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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Report of state plant board
 Report of the plant commission...
 Appendix A: List of pests and diseases...
 Appendix B: List of employees
 Appendix C: Rules and regulations...
 Appendix D: The quarterly bulletin,...














Group Title: Report for the period ... of the State Plant Board of Florida
Title: Report for the period ...
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098574/00003
 Material Information
Title: Report for the period ...
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: State Plant Board of Florida
Publisher: State Plant Board of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1924/26
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Protection of -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State Plant Board of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1920/22)- 23rd (1958/60).
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1950/52-1958/60 also called: Bulletin.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098574
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 10989019
lccn - sn 86033752
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report for the biennial period ending ... and supplemental reports to ...
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Title Page
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    Table of Contents
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    Report of state plant board
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    Report of the plant commissioner
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    Appendix A: List of pests and diseases intercepted during the biennium
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    Appendix B: List of employees
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    Appendix C: Rules and regulations of the state plant board in effect June 30, 1926
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    Appendix D: The quarterly bulletin, Volumes IX and X
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Full Text



STATE PLANT BOARD
OF FLORIDA





REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1924-
JUNE 30, 1926

(Sixth Biennial Report)







With Circulars Nos. 52 to 56, incl.

and

The Quarterly Bulletin
Vols. IX and X


UBRARY
FLORIDA EXPERIMENT SlT,.110[
IAINESVILLE. FLORIDA


JANUARY, 1927







AGRI.
CULTURAL
LIBRARy









/ STATE PLANT BOARD
of Florida

9 P. K. YONGE, Chairman.............................. ...............Pensacola
E. L. W ARTMANN .......................--- ............................... -Citra
EDWARD W. LANE ......-..........---------.......--...............Jacksonville
W. B. DAVIS--.......... ------.....- -------------. -Perry
ALBERT H. BLANDING .......--...............................----.------Bartow
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary--.........................-....---- Tallahassee

STAFF

WILMON NEWELL, Plant Commissioner--.....................Gainesville
E. W. BERGER, Entomologist............ ----...................... Gainesville
J. C. GOODWIN, Nursery Inspector -..................-.....-- Gainesville
J. H. MONTGOMERY, Quarantine Inspector-..................-Gainesville
R. E. FOSTER, Apiary Inspector --....--.....-.....----------.Gainesville
SO. F. BURGER, Plant Pathologist..................................Gainesville
M. R. BROWN. Grove Inspector, Dept. of Citrus
Canker Eradication ......----------.....................Gainesville
MIss LENA R. HUNTER, Chief Clerk............................... Gainesville







CONTENTS

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL................ ..... ... ................... .... 5
REPORT OF STATE PLANT BOARD............................ .............. 5
COCONUT BUD ROT.............-.... .. ...-... ................--....... 7
CITRUS APHIS INVESTIGATIONS................ .......................... 7
RULES AND PUBLIC NOTICES ..................--.... .................... 8
REPORT OF THE PLANT COMMISSIONER..................... ................. 11
SECTION I ......................-..................---- .... 11
The Quarantine Situation ........................................ 12
Parcel Post Shipments ................ ......................... ....... 14
Rail Movement ................................... ...... ..... ...... 15
Automobiles and Good Roads........ ....... ..........................15
Citrus Canker ............... ................. .... .. ............ ...... 17
The Nursery Problem ............................................ ..... 18
Federal-State Relations ........................... .... ............ 21
National Legislation ........................................... 22
State Legislation .............. .. ......... .... .......... 24
SECTION II
Departm ental Reports ........... ....................................................... 25
Grove Inspection Department (Citrus Canker Eradication)........ 25
Quarantine Departm ent ................................ ..................... 28
Summary of the Activities of the Department Since It Was
Inaugurated ................... ......... .. .............. ......... 30
Important Interceptions During Year Ending June 30, 1925 31
Important Interceptions During Year Ending June 30, 1926 32
Nursery Inspection Department......................... ................33
Summary of Work of Nursery Inspection Department for
Biennium Ending June 30, 1926............................... 35
Department of Entomology ................... ........................ 36
Specimens Examined and Recorded Annually from April
30, 1915 through June 30, 1926.................................. 36
Citrus A phis .................................................... 36
Celery Insect Investigations .................. ........................ 37
Department of Plant Pathology .................. ... ........... 37
Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane................. ....................... 38
Apiary Inspection Department...................... .... ................ 39
Summary of Apiary Inspection Work Since the Department was
Created in July, 1919....... ..................... .. ............. 39
SECTION III
Estimates of Funds Needed for Board's Work................................ 39

APPENDIX A Secretary's Report-Financial 4
LIST OF PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED DURING THE BIENNIUM.
APPENDIX B
LIST OF EMPLOYEES.
APPENDIX C
RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE PLANT BOARD IN EFFECT JUNE
30, 1926.
APPENDIX D
THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN, VOLUMES IX AND X.






Sixth Biennial Report


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

December 13, 1926.
To His Excellency,
John W. Martin,
Governor of Florida.
SIR: Herewith is submitted the report of the State Plant
Board of Florida for the biennium ending June 30, 1926. Please
submit same to the Legislature.
Respectfully,
STATE PLANT BOARD OF FLORIDA,
By P. K. YONGE,
Chairman.


REPORT OF STATE PLANT BOARD
The continuance of the work of carrying out the provisions
of the Plant Act of 1915 has been along the same broad general
lines as in former years. The application of the law and of the
rules and regulations passed by the Board has been entrusted to
the Plant Commissioner as chief executive officer of the Board.
Under the Commissioner the activities are directed by the several
department heads or by specialists in charge of certain projects.
The departments are: Grove Inspection (Citrus Canker Eradica-
tion), Nursery Inspection, Quarantine, Entomology, Pathology
and Apiary Inspection (Bee Disease Eradication).
The Board is pleased to report that the organization has func-
tioned efficiently and with profit to the state. Without question
the spread of plant pests has been curbed and the introduction of
new pests from without the state has been prevented. In its ac-
tivities the Board has had splendid cooperation from all organi-
zations concerned in work of a similar nature or whose activities
in any way touch those in which we are engaged. The United
States Department of Agriculture, through the Bureau of Plant
Industry, has continued to support the citrus canker eradication
campaign. The Bureau of Entomology has also aided in numer-
ous ways, while the Federal Horticultural Board has engaged






State Plant Board of Florida


with us in the effort to exclude foreign plant pests. The Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station, the College of Agriculture, and
other integral parts of the University have unfailingly responded
to the Board's request for assistance. In partial return for these
courtesies, the Board rendered help and advised with cooperat-
ing organizations. The relations with other state regulatory
bodies have been mutually helpful and cordial.
The Board submits as a part of its report the Biennial Report
of the Plant Commissioner and the financial statement of the
Board's Secretary. The Board would direct attention to the
Plant Commissioner's report in that it is of a somewhat unusual
nature. The Commissioner's report in its first section indicates
not only wherein the organization has performed efficiently but
indulges in some very constructive, although frank, criticism.
The Commissioner points out weak places in our defensive war-
fare against plant pests and suggests ways in which they may be
strengthened. The Board concurs in the Commissioner's com-
ments and commends to serious consideration the Commission-
er's recommendations for betterment of the service.
The detailed information with respect to the general and spe-
cial activities of the Board may be obtained by reference to the
Report of the Plant Commissioner. There are certain matters,
however, with which the Board has been directly and immedi-
ately connected and to which attention should be directed. Per-
haps the most important of these is that of legislation. In the
Commissioner's report is told the situation arising from a deci-
sion of the United States Supreme Court which placed an en-
tirely new construction on the rights of states to impose plant
quarantine regulations. In effect this decision was that by rea-
son of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 all such quaran-
tine measures must be imposed by the Secretary of Agriculture
of the Federal Government. The decision swept away all state
rights in plant quarantine which it was thought the states pos-
sessed. A critical situation was thus presented, which was met
by Congress taking emergency action and passing legislation
amending the Act of 1912 in such manner as to remedy the dif-
ficulty. A secondary effect is that expert legal opinion seems to
hold that state legislation enacted subsequent to the Federal Act
of 1912 is null and void. In this class would fall our own Plant Act
of 1915. In the opinion of the Board it may be desirable, at the
next session of the legislature, to so amend the present Plant Act






Sixth Biennial Report


as to remove any conflict between the Federal Law and the State
Law.
The Board has from time to time authorized attendance by
representatives at various conferences, hearings and meetings at
points outside the State. These have always been of sufficient
importance as plant quarantine subjects to justify the expense.
Notable among such have been hearings at Washington bearing
upon both foreign and interstate plant quarantines; also the
situation resulting from the court decision previously referred
to. In the latter Florida played no small part in the framing of
and passage of the necessary remedial legislation.
The Board reports that during the biennium sums were re-
leased from the Emergency Fund for two projects by joint action
of the Board and the Governor: (a) For prosecution of investi-
gations in re coconut bud rot; (b) for citrus aphis investiga-
tions. The circumstances in connection with each are as follows,
as abstracted from the minutes of the Board:

COCONUT BUD ROT
October 13, 1924.-The Plant Commissioner recommended that the inspec-
tional work in the coconut bud rot infected territory on the lower east
coast be increased very largely, but stated that unless funds could be secured
from the Emergency Appropriation he did not see how the work could be
continued. The Board agreed to present the request to the Governor on the
10th of November and in the meantime the Plant Commissioner was in-
structed to secure all the available information possible regarding the coco-
nut bud rot disease in Florida and have it ready for the consideration of the
Board and the Governor at the conference on the 10th of November.
November 10, 1924.-The Board met in conference with the Governor on
November 10 to consider the coconut bud rot disease situation on the lower
east coast. After discussing the matter at length, Mr. Davis moved that
an emergency be declared to exist necessitating the use of $10,000 of the
appropriation made under Section 2, General Appropriation Bill, Acts of
1923, between now and July 1, 1925, for the purpose of investigating the
disease known as coconut bud rot on the lower east coast of Florida. The
Governor requested the Chairman to put the motion. The motion was put
and carried unanimously. The Governor stated that he would consider the
above action as a recommendation coming to him from the Plant Board for
the release of $10,000 of the appropriation mentioned above for the purpose
as stated in the motion just voted upon and informed the Plant Board that
he would approve the recommendation.
(The 1925 appropriation bill provided funds for the continuance of this
work after July 1, 1925.)
CITRUS APHIS INVESTIGATIONS
February 16, 1925.-A special meeting of the Board was called at Talla-
hassee on February 16, 1925, for the purpose of holding a joint session with
the Governor to consider the advisability of determining that an emergency
exists in the citrus growing section of the state on account of the presence
of a serious pest known as the citrus aphis, necessitating the use of funds
appropriated under Section 2, General Appropriation Bill, Acts of 1923, to
be used by the Plant Board in the discovery of the best methods for the






State Plant Board of Florida


control of this insect. The Governor stated that he had requested a meeting
of the State Plant Board upon the request of several citrus growers who
were anxious to have funds from the Emergency Appropriation released in
order that the Plant Board might discover more effective methods of con-
trolling the citrus aphis in the citrus growing section of the state. *
The Governor and the Plant Board determined that an emergency existed
necessitating the use of $10,000 of the appropriation made under Section 2,
General Appropriation Bill, Acts of 1923, to be used for the purpose of
research work in an effort to discover more effective methods of controlling
the citrus aphis. The Governor then stated that he approved of setting
aside $10,000 of the Emergency Fund for investigating the citrus aphis.
The Secretary of the Board was instructed to notify the State Comptroller
of this action of the Governor and to request him to place the $10,000 as
requested to the credit of the Plant Board to be used for the purpose stated.
He was also instructed to notify the Plant Commissioner to proceed with
the work at the earliest possible date.
July 11, 1925.-The Plant Commissioner requested an expression from
the Board as to its attitude regarding the continuance of the citrus aphis
investigational work. The Chairman and the Plant Commissioner were re-
quested to take up the matter with the Governor and see what could be done
regarding the release of some of the Emergency Appropriation to carry on
this investigational work. The Plant Commissioner was instructed to do
his best to continue the work until after the next meeting of the Board.
August 10, 1925.-The legislature having failed to make any appropria-
tion for the citrus aphis investigational work, a set of resolutions was
adopted by the Board in re funds to be made available from the State Plant
Board Emergency Fund for use of the State Plant Board, in cooperation
with the Agricultural Experiment Station, for continuing the investigations
previously undertaken. A copy of the resolutions was forwarded to the
Governor with the request that he approve the expenditure of $10,000 for
the purpose of these investigations. The Governor did so.
The Board has, during the biennium, passed, revised or re-
pealed rules, regulations and public notices as follows:

RULES AND PUBLIC NOTICES
1924
September
(1) Rule 11F adopted.
(Prohibiting shipment of citrus fruits originating in Cuba into
State of Florida for delivery therein, on account of Mediterran-
ean fruit fly, West Indian fruit fly, etc.)
October
(1) Public Notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected
with scaly bark amended, so as to include new areas in Lake,
Orange and Putnam Counties.
November
(1) Rule 49 adopted.
(Prohibiting the importation into Florida of tung-oil stock and
seed in order to prevent the introduction of injurious insects and
diseases affecting tung-oil trees.)
(2) Public Notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected
with the mosaic disease of sugar cane amended to include the
Counties of Baker, Duval, Columbia, Hamilton, Nassau, Suwanee
and Taylor.
(3) Rule 6, re scaly bark certificate.
(The Board rescinded its action of April 14, 1924, amending Rule
6, so that in the future the form of the scaly bark certificate tag
will read as it did under the action of the Board on April 9, 1922.)







Sixth Biennial Report 9

December
(1) Public Notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected
with the mosaic disease of sugar cane amended to include the
Counties of Alachua, Bradford and Union.

1925
March
(1) Public Notice declaring certain areas in the State to be in-
fected with scaly bark amended so as to include Sections 10, 11
and 15, Twp. 34 S., R. 35 E., Okeechobee County.

June
(1) Rule 15, re scaly bark, repealed.
(2) Rules 15A and 15B adopted.
(Providing for more drastic requirements as preliminary to cer-
tification of nursery stock produced in localities where scaly bark
occurs.)
(3) Public Notice declaring certain areas to be infected with the dis-
ease known as scaly bark amended by striking out detailed de-
scription of infected area, substituting therefore the names of the
counties in which the disease occurs.
(4) Rule 6 amended.
(Eliminating from the rule that portion prescribing the form of
certificate tag to be made use of in connection with shipments of
citrus nursery stock originating in scaly bark areas.)
September
(1) Public Notice declaring certain areas in other states to be in-
fested by the sweet potato weevil amended to include Baldwin
County, Alabama.
October
(1) Rule 41 amended.
(Permitting importation of sugar cane from other states and
foreign countries into sections of Florida known to be infected
by the mosaic disease of sugar cane.)
(2) Rule 48 amended.
(Applying also to shipments of green beans, peas, etc., from
areas in other states which may at some future time become in-
fested with the Mexican bean beetle.)

1926
March
(1) Rule 4C, requiring the covering of nursery stock while in transit,
was repealed.
(2) Rule 4E amended.
(Permitting the scrubbing of host plants of San Jose scale in lieu
of fumigation.)
(3) Rule 41 amended.
(Eliminating the covering requirement from first paragraph; by
permitting scrubbing of host plants of San Jose scale in lieu of
fumigation; by eliminating the requirement regarding scrubbing
of host plants of cottony cushion-scale; by making the wording in
the fifth paragraph uniform; and by changing the expiration date
in the permit certificate to conform to the wording of the permit
certificate in Rule 6.)
(4) Rule 4J was repealed, for the reason that the provisions of this
rule are now included under other rules.







State Plant Board of Florida


(5) Rule 4K amended.
(By substituting the words "fish oil soap" for "whale oil soap",
and by changing the prescribed strength of the solution to be
used in scrubbing nursery stock.)
June
(1) Rule 4 amended.
(By eliminating "banana plants" from the definition of nursery
stock; and by striking out the second sentence of the rule,
providing for the use of a permit tag issued by state of destina-
tion on shipments of nursery stock consigned to points outside of
Florida, in lieu of a Florida certificate tag.)
(2) Rule 4G amended.
(Eliminating the words, "provided, however, that banana plants
and banana bulbs shall be considered as being nursery stock.")
(3) Public Notice declaring certain insects and diseases to be public
nuisances amended by the elimination of "Banana Root Borer"
and "Panama Wilt of Banana" therefrom.
(4) Rule 4A amended.
(Adding "Banana Root Borer" and "Banana Wilt Disease" to the
list of especially injurious insect pests and diseases.)
The official actions of the Board in connection with regulations
have been given publicity through the issuance of the Board's
"Circulars", through the "Quarantine Notices" issued from the
Quarantine Department, and also through the utilization of the
News Service of the Agricultural Experiment Station. The
Board has continued to publish the "Quarterly Bulletin", contain-
ing articles on subjects pertaining to plant pest control, depart-
mental reports, Board rules, etc.
The personnel of the Board at the end of the biennium is as
follows: P. K. Yonge, E. L. Wartmann, A. H. Blanding, W. B.
Davis and E. W. Lane. Messrs. Wartmann and Blanding had
been appointed as members of the Board by Governor Hardee in
July, 1923. Dr. Yonge was reappointed to succeed himself and
Mr. Lane to succeed Mr. J. C. Cooper, Jr., in August, 1925. Mr.
Davis, who filled out the unexpired term of Mr. W. L. Weaver,
was reappointed by Governor Martin on November 13, 1925.
The present Board was organized August 10, 1925, with P. K.
Yonge as Chairman and J. T. Diamond as Secretary.
The reports of the Plant Commissioner and the Secretary are
transmitted herewith.
STATE PLANT BOARD,
P. K. YONGE,
Chairman.






Sixth Biennial Report


REPORT OF THE PLANT COMMISSIONER
For the Biennium Ending June 30, 1926
Gainesville, Florida, November 15, 1926.
Honorable P. K. Yonge, Chairman,
State Plant Board of Florida.
SIR: I have the honor to present herewith my report as
Plant Commissioner for the biennium ending June 30, 1926.
Respectfully,
WILMON NEWELL,
Plant Commissioner.
SECTION I
The Plant Commissioner presents herewith his report for the
biennium ending June 30, 1926. This report differs somewhat
from the usual stereotyped official report, in that the statistical
matter is to a large extent eliminated and much material as to
the routine activities is not included. At this point it may be well
to quote from the last biennial report as follows:
"Former reports have been somewhat detailed and elaborate.
Now that the Board has been functioning for almost ten years,
its work has become systematized and the public is well advised
as to the nature of the Board's work, it is not thought necessary
or advisable to submit a report dealing with the work in such
detailed manner as formerly. The Board members are cognizant
of the manner in which the Plant Commissioner and the depart-
ment heads have handled the particular phases of Plant Board
work assigned to them. The members of the State Legislature
and the public generally, by reason of the extensive and rather
voluminous reports heretofore submitted, have been kept ad-
vised as to the efforts made by the Board to protect the state's
horticultural and agricultural industries. This report will
therefore deal especially with the more important aspects of our
work during the biennium closing June 30, 1924. In the compila-
tion of the statistical matter here presented, an immense amount
of detailed information has been condensed. This is particularly
true with respect to the data included in the section devoted to
the activities of the Nursery Inspection Department."






State Plant Board of Florida


What was said two years ago applies with equal or greater
force now. In still another and more marked respect this pres-
ent report will be different. The Plant Commissioner proposes
to indulge in extended comment not only upon the efficiency but
upon the inadequacy of the work of the Board which is under
his direction and to offer to the Board certain recommendations
with respect to the manner in which the weak places may be
strengthened.
Much of the subject matter in this report was included in a
carefully prepared address delivered by the Plant Commissioner
before the State Horticultural Society at Cocoa in April of this
year.
Ten years ago the citrus growers of Florida were engaged in
a life and death battle with citrus canker. That enemy has ap-
parently been successfully combated-has been defeated for the
time being at least. The immediate menace to the citrus indus-
try from that source has been averted. The horticulturists of
the state seem satisfied to rest content in this belief, thinking
that the canker danger is a thing of the past and that no other
dangers threaten. They are deluding themselves.
Many changes have taken place in Florida in ten years and
many of these changes have created new conditions for the hor-
ticultural industries and have brought new dangers. Some of
these we propose to bring to your attention.

THE QUARANTINE SITUATION
The Plant Board's quarantine work was commenced in 1916
and by 1917 was regarded as quite fully meeting the needs of the
situation. Quarantine inspectors were located at all ports of
entry, including Miami, Key West, Jacksonville, Tampa and Pen-
sacola and, with the volume of traffic moving at that time, these
men were able to inspect not only all horticultural materials ar-
riving by boat, but also all freight and express shipments of
plants and plant products and the hand baggage of passengers
arriving by rail at these points. By 1918 a fairly high degree of
cooperation had been perfected with the postmasters of the state,
whereby uninspected plant material arriving by mail from out-
side the state was submitted to Plant Board representatives for
inspection.
Let us contrast the situation then with that of today. All of
the ports mentioned have become maritime shipping points with






Sixth Biennial Report


a heavy foreign commerce and greatly increased coastwise com-
merce. At all of these places the pressure of work on the inspec-
tors has required the partial abandonment of inspection of parcel
post shipments and of railway freight and express shipments.
Vessels from foreign countries, and particularly from the tropics,
present the greatest menace, hence all other quarantine work has
been curtailed in order that this greatest menace may receive at-
tention. Even the foreign commerce alone is now taxing our
quarantine force to its utmost.
During the fiscal year 1916-17, 1,240 foreign vessels arrived
at Florida ports; during the last fiscal year there arrived 2,437.
Coastwise vessels arriving in 1916-17 numbered 2,017; in the
last year 3,027. During 1916-17, 3,105 shipments (both water
and rail) were inspected; while in 1924-25 the parcel (or con-
tainer) inspections numbered 1,633,015. Out of the latter num-
ber, 3,040 were found to contain dangerous pests and were de-
stroyed, while 2,630 more were returned to the shippers as being
unsafe for delivery in Florida.
What has this quarantine service meant in the way of pro-
tection to our industries? Since it was established, the Plant
Board inspectors have intercepted, in shipments coming into
Florida-or trying to come in-the blackfly 48 times, the West
Indian fruit fly 24 times, the pink bollworm of cotton three
times, the Mexican orange maggot twice and the Mediterranean
fruit fly once.
And this is not all. The Plant Board inspectors have inter-
cepted much infested material coming to us from other states.
The Argentine ant, the gipsy moth and the yam weevil have all
been "caught" in rail, express and mail shipments, while the in-
tercepted shipments infested with less serious insects and dis-
eases have run into the thousands.
Increase in the Plant Board's funds for quarantine work has
by no means kept pace with the tremendous increase in volume
of commerce coming into Florida. In 1916-17 the Board ex-
pended $25,835 in its quarantine work; in the present fiscal year
the Board has but $44,310 with which to try to meet the sit-
uation!
Of the pests intercepted, the Mediterranean fruit fly is the
dean of them all and the terror of horticulturists throughout the
world. Florida is not directly exposed to infestation by this in-
sect but that means very little, for infested fruit has been inter-






State Plant Board of Florida


cepted. The fruit that was found infested with the Mediterran-
ean fruit fly, .in this instance, came from Spain by way of Cuba
and was in a ship's stores. This experience only emphasizes the
fact that Florida is in danger of receiving any pest occurring
anywhere on the globe and the price of future freedom from
these threatening calamities is eternal and efficient vigilance.
We wish to emphasize the word "efficient". Even though the
individual Plant Board inspectors may be ever so efficient and
industrious and hard-working, there is a limit to human endur-
ance and to the amount of physical work one can do in a day or a
week or a year. When the number of vessels arriving passes
beyond a certain point the available inspectors cannot get to all
of them and the uninspected vessel or shipment may be the very
one that brings the long-feared pest that will cost the state mil-
lions of dollars. A fence is useless if it is down and broken in
many places.
The number of inspectors that the Plant Board can employ
is limited by the amount of appropriation available for this work.
We have already stated that the pressure of foreign commerce at
our ports has compelled the partial abandonment of inspection
of coastwise vessels and of freight and parcel post shipments.
A still further increase in foreign commerce at Florida ports
will bring a break-down of our quarantine against pests from
foreign countries, as our domestic quarantines have already
broken down under the great increase in the state's commerce.

PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS
Under an Act of Congress of March 4, 1915, the states may
make arrangements whereby parcel post shipments of plants
entering the state may be inspected by the state officials. Ar-
rangements were made for such inspections in 1916 and for a
few years, through rather good cooperation on the part of post-
masters, a large quantity of material was examined. During the
year 1917-18, for example, the inspectors examined 5,045 par-
cels, of which 266 were found non-deliverable because of insects
or diseases. Experience in making these inspections showed
that mail shipments are accompanied by many and diverse
dangers.
But what has happened? The Plant Board has never had any
specific provision in its budget for this work. It has had to
provide for it out of the funds available for quarantine work. As






Sixth Biennial Report


the latter work has increased at the ports and as it has become
increasingly necessary to concentrate on the foreign shipments,
less and less time and money have been available for the par-
cel post inspections. The cooperation of postmasters in selecting
out the mail shipments of plants and diverting them to the in-
spection stations can be maintained only by personal contact
with the postmasters themselves and it has simply been impossi-
ble to maintain this contact. During the past fiscal year, only
2,838 parcel post packages were submitted by the postmasters
for our inspection.
On top of all this, the post offices have themselves been
swamped with mail matter far beyond their capacities, it has re-
quired the utmost effort on the part of their clerks to handle the
mails at all and under such circumstances they could hardly be
expected to watch for a certain type of mail packages and hold it
out for our inspection.
Shipment of plants by parcel post has increased tremendously,
the volume of movement through this channel probably now be-
ing comparable with the volume of express shipments. The par-
cel post presents a most grave danger to Florida horticulture,
but the Plant Board finds itself helpless to cope with the situ-
ation. This door is practically wide open for our enemies.
RAIL MOVEMENT
A few years ago the great bulk of freight and express came
into Florida through Jacksonville and Pensacola. At present it
is coming in through several other gateways and new lines of
railway are being constructed which will still further increase
the points of entrance. It is even now impossible for Plant
Board inspectors to be stationed at all the junction points where
shipments of nursery stock and other suspicious material enter
the state.
This difficulty can be met in only one way and that is by the
state requiring all shipments of plants and plant products, des-
tined for Florida points, to be sent into the state through cer-
tain designated entry stations where they will be inspected.
This, of course, requires funds for the establishment and main-
tenance of these inspection stations and their personnel.
AUTOMOBILES AND GOOD ROADS
The perfection of motor vehicles and the construction of thou-
sands of miles of paved roads has been a wonderful factor in the






State Plant Board of Florida


development of Florida but these things have, at the same time,
provided a means for the rapid distribution of insects and plant
diseases such as the world has never before witnessed.
A few years ago, the state could be quite well safeguarded by
imposing and enforcing regulations governing the movement of
plants by rail, water and express. Now, the movement by auto-
mobile and truck probably exceeds that by rail. Examples of
this new danger are all around us. Trucks loaded with oranges
and grapefruit go from Florida to adjacent states and return
with loads of sweet potatoes infested with the sweet potato
weevil. Thousands of automobiles, coming through Georgia and
Alabama, gather up stalks of mosaic-infected sugar cane and
they even reach the heart of the future sugar area of the Ever-
glades before they have used or discarded the last of it. Estima-
ble Florida citizens, when desiring to bring in citrus trees from
other states without being interfered with by the Plant Board
regulations, merely drive a truck or auto into adjoining states
and get them. Tourist automobiles driven through the heart
of the Japanese beetle territory of New Jersey and Pennsylvania
in midsummer when the beetles are flying in swarms, are in the
State of Florida within four or five days thereafter.
There are nearly five hundred miles of northern boundary
line, crossed by hundreds of roads, and it would require an army
of men to police it.
Within the state, there is now a greater movement of unin-
spected nursery stock than ever before. It is being moved in
automobiles and trucks, up and down the roads, everywhere. The
amount of uninspected citrus being moved in this way is of such
great volume as to raise a serious question as to whether it would
be possible to stamp out or control citrus canker should the dis-
ease break out in more than a very small area. Coconut palms
uninspected and taken from nurseries under quarantine on ac-
count of coconut bud rot, have been moved from the lower East
Coast to the central part of the state and to the lower West
Coast. In fact, with the opening of additional cross-state high-
ways the West Coast is in a fair way to receive all pests and dis-
eases of the East Coast and vice versa-and we can assure you
that each of these sections now has a number of important
pests not common to the other.
California's experience has shown the menace attaching to
automobile traffic. However, Nature has provided California






Sixth Biennial Report.


with a wonderful opportunity for protecting herself, in that
there are but few automobile gateways to California. That
state does maintain inspection stations at these gateways and
every entering automobile is stopped and searched. Out of
84,000 such automobiles inspected, the California inspectors ap-
prehended 500 infested lots of materials!
We have no such gateways to make use of, but unless this
wholesale, unregulated movement of plants into and about the
state is curbed, the Plant Board's efforts to protect our horti-
cultural industries must become unavailing.
A continuation of this condition will mean that Florida will,
sooner or later, get citrus canker, the brown rot of citrus fruits,
the Japanese beetle and its equally destructive cousin, Anomala
orientalis, the Mexican bean beetle, gipsy moth, camphor scale
and Argentine ant. It also means that we may expect to see,
within a very few years, the sweet potato weevil and the mosaic
disease of sugar cane universally distributed throughout the
state.
In our opinion there is but one answer to this particular prob-
lem and that is the maintenance of motorcycle officers or inspec-
tors, on the public roads, whose special business it is to investi-
gate every motor vehicle carrying plants, fruits, trees or vegeta-
bles and to give proper attention to dangerous material. We
cannot expect county and city traffic officers to attend to this
duty for us: they are interested primarily in getting fees and
even were they so minded, they could not perform the duties of
"plant policemen" for they lack the necessary technical knowl-
edge. The Plant Board cannot at present place mounted in-
spectors on the roads: its inspectors do not have authority to
make arrests or to collect bond for the offenders' appearance in
court and without these weapons the inspectors would be help-
less. Likewise the Board has no funds available for supporting
this work, even if the legal authority could be found.

CITRUS CANKER
The conditions we have recited show how easy it has become
for citrus canker to again invade the state. It is also true that
the skeleton force of about twenty-five grove inspectors which
the Board now maintains in the groves of the state, can, by the
most hasty methods of scout inspection, get over the grove acre-
age in Florida only once in about four years. What an oppor-






State Plant Board of Florida


tunity is afforded for a little incipient canker infection to become
a wide-spread conflagration before it is detected! Our experi-
ence with the citrus canker outbreaks which have occurred in
the past six years has conclusively shown that the cost of main-
taining a larger grove inspection force would be more than met
by the reduced cost of stamping out canker infections, on account
of these being discovered before they assume large proportions.
In some instances it has cost more than $50,000 to stamp out a
single outbreak. How much more sensible would it be to pro-
vide a larger inspection force and catch the infections in their
incipiency, thereby saving not only the taxpayers' money but
averting heavy losses to the owners of the infected groves?

THE NURSERY PROBLEM
It must not be forgotten, in considering these matters, that the
horticultural nursery can be just as efficient a propagator and
distributor of insects and diseases as it is of trees and plants.
All measures of pest prevention must largely fail of their object
if the nurseries become infested and distribute these same pests
with the nursery stock. No state can in any sense consider its
horticulture protected unless it maintains a highly efficient nurs-
ery inspection service.
The nursery inspection work of the State Plant Board has
been, we believe, the most efficient of its kind in the United
States but, even so, it is not sufficient to meet the needs of
Florida.
The nursery acreage in the state has doubled in the last
three years. In 1923 there were 4,698 acres in nursery stock
and in 1925 there were 9,407 acres; the latter containing 68,-
266,000 trees and plants. To inspect these sixty-eight million
trees and plants, the Plant Board has but twelve field inspectors.
The average number of inspections per nursery a year is now
2.6. Not less than four inspections a year are necessary for a
relatively high degree of safety.


Expansion and concentration on the three major activities of
the Board appears to be the logical method of handling the situ-
ation depicted. Nursery inspection should be so organized as to
permit of four thorough inspections being made of all nurseries






Sixth Biennial Report


each year, the grove inspection force should be of such a size as
to make an inspection of all citrus trees in the state each year,
and the port quarantine inspection service should be strength-
ened so that all dangerous or potentially dangerous horticultural
material will either be barred or enter under supervision.
We do not mean by this that what might be termed the col-
lateral activities of the organization should be neglected. It is
necessary to the proper functioning of the organization that cer-
tain scientific work be carried on, as, for instance, the work of
the pathological and entomological divisions must be maintained
for the double purpose of identifying plant pests and of seeking
new information as to methods of control, suppression or elimi-
nation of plant pests. A striking example of the necessity for this
kind of activity lies in the surprising lack of information on the
subject of fumigation of trees and plants, especially under Flor-
ida conditions.
It is with these various facts in mind that we are submitting,
as a portion of this report, estimates of the funds believed to be
necessary to meet our pressing requirements. The Plant Com-
missioner and his staff have given great care to the preparation
of these estimates. We present them to the Board as represent-
ing our best judgment and as being the absolute minimum re-
quired to afford protection to our horticultural industries. Large
as the total may seem, yet it is small in comparison with other
figures which might be made use of in showing the annual toll
which the producer pays in combating, by means of sprays and
other methods, the pests which attack cur orchards and fields.
Unfortunately, we do not have available accurate statistics cov-
ering this cost in Florida. Our sister state of California has,
through her superior facilities, collected reliable data on this
subject. It is shown that in considering the California citrus
crop of 1924 a valuation of forty million dollars was placed upon
the crop. The amount expended by growers for the purchase
and application of spray materials and of fumigants was four
and a half million dollars. It is also stated that the direct loss
from plant pests to the California citrus crop of 1924 was four
million dollars, thus making a total of eight and a half million
dollars, or about twenty per cent of the crop value. It would
probably be safe to say that the Florida producer of citrus fruits
alone pays an equally great toll. Contrast this figure with the
total of the estimates here submitted. The conclusion is inevit-






State Plant Board of Florida


able that what might be termed the insurance rate is low. It
must be remembered also that the great bulk of the Board's re-
sources is expended in the combination effort of excluding plant
pests of major importance, such as the fruit flies, the citrus
blackfly, citrus canker, etc., and of locating such of them as may,
by some misfortune, evade the vigilance of our port guardians.
In the latter event, that is, discovery of a new and serious pest,
there would naturally be a concentration of effort to suppress.
It is here that the necessity arises for having immediately avail-
able a relatively large sum of money for emergency use. It is
sincerely hoped that the wise policy of past legislatures in pro-
viding an emergency fund, available through joint action of the
Board and the Governor, will be continued. The Plant Commis-
sioner ventures to recommend, however, that this emergency
fund be at least $100,000.
While on the subject of having available an emergency fund,
the Plant Commissioner would direct your attention to the fact
that such a fund, although it has been available since July 1,
1923, has not been made use of except on two occasions. In one
instance the Governor and the Board, on November 13, 1924,
approved of the release of $10,000 for investigation of the situa-
tion created by the discovery of what was believed to be a very
serious disease of coconuts on the lower East Coast, namely,
coconut bud rot. In the second instance where the emergency
fund was made use of, $10,000 was released on February 18,
1925, for the investigation of a new pest which was attacking
citrus and doing enormous damage to the citrus trees; that is,
the citrus aphid. Reference will be made further in this report
to both of these situations.
That the Board may be informed as to the activities of the sev-
eral departments of the organization, we present in following
sections brief summaries giving the essential facts in regard -to
each, which facts we believe should be brought to the attention
of the Board, the members of the State Legislature, and the pub-
lic. Inasmuch as former reports have, as a rule, gone into more
or less detail and as the work of the organization has become well
understood and, we hope, appreciated by officials and the public,
we deem it unnecessary to indulge in repetition and in the sub-
mission of much detailed information contained in former re-
ports.






Sixth Biennial Report


FEDERAL-STATE RELATIONS
Much of the work of the State Plant Board bears a direct rela-
tion to and connection with similar work of the Federal and other
state governments. We are pleased to report that the cordial
and helpful cooperative spirit which has heretofore existed has
continued throughout the past two years. In times past the
movement of nursery stock and horticultural products interstate
has been the subject of no little friction and misunderstanding,
due largely to multiplicity of regulations and lack of uniformity
in requirements, as well as application. This situation is vastly
improved.
The improved condition and better understanding is, in large
measure, the result of the various states and the Federal Depart-
ment of Agriculture being drawn closer together through con-
tacts of officials and by organization for exchange of views and
ideas pertaining to regulatory work. There has been formed a
group of conference bodies which, in turn, through selected rep-
resentatives, form a national organization. The state groups
consist of plant quarantine officials of the several states com-
prising the four regional organizations, or so-called Regional
Plant Quarantine Boards. With the approval of the State Plant
Board, the Plant Commissioner and the department heads hold
membership in the Southern Regional Board. The Plant Com-
missioner is one of the two representatives of the Southern Plant
Quarantine Board on the National Board.
The National Board consists of two representatives from each
of the four Regional Boards. This Board is, of course, unofficial
but is recognized by the United States Department of Agriculture
as an advisory board to act with the Federal Horticultural Board
in the effort to coordinate, correlate and systematize plant quar-
antine activities, state, interstate and national. It is expected
that much will be accomplished through the activities of these in-
terlocking organizations.
The necessity for closer relations and better understanding
between states and between the states and the Federal agencies
became so evident that the Secretary of Agriculture called a con-
ference of state and Federal officials at Washington in April of
1925. This was attended by your Plant Commissioner and Quar-
antine Inspector. After a two-day meeting, a formula was
worked out as a "basis of agreement" between state and Federal
officials. This formula, based largely on the opinions of the






State Plant Board of Florida


legal advisers of the Department, set forth the rights of state
quarantine and of Federal quarantine authorities and by so do-
ing cleared up much misunderstanding formerly existing, espe-
cially with respect to interstate movement of material which
had been the subject of Federal quarantine action. This national
conference also had the effect of crystallizing in the minds of
many officials the idea of organization and without doubt hast-
ened the creation of the Regional and National Plant Quarantine
Boards previously referred to.

NATIONAL LEGISLATION
In March of 1926 the Plant Commissioner's office was apprised
of the fact that a decision handed down by the United States
Supreme Court placed an entirely new interpretation on a por-
tion of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 with respect to
the rights of state authorities to impose restrictions on interstate
movement of plants and plant products. It had been believed
that in such matters the states were at liberty to impose such
restrictions as were thought necessary when the Federal authori-
ties had not acted. The nature of the decision rendered by the
nation's highest tribunal in the case referred to-i. e., The Ore-
gon-Washington Railroad & Navigation Company vs. The State
of Washington*-was such as to practically invalidate all state
quarantines regulating or prohibiting movement into or through
a state of plants and plant products. It was evident that the
scope of this decision was far-reaching and of great moment.
Under authorization of the Board, the Quarantine Inspector pro-
ceeded to Washington and there joined with Mr. Lee A. Strong,
Assistant Director of Agriculture, State of California, in a series
of conferences with officials of the Department of Agriculture
and others as to ways and means of correcting the critical situa-
tion resulting from the court decision. Remedial legislation was
drafted and presented to Congress. This proposed legislation
amended the Act of 1912 so as to restore to the states the rights
of which they had been deprived through the court decision. The
Plant Commissioner later went to Washington and appeared
before the Senate Committee on Agriculture in support of the
amendment and otherwise interested himself in furthering its
passage. At the regular monthly meeting of the State Plant
*-U. S.--, 70 L. Ed. (No. 187, October Term, 1925, U. S. Supreme Court.)






Sixth Biennial Report


Board held at Gainesville on April 12, 1926, the Plant Commis-
sioner formally reported to the Board regarding the status of
Federal legislation on plant quarantines and commented as
follows:

"Under date of March 29 the Plant Commissioner submitted by mail to
the Board members a report covering the situation with respect to the
enactment of federal legislation intended to restore to the several states
certain rights and privileges with respect to handling interstate movement
of plants and plant products, which rights and privileges the states had
been deprived of through a decision handed down on March 1 by the United
States Supreme Court. As of March 29 the remedial legislation had been
passed by the United States Senate. Subsequent to the date mentioned the
joint resolution was considered by the Agricultural Committee of the House
of Representatives, was favorably reported to the House, and on April 7
was passed without amendment. Without doubt the legislation will receive
the approval of the President.*
"It is worthy of note that the Federal Plant Quarantine Act, as now
amended, not only restores to the several states the authority which it
was formerly thought they possessed but greatly extends the states' author-
ity. Briefly, the amended legislation permits the states (a) to have state
quarantines or regulatory measures on interstate movements of plants and
plant products when such quarantines or regulations are not in conflict
with existing federal quarantines or regulations; (b) authorizes the Sec-
retary of Agriculture to cooperate with state officials; (c) provides that
states may inspect while in transit interstate shipments of plants and
plant products, even though under federal certification, and if such mate-
rials are found to be dangerously diseased or infested or if the shipment
is made in violation of the federal quarantine, to dispose of the material in
accordance with the regulations promulgated by the state authorities. Un-
der the Federal Plant Quarantine Act the federal authorities have no means
of disposing promptly of contraband material. Under the amended legisla-
tion the states do have this right. Prosecutions for violations of quaran-
tines, however, may be instituted by the federal authorities."
The amendment (for parliamentary reasons) was in the form
of a "Joint Resolution" and as passed reads as follows:

"JOINT RESOLUTION
"For the amendment of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, to
allow the States to quarantine against the shipment therein or through
of plants, plant products, and other articles found to be diseased or in-
fested when not covered by a quarantine established by the Secretary
of Agriculture and for other purposes.
"RESOLVED BY THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTA-
TIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN CONGRESS AS-
SEMBLED, That the Act of August 20, 1912 (Thirty-seventh United States
Statutes at Large, page 315), as amended by the Act of March 4, 1917
(Thirty-ninth United States Statutes at Large, page 1165), be, and the
same is hereby amended by adding at the end of section 8 thereof the
following:
"PROVIDED FURTHER, That until the Secretary of Agriculture shall
have made a determination that such a quarantine is necessary and has
duly established the same with reference to any dangerous plant disease or
insect infestation, as herein above provided, nothing in this Act shall be
construed to prevent any State, Territory, or District from promulgating,
enacting, and enforcing any statute, quarantine, order, rule, or regulation
prohibiting or restricting the transportation of any class of nursery stock,
*The President signed the amended Act and it became law.






State Plant Board of Florida


plant, fruit, seed, or other product or article subject to the restrictions of
this section, into or through such State, Territory, District, or portion
thereof, from any other State, Territory, District, or portion thereof, when
it shall be found, by the State, Territory, or District promulgating or en-
acting the same, that such dangerous plant disease or insect infestation
exists in such other State, Territory, District or portion thereof: PRO-
VIDED FURTHER, That the Secretary of Agriculture is hereby author-
ized, whenever he deems such action advisable and necessary to carry out
the purposes of this Act, to cooperate with any State, Territory, or District,
in connection with any statute, quarantine, order, rule, or regulation enacted
or promulgated by such State, Territory or District, as specified in the
preceding proviso: PROVIDED FURTHER, That any nursery stock, plant,
fruit, seed, or other product or article, subject to the restrictions of this
section a quarantine with respect to which shall have been established by
the Secretary of Agriculture under the provisions of this Act shall, when
transported to, into, or through any State, Territory, or District, in viola-
tion of such quarantine, be subject to the operation and effect of the laws of
such State, Territory, or District, enacted in the exercise of its police
powers, to the same extent and in the same manner as though such nursery
stock, plant, fruit, seed, or other product or article had been produced in
such State, Territory, or District, and shall not be exempt therefrom by
reason of being introduced therein in original packages or otherwise."
STATE LEGISLATION
The passing of the Joint Resolution by Congress remedied the
immediate and pressing critical situation, but the effect of the
Supreme Court decision was much greater and more far-reaching
than was at first anticipated. After the passage of the Federal
remedial legislation time and opportunity were afforded for
more careful study of other aspects and effects. The conclusion
was reached both by the solicitors of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture and by Attorney Generals of a number of
the states that all state quarantine rules and regulations apply-
ing to plant movement which were promulgated during the pe-
riod between the passage of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act of
1912 (August 20, 1912) and its amendment in April, 1926, were
without force and effect, and furthermore that such state legis-
lation bearing on plant quarantine subjects or creating Plant
Boards or similar bodies enacted during this same period was
null and void, inasmuch as the Federal legislation, as interpreted
by the Supreme Court, had precedence. The general effect of
this opinion would be that state laws passed prior to August 20,
1912, were in abeyance until the recent amendment became law,
that rules and regulations passed during this period must be
again promulgated in order to be legal, and that Boards created
by state legislation subsequent to August 20, 1912, were without
power to function, for the Act creating them was in conflict with
Federal law. In the latter class would fall our own Plant Act
of 1915.







Sixth Biennial Report


If these opinions are correct, and we believe they are, it be-
comes necessary for the State of Florida to take the proper ac-
tion in the premises; that is, re-enact the Plant Act of 1915,
followed by re-promulgation of the Plant Board rules and regu-
lations, or for the state to enact new legislation covering the
subject. The Plant Commissioner suggests that this is a matter
which should receive most serious consideration. He takes the
liberty of observing that the present Plant Act has been found to
be weak in a number of respects and is susceptible of improve-
ment.
SECTION II
DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS
With respect to the activities of the several departments and
special projects of the Plant Board organization we submit brief
summaries including essential statistical data in this section of
the biennial report. Complete and detailed information is in-
corporated in the annual reports of department heads which are
on file and available for reference in the office of the Plant Com-
missioner.
GROVE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
(Citrus Canker Eradication)
The Grove Inspection Department is concerned chiefly in the
prosecution of the citrus canker campaign. In the last biennial
report an account was given of the discovery for the second time
of canker at Davie. Intensive inspection was continued at Davie
and the general inspection of citrus trees throughout the state
was likewise continued. The only canker infection found during
the period covered by this report was at Boynton in March of
1925 when five old neglected trees located on two city lots were
found to be diseased. There was an immediate concentration
of inspectors and vigorous measures were instituted in coopera-
tion with the city authorities to dispose of the large number of
old abandoned trees which presented such a menace. After the
"clean up" at Boynton state-wide inspection was resumed, al-
though the whole area from West Palm Beach to Homestead was
and still is under closer supervision. No other infected trees
have been found.
The tabulations submitted herewith present some very inter-
esting information when analyzed. For instance, it is shown







State Plant Board of Florida


that the total cost of canker eradication has been $1,873,770.53,
of which the state supplied $773,255.50 the Federal Government
$1,015,495.41 and $85,019.62 was supplied by individuals, corpor-
ations and organizations. Again, it is shown that through this
expenditure practical results have been obtained, inasmuch as
only six trees have been found infected in the past three years
and none since March of 1925. At this time there are no known
active infections.
The number of inspectors engaged in the field work during
the biennium has ranged from 23 to 28. These men inspected a
total of 8,272,298 grove trees. This does not mean that that
number of trees were inspected, for many trees in especially ex-
posed areas were inspected a large number of times. It is the
practice in actively infected groves to inspect at weekly inter-
vals. It is a pleasure to report that at the close of the biennium
no properties are classed as actively infected and only two such
formerly infected groves are under limited restrictions.
With the limited number of inspectors engaged in grove in-
spection work, it is impossible to inspect all citrus trees in the
state even as frequently as once in three years. It is earnestly
hoped that this condition will be remedied.
The outbreak of citrus aphis in 1924 complicated the inspec-
tional work which was being carried on at Davie very greatly.
The curling of the citrus leaves, due to the aphis infestation,
made inspection very difficult. As the organization was gravely
concerned at this time over the canker situation at Davie, it was
deemed advisable to engage in an effort to control the aphids.
Little was known with respect to this insect or its control. Never-
theless, with the knowledge available, we undertook the task.
We not only succeeded in controlling the aphid to a very marked
degree, but, by reason of our work and the observations made,
contributed in no small measure to the amount of knowledge on
citrus aphis control.
The following tabulations show in detail the work which has
been done by the Grove Inspection Department in the canker
eradication work during the biennium.














No. em-
ployees
on can-
ker
force


1925
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
1926
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June


Prior to
July 1, 1925..
TOTALS ....


SUMMARY OF THE GROVE


No. of trees inspected*


Grove



162,480
180,433
436,218
502,653
615,417
664,197

829,127
876,284
906,430
1,041,085
920,587
1,137,387

8,272,298

85,853,320
94,125,618


INSPECTION AND CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1926

TOTAL NUMBER OF PROPERTIES


Found infected
Nursery from May 1, 1914,
to date


12,877,540
8,335,392
10,445,463
11,512,075
8,503,952
10,700,355

10,832,533
11,303,130
10,683,375
10,101,263
7,690,821
11,081,473

124,067,372

728,251,362
852,318,734


Declared no
longer danger
centers

510









512


Resting under
certain restric-
tions as to
cultivation, etc.

24









2


Still classed
as infected


No infections of citrus canker found during year ending June 30, 1926.
*Number of trees inspected for citrus canker. Nursery trees were reinspected several times during year: above figures include such reinspections.
Trees in Boynton and Davie sections inspected twice, all other grove trees once.







28 State Plant Board of Florida


The following summary supplies the essential information
concerning the eradication of citrus canker in Florida up to
June 30, 1926:

SUMMARY
Total number of properties found infected in the state...................... 512
Total number of properties declared no longer danger centers.......... 512
Total number of properties still classed as active infections, June
30, 1926 .................... ......................... .... ........... .......... ............ 0
Number of properties declared "clean".............................................. 510
Number of properties still under partial or full quarantine, June
30, 1926 ................................. .. .... ...................... 2
Total number of grove trees found infected from May 1, 1914 to
June 30, 1926.... ....... ...................... ... ..................... 15,156
Total number of nursery trees found infected from May 1, 1914 to
June 30, 1926 ................................ ...... ... ....... ................- 342,260
Total number of "exposed" grove trees destroyed from May 1,
1914 to June 30, 1926................................... 242,209
Total number of "exposed" nursery trees destroyed from May 1,
1914 to June 30, 1926....................... ...........2,721,850
The sums expended in this work in Florida from its inception
are shown in the following tabulation:
Federal State Other
Funds Funds Sources
Prior to May 1, 1920......................$ 860,973.51 $362,258.63 $85,019.62
May 1, 1920 to April 30, 1921...... 38,577.04 61,587.66 ..
May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922........ 16,944.42 81,555.32 .......
July 1, 1922 to June 30, 1924........ 83,786.61 127,334.64 ..............
July 1, 1924 to June 30, 1925........ 7,997.08 66,121.83 ...
July 1, 1925 to June 30, 1926....... 7,216.75 74,397.42 ...

Totals .................... ......... .....$1,015,495.41 $773,255.50 $85,019.62
Total, all sources ...................... ............. .............. ........$1,873,770.53
The following tabulation shows the total number of grove trees
found infected with canker by months and years since the work
began in May of 1914:

1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926
January ........ 306 86 14 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
February ...... 165 21 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
March ............ 444 49 9 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 5 0
April ............ 408 49 169 2 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0
May ............... 108 1042 338 52 1 1 0 0 585 2 0 0 0
June ..............160 772 450 45 10 0 0 0 168 1 0 0 0
July ................ 275 651 349 39 0 0 539 0 28 0 0 0
August ..........1313 1345 219 30 0 1 1 0 34 0 0 0
September ....767 618 124 6 0 0 0 0 23 0 0 0
October ........565 214 451 2 0 0 0 0 19 1 0 0
November .. 773 494 131 1 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0
December ......366 256 27 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0
Total 4327 6715 2294 372 15 4 540 0 873 11 0 5

QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT

The first and greatest purpose of the Quarantine Department
is to prevent the introduction into the state of dangerous plant
pests. The movement of plants and plant products is therefore







Sixth Biennial Report


safeguarded through restrictive or prohibitory regulations.
These regulations of the Plant Board are applied by the.inspec-
tors of the Quarantine Department, who are likewise collabora-
tors of the Federal Horticultural Board and administer federal
regulations applying to the entry of plants and plant products
from foreign countries through Florida ports of entry. The
salary and expense items of this work are borne by the state. The
holding of federal appointments, however, permits of our men
possessing greater authority to pass upon the horticultural mate-
rial entering through our ports.
As heretofore, quarantine inspectors are stationed at Pensa-
cola, Jacksonville, Miami, Key West and Tampa as our chief
ports. Part time men are at West Palm Beach and Fort Myers.
During the biennium these men boarded and inspected more than
12,000 vessels. Of these approximately one-half were from for-
eign ports. The great bulk of the foreign ships came directly
from tropical countries, although every part of the world con-
tributed tonnage.


The following tabulation summarizes very
quarantine work for the biennium:


Ships inspected:
Foreign ........................................ ......... 2,437
Domestic coastwisee) ........... .... .. ...... 3,027
Total ...................... ........... ...... .......... 5,464
Total number parcels inspected:
Arriving by boat, express, mail, freight......1,633,015
Of the total there were:
Treated and passed ............................... 192,707
Returned to shipper ................................ 2,630
Contraband destroyed ............................... 3,040


tersely the port


1924-25 1925-26 Total


2,705
3,963
6,668


5,142
6,990
12,132


2,435,470 4,068,485

865,927 1,058,634
3,766 6,396
3,469 6,509











THE FOLLOWING TABULATION IS PRESENTED SHOWING THE WORK OF THE QUARANTINE
DIVISION BY YEARS SINCE THIS WORK WAS INAUGURATED


1915- 1916- 1917- 1918-
1916 1917 1918 1919


Foreign boats 166 1240 1777 1724

Total boats.... 370 3257 4253 3485

No. packages
arriving by
boat, ex-
press,
freight,
mail .......... 500 3105 3422 *69985

No. packages
returned .... 18 255 485 1521

No. packages
destroyed 69 1182 1037/2 1743%

No. packages
treated
and passed


1919-
1920


2458

4504


1920- 1921- May& 1922-
1921 1922 June, 1923
1922

3035 2225 364 220'

4948 4179 697 455!
iI I


336059% 17104121/2


49361/2


23451


2130%


1564/3


1333333 /2


2610


1757


1923- 1924-
1924 1925
SI


2309

4842


747972 1827727 1410860t1


201 1006 1566


311 2278 4478


2437

5464


1925-
1926 TOTAL


2705

6668


1633015 2435470


2630 3766


30401 3469]



192707 865927


22647 c

47226


c-

0
10515135


21125
5!"


2.


1/2 232541/2



I 1058634


*Prior to August 1, 1918, horticultural material inspected was reported by shipments. A shipment might comprise 1 or 1,000 packages. Subsequent
to above date reports were made of the number of packages and bulk shipments were reduced to packages on basis of contents of standard containers
used for particular products.
tDecrease in number of packages arriving was due to the Federal Horticultural Board Quarantine No. 56. prohibiting the entry of fruits from
foreign countries, except under permit, which went into effect in November, 1923.








Sixth Biennial Report


A complete list of the plant pests intercepted is presented as
an appendix to this report. Some of the more important are
here listed.
Intercepted During Year Ending June 30, 1925
Insect or Disease From Number Ship-
ments Intercepted
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby
blackflyy) ... .................. ....... Cuba ........................ 8
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby
blackflyy) ............................ ..... Jam aica ..............-.... 2
Anastrepha fraterculus Wied.
(West Indian fruit fly) ............. Cuba .....---.....-............ 1
Anastrepha ludens (Loew.)
(Morelos fruit fly) ..................... Mexico ........... .. 2
Aonidia lauri (Bouche)
(scale) .. ........ .. ....- ... Spain ................ 1
Aonidia lauri (Bouche)


(scale) ........................................ Cuba .......... .....
Aspidiotus destructor Sign.
(destructor scale) ...... .. .. Cuba ----
Aspidiotus destructor Sign.
(destructor scale) .. Porto Rico ....
Ccratitis capitata Wied.
(Mediterranean fruit fly).......... Spain ...
Coccus viridis (Green)
(green scale) ......-......................... Cuba
Diplodia natalensis Ev.
(fungus) .... .........-...- ......... ..- ICuba .... ......
Eriococcus araucariae Mask.
(Araucaria eriococcus) .............. Spain ........
Lepidosaphes crotonis (Ckll.)
(scale) ...... ....... .. ...... .... ........ Porto R ico ........
Lepidosaphes lasianthi (Green)
(scale) ...---..... .... .. Santo Domingo
Pectinophora gossypiella (Saun-
ders) (pink bollworm) ............. China .. .......
Pectinophora gossypiella (Saun-
ders) (pink bollworm) ........... I Cuba .--
Phthorinaeca operculella Zell.
(potato tuber moth) ..............i Germany .......
Ph thorimaea operculella Zell.
(potato tuber moth) .- .. I.. Island of Malta.
Pseudaonidia articulates (Morg.)
rufouss scale) .......-...... ---...---- Cuba -----
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) .-................... Bahama Islands
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ............ ..... Jamaica --------
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ...-... ...--......... Mexico ........
Pseudaonidia articulates (Morg.)
rufouss scale) .----. Spain ...........
Pseudaonidia articulates (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ....................... St. Lucia, B. W
Pseudaonidia tesserata (de
Charm ) (scale) ............................ Cuba .... .........
Targionia hartii (Ckll.)
(yam scale) ............ ....---- Cuba ..................
Targionia hartii (Ckll.)
(yam scale) ....................------ Santo Domingo


6


. I......


1
1

[1 1

1

1

1

8

S 1

- 2

- 1

1

. 1
1

.1 1
-I 1


-----------
-----------

-----------







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease From Number Ship-
I _ments Intercepted
Tyloderma fragariae Riley
(strawberry crown borer).......... Arkansas ...................... 1
Tyloderma fragariae Riley
(strawberry crown borer).......... Alabama ..................... 1
Uromyces caryophyllinus (Schr.) I
Wint. (carnation rust)................ Pennsylvania ..............1

Intercepted During Year Ending June 30, 1926
Insect or Disease From Number Ship-
Iments Intercepted
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby
blackflyy) .................................... Cuba ........................... 8
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby
blackflyy) ................................ Bahama Islands ......... 1
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby
blackflyy) ...................... ..... Jam aica .......... .... .... 1
Anastrepha fraterculus Wied.
(West Indian fruit fly) ..... Cuba ....... ....... .............. 1
Aspidiotus destructor Sign.
(destructor scale) ............................ ........ 10
Aspidiotus destructor Sign.
(destructor scale) ...................... Porto Rico .................... 1
Aspidiotus destructor Sign.
(destructor scale) ........................ Santo Domingo .......... 1
Aonidia lauri (Bouche)
(scale) .............................. Italy .......... ......... 1
Coccus viridis (Green)
(green scale) ............................... Cuba ............................ 1
Diarthronomyia hypogaea Loew.
(chrysanthemum midge) .......... Pennsylvania ............ 16
Iridomyrmex humilis Mayr.
(Argentine ant) ........................ Alabama ...................... 1
Iridomyrmex humilis Mayr.
(Argentine ant) .................... Louisiana .................... 1
Parlatoria sp.
(scale) ...................... .... ....... Trinidad ........................ 1
Phthorimaea operculella Zell.
(potato tuber moth) ................. Virginia ........................ 1
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ............................ Bahama Islands .......... 4
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) .............................. British West Indies-..... 1


Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ............................
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ...........................
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ........... .......... ..
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ...........................
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ..............................
Pseudaonidia articulatus (Morg.)
rufouss scale) ..............................
Uromyces caryophyllinus (Schr.)
Wint. (carnation rust) ..............
Vinsonia stellifera (Westw.)
stellatee scale) ....... ...............
Xylostodoris luteolus Barber
(royal palm bug) ......................


Costa Rica ..................

Cuba ........... .............
Guatemala ......... ....

Jam aica ......................

Trinidad ...................

West Indies ................

Pennsylvania .........

Bahama Islands ...-...

Cuba ...........................






Sixth Biennial Report


During the year ending June 30, 1925, insect pests and plant
diseases were intercepted on material arriving at Florida ports
from 42 foreign countries:
1. Africa 2". Grand Cayman
2. Algeria 23. Greece
3. Argentina 24. Holland
4. Bahamas 25. Honduras
5. Barbados, B.W.I. 26. India
6. Belgium 27. Island of Malta
7. Bermuda 28. Italy
8. Brazil 29. Jamaica
9. British West Indies 30. Japan
10. Canal Zone (Panama) 31. Mexico
11. Canary Islands 32. Norway
12. Cape Verde Islands 33. Porto Rico
13. Chile 34. Santo Domingo
14. China 35. Scotland
15. Costa Rica 36. Spain
16. Cuba 37. Spanish Honduras
17. Dominica 38. St. Lucia (B. W. I.)
18. England 39. Trinidad
19. France 40. Uruguay
20. Germany 41. Virgin Islands
21. Gibraltar 42. Wales

During the year ending June 30, 1926, insect pests and plant
diseases were intercepted on material arriving at Florida ports
from 39 foreign countries:
1. Africa 21. Guatemala
2. Algeria 22. Haiti
3. Argentina 23. Holland
4. Austria 24. Honduras
5. Azores 25. Isle of Pines
6. Bahama Islands 26. Jamaica
7. Barbados (B. W. I.) 27. Italy
8. Belgium 28. Mexico
9. Bermuda 29. Panama
10. Brazil 30. Porto Rico
11. Canada 31. Santo Domingo
12. Chile 32. Scotland
13. Costa Rica 33. Spain
14. Cuba 34. Sweden
15. Denmark 35. Trinidad
16. Ecuador 36. Tunis
17. England 37. Venezuela
18. France 38. Wales
19. Germany 39. West Indies
20. Grand Cayman

NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT

Inspection of nursery stock has been a practice followed in all
states where horticulture is of importance. Such service is ren-
dered in practically every well organized government. On ac-
count of the magnitude of the horticultural interests of Florida
demanding protection and the semi-tropical conditions existing





State Plant Board of Florida


in this state, the nursery inspection service may be regarded as
of prime importance. Of recent years this service has been
highly developed and from the standpoint of efficiency may well
be compared with similar services in wealthier commonwealths.
And yet we are far from feeling that suitable or adequate service
is rendered. As an illustration, we may say that our goal, since
the creation of the State Plant Board ten years ago, has been to
make four inspections annually of all commercial nurseries. We
have never done so. In 1924-25 we averaged 2.4 inspections per
nursery. In 1925-26 the average was 2.6.
The Nursery Inspector, in his annual reports for the fiscal
years 1924-25 and 1925-26, has presented a mass of statistical
matter pertaining to the activities of the Nursery Inspection De-
partment. This material is of value as a permanent record for
reference and is available to officials and citizens desiring to ob-
tain special information. It is so voluminous, however, that we
do not deem it wise or necessary to publish it in full in this
report. What may be termed the "high-lights" are here pre-
sented:
During 1924-25 there were eleven assistant nursery inspectors,
while in 1925-26 the department had available thirteen such at-
taches. These men had 4,568 nurseries of all kinds under in-
spection in 1924-25 and 3,059 in 1925-26. In 1924-25 these
nurseries contained 68,004,635 trees and plants, while in 1925-26
there were a total of 81,746,963 trees and plants under inspec-
tion. The acreage in nursery plantings was as follows:
Citrus Non-citrus Total
1924-25 ............ ... ........................... 5,843 3,187 9,030
1925-26 .................. ..... ............ ...... 6,390 3,035 9,425
The two outstanding objectives in nursery inspection are:
(a) to discover and prevent distribution of plant pests particu-
larly of a major nature, such as citrus canker, blackfly, etc., and
(b) to see that the orchard planter does not begin his operations
laboring under the handicap of pest infested trees. In the prose-
cution of its activities the Nursery Inspection Department has
not during the biennium discovered any nurseries affected by
major pests. On the whole, the nurseries have been well main-
tained. This is especially true of the larger operators. That we
have been instrumental in protecting the orchardists, however,






Sixth Biennial Report


from receiving trees affected by the minor pests is evidenced by
the fact that during the biennium 3,233 certification withdrawals
or refusals of certification were handled through the depart-
ment. Some small nurseries repeatedly failed to pass inspection,
which increases the total considerably.
Compliance with the requirements of the Board upon the part
of nursery stock producers has been excellent. There seems to
be an appreciation by nurserymen of the necessity for state su-
pervision and of the benefits thereof both to producer and con-
sumer of stock. It has only been necessary to file information
four times for violation of the Board's rules.
Following is a brief summary showing the more important
data regarding the activities of the Nursery Inspection De-
partment:

SUMMARY-NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 1926
1924-1925 1925-1926
Total number nurseries under inspection................ 4,568 3,059
Total acreage in nurseries under inspection.......... 9,030 9,425
Total amount of stock in nurseries under inspec-
tion -........ ....... ............. .. ....--- ...... .....- ....... .... 68,004,635 81,746,963
Total amount of stock in nurseries refused certifi-
cation .............. ..........-- ... .....------ .........14,189,934 24,395,585
Total acreage in citrus stock as of June 30............ 5,843 6,390
Total acreage in non-citrus stock as of June 30...... 3,187 3,035
Total amount of citrus stock as of June 30 ............54,432,832 52,711,485
Total amount of non-citrus stock as of June 30........13,571,803 29,035,478*
Average number of inspections per nursery per
annum ........ -.. 2.4 2.6
As in the past, the Department has issued so-called "Permit
Certificates" for use on stock to be shipped into this state. Dur-
ing 1924-25, 36,942 such certificates were issued to 298 concerns
and in 1925-26, 37,552 certificates to 346 nurseries. In all cases
where shipments are made into Florida an invoice containing
certain essential information is required. This is also required
for stock produced in Florida and handled under certificate. The
object sought is to have a permanent record so that in the event
of a serious outbreak of a plant pest it would be a relatively easy
matter to run down all suspicious shipments or shipments orig-
inating in the nursery in which the pest was discovered.
*The marked increase in 1925-26 over 1924-25 due partially to the Department placing
ferneries under inspection.






State Plant Board of Florida


DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY
As has been repeatedly stated, the State Plant Board is pri-
marily a regulatory or police organization, yet a certain amount
of scientific work must be done by specialists in order that the
organization may function efficiently. In the entomological field
this phase of Plant Board work is performed by the Board's En-
tomologist and an Associate Entomologist. These officials make
necessary investigations, carry on research in a limited way and
identify and classify insect pests attacking plants. In regulatory
work the latter activity is a very important one indeed. The fol-
lowing table indicates the volume of this kind of work which
the Department performs:

SPECIMENS EXAMINED AND RECORDED ANNUALLY
(April 30, 1915 through June 30, 1926)
1915-1916 ...............-- ...-- ... ....-.... ... 388
1916-1917 ............... -.....-.... ............ 612
1917-1918 ............... .... .... ........ ..... ...........- 2593
1918-1919 ................... .... ................ ............ ............... 1921
1919-1920 ....................... ............ .......... ............ .... .. 2521
1920-1921 ........ .. ...... ... .. .. ..................... .... ................. 1998
1921-1922 .... ....... .............. ..... ...................... 3545
1922-1923 ....... ...... .... ......... ... ................ 3904
1923-1924 ............. ....................... 2418
1924-1925 .............. ......... .. ..... ......... ............ 2940
1925-1926 .......... .......... ... ..--. ................................ 2023
1915-1926- Total ..................... .................................... ..... 24,863
The Department has continued to produce and distribute fun-
gus for the control of the citrus whitefly. A nominal charge is
made to growers who apply for this fungus. The same is true
in connection with the collection, rearing and distribution of
Vedalia, a predatory insect which preys upon and materially as-
sists in the control of the cottony cushion-scale. During the bien-
nium 1,0131/2 cultures of whitefly fungus and 4571/ colonies
of Vedalia were sent into the field by the Department.

CITRUS APHIS
In connection with the routine work of the Department the
Entomologist and Associate Entomologist have participated in
the investigations regarding the new (?) pest attacking citrus
commonly called "the citrus aphis", for which an allotment was
made from the Emergency Fund of the Board. This work has
been conducted cooperatively by the Plant Board and the Exper-
iment Station. Special investigators have been employed in






Sixth Biennial Report


addition to the regular members of the entomological staffs of
the Board and the Station. Research has been conducted along
entomological lines as to the biology of the insect and methods of
control. In the pathological field efforts have been made to learn
of diseases affecting the insect and ways of disseminating these
diseases to the end that natural control measures may be used in
conjunction with sprays and (or) fumigants. At the same time
predatory insects are being sought. Progress has been made
and it is hoped that ultimately a relatively cheap and effective
control will be developed.

CELERY INSECT INVESTIGATIONS
For some years past the celery growers in the Sanford area
have sustained serious loss and damage through insect depreda-
tion. The last session of the legislature included in the appro-
priation for the State Plant Board an item for prosecution of an
investigation of this situation to the end that the damage might
be alleviated. The Board was fortunate in securing for this pur-
pose the services of an eminent entomologist, Doctor E. D. Ball,
who had just resigned as Director of Scientific Research, United
States Department of Agriculture. Doctor Ball was appointed
Associate Entomologist, provided with a laboratory and the
necessary equipment at Sanford, and supplied an assistant. He
has been engaged in carrying on special investigations particu-
larly into the life history and habits of the celery leaf-tyer, the
insect which has occasioned the most damage to the celery crop'
Doctor Ball has not by any means overlooked the more practical
aspect of the project, i. e., control, and has engaged in a field
study of this in conjunction with the Sanford growers. It is
sincerely trusted that provision will be made for the continuance
of this work either as at present or under, the auspices of the,
Agricultural Experiment Station.

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY
The Plant Board does not maintain a separate and distinct.
pathological organization as such. In cooperation with the Ag-
ricultural Experiment Station, however, much investigational
and identification work in connection with plant diseases has.
been made possible. The chief of the Department of Plant Path-:
ology of the Station holds appointment as. 'Pathologist on the;
Plant Board staff. In the several special pieces of work which






State Plant Board of Florida


are under way assistant plant pathologists are appointed and
paid by the Board. Special investigations are thus being con-
ducted with respect to citrus canker, citrus aphis, scaly bark,
coconut bud rot and diseases of strawberries. The canker in-
vestigations and those of scaly bark and coconut bud rot are con-
tinuing activities from previous years. The others have been
undertaken during the present biennium. Reference has been
made to the aphis under the report on the Entomological Depart-
ment. The strawberry disease work was instituted as the result
of a special appropriation being made for that purpose by the last
legislature. A laboratory has been equipped and this work is
being carried on chiefly at Plant City.
Laboratory facilities for carrying on special research in con-
nection with coconut bud rot and scaly bark have been provided
at Gainesville. The coconut bud rot situation is one which had
occasioned special concern at the time of presentation of the last
biennial report. It now seems that this affection does not do
the enormous damage in Florida as elsewhere, nor does it ap-
.pear to be as infectious. The general situation is being handled
through quarantines on affected nurseries imposed by the Nurs-
ery Inspection Department and seems to be well in hand. In the
Annual Reports of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
may be found statements as to the progress being made in con-
nection with the scientific investigations being carried on co-
operatively.
MOSAIC DISEASE OF SUGAR CANE
Although no special work of an investigational nature has
been carried on in connection with this disease, reference should
here be made to what has been done to prevent the spread. Pre-
vious reports have told how this cane disease was introduced into
Florida and the efforts to at first eradicate and later to prevent
spread. As was predicted, the disease has gradually spread
throughout the whole northern tier of counties and has been
found as far south as Alachua County. It is only a matter of
time until the whole cane growing area will be involved. Un-
questionably the quarantine regulations of the Board have re-
tarded the spread and afforded the unaffected areas opportunity
to prepare for the invasion. The outlook for continued produc-
tion is good if growers will use only varieties of cane which are
tolerant, resistant or immune to the disease.







Sixth Biennial Report


APIARY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
Under the Bee Disease Act of 1919 the State Plant Board has
maintained an apiary inspection service. The purpose is to
prevent and control serious diseases affecting honeybees. An
Apiary Inspector has been in charge of this work, assisted by a
number of "local inspectors". The Apiary Inspector is a trained
specialist, while the local inspectors are practical beekeepers who
are familiar with bee diseases. The Board has adopted the policy
of "eradication" in handling the most serious of the bee diseases,
American foul brood. There has never been a great quantity of
this in the state and it was felt there was a very fair prospect
of success. During the year ending June 30, 1925, 53 colonies in
7 apiaries were found infected with American foul brood, while
for the year ending June 30, 1926, but 20 colonies in 5 apiaries
(in four counties) were found affected.
The progress of the work of eradication is best shown by the
following table.

SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK SINCE THE DEPARTMENT
WAS CREATED IN JULY, 1919


Year Ending


June
June
June
June
June
June
June


1920.
1921.
1922.
1923..
1924..
1925-.
1926..


Apiaries
infected
Apiaries Colony with Anfetedr-
inspected inspections ican foul
brood
366 15007 37
739 17931 21
822 22221 I 17
1012 23883 18
785 21857 9
670 22566 7
697 17617 5


SECTION III
ESTIMATES
The Plant Commissioner submits to the Board estimates of
amounts of funds believed to be necessary to properly conduct
the inspectional and other activities of the Board for the bien-
nium beginning July 1, 1927. The estimates are as follows:


ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES OF BOARD
Salaries: Per annum
Secretary ..... ..................... ........$1,500.00
Stenographer ..................................... 1,000.00
Total for Salaries ................. .........................$2,500.00


For biennium
$3,000.00
2,000.00
$5,000.00


Colonies
infected
with Amer-
ican foul
brood
103
30
34
30
13
53
20






40 State Plant Board of Florida

Operating Expenses:
Traveling expenses of Board members and Sec-
retary and miscellaneous office expenses ...... 1,500.00

Total for Administration, Board ...........................$4,000.00

PLANT COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
(General Expenses)
Salaries: Per annum
Plant Commissioner ............. ....................$3,300.00
Assistant Plant Commissioner (supplementing
salary of department head designated to act) 500.00
Chief Clerk .................................- ... ....... 2,400.00
Stenographer ....................................... 1,800.00
Filing Clerk ................ .................. 1,500.00
Janitor ...... ..... .... .. .................. ............... 750.00

Total for Salaries............................... ..$10,250.00
Operating Expenses:
Traveling Expenses .................. ........$1,500.00
Printing of Quarterly Bulletin, Circulars, etc.,
Office Equipment, Postage, Stationery, Tele-
phone and Telegraph, Miscellaneous Expenses 5,700.00

Total for Expenses -...................-.. .... .... 7,200.00
Total for Plant Commissioner's Office...................$17,450.00

GROVE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
(Citrus Canker Eradication)
Salaries: Per annum
Chief Inspector ............ .......................... $4,000.00
10 Supervising Inspectors (foremen) at aver-
age of $2,700 per annum............ ............27,000.00
30 Inspectors at average of $2,400 per annum..72,000.00
1 Stenographer and Filing Clerk...................... 1,500.00

Total for Salaries .................................$104,500.00
Operating Expenses:
Travel and subsistence for chief and assist-
ants ........... ....... ........................ 30,500.00
Office Supplies, Field Equipment, Labor and
Miscellaneous Expenses .................................. 5,000.00

Total for Expenses ............................$ 35,500.00
Total for Grove Inspection Department..........$140,000.00

NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
Salaries: Per annum
Chief Inspector --................... ....$. $ 4,000.00
20 Assistant Inspectors at average of $2,700
per year .............. ........................... 54,000.00
4 Stenographers at average of $1,500 per
year .... ................................................. 6,000.00
1 Filing Clerk .......... ........... 1,500.00

Total for Salaries .................................$ 65,500.00


3,000.00
$8,000.00


For biennium
$6,600.00
1.000.00
4.800.00
3.600.00
3,000.00
1.500.00

$20,500.00

$3,000.00

11,400.00

14,400.00
$34,900.00


For biennium
$8,000.00

54,000.00
144,000.00
3,000.00
$209,000.00


$ 61,000.00

10,000.00

6 71,000.00
$280,000.00


For biennium
$ 8,000.00
108,000.00

12,000.00
3,000.00
$131,000.00








Sixth Biennial Report


Operating Expenses:
Travel and subsistence for chief and as-
sistant inspectors ....................................... $ 20,000.00
Office and Field Equipment and Supplies,
Stationery and Miscellaneous Expenses.... 5,000.00

Total for Expenses................................... $ 25,000.00
Total for Nursery Inspection Department.............$ 90,500.00

QUARANTINE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
Salaries: Per annum
Chief Inspector ....................................................$ 4,000.00
22 Assistant Inspectors:
6 at average of $3,600 per year............. 21,600.00
(Supervising inspectors in charge of ports)
12 at average of $3,000 per year....... ................ 36,000.00
4 at average of $3,000 per year.................... 12,000.00
(Mounted motorcycle patrol)
1 Stenographer and Filing Clerk. .............. 1,800.00
Total for Salaries ..................................... $ 75,400.00
Operating Expenses:
Travel and subsistence expenses of chief and
assistants (not including mounted in-
spectors) .............. ...... ..........................$ 15,000.00
Fumigants and other supplies and equipment,
office and field expenses ............................ 5,000.00
Travel and subsistence expenses and equip-
ment for mounted patrol................................ 6,000.00
Total for Expenses.................................. $ 26,000.00
Total for Quarantine Inspection Department ........$101,400.00

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY
Salaries: Per annum
Entomologist .................................... .....$ 3,500.00
SAssistant Entomologist ................................... 3,000.00
Stenographer and Filing Clerk ...................... 1,500.00

Total for Salaries ................................. $ 8,000.00
Operating Expenses:
Laboratory and office equipment and sup-
plies, library acquisitions, travel and sub-
sistence .......... .............. ..... ...................$ 2,000.00
Total for Department of Entomology......................$ 10,000.00

INVESTIGATION OF CELERY PESTS


Salaries:
Entomologist ..............
Assistant Entomologist


Per annum
..................................$ 4,000.00
................................ 2,400.00


Total for Salaries .......................................$ 6,400.00
Operating Expenses:
Field, office and laboratory equipment and
supplies, labor, travel and subsistence........ 4,000.00
Total for Celery Pest Investigations......................$ 10,400.00


For biennium
$ 8,000.00
4,800.00
$ 12,800.00


8,000.00

$ 20,800.00


$ 40,000.00
10,000.00

$ 50,000.00
$181,000.00


For biennium
$ 8,000.00

43,200.00

72,000.00
24,000.00
3,600.00

$150,800.00



$ 30,000.00

10,000.00

12,000.00
$ 52,000.00
$202,800.00


For biennium
$ 7,000.00
6.000.00
3,000.00

$ 16,000.00



$ 4,000.00
$ 20,000.00







State Plant Board of Florida


DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY
Salaries: Per annum
Pathologist (in cooperation with Agricul-
tural Experiment Station) ............................$ 500.00
1 Assistant Pathologist
(Citrus Canker Investigations) ............... 3,000.00
1 Assistant Pathologist
(Palm Disease Investigations) .................... 3,000.00
1 Assistant Pathologist
(Strawberry Disease Investigations) .......... 3,000.00

Total for Salaries ...... ................................$ 9,500.00
Operating Expenses:
Field, laboratory and office equipment and
supplies, labor, travel and subsistence, fer-
tilizer, etc.
For Plant Pathologist ................................... 500.00
For Citrus Canker Investigations.............. 1,500.00
For Palm Diseases Investigations................ 1,500.00
For Strawberry Disease Investigations........ 2,000.00

Total for Expenses ..................................$ 5,500.00
Total for Department of Plant Pathology..............$ 15,000.00


SFor biennium

$ 1,000.00

6,000.00

6,000.00

6,000.00

$ 19,000.00




$ 1,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
4,000.00

$ 11,000.00
$ 30,000.00


FUMIGATION INVESTIGATIONS
Salaries: Per annum For biennium
Special Investigator ..................................... $ 4,000.00 $ 8,000.00


Operating Expenses:
Field and laboratory supplies, travel and
subsistence expenses, fumigation, etc.......... 1,000.00

Total for Fumigation Investigations........................$ 5,000.00


2,000.00

$ 10,000.00


APIARY INSPECTION
Salaries: Per annum For biennium
Apiary Inspector ...............................................$ 3,500.00 $ 7,000.00
Local Assistant Inspectors at $7.00 per day
w. a. e. (500 man days).................................. 3,500.00 7,000.00

Total for Salaries ......................................$ 7,000.00 $ 14,000.00
Operating Expenses:
Field and office equipment and supplies,
travel and subsistence expenses, etc.............$ 4,000.00 $ 8,000.00
Total for Apiary Inspection Department................. $ 11,000.00 $ 22,000.00







Sixth Biennial Report


RECAPITULATION
For Biennium
Salaries Expenses


Administration, Board ................................$ 5,000
Plant Commissioner's Office
(General Expenses) ......... ................... 20,500
Grove Inspection Department
(Citrus Canker Eradication).................... 209,000
Nursery Inspection Department---............... 131,000
Quarantine Inspection Department............ 150,800
Department of Entomology ....................... 16,000
Investigation of Celery Pests .................... 12,800
Department of Plant Pathology.................... 19,000
Fumigation Investigations ......................... 8,000
Department of Apiary Inspection
(Bee Disease Eradication) .................... 14,000
Totals .................. ..................$586,100
Emergency Fund ..................................


Total


$ 3,000 $ 8,000
14,400 34,900


71,000
50,000
52,000
4,000
8,000
11,000
2,000


280,000
181,000
202,800
20 000
20,800
30,000
10,000


8,000 22,000
$223,400 $809,500
...................... $100,000
$909,500


FINANCIAL REPORT
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1925

Tallahassee, Fla., October 1, 1925.
To the State Plant Board:
GENTLEMEN: I herewith submit the following report of the
receipts and disbursements of the Board during the fiscal year
beginning July 1, 1924, and ending June 30, 1925:
Summary of receipts and disbursements together with the
balances in the different funds of the State Plant Board.


Name of Fund
Continuing Appropriation,
Chapter 6885 .........


Receipts Disbursements Balances


............$ 70,000.00 $ 35,000.00


General Appropriation
Chapter 9121, Section 1 -..-. 150,000.00
Controlling the Boll Weevil and
other Cotton Insects, Chap-
ter 9187 ...-----........................... 19,886.63
Emergency Appropriation
Chapter 9121, Section 2
Coconut Bud Rot Disease
Investigation .................... 10,000.00
Citrus Aphis Investigation 10,000.00
Incidental Fund ..........................- 4,697.72
Total .................................$264,584.35


150,000.00.


19,886.63


10,000.00
9,115.77
3,409.60'
$227,412.00


$ 35,000.00


884.23
1,288:12
$ 37,172.35







44 State Plant Board of Florida

CONTINUING APPROPRIATION (CHAPTER 6885)

RECEIPTS:
iBalance Brought Forward July 1, 1924........................................$ 35,000.00
Continuing Appropriation Available May 1, 1925............................ 35,000.00

$70,000.00
DISBURSEMENTS:
Administrative:
For Salary of Secretary ......................................... $ 1,250.00
For Traveling Expenses Board Members................. 457.26

$ 1,707.26
Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ................--..... -.......---- .......- ......... 6,760.00
For Traveling Expenses ......................................... 301.59
For Office Supplies ...................................................... 879.94
For Freight and Express............................................. 20.62
For Printing ......................... ....... .. ............. 2,768.93
For General Supplies ............................ ............ 7.00

$ 10,738.08
Entomological Department:
For Salaries ...........--......--- ....--...............$ 5,165.74
For Traveling Expenses ........--.....-..................... 216.42
For Office Supplies .........................----.......--- .. 637.69
For Freight and Express .......................-............... 8.40
For Printing ................................... .. ... ................ 79.45
For General Supplies ..................................... ..... 123.98

$ 6,231.68
Mosaic Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ............................ .. ...... ..... $ 12.00
For Traveling Expenses ........................................... 710.59
For Office Supplies .... ............................ ........... 7.40
For General Supplies ................. ...... ................. 42.40

$ 772.39
Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries .-. .. .................. ......................$ 5,989.99
For Traveling Expenses ......................................... .. 2,776.80
For Office Supplies .......................................... ........ 18.15
For General Supplies .......-----..-...;-....:.................. 114.72
For Miscellaneous Expenses ........................................ 10.00

$ 8,909.66
Quarantine Department:
For Salaries ................... ................................. $ 4,573.32
For Traveling Expenses .............................................. 1,826.82
For Office Supplies .-------.......... .. ... ................. 210.49
.For Freight and Express ...................................... .. 7.30
For Printing ................ ................. ........ 23.00

$ 6,640.93

Total ............... ...... ....... ... ............ ......... ......................... .$ 35,000.00
Balance Carried Forward July 1, 1925..............................................$ 35,000.00







Sixth Biennial Report 45

GENERAL APPROPRIATION, CHAPTER 9121, SECTION 1.
RECEIPTS:
Appropriation Available July 1, 1924................... .................$150,000.0
DISBURSEMENTS:
Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries ............................................... .......$35,979.53
For Traveling Expenses ........................................... 13,652.92
For Office Supplies ..................................... 686.00
For Freight and Express ..................................... 53.24
For Printing ..................................... ............. 10.65
For General Supplies ............ ........................ 6,749.83
For Miscellaneous Supplies................ ....... .... 80.00

$ 57,212.17
Nursery Inspection:
For Salaries ................................... .... ....... ....$26,321.34
For Traveling Expenses ........................................ 15,639.46
For Office Supplies ........... ..................... .... 1,557.83
For Freight and Express ........... ............-....... .48
For Printing ................ ........ ...... ...... ................ 302.01
For General Supplies .................................. ............ 9.50

$ 43,830.62
Quarantine Department:
For Salaries ............................................$22,378.46
For Traveling Expenses ..... ...........- .... 8,951.43
For Office Supplies ........................... 256.30
For Freight and Express ...................................... 163.57
For Printing ....................... ............ ... .... 831.96
For General Supplies .................................................. 605.56

$ 33,187.28
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication: 33,187.28
For Salaries .................................. ...............$ 901.15
For Traveling Expenses ................................... 565.38
For Office Supplies ........... ............................. 1.99
For Freight and Express ..................................... 39.00
For General Supplies ................................... 341.87

$ 1,849.39
Bee Disease Eradication: $ 1,849.39
For Salaries .................................... ...........................$ 4,618.62
For Traveling Expenses ...................................... 2,158.49
For Office Supplies ................................... 33.03
For Freight and Express .............................................. 4.36
For General Supplies .................................................. 55.94
$ 6,870.44
Mosaic Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ....... ........................ ............. ... ...$ 1.00
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 100.50
For General Supplies ................ ....................... 133,00
$ 234.50
Department of Entomology:
For Salaries ..............................................................$ 766.65
For Office Supplies ......... .................................. ....... 890.72
For Printing .................... ..... ...... ................. 150.50
For General Supplies .................................................. .. 187.19

$ 1,995.06







46 State Plant Board of Florida

Boll Weevil Investigation:
For Salaries ..................... ....................................$ 1,650.00

$ 1,650.00
Administrative:
For Salary, Secretary Plant Board............................$ 250.00

$ 250.00
Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ................................ ................................ $ 1,225.00
For Traveling Expenses ............................................. 205.53
For Office Supplies ...................................................... 636.57
For Printing .......................................................... 562.44
For General Supplies ................................................. 291.00

$ 2,920.54

$150,000.00

EMERGENCY APPROPRIATION, CHAPTER 9121, SECTION 2.

Coconut Bud Rot Disease Investigation:
RECEIPTS:
Amount declared to be available by the Governor and the State
Plant Board ........................... ............................ $ 10,000.00
DISBURSEMENTS:
For Salaries ................................... ........................... .$ 4,511.34
For Traveling Expenses .......................................... 2,859.34
For Office Supplies ................. ................................. 215.94
For Freight and Express .......-.................................. 21.19
For. Printing .....-......... ------..... .......... .................. ..... 5.00
For General Supplies .................................................. 2,387.19

$ 10,000.00
Citrus Aphis Investigation:
RECEIPTS:
Amount declared to be available by the Governor and the State
Plant Board ...............................................................-.............. $ 10,000.00
DISBURSEMENTS:
For Salaries ...................... .. ..........................$ 1,805.57
For Traveling Expenses .............................................. 2,884.67
For Office Supplies ...................................................... 622.11
For Printing ............................................................... 63.45
For General Supplies ........................................... .... 2,739.97

$ 9,115.77
Balance Brought Forward" July 1, 1925 ............................................$ 884.23







Sixth Biennial Report


SPECIAL APPROPRIATION CONTROLLING THE BOLL WEEVIL AND
OTHER COTTON INSECTS, CHAPTER 9187.
RECEIPTS:
Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1924........ ........................$ 4,886.63
Appropriation Available July 1, 1924 ....................... 15,000.00


DISBURSEMENTS:
Boll Weevil Investigation:
For Salaries .............-.....-- .. ......................------
For Traveling Expenses ......... .....................
For Office Supplies -...........-------.----------
For Freight and Express ..................-----------
For Printing ----------------------
For General Supplies .........----.......... -------
For Miscellaneous Expenses ............-----------

Cotton Disease Investigation:
For Salaries ....... ...... ............... .... .....---- --------$
For Traveling Expenses ........--.--.. ----...-----
For Office Supplies ...............----------------
For Freight and Express ..............-------.-----..
For Printing ..........------- --------------
For General Supplies ..----...-.---.......----------

Fertilizer and Variety Tests:
For Salaries ...................---...---- -------- ....-$
For Traveling Expenses .-............----------------
For Office Supplies ..... ---.................-.. ----
For Freight and Express ..................-----------
For General Supplies ..........---- -----------------
For Miscellaneous Expenses ...................--------

Administrative Expenses:
For Freight and Express ...................-...................---


$ 19,886.63


4,666.86
1,351.20
279.62
66.86
25.18
1,115.98
100.00


4,311.75
473.70
713.42
134.70
17.50
2,634.41


1,746.67
189.44
232.11
29.84
1,327.14
468.27


1.98


$ 7,605.70






$ 8,285.48






$ 3,993.47


$ 1.98
$ 19,886.63


RECEIPTS: INCIDENTAL FUND
Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1924.............................. ... $ 2,158.97
Receipts Collected July 1, 1924 to July 1, 1925................... ............. 2,538.75
'4 AUOIn i7


DISBURSEMENTS:
For Salaries ...---............ ------------------......$
For Traveling Expenses ..--- -------------
For Office Supplies ---- ---------.------
For Freight and Express --- -------------
For Printing ............. --------- ------------
For General Supplies .............-----------------
For Miscellaneous Expenses ..........---- -- --------


1,653.28
243.02
371.24
51.09
225.36
565.61
300.00


$ 3,409.60

Balance Carried Forward July 1, 1925 ----................................---$. 1,288.12
Respectfully submitted,
J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary, State Plant Board.







48 State Plant Board of Florida

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1926.
Tallahassee, Florida, Oct. 1, 1926.
To the State Plant Board:
GENTLEMEN: I herewith submit the following report of the
receipts and disbursements of the Board for the fiscal year be-
ginning July 1, 1925, and ending June 30, 1926.
Summary of receipts and disbursements together with the
balances in the different funds of the State Plant Board.

Name of the Fund Receipts Disbursements Balances
Continuing Appropriation,
Chapter 6885 ....-..... ....$ 70,000.00 $ 35,000.00 $ 35,000.00
General Appropriation,
Chapter. 11,332 ....................... 221,205.00 212,856.87 8,348.13
Emergency Appropriation,
Chapter 11,332, Section 2
Citrus Aphis Investigation.. 10,884.23 9,379.55 1,504.68
Incidental Fund ................ 4,913.06 3,352.97 1,560.09
Total ......................................$307,002.29 $260,589.39 $ 46,412.90

CONTINUING APPROPRIATION (CHAPTER 6885)
RECEIPTS:
Balance Brought Forward, July 1, 1925............... ........... ........$ 35,000.00
Continuing Appropriation Available May 1, 1926........................... 35,000.00

$ 70,000.00
DISBURSEMENTS:
Administrative:
For Salary of Secretary .............................$ 1,250.00
For Traveling Expenses, Board Members................ 640.49

$ 1,890.49
Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ................. .. ..... .............................$ 7,400.00
For Traveling Expenses .................................... 592.19
For Office Supplies ...................... ...... ............ 2,293.30
For Freight and Express .................... ................ 10.38
For Printing ........................ ....... .........-. 992.01

$ 11,287.88
Entomological Department:
For Salaries :.............. .......... .......... ............ $ 5,846.60
For Traveling Expenses .......................................... 74.93
For Office Supplies .... .............................................. 593.01
For Freight and Express .................................... 11.93
For Printing ............................................................... 41.25
For General Supplies .............................. ................ 703.69

$ 7,271.41
Mosaic Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ............. ......... ....... .....................$ 77.50
For Traveling Expenses .......................... ............... 749.54
For Office Supplies .................................................. 2.20

$ 829.24







Sixth Biennial Report 49

Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries .....................................................$ 9,771.99
For Traveling Expenses ........................................ 3,623.72
For Office Supplies .............. ................................ 61.08
For General Supplies .......................... ...... .... 239.19

$ 13,695.98
Nursery Inspection:
For Office Supplies .......................... ................... .. $ 25.00

Total .......................... ... .. --$........... ... 35,000.00
Balance Carried Forward, July 1, 1926...................................$ 35,000.00

GENERAL APPROPRIATION, CHAPTER 11,332.
RECEIPTS:
Appropriation Available July 1, 1925..................... ........-........$221,205.00
DISBURSEMENTS:
Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries .. ............................... .............. .....$42,045.16
For Traveling Expenses .................................... 17,071.63
For Office Supplies ................................ ................ 281.27
For Freight and Express ......................................... 54.10
For Printing ...................................... .. 17.25
For General Supplies ................... ....................... 1,187.03
For All Other Purposes ...-----... --...... .... ....... 45.00

Nursery Inspection: $ 60,701.44
For Salaries ..... .....-..........................$37,949.75
For Traveling Expenses ....................................... 14,887.36
For Office Supplies ................................................... 3,521.07
For Freight and Express ..............-.................... 7.86
For Printing ...................................... 566.18
For General Supplies ............................................ 7,903.69

Quarantine Department: $ 64,835.91
For Salaries ................ ....... .................. .........$32,607.28
For Traveling Expenses ................... ............. 11,666.91
For Office Supplies ...................... ................................ 764.88
For Freight and Express ..................................... 98.32
For Printing ..................... ......................... 219.98
For General Supplies ................ ............. 2,395.03

$ 47,752.40
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication:
For Salaries ................... ....................................$ 330.65
For Traveling Expenses ..................................... 377.88
For Office Supplies .................. ................................ 1.13

Bee Disease Eradication: $ 709.66
For Salaries ................................. ......... ...................$ 3,313.30
For Traveling Expenses ..................................... 2,089.18
For Office Supplies ...................................... ............ 5.74
For Freight and Express ............................................ 1.24
For Printing .................................................................. 25.00
For General Supplies .................................................. 44.98
For All Other Purposes .............................................. 17.50

$ 5,496.94







50 State Plant Board of Florida

Coconut Bud Rot Survey:
For Salaries ......................................................... $ 8,038.32
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 1,709.88
For Office Supplies .................................................... 272.01
For Freight and Express .......................................... 13.82
For General Supplies .................................. 3,375.45

$ 13,409.48
Plant Pathology:
For Salaries ....................................................... $ 1,949.98
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 78.15

$ 2,028.13
Department of Entomology:
For Salaries ................... .. ......................$ 1,202.82
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 20.95
For Office Supplies .................................................. .. 442.48
For Printing .................... ......................... .............. 485.00
For General Supplies ............................................... 242.57

$ 2,393.82
Mosaic Disease Eradication:
For Traveling Expenses ....................................$. 90.00

$ 90.00
Celery Disease Investigation:
For Salaries ..................... .............................. $ 4,183.33
For Traveling Expenses ....................................... 518.46
For Office Supplies .................................................... 399.72
For Freight and Express .......................................... 1.00
For General Supplies ............................................... 639.08

$ 5,741.59
Strawberry Disease Investigation:
For Salaries .................... ................................ ....$ 2,241.79
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 797.08
For Office Supplies .................................................... 168.08
For Freight and Express .......................................... 23.18
For Printing ................................................................ 1,313.66
For General Supplies ...................................... 690.22

$ 5,234.01
Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ............................................ $ 1,500.00
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 312.60
For Office Supplies ......................-................ ... 865.93
For Freight and Express .......................................... 53.16
For Printing ............. ........... ........................ 1,481.80

$ 4,213.49
Administrative:
For Salary, Secretary Plant Board ..........................$ 250.00

$ 250.00

$212,856.87
Balance Carried Forward, July 1, 1926...................................$ 8,348.13







Sixth Biennial Report 51

CITRUS APHIS INVESTIGATION
RECEIPTS:
Balance Brought Forward, July 1, 1925..............................................$ 884.23
Amount of the Emergency Appropriation Declared to be Avail-
able ........ .............................. .............$ 10 000.00

$ 10,884.23
DISBURSEMENTS:
For Salaries ............. ...... ........ .................. ..$ 5,580.41
For Traveling Expenses ............................................ 2,080.76
For Office Supplies ...................................................... 131.41
For Freight and Express ............................................ 1.51
For Printing ................................................................. 4.50
For General Supplies .................................................. 1,580.96

$ 9,379.55
Balance Carried Forward, July 1, 1926......................................$ 1,504.68

INCIDENTAL FUND
RECEIPTS:
Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1925.............................................$ 1,288.12
Receipts Collected from July 1, 1925 to July 1, 1926........................ 3,624.94
$ 4,913.06
DISBURSEMENTS:
For Salaries ................................. .....................$ 914.09
For Traveling Expenses ............ ....................... ....... 275.96
For Office Supplies .-............ --------- -...................... 604.71
For Freight and Express ............................................ 102.90
For Printing ...... ........... ..................................... ...... 249.42
For General Supplies ............................................... 234.64
For All Other Purposes ............................................. 971.25
$ 3,352.97

Balance Carried Forward July 1, 1926......................................$ 1,560.09

Respectfully submitted,
J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary, State Plant Board.







State Plant Board of Florida


APPENDIX A

PLANT PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED
BY STATE PLANT BOARD
1925-26
PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED*
Shipments by all means of transportation except
Parcel Post
Year Ending June 30, 1925

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Acuminate scale
(Coccus acuminatus
(Sign.)) .............. Gardenia ...................... Cuba ................... 1
Acuminate scale
(Coccus acuminatus
(Sign.)) .............. Jasmine .................... Cuba .............. ... 1
Alien scale
(Pseudischnaspis
alienus Newst.).... Rose ........................... Florida ............... 1
Ant ............................. Coconut palm .............. Spanish
Honduras ............ 1
Ant .............................. English walnut .. .. England .............. 1
Ant ................................ Yam ........ ............... Santo Domingo 1
Anthracnose
(Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides
Penz.) ............. Lemon ............ ......... Italy ...... ........ 1
Anthracnose
(Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides
Penz.) .................. Lim e .............................. B. W Indies ...... ..
Anthracnose
(Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides
Penz.) ................ Mango ........................ Cuba ................ 1
Aphid
(Cerataphis lataniae Aechmea mariea-
(Boisd.)) ........... reginae ................ Argentina ............ I
Aphid ........................... Chrysanthemum .......... North Carolina .... 1
Apple scab
(Venturia
inaequalis) ..-... ... Apple ......................... England .............. 1
Apple scab
(Venturia
inaequalis) ......... Apple .... ........ Holland ................ 2
Araucaria eriococcus
(Eriococcus arauca-
riae Mask.) ......... Norfolk Island pine.... Spain ................... 1
*For common and scientific names of Florida scale insects see Quarterly Bulletin,
State Plant Board, Vol. VII. No. 4, 1923.








Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Azalea leaf miner
Gracilaria azaliella
Brants) ..............
Bag-worm
(Thyridopteryx
ephemeraeformis
H aw .) ....................
Bamboo scale
(Asterolecanium
bambusae Bdv.)..
Black fungus
(Myriangium
duriaei) ..............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) .............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ..............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ..............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ..............
Black thread scale
(Ischnaspis longi-
rostris (Sign.))....
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) ..
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby)
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby)..
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby)..
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) ..
Blackfly egg spirals
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby)..
Blotch ..................... ...
Blotch
(Phyllosticta soli-
taria E. & E.)......
Blue mold ...................
Blue mold ...................
Blue mold .................


Occurring on


From


Azalea .......................... Belgium .........


Plum .............................. Pennsylvania

Bamboo ...................... Florida ...........


Purple scale on orangelMexico .........


Avocado ........................ Florida .......


Citrus ........................... Florida .......

Hibiscus .... ....... .......Florida .......
I


Lemon ..


.................. Italy


Oleander ...................... Florida ................

Rose .............................. Santo Domingo ..

Palm ................... Cuba ...................


Citrus ....................I Cuba ....................

Coffee ............. Cuba ...............


Yppml .......... ------ ......
Lemon ..........................
)range ........................
)range .....................


Italy ......................
Louisiana ..........
California ............
Louisiana ............


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1



I 1

1


1


1

1


1




2

1


2


3

2

1


1

1


1

1
1
1
1







54 State Plant Board of Florida

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
S1 Infested
Blue mold,
(Penicillium sp.)...... Orange .......................... Spain .- .... 1
Boisduval's scale
(Diaspis boisduvalii Aechmea mariea-
Sign.) ................. reinae ...................... Argentina ........ 1
Boisduval's scale
(Diaspis boisduvalii
Sign.) ................ Coconut ..... ............ Bahama Islands .. 1
Boisduval's scale
(Diaspis boisduvalii
Sign.) ................... Coconut .. ... Cuba .................. .. 4
Borer injury (Cole-
opteron?) ................ Sugar cane .. ..........Cuba .....- ........- 1
Cactus scale
(Diaspis echinocacti
Comst.) ....... ..... cactus ........................ Louisiana ............
California. red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aurantii (Mask.)) Lemon .........................Greece .............. 1
Camellia scale
(Lepidosaphes
camelliae Hoke) .. Camellia ....................... Louisiana ............ 1
Cardin's whitefly
(Aleurodicus car-
dini Back) ..........Guava ............... Cuba. ...........-..--. 1
Cerambycid beetle ......Unknown ...................... Cuba ................. 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii. Comst.)...... Grapefruit .................... Louisiana ........... 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii, Comst.)...... grapefruit .................. Texas ................ 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.)...... Lemon ..................... Cuba .................. 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatqria per-
gandiz Comst.)...... Lemon .......... ......... Greece .............. 1
Chaff sca e
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.)...... Lemon ...........- ...Holland ............... 1
Chaff sca#e
(Parlatwoia per-
gandiiz Comst.)...... Lemon ..... ............... Italy ...... ....... 2
Chaff scae
(Parlatoria per-
gandi" Comst.). Orange...... ... Cuba................. 1
Chaff sca
(Parlatoria per-
gandiii Comst.)...... )range ............. Florida.............Flori ...... 1
Chaff scae
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.)..... range .................. Mexico ........Mexico ....... 2
Chaff scale
(Parlatdria per-
gandii Comst,)...... Orange ........... Spai ................ 5
Chaff scale,
(Parlatoria per-
dandii Comst.), .... Orange ...............--.......... Trinidad .............. 1







Sixth Biennial Report 55

| I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on I From I Shipments
( _Infested
Cherry scale I
(Aspidiotus forbesi
Johnson) ............ Plum ............................ Pennsylvania ...... 1
Citrus scab
(Cladosporium
citri M assee) ........ Citrus ............... ....... Florida ............... 1
Citrus scab
(Cladosporium
citri Massee) ........ Grapefruit .................. Mississippi .......... 1
Cloudy-wiriged white-
fly
(Dialeurodes
citrifolii (Morg.)) Citrus ..................... Florida ............. 1
Cloudy-winged white-
fly
(Dialeurodes
citrifolii (Morg.)) Grapefruit .................. Cuba ....................
Cloudy-wiriged white-
fly
(Dialeurodes
citrifolii (Morg.)) Orange ........ ............. Cuba ................... 1
Coconut mealybug (?)
(Pseudococcus nipae
(Mask.)) (?)........ Coconut ..................... Jamaica ..-.. 1
Coconut mealybug
(Pseudotoccus
nipae : (Mask.)) .. Palm ......... .............. Florida ................ 1
Coconut mealybug
(Pseudoeoccus
nipae (Mask.)) .. Palms ....... .............. Santo Domingo .. 1
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso))........ 3readfruit ................... Cuba ................ 1
Common mealybug
(Pseudoocccus
citri (Risso))........ "hrysanthemums ........ North Carolina .. 1
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso))........ Frangipanni? .............. Bahama Islands 1
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus o
citri (Risso))........ Lime ......-- ... Dominica, B.W.I.I 1
Common mealybug
(Pseudokoccus
citri (Risso))........ Oleander ..... ......... ... Florida .............. I 1
Common mealybug I
(Pseudoeoccus
citri (IRisso))........ Rose .............................. Connecticut ........ 1
Common nmealybug I
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso))....... Unknown ....... Florida ..........Florida 1
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ................ Cape jasmine ............Alabama ..............
Common Whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ................ Cape jasmine ......... Arkansas ............ 1
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) .............. Cape jasmine ......--......Florida ................ 1








State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease


Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ........
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ...........
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ...........
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ...........
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ..............
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ................
Corn ear worm
(Chloridea obsoleta
(Fab.)) ...........
Cottony-cushion scale
(Icerya purchase
M ask.) ..................
Cottony-cushion scale
(Icerya purchase
M ask.) ................
Cottony-cushion scale
(Icerya purchase
M ask.) ..................
Crazy ant
(Prenalespis longi-
cornis Fab.) ........
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens E. F. S.)..
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens E. F. S.).
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens E. F. S.)..
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens E. F. S.)..








Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Cyanophyllum scale
(Aspidiotus cyano-
phylli Sign.)..........
Cyanophyllum scale
(Aspidiotus cyano-
phylli Sign.) .........
Cyanophyllum scale
(Aspidiotus cyano-
phylli Sign.) ........
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) .............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ...........
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ..............


Occurring on


Magnolia


.................... Louisian


Palm ............................ Californi


Seed pod ................... Bahama


Avocado .......



Banana .



Coconut .......



coconut ......



Euonymus ...


Lemon


............ Florida


jCuba ...



Bahama



Cuba ....


Spain


......................... England


Lemon ... .................... Holland



Lemon ..................... Italy .



Lemon ...................... Spain ..



Ligustrum (?) ............ Spain -


Range


........................ Spain


Palm .............................. IFlorida ................


I Number of
om Shipments
SInfested


1
a ............ 1


a ............ 1


Islands 1



................ 1



.............. 1



Islands 1



................ 1



................| 1



.............. 1







............... 1



................ 1



................ 1



................ 2


I


,







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ........ ....
Dictyospernium scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ..............
Drug store beetle
(Sitodrepa panicea
(Linn.)j) ................
Elaterid larvae ............
English walnut scale
(Aspidiotus juglans-
regiae Comst.) ....
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................
Flies (Family Droso-
philidae) ..................
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidul (Linn.))
Florida red, scale
(Chrysomphalus
aoniduh (Linn.))
Florida red; scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red, scale
(Chrysorphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red, scale
(Chryson4phalus
aoniduw (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))


Occurring on



Palm ............. ..........


Pandanus ......................


Shattuck (?) ..............


I Number of
From Shipments
Infested


SSpain .............. 3


Florida ................ 1


Jam aica ................


Seed ............................ Cuba ............
Dracaena ......... ...... Pennsylvania ....


Holly ............................


South Carolina ..


Aspidistra .................... Texas ...............


Coconut ........................ Span'h Honduras


Fern ............................. Pennsylvania ......


Palm ............................ Texas ...............

Sweet potato ............ Cuba ...................

Citrus .......................... Cuba ..............

Citrus ............................ Florida ................

Coconut ...................... Florida........

Oleander ................ Florida ................


Orange .........................


Africa ..........


Orange ............. Cuba.......... Cuba .......

Orange ........................ Florida ................








Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida wax scale
(Ceroplastes flori-
densis Comst.) ....
Florida wax scale
(Ceroplastes flori-
densis Comst.) ....
Florida wax scale
(Ceroplastes flori-
densis Comst.) ....
Florida whitefly
(Trialeurodes flori-
densis (Quaint.))
Flower thrips
(Frankliniella tritici
bispinosa
(Morg.)) ..............
Fungus
(Colletotrichum sp.)
Fungus
(Corticium vagum
B. & S.) ...............
Fungus
(Corticium vagum
B. & S.) ................
Fungus
(Diplodia natalen-
sis) ........ ......
Fungus
(Diplodia sp.) .......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ...


Occurring on



Palm ..........................

Palm .............................

Palm ..................

Pandanus ....................


Rose ......... ...


Shattuck (?) .............


Sour orange ................


Tea plant ..................

Tea plant (?) ............

citrus .......................


3uava ..................

Mango ....................

Avocado ...................


Rose .................

Palm s ...........................

Potato .........................

Potato .........................


Coconut ..................

Coconut .... ...........

Potato .......................

Potato .......................


Cuba ...................

Algeria ................

Belgium ................


59

[ Number of
From I Shipments
SInfested


ntina ........... 2


ida ............. 1

ana ............... 1


ida ............ 1


ida ................ 1

aica ........... 1

a ...................I 1


siana .......... 1

siana ........... 1

ida ............. 1

ida ............... 1


ida ............. 1

ida ................ 3


a ................... 2

,o Domingo 1

and ............ 1

nany .............. 1

] 1


Flor


Cubs

Sant

Engl

Ger

C'ubh








State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ...
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) .....
Fungus
(Gloesporium sp.)...
Fungus
(Glomerella sp.) ...
Fungus
(Macrosporium sp.)
Fungus
(Macrosporium sp.)
Fungus
(Macrosporium sp.)
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctotia sp.)....4
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....2
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....I
Fungus
(Rhizocto4ia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctoiia sp.) ....
Fungus
(RhizoctoChia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.) ....


Occurring on


From


Potato ............................ Bermuda ..............

Potato .......................... Brazil ..................

Potato............................ Canary Islands ..-

Potato .......................... Cape Verde Isl...

Potato -......--..........--------. Cuba .............

?otato ...............-...- England ..............

Potato ----.............---- ....... France ............

?otato .......................- Germany .........

potato ........................... H olland ...........

Potato .....................Italy ..................

otato .......................... M exico ..................

?otato .......................... Scotland ..............

potato ............. .......... Spain ............. .....

3weet potato .. ...... Louisiana .........

?apaya ... ----... Cuba ..................

Peach ....................... Illinois ..............

?otato ......................... Gibraltar ..............

?otato ............... .. Greece ..................

potato .......--.............----- Mexico ..................

?otato ................... Belgium ..............

Potato ........--... ..-...- Brazil ....

potatoo .................. ...... Canary! Islands.

Potato ..................... Chile ..................

Potato ............................. ngland ...............

potato .......................... Germany ......

?otato ............................----- Italy -..........---

?otato ...................------ Mexico ---......

Potato ......................... Norway .............

Potato .......- ......... Spain .................

Potato ...........................iWales ...............


Number of
Shipments
Infested

1

1

3

1

1

6

1

11

2

4

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

3








Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Fungus (?) .............
Green scale
(Coccus viridis
(Green)) ..............
Greenhouse orthezia
(Orthezia insignis
Douglas) ..............
Greenhouse orthezia
(Orthezia insignis
Douglas) ..............
Greenhouse thrips
(Heliothrips haem-
orrhoidalis
(Bouche)) ............
Greenhouse thrips
(Heliothrips haem-
orrhoidalis
(Bouche)) ............
Hemispherical scale
(Saissetia hemis-
phaerica (Targ.))
Hemispherical scale
(Saissetia hemis-
phaerica (Targ.))
Hemispherical scale
(Saissetia hemis-
phaerica (Targ.))
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) .............
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ...............
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................


Occurring on

Palm ................... ....

Jasmine ..... .........-

Gardenia ...................

Unknown ...................


From

Texas .............

Cuba ................

Cuba ...................

Bahama Islands..


Ophiopogon ................ Pennsylvania ......


Coconut ...................... Porto Rico ............

Fern ...................... Pennsylvania ......

Palm ..................... California ............

Unknown ................ New York ...........

Lemon ...................... Africa ................

Lemon ...................... Argentina ............

Lemon .......................... England ..............

Lemon ......................... Florida ................

Lemon ....................... Germany ..............

Lemon ........................ Italy ....................

Lemon ........................ Spain ....................

3phiopogon .................. California ............

Palm .............................. Texas ..................

Thododendron .............. North Carolina ..

Sazo alm ................. Florida ...............


61


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1



1
1

1





1

1


2

1

1

1

1

1

1


2

1

1

2

1

1







62 State Plant Board of Florida

I I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SInfested
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) .............. Holly ............ ............ South Carolina 1
Larvae
(Diatraea sp.) ..... Corn ........................ Bahama Islands. 1
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) ............ Azalea ......................... Florida ................ 1
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) .......... Bay -........................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) ............ Euonymus ......... Spain ........Spain ......... 2
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) ............ Loquat ........................ Florida ................ 1
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) ............ Palm ............................ Florida ................ 1
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) ........... Pecan .......... ......... Florida ................ 1
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus latan-
iae Sign.) .......... Sugar apple .............. Cuba ..............- 1
Lepidopterous larva.... Mango .......................... Grand Cayman .. 1
Lepidopterous larva.... Orange ........ ............ Mexico .................. 1
Lepidopterous pupa .... Birch bark ............New Hampshire .. 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) .... Cassava ..................... Span'h Honduras 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) .... Coconut ..................... Cuba .................... 2
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) ....Coconut ....................... Florida ............. 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) .... Croton ...... ..... Cuba ....... ............... 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor .(Mask.)) .... Croton .......................... Florida ............. 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Hibiscus ........................ Florida ............. 4
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Legume (woody) ........ Cuba .................... 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Palm .... .................... Argentina ............ 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Palm .... ............... Cuba .................... 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Palm .............................. Florida ................ 1







Sixth Biennial Report


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
_ Infested
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Sugar apple ..............Cuba ................. 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Unknown legume ........ Cuba ............... 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... W isteria ...................... Florida ................ 1
Liriodendron scale
(Toumeyella lirio-
dendri (Gmel.)).. Magnolia .....................- Florida ................ 1
Long scale
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)).. Lemon ... ..................... Cuba ..... ............ 1
Long scale :
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)).. Orange .......... ....... Spain ................ 3
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus
longispinus
(Targ.)) .---...-----. Acalypha ...................... Florida ................
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus
longispinus
(Targ.)) .............. Bougainvillea ............. Florida ............. 1
Long-tailed' mealybug
(Pseudococcus
longispinus
(Targ.)) .............. Croton ......................... Cuba ................ 1
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus
longispinus
(Targ.)) .............. Croton ..... ................ Florida ................ 1
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus
longispinus
(Targ.)) ...... D.............. DracaenaPennsylvania ...... 1
Mealybug (:?)........ Unknown .................... New York ............ 1
Mealybug ................... Yam .............................. Santo Domingo 1
Mealybug
(Pseudococcus
virgatus (Ckll.)).. Cotton boll .................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Mealybug
(Pseudococcus sp.).. Muehlenbeckia sp. ..... Cuba ................ 1
Mediterranean fruit
fly
(Ceratitis capitata
W ied.) ............... Orange ...... ................ Spain ................. 1
Melanose (?) .............. Orange ....................... Canal Zone ........ 1
Melanose
(Phomopsis citri
Fawcett) ............. Orange ........................... Texas .................. 2
Mimosa scale
(Chrysomphalus I
mimoscen
(Comst,)) ............ Cuban plum ................ Cuba .................... 1







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Mimosa scale
(Chrysomphalus
mimosae
(Comst.)) ............
Mining scale
(Howardia biclavis
(Comst.)) ............
Mining scale
(Howardia biclavis
(Comst.)) ............
Mining scale
(Howardia biclavis
(Comst.)) ............
Mite
(Tetranychus sp.)....
Monarch butterfly
(Anosia plexippus
Linn.) ..................
Morelos fruit fly
(Anastrepha ludens
(Loew.)) .........
Morelos fruit fly
(Anastrepha ludens
(Loew.)) .............
Moth
(Aganoptera sp.) ....
Moth borer
(Diatraea sp.) ........
Moth borer injury
(Diatraea sp.) ........
Moth borer larva
(Diatraea sp.) ........
Mulberry whitefly (?)
(Tetraleurodes mori
(Quaint.)) .......
Nematode .....................
Nematode ......................
New aphid
(Aphis spiraecola
Patch) .........
Onion thrips
(Thrips tabaci Lin-
deman) (?) ........
Onion thrips
(Thrips tabaci Lin-
deman) .............
Oyster-shell scale
(Lepidosaphes ulmi
(Linn.)) ..............
Palmetto scale
(Comstockiella sa-
balis (Comst.)) ..
Palmetto scale
(Comstockiella sa-
balis (Comst.)) ..
Parlatoria-like scale
(Pseudoparlatoria
parlatorioides
(Comst.)) ............


Occurring on From



Hog plum .................... Bahama Islands..

Acalypha .................... Porto Rico ............

Jasmine ....................... Cuba ...................

Sapodilla ..... .......... Bahama Islands..

Frangipanni (?) ........ Bahama Islands..

Unknown ................... Cuba ..................

Grapefruit ........... .. Mexico ..................

Orange ..........................Mexico .........

Spruce ....................... Vermont ..............

Sugar cane ......... ... Cuba .............

Sugar cane ................. Cuba ...................

Sugar cane ................. uba .............

Holly ...................... South Carolina..
?otato .... ................. Brazil ..................
'otato ........ .............. ile ......................

Citrus ... ...........Florida ................

Onion ..... ............ Greece ...............

Onion ....... ......... Spain .................

Shrub ....................... North Carolina

Palm ............ ........... Florida ................

Sabal palm .......... Florida ................


Coconut ............... ISpan'h Hondurasl


Number of
Shipments
Infested



1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

7

1

1
1
1

1

1

1

1

1

1


1


-----







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Peach treeborer
(Sanninoidea exi-
tiosa Say) (?) ....
Pineapple mealybug
(Pseudococcus
bromeliae
(Bouche)) ...........
Potato tuber moth
(Phthorimaea oper-
culella Zell.) ........
Potato tuber moth
(Phthorimaea oper-
culella Zell.) ........
Predaceous mite
(Cheletia sp.) ..........

Psocid (?) ..................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ...........
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ...........
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............


Occurring on


65

I Number of
From Shipments
Infested


Peach ................ ........ Alabama .........


Pineapple .................--I Cuba .......

Potato ....................... Germany -...-

Potato ..................-......- Island of Malta..

Scale (Aspidiotus or-
ientalis cocotiphagus
(Marl.) ...-.......... -.. Bahama Islands..
Lemon ...... .......... ......... Italy ................

Citrus ....... .......--. Cuba ..... ........

Grapefruit .......-..... .... Cuba ........

Grapefruit ............ Jamaica .............

Grapefruit ...........- Louisiana .....

Grapefruit ........... ... M ississippi ..........

Lemon ..............--... .... Argentina ............

Lemon ................-. Cuba ......

Lemon ......... ............. Italy ...............

Lime ............... ..... ...... Cuba ....... ....

Lime .......................... Dominica, B.W.I.

Lime ............................ Mexico ...............

Lime .............................. St. Lucia, B.W .I.

Orange .................... Africa .. ......

Orange .......................... Argentina ....


1







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease Occurring on

Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ..........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckiil
(Newm.)) ....-..- )range ..........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm .)) ............ range .........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm .)) ............ range ..........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ..... range............range ......
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) -.....---. range ........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ........... range ........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii\
(Newm.)) ............ )range ...................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckiil
Newm.)) ............ )range ....... ............
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ range .........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Satsuma ........................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ........... Shattuck ?o...................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Sour orange ................
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm. )) ............ Tangerine ...................
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Guava a...--pp..............
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Jamaica apple ............
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Oleander .....................
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Oleander ......................
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Oleander ....................
Pustule scale
(Asteralecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Unknown ......................


From



Brazil ..................

Canal Zone ..........

Costa Rica ..........

Cuba ....................

Florida ................

Jamaica ..............

Louisiana ............

Mexico ................

Spain ............

Trinidad .............

Louisiana ............

Jamaica ...............

Cuba ...............

Belgium ..............

Cuba ....................

Bahama Islands..

Alabama ..............

Bahama Islands..

Florida ................

Florida ...........


Number of
Shipments
Infested


2

2

1

8

3

2

1

2

5

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

5

1






Sixth Biennial Report 67

1 Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SInfested
Putnam's scale
(Aspidiotus ancylus
(Put.)) .............. Peach ............................ South Carolina .I 1
Putnam's scale
(Aspidiotus ancylus
(Put.)) ................ Unknown ................. South Carolina .. 1
Red-banded thrips
(Selenothrips rubro-
cinctus (Giard.)) Croton ....................... Cuba ................. 1
Red-banded thrips
(Selenothrips rubro-
cinctus (Giard.)) Guava ............................ Florida ............. 1
Red heart
(Colletotrichum fal-
catum Sacc.) ...... Japanese cane ............. Florida ................ 1
Rind disease
(Melanconium sac-
chari Mass.) ...... Japanese cane .............. Florida ............... 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.) )...... Althaea ....................... Alabama ........... 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici- I
cola (Greef.))...... Cassava ...................... Florida ............... 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Coral plant ............... Alabama ............. 1
Root knot:
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Fig .... .................... Alabama ............. 2
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Fig ................. ........... California .......... 1
Root knot;
(Heterodera radici- I
cola (Greef.)).. Fig ................................ Florida ............... 11
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))..... Fig ........................ Georgia .............. 6
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ... Fig .............. INorth Carolina I 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ......Fig ................. ..... Virginia ............. 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Forsythia ........... Georgia ........ 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Hibiscus ...................-. Florida ................ 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ..... Peach ...................... Alabama .............. 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.) )..... Peach ..................... Florida ................ 2
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Peach ............................ Georgia ......... i 3







68 State Plant Board of Florida


SNumber of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From I Shipments
Infested
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Plum ............................ Florida ................ 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ..... Rose ............................. Florida ............... 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.) )----.... Rose ............................. Pennsylvania ...... 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))..... Rose ....................... South Carolina .. 1
Rose aphid
(Macrosiphum rosae
(Linn.)) ............... Rose ....................... Cuba ... C b .................. 3
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) .......... Blackberry .................... Georgia ................ 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ........... Raspberry ................. Georgia ................ 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ............ Rose .......................... Florida --............ 2
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ............ Rose .......................... North Carolina .. 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ............ Rose .........................--- South Carolina .. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) .............. Banan.. ...... ................... Florida ................
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) .............. Breadfruit .................... Cuba ............... .
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) .............. Citrus ........................ Cuba ..- ...........
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) .............. Citrus .i...................-- .... Florida ................ I
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) ............ Grapefruit .................. Jamaica ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) .............. Ja m i e .......................b. a ..................
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) .............. Lime .............................. St. Lucia, B.W.I.___ 1







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.) ) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) ............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(M org.)) ..............
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia
articulatus
(Morg.)) .............
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.)....
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.)....
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.)....
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.)...
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.)....
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.)....


Occurring on


Range



Orange



Orange



Orange


Orange


?alm


From


......Argentina


......... Cuba


..............I Jamaica


...... Mexico


.......................... Spain


........................... .uba


Rose ....................... Florida


ramari


Unknown



Unknown


Apple


Apple


Fig ....


Fig ....


Peach


Peach


nd ....................... Bahama Islands.


n .................... Cuba .. .....


n .................... Florida ...............


....--....-....-.... ..- Georgia ...............


-..................... South Carolina .


. ..... .... Florida ..............


............................ Georgia ..............


.....Alabama ............


.......Georgia .............


Number of
Shipments
Infested



1



1



1



1




1

1



1






2


1


1

1


2


1


1


2


I







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease Occurring on

San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Peach ........................
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Pear .......................
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Pear .............................
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Pear .............................
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Plum ..........................
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Rose ............... .........
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.).... Rose ...........................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ......... Potato .......................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..... ........ Potato ..........................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ........ Potato .........................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato ......................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato ........... ............
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato .................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato .........................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ............. Potato ......................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato ............................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato .....................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato .......................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato .........................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ............. Potato ... ......


From



South Carolina .

Alabama ..............

Florida ..................

Mississippi ..........

North Carolina ..

Alabama ..............

South Carolina ..I


Argentina ...........

Belgium ...............

Bermuda .............I

Brazil .................

Canary Islands .

Chile ....................

Cuba ....................

England ........

France .............

Germany ..............

Gibraltar ............

Greece .................

Holland ................


Number of
Shipments
Infested


2

1

1

1

1

2


3

5

11

1


8

3

4

2

20

2-


24

2

2

5







Sixth Biennial Report 71

I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato ................... ndia ..........India 1
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato ..........................I Italy ........ ......... 10
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato ......................... Louisiana ............ 1
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato .......................... Mexico ................. 5
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato ............... .......... Norway ................ 1
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato ....................... Scotland ............ 1
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............. Potato .......................... Spain .................. 3
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................ Potato ............................ Uruguay .........
Scab I
(Actinomyces
scabies) ........ Pot........ Potato .... ................Wales .............i- 1
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
Massee) .............. Lime ......................... Cuba .................... 1
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
M assee) ............. Orange ........................Florida ................ 1
Scale
(Aonidia lauri
(Bouche)) ............ Laurel ............ ...... Cuba ................... 1
Scale
(Aonidia lauri
(Bouche)) ............ "Laurel" bay .......C............ 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Avocado .......... ......... Florida ............... 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Banana ........................ Cuba .................... 3
Scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Coconut .................... Cuba ................... 2
Scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Coconut ................ Porto Rico .......... 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) .......... Pandanus ...Florida ........Florida ........ 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus hercu-
leanus D. & H.) .. Hog plum .................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus ]
Marl.) ...................ICoconut ........................Bahama Islands.. 8








State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease Occurring on Fro

Scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
Marl.) .................... Coconut .................. Cuba .....
Scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
Marl.) ............... Coconut .............. iFlorida
Scale
(Aspidiotus orien- a
talis cocotiphagus
Marl.) .................... Coconut ....... .....I Jamaica
Scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
M arl.) ................... Palm ......................... Cuba .....
Scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
Marl.) ............... Sugar apple ............... Cuba .....
Scale
(Aspidiotus osborni
Newell & Ckll.).... Blueberry .............. Alabama
Scale
(Aspidiotus spinosus
Comst.) .......... Palm ............................. Argentin
Scale
(Aspidiotus sp.) ...... Plum ........................ Ohio .....
Scale
(Asterolecanium
miliaris longum
(Green)) .............Bamboo .................... Cuba ....
Scale
(Diaspis echinocacti
(Bouche)) ............. Cactus ........................ Virgin I
Scale
(Lepidosaphes cro-
tonis (Ckll.)) .... Acalypha ....-............... Porto Ri
Scale
(Lepidosaphes lasi-
anthi (Green)) .... Croton ......-................. Santo D
Scale
(Orthezia sp.) ........ Tamarind ...................... Bahama
Scale
(Parlatoria theae
Ckll.) .................. Maple ............. ..-...... Japan ....
Scale
(Parlatoria sp.) ...... Lime ............................. Dominica
Scale
(Parlatoria sp.) ...... Orange ........................ Bahama
Scale
(Parlatoria sp.) ...... Orange ........................ Brazil
Scale
(Pseudischnaspis
aliens (Newst.)) Jasmine ................. Cuba ....
Scale
(Saissetia nigra
(Nietn.)) ....... .Hibiscus ........................ Florida


I Number of
m I Shipments
Infested



....-......... 22



------.............. 3



............. 1



...... ........ 1





1




.. I 1
a ............ 1

............. 1



................ I


slands.... 1


co ......... 1


omingo .. 1

Islands.. 1


................ 1

a, B.W.I. 1

Islands-_ 1

................ 1





................- I


___







Sixth Biennial Report


SI
Insect or Disease Occurring on From

Scale
(Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) ) ................. Sugar cane ....... ...... Cuba .............
Scale
(Targionia sp.) ...... Magnolia .................... Florida .........--
Scale
(Toumeyella sp.) .... Magnolia ................... Florida ..............
Scale
(Toumeyella sp.) .... Magnolia .................... Louisiana ......-
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ........................... Argentina .........
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... ?otato ............................ Belgium ...............I
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium I
atrovirens) .... Potato......... ....... ... Cuba ..........
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) ......... Potato ...................... England ..........
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) ......... Potato ......-......... France .............
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............. ........... Germany .......
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato .......................... Gibraltar ............
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............................ Greece ..................
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ..................... Holland ............
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato .................. Italy ...............
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ..................... .... Spain ................
Six-spotted mite
(Tetranychus sex-
m aculatus Riley).. Rose .............................. Cuba ....................
Six-spotted mite
(Tetranychus sex-
maculatus Riley). Rose.................... New York ..........
Snail ........-----.. ....-- ...... Dracaena .. ................ Pennsylvania ......
Snow scale
(Chionaspis citri
Comst.) ... ... ... I rapefruit ....... ........ iJamaica ............
Snow scale
(Chionaspis citri
Com st.) ................ Orange . Spain ....................
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) ........ Citrus.............. Citrus --Cuba


73


Number of
Shipments
Infested







State Plant Board of Florida


II Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
__ __ Infested
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............. Euonymus .... ........ Spain .................. 1
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............. Frangipanni ? ............ Bahama Islands.. 1
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............. Palm .............................. Florida ................ 1
Soft rot
(Rhyzopus sp.) ...... Sweet potato ............. Louisiana ............ 1
Stem end rot.................. Orange ......................... Louisiana ............ 1
Strawberry crown
borer
(Tyloderma fragar-
iae Riley) ............ Strawberry ................. Alabama .............. 1
Strawberry' crown
borer
(Tyloderma fragar- I
iae Riley) ............I Strawberry -.........---.... Arkansas ............ 1
Sugar cane borer work
(Diatraea sp.) ....... Sugar cane .................. Cuba .................... 1
Sugar cane moth borer
(Diatraea sacohar-
alis crambidoides
(Trote)) e............. Japanese cane ............ Florida ................ 1
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius I
Fab.) .................... Sweet potato ................ Cuba .................... 4
Sweet potato weevil I
(Cylas formicarius I
Fab.) .... ......... Sweet potato ................ Florida ............... 1
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
Fab.) .... .......... Sweet potato ................ Louisiana ....... 3
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
Fab.) .................. Sweet potato .............. Mexico ................ 1
Termite injury .......... Sweet potato ................ Honduras ............ 1
Thrips
(Haplothiips gow-
deyi (Franklin)).. Breadfruit ............... Cuba .............. 1
Thrips
(Haplothrips mer-
rilli Watson) ...... Coconut ................... Cuba .................. 2
Thrips
(Symphyothrips
punctatus H.&W.) Scales on coconut.......... Porto Rico .......... 1
Thrips (immature) .... Frangipanni ? ............ Bahama Islands.. 1
Tuber spot
(Macrosporium sp.) Potato ........................ Cuba .................... 1
Weevil
(Calendra linearis
(Hbst.)) ............... Tamarind .................... Cuba ................. 1
West Indian fruit fly
(Anastrepha frater-
culus W ied.) ...... Guava ............................ Cuba ................. 1
White peach scale
(Diaspis pentagon,
(Targ.)) .............. Peach ................... ..... Georgia .............. 1







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease


Occ


White peach scale
(Diaspis pentagon,
(Targ.)) ............ Plum ...
White peach scale
(Diaspis pentagon,
(Targ.)) .............. Tree of
(Bryo
Wire worm injury ...... Sweet p
Wire worm injury ?.... Sweet p
Woolly apple aphis
(Schizoneura lani-
gera Hause) ........ Apple
Yam scale
(Targionia hartii
(Ckll.)) ............... Yam ...
Yam scale
(Targionia hartii
(Ckll.)) ................ Yam
Ziziphus scale
(Parlatoria ziziphus
(Lucas)) ............. Lemon
Ziziphus scale
(Parlatoria ziziphus
(Lucas)) .............. Lemon
Ziziphus scale
(Parlatoria ziziphus
(Lucas)) .........-.. Lemon
Ziziphus scale
(Parlatoria ziziphus
(Lucas)) ........... Orange


urring on



...........................

Life
phyllum sp.)..
otato ..............
otato ..............


From



Florida ...............


Jamaica ..............
Cuba ....................
Cuba ...................


................... .... Georgia ..........

.......................... Cuba ....................

........... ......... Santo Dom ingo .

......................... IFlorida .............


.......................... Greece ...........


......................... Italy ....................

......................... Spain ....................


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1



1
1
1

1


1

1

1


S 1


1

1


PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED

In Mail Shipments
For Year Ending June 30, 1925


Insect or Disease Occurring on I From

Ant ............................. Unknown .................. I Florida ...............
Aphid .......................... Easter lily -..........i--Bermuda ............
Aphid ... ................. Oleander .................. Illinois ..................
Aphis sp .................... Easter lily ............- Bermuda ............
Aphis sp .................... Easter lily .................. Georgia ................
Bamboo scale
(Asterolecanium
bambusae Bdv.) Bamboo ........................ Barbados, B.W.I.
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ............. Almond ............... Cuba ....................
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) Citrus ......................... Cuba ..................
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.) .... Lime .............................. Illinois ..................


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1
1
1
6
1


1


1

1


1


_ _







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease Occurring on

Chalcid
(Hymenopterous in-
sect) ................. Sugar apple ...............
Cherry scale
(Aspidiotus for-
besi Johnson) ...... Peach ...........................
Cherry scale
(Aspidiotus for-
besi Johnson) ...... Plum (?) ......................
Citrus scab
(Cladosporium
citri M assee) ........ Lime ........... ......
Cloudy-winged white-
fly
(Dialeurodes citri-
folii (M org.)) .... citrus ....... ..............
Coconut mealybug
(Pseudococcus nipae
(Mask.)) -........ --- -Palm ..........................
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso)) ...... Coleus -.......................
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso)) ...... Coleus ....-.-............ --.
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso)) ...... Geranium ............
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso)) ...... Jessamine ...................
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus
citri (Risso)) ...... Rose ............................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ............. Cape jasmine ............
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) .............. Cape jasmine ..............
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ..-........-. Citrus ....................
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) ............... Citrus ........... ...............
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) .............. Jasmine ......... ...
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(A sh.)) .......... Orange .........................
Cottony-cushion scale
(Icerya purchase
M ask.) ............... Rose ... .........................
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens E. F. S.) .Plum (?) ..............


From



Cuba ....................


Tennessee ...........

West Virginia ....


Illinois ................


Florida ................


Illinois ..............

Ohio ......... .

Pennsylvania ......

SPennsylvania ......

Florida ..............

Pennsylvania ......

Florida ..............

Georgia ................

Florida ............

c;uth Carolina


Georgia ................

Florida -.........

Florida ................

West Virginia ....


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1


1

2

1


1


2

2

1

1

1

3

1


1

1

1

1

1

1

2


~







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens E. F. S.)..1
Cuban Aschersonia
(Aschersonia
cubensis) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ..............
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(M org.)) ........I
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ............
English walnut scale
(Aspidiotus jug-
lans-regiae
Comst.) ................
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) .......
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida whitefly
(Trialeurodes
floridensis
(Quaint.)) ..........
Fungus ..........................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ..............
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(V all.)) ................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) ....................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) ....................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) ....................


Occurring on



R ose ............. ......


From



Pennsylvania


Lecanium sp. on orchid Costa Rica


Cape jasmine


Citrus


Peach .....................


Florida


...... Florida


......Florida


Unknown


........... Florida


Oleander .................... Florida


Rubber .......................... Florida


Guava .......................... Florida
Orange ................... Texas


Comptie


........Florida


Ivy ............. ..............


District of
Columbia


Oleander ...................... Illinois


Sago palm


................... Florida


Antigonon ................. New Jersey


Fig ..........


.................... Florida


Fig ................................ Georgia .............


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1


1


1


1


1


1


1

1


1


1
1

1


1

1

1

1

1

1







78 State Plant Board of Florida


I I Number of
Insect or Disease I Occurring on From I Shipments
SI Infested
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniael
Sign.) .................... Guava ......................... Florida ............. 1
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) .. Hibiscus ..................... Florida .............1.
Long soft scale
(Coccus elongatus
Sign.) .................. Rose ............................ Pennsylvania ...... 4
Parlatoria-like scale
(Pseudoparlatoria
parlatorioides
(Comst.)) .........-. Unknown .........-.......... Cuba ..-----.---- ..--- 1
Pine scale
(Chionaspis pini-
foliae hetero-
phyllae Cooley) Pine .............................. Florida .............. 1
Pineapple scale
(Diaspis bromeliae
(Kern.)) .............- Orchid ......................---- Costa Rica ......... 1
Pink bollworm
(Pectinophora
gossypiella
(Saunders)) ...... Seed cotton .................. China .................. 1
Pink bollworm
(Pectinophora
gossypiella
(Saunders)) ........ Cotton boll ... ..... Cuba ................. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes
beckii (Newm.)).. Citrus ........................... Cuba .................. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes
beckii (Newm.))..- 'itrus ......................... Florida ............... 2
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Oleander .................... Florida ............. 9
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Oleander ...................... Unknown ........... 1
Pyriform scale
(Pulvinaria pyri-
formis Ckll.) ...... Cape jasmine .............. Florida ............. 1
Red rot
(Colletotrichum
falcatum) ............ Sugar cane .................- Cuba .................... I
Red-headed scale-
fungus
(Sphaerostilbe sp.).. San Jose scale ............ Unknown ...........
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) ........... Coral vine ............. Florida ............. 1
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) .............. Fig ................................ Florida ................ 4








Sixth Biennial Report


I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) ...... Fig........georga........ ........ 1
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) ........ Ge........Gera .................. Florida .............. 1
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) .............. Plumbago .................. Florida ................ 1
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) ..............Rose ............................ Pennsylvania ...... 7
Root knot
(Heterodera
radicicola
(Greef.)) ............ W isteria ............ ........ Alabama .......... I 1
Rose aphid
(Macrosiphum
rosae (Linn.)) .... Rose .............................. Pennsylvania ...... 2
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ........... Rose ........................ Pennsylvania ..... 1
Rust
(Uromyces caryo-
phyllinus) ........... Carnations ................ Pennsylvania ..... 1
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) .... Plum ............................ Florida ................ 1
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.)...... Rose ........................... Unknown ............ 1
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) .... Unknown .................... Unknown ............ 1
Scale
(Aonidia lauri
(Bouche)) ............ Laurel ........................ Spain ............... 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Almond Cuba ............... 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus spino-
sus Comst.) ........ Rose ........................ Unknown .......... 1
Scale
(Aspidiotus sp.) .... Ivy .................... Louisiana .... 1
Scale
(Asterolecanium
miliaris longum
(Green)) ............ Bamboo ....... ......... Barbados, B.W.I. 1
Scale
(Conchaspis an-
graeci Ckll.) ........ Hibiscus ...... ............ Florida ............ 1
Scale
(Diaspis sp.) (?).... Orchids ............. .................. 1
Scale
(Lecanium sp.) ........ Orchid ....................... Costa Rica 1.....-... 1







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Scale
(Pseudaonidia tes-
serata (de
Charm)) ..........
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) ...........
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) ...........
Soft scale
(Lecanium sp.) ......
Spinning mite
(Tenuipalpus
palmatus Donn.)..
Tea scale
(Piorinia theae
Green) ..................
White peach scale
(Diaspis penta-
gona (Targ.)) ...
White peach scale
(Diaspis penta-
gona (Targ.)) ....
Woolly whitefly
(A leurothrixus
howardi
(Quaint.)) ..........


Occurring on


From


Unknown vine ............ Cuba ...................

Citrus ........................... Florida ..............

Lime............I.
L im e .............................. Illinois ................

Oleander .................. .. Illinois ................

Orange ........................ lorida ............

Antigonon .................. New Jersey ........


Magnolia .................... Florida ...........

rea plant .................... Florida ................

Privet ............................ South Carolina .

Unknown .... ............... South Carolina


'itrus ............................ Florida ................


'ESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED

Shipments by All Means of Transportation
Parcel Post

Year Ending June 30, 1926


Except


I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
S_________ Infested
Acuminate scale
(Coccus acuminatus
(Sign.)) .............. Gardenia ...................... Cuba .................. 1
Alien scale
(Pseudischnaspis
alienus Newst.) .. "Penequin" .................. Cuba ................... 1
Alien scale
(Pseudischnaspis
aliens Newst.) .. Rose .............................. Florida ........... 1
Alien scale
(Pseudischnaspis
alienus Newst.) .. Unknown ..................... Cuba ................ 1


S.


Number of
Shipments
Infested



1

1

1

1

1

1


1


1

1

1


1


I







Sixth Biennial Report



Insect or Disease Occurring on From

Anthracnose
(Colletotrichumn
gloeosporioides) iOrange .......................... California ...........
Anthracnose I
(Colletotrichum
gossypii) .............. Cotton bolls ..... .... ICuba ............
Anthracnose
(Colletotrichum
sp.) ........................ A vocado ...... .... .. M exico ................
Ants ............................ Sugar cane .............. uba ..................
Aphid
(Aphis nerii Fonsc.) Oleander ....... ...Bahama Islands..
Argentine ant
(Iridomyrmex
humilis Mayr.) .... Pineapple .....................Louisiana ...........
Argentine ant
(Iridomyrmex
humilis Mayr.) .... Soil ... .................... Alabama ..........
Bamboo scale
(Asterolecanium
bam busae Bdv.) .. Bamboo ........................Cuba ................
Beetle grub ................. Soil about citrus ..------ICuba ..............
Black rot
(Sphaeronema
fimbriat) ................ Sweet potato ...........- Texas ........
Black melanose ..........Orange ...................... ICuba
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae I
(Bern.)) .............. Oleander ................... Bahama Islands.
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) ......... Oleander ...................... Florida ...............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) .............. Orange .......................... Cuba ............
Black scale
(Saissetia oleae
(Bern.)) .............. Pepper tree ?................ California ........
Black thread scale
(Ischnaspis longi-
rostris (Sign.)).. Coconut ........ Santo Domingo....
Black thread scale
(Ischnaspis longi- \
rostris (Sign.)).. Coffee .................. Cuba ....-- ..
Black thread scale
(Ischnaspis longi-
rostris (Sign.)).. Palm ........................ .. Cuba ....................
Blackfly
(A leurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) .. Citrus ........................... Jamaica ................
Blackfly
(A leurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) .. Jasmine ................ Cuba .................
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) .. Orange ........................Cuba ...............
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) .. Sapodilla ? .................... Bahama Islands..


81


| Number of
Shipments
Infested


1


1

1
1

1


1

1


1
1


1
1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1







82 State Plant Board of Florida

SI Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
1| |Infested
Blackfly eggs
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) .. Bougainvillea .......... Cuba ........ .....i 1
Blackfly eggs
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) .. Coffee .................... Cuba .................... 2
Blackfly eggs
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby) Unknown .. ... ................... 1
Blue mold I
(Penicillium
italiensis) ......... Lime ............- ... Trinidad .......-. 1
Blue mold
(Penicillium
italiensis) ............ Orange ........................ Trinidad .............. 1
Blue mold
(Penicillium sp.) .. Orange ......-............. IPanama ......... 1
Blue mold
(Penicillium sp.) .. range ...................... Spain .................. I
Boisduval's scale
(Diaspis boisdu-
valii Sign.) ....... Coconut...................-.. Barbados .....-..I 1
Boisduval's scale
(Diaspis boisdu-
valii Sign.) ........ Coconut ............ ....... Cuba .... ........... 3
Boisduval's scale
(Diaspis boisdu-
valii Sign.) ..........Coconut ....................... Trinidad .............. 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.) ....i Grapefruit ............... Cuba ........... 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.) .... Grapefruit ................... Mexico .......... 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.).... Grapefruit .................. West Indies ...... 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.).... Lemon ....................... Italy ...................... 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.) ... Lime .............................. Santo Domingo .. 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.)- Orange ......................... Cuba .................... 3
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.)... Orange ............... France ................ 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.).... Orange .......................... Spain ................. 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.) .... Orange ......................... Trinidad ............. 1
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.).... Tangerine ... Cuba .................... 1







Sixth Biennial Report


I I
Insect or Disease I Occurring on I From

Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.).... Tangerine ..................Mexico .............
Cloudy-winged white-
fly
(Dialeurodes citri-
folii (Morg.)) .--.lOrange .................... Cuba .................
Coconut mealybug I
(Pseudococcus I
(ipae (Mask.)) ..IPalm ..-..................District of
Coconut mealybug I Columbia ....
(Pseudococcus I
nipae (Mask.)) ..IRoyal palm ................. Cuba ...C--
Coconut mealybug
(Pseudococcus
nipae (Mask.)) Sapodilla ..................Bahama Island
Coconut mealybug
(Pseudococcus
nipae (Mask.)) Sugar apple ? ........I Cuba ...............
Common scab
(Rhizoctonia sp.) Irish potato ............... Brazil ..............
Common mealybug
(Pseudococcus citri I
(Risso)) .............. Citrus .... ...... ......... Florida ............
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ............... Cape jasmine ........... Alabama ..........
Common whitefly I
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ................ Cape jasmine ............. Florida ...........
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ......... Citrus ........................... Florida ............
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ................ Jasmine .......... ... Georgia ............
Corn ear worm
(Chloridea obsoleta
(F ab.)) ................ Corn .............................. Cuba ................
Corn Silvanus
(Silvanus surina-
mensis (Linn.)) .. Corn ................... Ecuador .......
Cottony-cushion scale I
(Icerya purchase
M ask.) .............. Rose .................. .. Florida ............
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens) Rose ...........Rose.................. Illinois ..............
Cuban Aschersonia
(Aschersonia cu-
bensis) ................ Scale on star apple
leaves ...... ............ Cuba ................
Cyanophyllum scale
(Aspidiotus cyano- i
phylli Sign.) ...... Palm .................... Cuba ................
Destructor scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............Almond .... ..... . Cuba ..............


....

"I



s..
....

[...




.... I















..- i
.. .




i..


I I
i I


83


Number o.
Shipments
Infested


1


2


1

1


1


1

1


1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1


1


1

1


1







State Plant Board of Florida


Occurring on


Destructor scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ...........---- Coconut
Destructor scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Coconut
Destructor scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-[
tor Sign.) ........... Pandanu
Destructor scale
(Aspidiotus destruc-
tor Sign.) ............ Royal p,
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Coconut
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Grapefr
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ............. Lemon ..
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Oleandei
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Orange
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Orange
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ........... Palm ....
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Royal pi
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) ........... Shaddoc
Earthworms .............. Soil aboi
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................ Aspidist
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................ Aspidist


uit ....... .....


From


-.-.............-.. Cuba
I


Santo Domingo

Porto Rico .......


Cuba .... ........



Cuba ...


West Indies .....


-....-..... ............. Italy ..................


Florida ..............


.................. Mexico


Spain


....................... Massachusetts


.......... Cuba


k ..................... Grand Cayman
ut citrus .......... Cuba ............


....................Florida


Insect or Disease


New Jersey ........|


--------


I Number of
I Shipments
Infested


.1 8


.. 1

1


.1 1


1


1


2


1


1



1


1



I 1



I
::I 1


..I 1


.....................







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ---...........--
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ................
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.))
Florida wax scale
(Ceroplastes flori-
densis Comst.) ....
Flower thrips
(Frankliniella sp.)..
Fungus
(Alternaria sp.) .....
Fungus
(Aspergillus sp.) ....
Fungus
(Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides) ..
Fungus
(Colletotrichum sp.)
Fungus
(Diplodia sp.) ..........
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......


Occurri:


ng on


From


Fern ............................. Louisiana ... ......


Ophiopogon ................. Louisiana ...........


Ophiopogon sp. ......... Louisiana ...-......-


Aspidistra ....................New Jersey .......I

Citrus .................... jFlorida ................

Grapefruit ..................West Indies ........

Lime ............................ Trinidad ............

Oleander ...... ........ .... Florida ..............

Orange .......................... Cuba ....................

Palm ... ................. West Indies ...

R ose ..................... ...... F lorida ................

Rubber ......................... Louisiana ............

Vincas (?) .. ............. Louisiana ............

Rose .......................... Cuba .............

Potato ............. ...... Holland ................

Cauliflower ................. France ............

Banana ......................... Cuba ............. ..

Papaya ...................... Honduras .....

Lime .......... ..........Jamaica ................

Cotton bolls ........... Cuba .................

Potato ......... ...........Algeria ................


I


Number of
Shipments
Infested



1


2


1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1








State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ...
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) .....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ...
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) .....
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Graphiola
phoenicis) .......
Fungus
(Graphiola
phoenicis) ............
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizoctonia sp.)....
Fungus
(Rhizopus
migricans) ............
Fungus
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fusarium
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fusarium
(Fusarium sp.) ......


Occurring on


Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato

Potato


Palm ....................


Phoenix palm ..............

Potato ....-......- .....



Potato ...... ...

Potato ........... ..... ....

Potato .....................

Potato ............

Potato ........ ..........

Potato ..................... .....

Potato ..........................


Banana --....-----..

Irish potato .. ......

Irish potato ............

Irish potato .... .......


........................

--------------------------

............ -------

..... I ....... ----------

..........................

.........................

..........................

................... I ......

..........................

------- I ..................

---------- ...............

....................... -


From


Argentina ..-.--

Belgium ...........

Brazil ............

Canada -...........

England ................

France ...............I

Germany ...........

Holland ............

Italy .................

Mexico ..........I..

Panama ...........

Venezuela -..........

Wales -... .----

Texas ..................


Florida .............

Argentina ........

Brazil ... ......

Belgium ................

England ..............

H olland ................

Jamaica .............

Spain ..........

Sweden ..............- .

Unknown ............


Cuba .............

Germany ..............

Germany .........

Jamaica .............


Number of
Shipments
Infested

1

4

4

2

3

1

6

2

2

2

1

1

1


2


1

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

1


1

1

1

1











Insect or Disease

Fusarium
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fusarium rot
(Fusarium sp.) ......
Fungus
(Macrosporium sp.)
Greedy scale
(Aspidiotus rapax
Com st.) ...............
Green mold
(Penicillium sp.)......
Hemispherical scale
(Saissetia hemis-
phaerica (Targ.))
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(V all.)) ................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ...............
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(V all.)) ...............
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) .............
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(Vall.)) ................
"Jumping bean"
lepidopteronn) ........
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) ....................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) ..................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) ...................
Late blight
(Phytophthora
infestans) ............
Leaf miner ..................
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.))....
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.))....
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) ....
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.))....
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.))....


Sixth Biennial Report 87


SNumber of
Occurring on From I Shipments
Infested

Irish potato .................. Tunis ................. 1

Irish potato .................. Brazil ..........I 1

Potato ...... ............. England ....-- .. 1

Orange ......................... California ........... 1

Lemon ......................... Brazil .............. 1

Oroton .......................... West Indies .----- 1

Asparagus plumosus.. Brazil ................. 1

English ivy ................. Illinois ................ 1

Lem on .......................... Italy .................... 4

Lemon ......................... Spain .................) 3

Palm ............................West Indies ..........I
I
Seed .............................. Unknown ............ 1

Palm ............................. Cuba ................... 1

Pandanus ...................... Porto Rico .......... 1

Rose ............................. Florida ................ 2

Potato ............ ....... Nova Scotia ....... 1
Orange (fruit) ............ Trinidad .............. 1

Cassava cutting .......... Honduras ............ 1

Coconut ........ .......... Cuba .................... 3

Papaya ......................... Honduras ............ 1

Royal palm .............. Cuba .................. 2

Royal palm seed .......... Cuba .................... 1







State Plant Board of Florida


I I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)).... Soursop ..................... Honduras ........... 1
Long scale
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)) Grapefruit .................. Cuba ................... 2
Long scale
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)) Orange ...... ... Cuba .................... 2
Long scale
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)) (Orange.... France .............France ... 1
Long scale I
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)) Orange ........................ Holland .............. 1
Long scale
(Lepidosaphes
gloverii (Pack.)) Orange ................... Spain ................. 1
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus long-
ispinus (Targ.))..Croton .................... West Indies ........ 1
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus long-
ispinus (Targ.))-. Sapodilla (?) .............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Long-tailed mealybug
(Pseudococcus long-
ispinus (Targ.))..IStephanotus ............ Bahama Islands 1
Mealybug I
(Pseudococcus sp.)..ISugar cane ................. .Cuba .................... 2
Melanose
(Phomopsis citri
Fawcett) .............. Citrus .......................... Florida ................ 1
Melanose
(Phomopsis citri
Fawcett) .............. Grapefruit ................... Grand Cayman.... 1
Melanose
(Phomopsis citri
Fawcett) .. ..... Grapefruit ..............Mexico ................
Melanose
(Phomopsis citri I
Fawcett) ..............Orange .......... .......... Bahama Islands.. 1
Melanose
(Phomopsis citri
Fawcett) .............. Lime .............................. Jam aica .............. 1
Mite
(Tetranychus sp.).. Rose .............................. Cuba ............... 1
Moth
(Family Pyraus-
tinae) .................... Fern ............................ New Jersey ........ 1
Moth borer
(Diatraea sac-
charalis var.)...... Sugar cane ................. Cuba ..... .........
Moth borer
(Diatraea sp.) ........ Sugar cane ................... Cuba .................... 5
Moth borer injury (?) Sugar cane .................... Mexico ............... 1
Oleander aphid
(Aphis nerii Fonsc.) Oleander ..................... Florida ................ 1
Onion thrips
(Thrips tabaci Lin-
dem an) ? .............. Onion ............................ Italy .................. 1







Sixth Biennial Report 89

Number of
Insect or Disease I Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Oriental scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
(M arl.)) .............. Banana ..... ............ Cuba ..............
Oriental scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
(M arl.)) .............. Coconut ....................... Cuba ................... 25
Oriental scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus I
(Marl.)) ............. Royal palm ................ Cuba ........... ... 1
Oriental scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus I
(Marl.)) .............. Unknown ..................... Bahama Islands.. 1
PeniciJlium I
(Penicillium sp.)...... Irish potato .................1 Jamaica .............. 1
Pineapple mealybug I
(Pseudococcus brom-I I
eliae (Bouche)).. Pineapple ...................... Span. Honduras. 1
Pink-spotted hawk-
moth
(Herse cingulata
Fab.) .................. Unknown ...................Jamaica .............. 1
Potato tuber moth I
(Phthorimaea oper- I
culella (Zeller)) .Potato .........................V.Virginia ............ 1
Purple scale I
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(N ew m .)) ........... Citrus ............................ Cuba ................... 1
Purple scale I
(Lepidosaphes beckiij
(Newm.)) ........... Citrus ........ ......Flor ......... 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Citrus .... .............. Jamaica ..........a .... 1
Purple scale |
(Lepidosaphes beckii I
(Newm.)) ............. Grapefruit .................Cuba ................... 9
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii[
(Newm.)) ............[Grapefruit ............... Grand Cayman .. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) .......... Grapefruit ................. Isle of Pines...... 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckiil
(Newm.)) ........... Grapefruit ................ Mexico .............. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckiil
(Newm.)) ............ Grapefruit ................ West Indies ........ 1
Purple scale I
(Lepidosaphes beckii i
(Newm.) ) ............ Lemon ............. Brazil ................ 2
Purple scale | I
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ..... .......Lemon .. ---- Italy .................-- 4







State Plant Board of Florida


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SInfested
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Lime ............................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Lime ...................... Grand Cayman .. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) .......... Lime .......................-... Santo Domingo .. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ......... Lime ............................. Trinidad .............. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ........... Orange ....................... Bahama Islands.. 3
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) .......... Orange ....................... British W. Indies 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ...................... California ............ 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange .......................... Canal Zone .......... 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ......................... Costa Rica .......... 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) .......... Orange .......................- Cuba .................. 15
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ..................... Haiti ................ 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ..................... ... Louisiana ............ 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ........... Orange ...................... Mexico ................ 2
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ........................ Panama .............. 3
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange ....................... Spain .................. 2
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange .......................... Trinidad .............. 3
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Orange (fruit) ........... Trinidad .............. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ......... Pomelo ......................... Cuba .................... 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Pomelo ......................... Mexico ................ 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Satsuma orange .......... Alabama ..............| 2







Sixth Biennial Report 91

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shinments
_ Infested
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ........... Shaddock .................. Grand Cayman .. 1
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newm.)) ............ Tangerine .................... Cuba ...... ......... 1
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.)) Oleander ..................... Florida ............... 2
Pyriform scale
(Pulvinaria pyri-
formis Ckll.) ...... Jessamine .................... Florida ................ 1
Red rot
(Colletotrichum
falcatum Sacc.).... Sugar cane ................. Honduras ............ 1
Red rot
(Colletotrichum
falcatum Sacc.).... Sugar cane .............. Mexico ........I. 1
Red-headed scale-
fungus
(Sphaerostilbe sp.).. Purple scale on orange Costa Rica .......... 1
Red-headed scale-
fungus
(Sphaerostilbe sp.).. Purple scale on orange Cuba .................... 1
Rice weevil
(Calendra oryzae
(Linn.)) ............ Unknown ........... ....... Cuba ................... 1
Rot
(Fusarium sp.) ...... Potato ..................... Wales .................. 1
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Fig .......................... Alabama .............. 2
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ... Fig ............................ Georgia ................ 3
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))...... Unknown .-----......... Georgia ............ 1
Rose aphid
(Macrosiphum
rosae (Linn.)) .... Rose ........................... Cuba ................... 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) _..........Rose .................... New Jersey ........ 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ............ Blackberry ................. Kentucky ............ 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ........... Blackberry ................... North Carolina ..1 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ........... Raspberry .............. .South Carolina .. 1
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ........... Rose .......................... Alabama .............. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)) .... Almond ............. Cuba ................. Cuba ..... ...- 1







92 State Plant Board of Florida

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From I Shipments
Infested
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Bannaa ......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Cinnamon .......... ............Cuba ............... 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.))... Cconut ........ ...Cuba ................. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Coffee ............................ Cuba ................. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-I
ulatus (Morg.)) .... Coffee ................... Guatemala .......... 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)) .... Grapefruit ................... Costa Rica .......... 1
Rufous scale I
(Pseudaonidia artic-i
ulatus (Morg.)) .... Grapefruit .................... West Indies ........ 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-I
ulatus (Morg.)).... Lime ......................... Trinidad .......-. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-1
ulatus (Morg.)).... Orange ..................... Belgium ......... 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Range ....... ............ British W. Indies 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Orange ............... ..............Cuba ................ 2
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Orange ........................ Trinidad ............. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Royal palm.................. Cuba ................. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Sapodilla (?) ............ Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Unknown .................. Bahama Islands. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Unknown ........---........ Jamaica .............. 1
Rufous scale
(Pseudaonidia artic-
ulatus (Morg.)).... Unknown leaves .......... Bahama Islands. 1
Rust mite
(Eriophyes oleivorus
Ash.) .................... Orange ...................... Cuba .................... 1
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) .... Peach ........................... North Carolina.. 1
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) .... Rose ... ............... Florida .........


U.







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) ....
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) ....
San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) ....
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..............
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..............--.
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ............
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(A ctinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(A ctinomyces
scabies) ................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .............
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ..................


Occurring on



Rose ................


Rose ...........


Rose ...


Potato


Potato

Potato


Potato


Potato


Potato


Potato


Potato


Potato



Potato

Potato


Potato


Potato


Potato


Potato

Potato
Potato
Potato


From.



Georgia ..............


Kentucky ............


. .............. Maryland ...........


........................ Africa ..................




I
--....- ...- Argentina ---....
Azores ..................


Bahama Islands.-


Belgium ..............

........................
Bermuda ..............


Brazil ................

Canada ..............
.I


C while .......I

u....................... I.
................ Cuba ...................



Fr........ Englance ..............

.......................... France ................


.......................... Germany ............


.......................... Holland ..............


.......................... Italy .....................


........................ Jamaica ...............


......................... Mexico ................


1


93


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1


1


1


1


5


1


1


12


1

9


7




3


16


1


14


7


4


1


2







State Plant Board of Florida


I I I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
_I Infested
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .................. Potato ........... ........... Scotland I... ..... I
Scab
(Actino myces
scabies) .................. Potato ........................ Spain .... ......... 2
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .................. Potato ................... Sweden .............. 1
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .................. Potato ....... ............... Trinidad ......... 1
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .................. Potato ....................... Unknown ...........
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) .................. Potato ...................... Venezuela ........... 2
Scab
(Actinomyces
scabies) ................. Potato ............. ... W ales ................. 2
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
Massee) .............. Citrus ........................ Florida ...... 1
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
Massee) .... .... Grapefruit ............... Cuba ............... 1
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
Massee) ........... Grapefruit .................. Mexico ............... 1
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
Massee) ................ Lemon ........................... Brazil ............ 2
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
Massee) ................ Grapefruit ................. Costa Rica .......... 1
Scab
(Venturia in-
aequalis) .............. A pple ............................ France .............. 1
Scab
(Venturia in-
aequalis) ............. Apple .......................... Italy ............. 1
Scale
(Aonidia lauri
(Bouche)) ........... Laurus nobilis ............ Italy .................. 1
Scale
(Coccus viridis
(Green)) ............ Gardenia ..................... Cuba ............... 1
Scale
(Parlatoria proteus
(Curtis)) ............ Dracaena .................... West Indies ....... 1
Scale
(Parlatoria proteus
(Curtis)) ............ Palm ........................ West Indies ........ 1
Scale
(Parlatoria sp.) ...... Lime .......................... Alabama .............. 1
Scale
(Parlatoria sp.) ...... Lime ............................ Trinidad .............. 1
Silver scurf .................. Lemon .......................... Bahama Islands. 1
Silver scurf .................. Lime .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1







Sixth Biennial Report 95

I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From IShipments
Infested
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Irish potato ............... Belgium ............... 2
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Irish potato .............. Tunis .................... 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............. Algeria ............ 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ...... Argen a ............ 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ................ Austria ............... 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) ......- Potato ........ ...... Azores ............. 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ................. Belgium ............. 6
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............. ... Bermuda .............. 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ......... ... ....... Brazil ................ 2
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ......... ...... Canada ............... 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ......... ...... .. Cuba ............. 2
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ........ ....... England ............. 10
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ......-.... .. IGermany ............ 3
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............... ....... Holland .. ........... 1
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............ .............. Italy -- ........ .| 5
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ......... ...... Mexico ............... 1
Silver scurf I
(Spondylocladium I
atrovirens) .......... Potato ....... ... Spain................. 6
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ............... .... I Sweden ............... I
Silver scurf
(Spondylocladium
atrovirens) .......... Potato ....................... Venezuela ............ 1
Snow scale
(Chionaspis citri
Comst.) ...... .... Grapefruit .................... Costa Rica .......... 1







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Snow scale
(Chionaspis citri
Com st.) ................
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............
Soft brown scale
(Coccus hesperidum
(Linn.)) .............
Soft rot
(Penicillium sp.) ....
Spindle tuber ..............
Stellate scale
(Vinsonia stelli-
fera (Westw.))....
Stellate scale
(Vinsonia stelli-
fera (Westw.))...
Sugar cane borer
(Diatraea sp.)..........
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
(Fab.)) ................
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
(Fab.)) ............
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
(Fab.)) ................
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
(Fab.)) .............
Sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius
(Fab.)) ................
Thrips
(A leurodothrips
fasciapennis
Franklin) ............

Thrips
(Aleurodothrips
fasciapennis
Franklin) ............
Thrips
(Cephalothrips
merrilli Watson)..
Tuber spotting
(Alternaria sp.) ......
Wax scale
(Ceroplastes sp.) ....
Weevil
(Euscepes sp.) ......
West Indian fruit fly
(Anastrepha fra-
terculus Wied.) ....
Whitefly
(Aleyrodes lauri
Sign.) (?) ..........


Occurring on From




II
Orange ...................... Belgium ..............

Citrus ......................... Florida ................


Oleander ...................... M issouri ..............

Apple ........ ..........Spain ..................
Potato ......-.-.....-.- Belgium .............

Banana ..................... Bahama Islands..

Sapodilla (?) ............ Bahama Islands..

Sugar cane ...... ....... Cuba ....................

Sweet potato ................ Bahama Islands..

Sweet potato ........... Cuba ..........

Sweet potato ..-....--Grand Cayman....

Sweet potato ........... Louisiana ...........

Sweet potato ................ Texas ..............


Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus
(Marl.) on coconut..


Cuba ....


Coconut ................. Trinidad .............
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus
(Marl.) on coconut.. Cuba ................
Potato .......................... Mexico ................

Jasm ine ........................ Cuba ....................

Sweet potato ................ Brazil ..................

Guava ................... Cuba ....................

Laurus nobilis ........... Italy ....................


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1

1

1

1
1

1

1

1

1

2

1

2

6




1


1

1

1
1

1

1

1







Sixth Biennial Report 97


1 I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on I From Shipments
IInfested
Withertip
(Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides
Penz.) .. ........... Citrus ........................... Florida ................ 1
Withertip
(Colletotrichum
glceosporioides
Penz.) ................... Lime ....... ................. Barbados ........... 1
Woolly whitefly
(A leurothrixus
howardi
(Quaint.)) .......... Orange .......................... Cuba .................... 1
Woolly whitefly
(Aleurothrixus
howardi
(Quaint.)) ............ Unknown .....................Bahama Islands-.! 1

PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED

Shipments by Means of Parcel Post
Year Ending June 30, 1926

I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Fm Infested
Aphid
(Aphis sp.) ......------ Chrysanthemum .......... Pennsylvania ...... 1
Aphid I
(Aphis sp.) ........Lily ............................... Bermuda .......
Aphid
(Rhopalosiphum I
sp.) .....-... Chrysanthemum .......... Pennsylvania ...... 5
Blackfly
(Aleurocanthus
woglumi Ashby).. Citrus ............................ Cuba .................. 2
Carnation rust I
(Uromyces caryo-
phyllinus) ............ Carnation .................. Pennsylvania ...... 9
Chaff scale
(Parlatoria per-
gandii Comst.) .... Lime ................. Mexico ................ 1
Chrysanthemum midge
(Diarthronomyia
hypogaea Loew.).. Chrysanthemum .......... Pennsylvania ...... 16
Common fungus
(Verticillium
heterocladum) ...... Common whitefly on
jessamine ................ Georgia .............. 1
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ................ Citrus .............. .. Florida ............... 1
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) ............... Jessamine ..................... Georgia ........... 1
Common whitefly
(Dialeurodes citri
(Ash.)) .............. Orange .................... Florida ................ 1







State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease Occurring on

Convergent ladybeetlel
(Hippodamia con-
vergens Guer.) .... Chrysanthemum ..........
Cottony-cushion scale
(Icerya purchase
Mask.) ............... Acalypha .....................
Cottony-cushion scale
(Icerya purchase
M ask.) ....... ..... Pecan ......... .............
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens) .............. Lantana ......................
Crown gall
(Bacterium tume-
faciens) ............... Rose ..........................
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Camphor ....................
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Oleander ......................
Dictyospermum scale
(Chrysomphalus
dictyospermi
(Morg.)) .............. Orange ........................
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ..............Fern ....... ...........
Fern scale
(Hemichionaspis
aspidistrae
(Sign.)) ..............Fern ....... ...........
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.)) Oleander ......................
Florida red scale
(Chrysomphalus
aonidum (Linn.)) Succulent plant ............
Hemispherical scale
(Saissetia hemis-
phaerica
(Targ.)) ..............Fern ..............................
Ivy scale
(Aspidiotus hederae
(V all.)) ................ Ivy ................................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) .......... ......... Fig ...........................
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign.) .......... .... Jasmine ....... ...........
Latania scale
(Aspidiotus lataniael
Sign.) .................. Sapota ..........................
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.)) .... Hibiscus ......................


From



Georgia ................

Florida ................


Florida ...............

Pennsylvania ......

Florida ...............


Florida ...............


Florida ................


Florida ................


Ohio ...................


Pennsylvania ......

Florida ................

Florida ................


Ohio ................

Florida ................

Florida ................

Florida ................

Mexico ................


Florida ....... ....


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1


1


1

1

1


1


1


1


1


2

1

1


1

1

1

1

1

2


I







Sixth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.))....
Lesser snow scale
(Hemichionaspis
minor (Mask.))....
M ite (?) .....................
Mulberry whitefly
(Tetraleurodes
mori (Quaint.))..
Palmetto scale
(Comstockiella sa-
balis (Comst.))....
Purple scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii
(Newman)) ........
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.))
Pustule scale
(Asterolecanium
pustulans (Ckll.))
Pyriform scale
(Pulvinaria pyri-
formis Ckll.) ......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.) )......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.))......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.) )......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.) )......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ......
Root knot
(Heterodera radici-
cola (Greef.)) ......
Rose scale
(Aulacaspis rosae
(Bouche)) ............


Occurring on



Palm ..............................


Succulent plant ..........
Dasheen ..... ..............


Guava ............................


Palm etto ..................

Lemon ........................


Geranium ..........--------

Oleander ........................


3uava ...................-..I...


lematis -........-...-- ----


Coleus ....................-----

Fig ......------ -------.

Geranium ......................

Peach ......... -..........


Pecan ..................-

Rose --- ------

R ose ..............- .........


Unknown .......................

Weigela ......................


Rose .........- ....-


From



Florida ................


Florida ...........-
Florida ..............

Florida ................

Florida ................

Italy ..................


Florida ..............

Florida ........

Florida ...............


Pennsylvania ......

Florida .......--.

Florida ............

Pennsylvania ......

Florida ..............

Florida ..............

Florida ..............

Pennsylvania ......

Florida ................

Pennsylvania ......

Florida ................


99


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1


1
1

1

1


1

1


6


1


1

1

3

1


1

1

1

9

1

2


1







State Plant Board of Florida


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Royal palm bug
(Xylostodoris luteo-
lus Barber) ........ Royal palm ........... .... Cuba ...... ......... 1
Rust
(Physopella fici
(Cost.) Arth.)..... Fig ....................... Cuba ................. 1
Scab
(Cladosporium citri
M assee) ..... Citrus ........................... Florida ........... 2
Scab
(Venturia
inaequalis) .......... Apple .......-..- ......... IDenmark .............. 3
Scale
(Aspidiotus orien-
talis cocotiphagus
(M arl.)) .............. Coconut ..................... Cuba ..................
Soft brown scale I
(Coccus hesperiduml
(Linn.)) ............... Oleander .................... Florida ...............
Tea scale
(Fiorinia theae
Green) ................ Japonica ................... Georgia .... 1
Withertip
(Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides I
(Penz.)) .............ILim e ........................... M exico ................ 1




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