMl


UNDERSTANDING

BELLY FAT


Researchers also hae\ foLund that abdominal
fat cells aren t just dorinant enc i' \ tai ing to
bc bunied ulp The cells arc actilc. pioducinL
horlmoines nd otiler sibsta1nccS that %can1
aftcct \ouI health For c\amnplc. sonic fat-
ccll-pioducicd lhormonl s %:can piomlot.'c lll n1111
icsistancc. a pirccuisor to tvp' 2 diabetes.
oil'-rs can produce ictrogecn after mInulnolpalisc.
\\lich ina\ iincicasc \oiir breast cancer risk
Researchcir are still sortingl out ho\\ the
ex\Css honnoiics aftcct o\crall health. but
the\ do know that too muLch isccral fat can
disrupt the bod\ s n onnal lionnonal balance





The good news

is that a few

lifestyle changes

and some targeted

abdominal

exercises can help

you battle your

belly bulge.












\AI


r


111111111~


,,
-~n
-5
















rf ii: u u. .

!1.
F' .f.

f'