• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Report of the state plant...
 Report of the plant commission...
 Appendix A: List of pests and diseases...
 Appendix B: Rules and regulations...
 Appendix C: The quarterly bulletin,...






Group Title: Report for the period ... of the State Plant Board of Florida
Title: Report for the period ...
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098574/00002
 Material Information
Title: Report for the period ...
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: State Plant Board of Florida
Publisher: State Plant Board of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1922/24
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Protection of -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State Plant Board of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1920/22)- 23rd (1958/60).
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1950/52-1958/60 also called: Bulletin.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098574
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 10989019
lccn - sn 86033752
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report for the biennial period ending ... and supplemental reports to ...
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
    Table of Contents
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
    Report of the state plant board
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
    Report of the plant commissioner
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    Appendix A: List of pests and diseases intercepted during the biennium
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    Appendix B: Rules and regulations of the state plant board in effect June 30, 1924
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    Appendix C: The quarterly bulletin, Volumes VII and VIII
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Full Text




STATE PLANT BOARD
OF FLORIDA





REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1922-
JUNE 30, 1924


(Fifth Biennial Report)


I;,


With Circulars Nos. 45 to 51, incl.
and

The Quarterly Bulletin
Vols. VII and VIII


LIBRARY
PLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION
OAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

JANUARY, 1925




/02
pFrl c/
AGRI-
CULTURAL
LIBRARY









STATE PLANT BOARD
of Florida
P. K. YONGE, Chairman..............................-..............-....Pensacola
E. L. W ARTMANN- ---...................-.... ---.......................... Citra
JOHN C. COOPER, JR.-----. ....-...-.........-.........------Jacksonville
W. B. DAVIS ..--......................- ....... ..Perry
ALBERT H. BLANDINGG..---. ---------.......................Leesburg
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary ........................................... Tallahassee

STAFF
WILMON NEWELL, Plant Commissioner-----........................Gainesville
E. W BERGER, Entomologist..........................................Gainesville
F. M. O'BYRNE, Nursery Inspector..............-................-Gainesville
J. H. MONTGOMERY, Quarantine Inspector.................. Gainesville
J. C. GOODWIN, Apiary Inspector..-----................-- Gainesville
ARTHUR C. BROWN, General Inspector, Dept. of Citrus
Canker Eradication....... .....Gainesville
O. F. BURGER, Plant Pathologist.---.........................Gainesville
MIss LENA R. HUNTER, Chief Clerk......--........................Gainesville











CONTENTS
/3v
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL ................................... ................ 5
REPORT OF THE STATE PLANT BOARD........................................... 5
REPORT OF THE PLANT COMMISSIONER.................................. 7
CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT................................... 9
NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT ............... ......... .................11
Perm it Certificates ...................................... ............................13
Violations of Regulations-...-.--- --............................14
QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT ............ .............. .......... ...................--14
Summary of Activities of the Department Since It was Inaug-
urated ... ---....---.............-- ....--- ------ ------- ..- .............--- 16
Important Interceptions During Year Ending June 30, 1923........17
Interceptions During Year Ending June 30, 1924..............-.............17
DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY----- -............ .......----------..---.. 19
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication................... .....................20
Cotton Insects ...------...... ........................ 21
PLANT PATHOLOGY .............................................. ........... 23
Cotton Disease Investigations--......----... ....---------..... 23
Coconut Bud Rot------............. ------.................24
Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane..-..........-.... ..-----......--- ---- 25
APIARY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT -........--. ----------......................---26
Summary of Activities of the Department Since It was Inaug-
urated ...-----..... ....... ............................... 27
COOPERATION .... .. ......................... ........................... ... ....------ 28
RULES ............... ........ .---------.....------..-----..28
PUBLICATIONS -----...........--- ----------------.....- ..........31
RECOMMENDATIIONS AND ESTIMATES.---.....--....- .................... 31
EMPLOYEES
List of Employees June 30, 1924.. -------------............ ... ....................32
FINANCIAL REPORT
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1923---------......-----............... ...----- 34
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1924.........-........... -------.........-- 37

APPENDIX A
LIST OF PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED DURING THE BIENNIUM......42

APPENDIX B
RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE PLANT BOARD IN EFFECT
JUNE 30, 1924.

APPENDIX C
THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN, VOLUMES VII AND VIII.






Fifth Biennial Report


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

January 15, 1925.
To His Excellency,
John W. Martin,
Governor of Florida.
SIR: Herewith is submitted the report of the State Plant
Board of Florida for the period beginning July 1, 1922 and end-
ing June 30, 1924. Please submit same to the Legislature.
Respectfully,
STATE PLANT BOARD OF FLORIDA,
By P. K. YONGE,
Chairman.

REPORT OF STATE PLANT BOARD
There has been little change in the practices and policies of
the State Plant Board in carrying out the purpose and intent of
the Florida Plant Act of 1915 (Chapter 6885, Laws of Florida)
as they have been developed since the passage of the Act creat-
ing the Board. The regulatory work of the organization under
the direction of the Plant Commissioner has, in our opinion,
contributed greatly to the prosperity and stability of our agri-
culture through efforts to prevent the introduction into the
state or the distribution within the state of injurious plant
pests. The prosecution of the campaign to eradicate citrus
canker has been continued without interruption and with appar-
ent success. No new centers of infection have been located
since the discovery of the Davie infection in May of 1922 as re-
ported in our last biennial report. Under direction of the Legis-
lature the Board has undertaken certain investigations with
respect to cotton pests and of measures to control these pests.
Specialists in both Entomology and Plant Pathology are em-
ployed for this purpose and laboratory as well as field work is
being carried on. All of these activities are reported on in the
report of the Plant Commissioner which is incorporated in and
made a part of the Board's report. There is also presented the





6 State Plant Board of Florida

report of the Board's Secretary as to the administration of the
state funds placed at the disposal of the Board.
The personnel of the Board at the end of the biennium is as
follows: P. K. Yonge, E. L. Wartmann, W. L. Weaver, J. C.
Cooper, Jr., and A. H. Blanding. Messrs. Yonge, Weaver and
Cooper had been appointed as members by Governor Hardee in
July, 1921. Mr. Wartmann was reappointed to succeed himself
and Mr. Blanding to succeed J. B. Sutton in July, 1923. The
present Board was organized July 9, 1923, with P. K. Yonge as
Chairman and J. T. Diamond as Secretary.
The reports of the Plant Commissioner and Secretary are
transmitted herewith.
STATE PLANT BOARD,
P. K. YONGE,
Chairman.






Fifth Biennial Report


REPORT OF PLANT COMMISSIONER
For the Biennium Ending June 30, 1924
Gainesville, Florida,
December 15, 1924.
Hon. P. K. Yonge, Chairman,
State Plant Board of Florida.
SIR: I have the honor to present herewith my report as Plant
Commissioner for the biennium ending June 30, 1924.
Respectfully,
WILMON NEWELL,
Plant Commissioner.

During the past two years the policies and practices of the
Board have been continued along the same lines as formerly.
It is believed that the Board's efforts to prevent the introduc-
tion into and the spread within the state of serious plant pests
have been in large measure successful.
There have been no recurrences of citrus canker in any of
the localities where the disease had previously been found and
the situation with respect to the most recent outbreak, that at
Davie which was found in May of 1922, is most encouraging.
No infected trees have been found there or elsewhere in the
State since October 18, 1923.
So far as known, no pest of first importance has been intro-
duced, and the nursery inspection service has functioned with
a fair degree of efficiency notwithstanding greatly increased ac-
tivity in the nursery business and the handicap of a small force
of inspectors.
Former reports have been somewhat detailed and elaborate.
Now that the Board has been functioning for almost ten years,
its work has become systematized and the public is well advised
as to the nature of the Board's work, it is not thought neces-
sary or advisable to submit a report dealing with the work in
such detailed manner as formerly. The Board members are
cognizant of the manner in which the Plant Commissioner and
the department heads have handled the particular phases of
Plant Board work assigned to them. The members of the State
Legislature and the public generally, by reason of the extensive






State Plant Board of Florida


and rather voluminous reports heretofore submitted, have been
kept advised as to the efforts made by the Board to protect the
state's horticultural and agricultural industries. This report
will therefore deal especially with the more important aspects
of our work during the biennium closing June 30, 1924. In the
compilation of the statistical matter here presented, an im-
mense amount of detailed information has been condensed. This
is particularly true with respect to the data included in the
section devoted to the activities of the Nursery Inspection De-
partment.
The Plant Commissioner would here call attention to the
limitations on the complete and most efficient operation of this
department through the greatly increased plantings of nurser-
ies in the state without correspondingly increased facilities for
making the necessary inspections. Under the climatic condi-
tions existing in this state and the character of the nursery
stock grown and planted, it is regarded by the best authorities
that four inspections a year of all nursery stock are essential.
This has been our aim, but we regret that during the year just
closed barely two inspections have been made on an average.
This deficiency is accounted for by the astonishing development
of field plantings, which has called for corresponding expansion
of the nurseries. As an illustration, it may be stated that the
acreage planted to citrus in this state was, in 1919, 160,397
acres, while in 1923 this acreage had increased to 253,570. In
order to meet the demand from planters for trees, the citrus
nurseries increased from 1,910 acres in 1919 to 4,416 acres in
1923. The number of inspectors engaged in the nursery inspec-
tion work is totally inadequate. The number of men it has been
possible to assign to this work was reduced by two in 1923-24
as compared with 1922-23, notwithstanding the increased plant-
ings. Obviously the work suffered. It is earnestly hoped and
expected that financial provision will be made for expanding
this department to keep pace with the demands.
As in the past, the work of the Board has been conducted
under the general supervision of the Plant Commissioner. The
major activities have likewise been conducted under the im-
mediate supervision of officials acting as department heads.
These major activities have been classified as
(a) Citrus Canker Eradication and Grove Inspection
(b) Quarantine Inspection
(c) Nursery Inspection






Fifth Biennial Report


(d) Entomology, Including Boll Weevil Control
(e) Plant Pathology, Including Cotton Disease Investigation
(f) Apiary Inspection
Certain special lines of work on situations requiring attention
of a special nature, not specifically contemplated under the gen-
eral plan of departmental classification, are supervised by the
Plant Commissioner personally or, under special assignment,
by some one of the department heads; as, for instance, the ef-
forts to eradicate the sweet potato weevil in certain portions of
the State and similar efforts to prevent the spread of, and to
minimize the effects of, the mosaic disease of sugar cane.
The Plant Commissioner is pleased to report that in all lines
of endeavor the Board's efforts have resulted, in his judgment,
in benefit to the State. It is a matter of pardonable pride that
other states, observing the good accomplished by the State Plant
Board of Florida, have modeled, in many respects, their own
work after that of Florida.

CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION

If any one of the chief departmental activities might be called
the most important, it would probably be that of Citrus Canker
Eradication and Grove Inspection. Ten years ago the citrus
growers of this state were thrown into consternation through
the discovery of a strange and unknown disease attacking citrus
trees. Experts were at a loss to identify it and curative or
repressive measures were of no avail. Finally the condition was
recognized as one which was quite common in Japan and other
parts of the Orient. Under the favorable climatic conditions in
Florida and the Gulf States the disease threatened to prove
disastrous. The conclusion was reached that only through com-
plete eradication could the citrus industry be saved and a vig-
orous campaign was entered upon participated in by growers
and both the state and federal governments. The total cost of
this effort, up to June 30, 1924, has been great, involving an
expenditure of $1,718,037.45, which does not include the value
of trees, infected and noninfected, which were destroyed in the
course of the campaign. Large as this sum is, it is insignificant
when compared to value of the industry which has been saved.
Conservative estimates of the value of the citrus grove plant-
ings in Florida place the figure at $250,000,000.00. The citrus
crop of 1923-24 amounted to 20,000,000 boxes. There is no ques-







State Plant Board of Florida


tion but that this large industry has been saved through the
joint efforts of the State Plant Board and the Bureau of Plant
Industry, United States Department of Agriculture.
Inspectors of the Board have not only combated citrus
canker in the Davie section, but have kept under close observa-
tion all areas where the disease had formerly been found and
apparently stamped out. Then too, during the biennium a
complete survey of all citrus plantings in the state was fin-
ished. During the two-year period more than twelve million
citrus grove-tree inspections were made by agents of the Board.
This does not mean that twelve million trees were inspected,
for many trees in the infected and exposed areas were inspected
repeatedly. During the year ending June 30, 1924, 26 inspectors
have been engaged in this work.
The following summary supplies the essential information
concerning the eradication of citrus canker in Florida up to June
30, 1924:

SUMMARY

Total number of properties found infected in the State.................... 510
Total number declared no longer danger centers.............................---... 502
Number still classed as active infections, June 30, 1924.................... 8
Number of properties declared "clean"...................---................. 486
Number of properties still under partial or full quarantine, June
30, 1924 .................................................................. ............................. 24
Total number of grove trees found infected May 1, 1914 to June
30, 1924 ..----................-.... ------------...... 15,151
Total number of nursery trees found infected May 1, 1914 to June
30, 1924 ..........................................---- .........-...............--- 342,260
Total number of "exposed" grove trees destroyed, May 1, 1914 to
June 30, 1924 .-.......................---- .......... ........ ............. ..... 236,873
Total number of "exposed" nursery trees destroyed, May 1, 1914
to June 30, 1924.........--.................--- ...- .. ... ..----- .- -......- ..--2,720,525
The sums expended in this work in Florida from its inception
are shown in the following tabulation:
Federal State Other
Funds* Funds Sources
Prior to May 1, 1920.................---$ 860,973.51 $362,258.63 $85,019.62**
May 1, 1920 to April 30, 1921.... 38,577.04 61,587.66 ...
May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922.... 16,944.42 81,555.32 ....
July 1, 1922 to June 30, 1924 ..... 83,786.61 127,334.64 .. ...
Totals ............. .......................$1,000,281.58 $632,736.25 $85,019.62
Total, all sources ........................... ---- ----------$1,718,037.45***
*Does not include special salary increases provided by Act of Congress.
**Includes donations from inspectors,, transportation companies, growers, etc.
***Includes expenditures directly chargeable to citrus canker eradication.






Fifth Biennial Report


The following tabulation shows the total number of grove
trees found infected with canker by months and years since
the work began in May of 1914.


rN |11 No | 1 No *

Jan. .... 306 86 14 0 O0 i0 0 0 1 0
Feb. ._.. ...... 165 21 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0
Mar. ... ....... 444 49 9 1 1 0 0 0 2 0
Apr. ... ...... 408 49 169 2 1 0 0 0 3 0
May ... 108 1,042 338 52 1 1 0 0 585 2 0
Jun. ... 160 772 450 45 10 0 0 0 168 1 0
Jul. .. 275 651 349 39 0 0 539 0 28 0
Aug. 1,313 1,345 219 30 0 1 1 0 34 0
Sep. .... 767 618 124 6 0 0 0 0 23 0
Oct. ... 565 214 451 2 0 0 0 0 19 1
Nov. ... 773 494 131 1 0 0 0 0 12 0
Dec. ... 366 256 27 1 0 0 0 0 4 0
Tot. ....14,327 16,715 2,2941 372 | 15 4 540 0 873 11 _

Citrus canker has been found in twenty-two counties in the
State. In the 510 infected properties, 15,151 grove trees and
342,260 nursery trees have been found diseased and destroyed

NURSERY INSPECTION

The methods made use of by this department to prevent dis.
tribution of plant pests by means of nursery stock have not
been materially changed during the past biennium. The volume
of nursery inspection work has very greatly increased, necessi-
tating a reduction of the number of inspections per annum to
each nursery. It has been our objective to not only make
thorough inspections but frequent ones as well. Owing to the
extensive activity in nursery operations, it has not been possible
to make on an average more than two inspections a year. These
inspections have been careful, as is evidenced by the number of
nurseries which were refused certification or which had certifi-
cates suspended. For the year ending June 30, 1924, there
were 657 nurseries from which certification was withheld or
suspended. Some of these nurseries were unable to pass rein-
spection, bringing the total number of "refusals" (not nurser-
ies) for the year up to 965. In the preceding year the number
was 310. The total number of nurseries, both commercial and
non-commercial, under inspection for 1922-23 was 3,695, contain-
ing 4,698 acres. In 1923-24 there were 4,784 nurseries, with a






State Plant Board of Florida


total acreage of 6,864. In 1922-23 there were 1,566 nurseries in
the state holding certificates, while in 1923-24 this number had
increased to 2,005.
The greatest increase in number of nurseries and in acreage
under inspection has been in citrus. This was due to stimulation
of demand to meet the requirements of grove plantings. The
acreage in citrus nurseries was 3,433 in 1922-23 and 4,416 in
1923-24. This acreage includes nurseries, whether certified or
not. Many nurseries do not need certification, for it was not
contemplated that stock would be sold therefrom. However,'
all nurseries, whether propagating for sale purposes or not,
are kept under inspectional observation, for experience has
shown that stock movement is frequently made from so-called
"non-commercial" nurseries. The non-commercial nurseries
are not inspected as frequently as are those which make nursery
stock propagation a business.
Under the Florida system of nursery inspection, each pack-
age or lot of nursery stock, when moved from the property
where grown, must have a certificate tag attached. Certificate
tags, when issued are valid until used, recalled or the nursery
goes out of business. Nurseries, on the original certification,
can procure from the State Plant Board additional quantities of
tags, dependent, of course, upon the nursery continuing to pass
inspection. The use of a tag on a shipment invalidates it for
further use. The number of tags issued each year serves, in a
measure, as a fair index of the volume of nursery stock move-
ment. There were 195,028 such tags issued during the year
ending June 30, 1924. There were 14,293 more certificate tags
issued in 1923-24 than in the preceding year, which was itself
a record breaking year. The number of individuals or firms
holding certificates increased by 593.
Most states, including Florida, require, as a preliminary to
authorizing shipment of nursery stock into the State, that a
certificate of inspection from the home state of the nursery
be filed with the proper official of the state into which the stock
is to be shipped. Florida nurserymen have engaged quite ex-
tensively in export business. In 1922-23 the Nursery Inspector
issued to Florida nurserymen 290 such certificates for filing in
31 states and in 1923-24, 254 for filing in 32 states.







Fifth Biennial Report


PERMIT CERTIFICATES

Under the Florida law (Section 8 of the Plant Act of 1915)
there are certain requirements which must be complied with in
order to make shipments of nursery stock into the State. All
such shipments are subject to inspection when coming under the
observation of inspectors of the Board. Many are handled each
year by inspectors of the Quarantine Service. When found to
be infected or infested, they are either properly treated or re-
fused delivery.
In order to facilitate movement of stock into the State as well
as to have a record of such movements, the certificate or permit
provided for in Section 8 of the Plant Act is issued to out-state
nurserymen after the Nursery Inspector has been supplied with
a signed copy of the certificate issued by the inspector of nur-
sery stock of the state wherein the nursery is located, and has
also been supplied with such other information as may indicate
the reasonable assurance that shipments may be made with
safety. All shipments made under permits must be reported to
the Nursery Inspector by invoice just as are shipments made
within the State.
During the year ending June 30, 1923, 34,383 permit certifi-
cate tags were issued to 247 out-state nurseries. For the year
ending June 30, 1924, 284 nurseries secured 36,925 permit cer-
tificate tags.
In connection with the actual inspection of nurseries in Flor-
ida the State Plant Board system contemplates having a com-
plete record of all stock movements made under certificate. This
means all stock, for none can be moved legally unless accom-
panied by a certificate tag. This practice insures proper use
and accounting for such use of all tags issued. In addition, and
perhaps of more importance, there is provided a record of all
stock-quantity and kind-shipped, by whom and to whom.
There is, consequently, available important information at all
times in event of necessity arising to follow up nursery stock
movements.
Citrus constitutes the bulk of nursery stock moved in this
state. From our records we are enabled to submit the follow-
ing tabulation showing the quantity of citrus stock moved in
Florida during the past several years.








State Plant Board of Florida


Orange ..................
Grapefruit ............
Tangerines ..... .....
Satsumas ............
Limes .............-
Lemons .......-........--
Sour Orange
Seedlings .........
Other Seedlings..--
Citrus (Var. Not
Given) ..............
Total Citrus
Moved ..............-.


1,458,293
460,614
133,639
50,715
11,677
372,414

97,421


2,584,773


r, 01 0 C.1 C11

co a n 0 oa



1,118,255 1,117,752 1,955,638 1,730,668
352,522 259,416 504,250 462,288
121,662 171,750 437,259 388,145
41,627 140,378 80,009 224,513
7,116 2,134 3,214 3,293
3,294,558 3,719,137 2,820,427 3,715,916
774,330 1,159,544 1,461,232 5,013.768
77,104 220,618 206,491 1,160,166
137,024 115,670 131,440 338,710

5,990,196 6,906,399 7,619,657 13,037,467


VIOLATIONS OF REGULATIONS

As in all regulatory work, there are at times infractions of
the rules and regulations of the State Plant Board. This is par-
ticularly so with respect to the requirements as to the movement
of nursery stock. It is a matter of surprise and of congratula-
tion, however, that the observance of these restrictions is most
excellent. When investigation shows that violations are unin-
tentional, admonition and advice are given. When, however, it
is evident that there were intentional and premeditated viola-
tions the Board has instituted proceedings. During the bien-
nium there were seven prosecutions and seven convictions; three
of the convictions were in cases pending at the close of the pre-
vious biennium. There are now three prosecutions not dis-
posed of. Since the inauguration of the Plant Board work,
forty-eight cases have been tried and forty-three convictions
secured. This is a record which is very creditable for it indi-
cates two things of importance: general observance of the
Plant Board regulations and that the Board is not oppressive
or unreasonable in the administration of its work.

QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT

In the protection of the State's plant industries it is obviously
of no avail to maintain protective service within the State if at
the same time efforts are not made to .prevent the introduction
of new and additional plant pests from without. The Board,






Fifth Biennial Report


therefore, has put forth every possible effort in this direction.
A division was early created (the Port & Railway Inspection De-
partment, later known as the Quarantine Department) whose
particular duty it is to see that shipments of nursery stock and
plant products into the State are made in conformity with the
rules of the Board. Inspectors of the Quarantine Department
are stationed at the maritime ports and the principal rail gate-
ways. All plants and plant products coming under the rules of
the Board are carefully scrutinized. Prohibited materials are
rejected. Diseased or insect-infested plants are either treated
and made safe or otherwise disposed of, and in other ways the
rules of the Board are applied. In the process of the application
of the Board's rules all vessels, domestic and foreign, arriving
at Florida ports are inspected and shipments by freight, ex-
press and mail are likewise safeguarded. In the inspection of
foreign vessels and the handling of plant materials from for-
eign countries the Board's inspectors, holding appointments as
collaborators of the Federal Horticultural Board, administer the
federal regulations as well as those of the state. In this work
the closest cooperative relations exist with the operatives of the
Customs, Immigration and other Federal Services. Inspectors
of the Quarantine Department are stationed at Pensacola, Jack-
sonville, West Palm Beach, Miami, Key West, Fort Myers and
Tampa. There are now fourteen men attached to this service.
The men at West Palm Beach and Fort Myers are engaged in
grove inspection and nursery inspection work, as well as acting
as inspectors of the Quarantine Department. At other smaller
ports of entry, as Apalachicola, St. Augustine, etc., the Cus-
toms officials cooperate with us in handling foreign imports of
plants.
During the biennium 4,516 vessels from foreign ports were
boarded and inspected, while 4,885 domestic vessels were simi-
larly inspected. On account of the grave danger of the intro-
duction of new and dangerous pests from abroad, such as fruit
flies, the black fly and the citrus canker, particular attention
is given to the inspection of foreign shipping. At Key West,
Miami and Port Tampa (the ports through which the bulk of
foreign imports pass) fumigating plants are operated where
all fruits, vegetables and other plant materials entering under
permit are fumigated with hydrocyanic acid gas.














The following tabulation is presented showing the work of the
Quarantine Division by years since this work was inaugurated


SN- O C CO c P s
IM CO 00 M C0 M CO CO
-q01 01 M



boat, express, t
Foreign Boats.. 166 1240 1777 1724 2458 73035 2225 364 12207 2309 17503 *
Total Boats-...... 370 3257 4253 3485 4504 4948 4179 697 4559 4842 35094 ty
No. Packages o
arriving by
boat, express,
freight, mail.. 500 3105 3422 *69985 336059% 710412/ 1333333%2 747972 1827727 1410860t 6446650
No. Packages
returned -------...... 18 255 485 1521 49361/2 2130% 2610 201 1006 1566 14729
No. Packages I
destroyed ...... 69 1182 1037% 17433% 2345 1564% 1757 311 2278 4478 16745
*Prior to August 1, 1918, horticultural material inspected was reported by shipments. A shipment might comprise 1 or 1.000 packages. Sub-
sequent to above date reports were made of the number of packages and hulk shipments were reduced to packages on basis of contents of standard
containers used for particular products.
tDecrease in number of packages arriving was due to the Federal Horticultural Board Quarantine No. 56, prohibiting the entry of fruits from
foreign countries, except under permit, which went into effect in November, 1923.







Fifth Biennial Report


There is presented herewith statistical information in the
form of a tabulation showing the work of the Quarantine De-
partment by years, since the work was inaugurated.
A complete list of the pests intercepted is appended to this
report. Some of the more important are here listed.


INTERCEPTED DURING YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1923

I No. Ship-
Insect or Disease From I ments in-
Stercepted
Argentine ant.... ...........--. ---.. .. ..... Louisiana ...................... 1
Aspidiotus destructor Sign................ Cuba ................... .. 52
Aspidiotus orientalis Newst.............- Cuba and Colombia.... 84
Alcurocanthus woglumni Ashby (black-
fly) .......... ...... .............-. Cuba and Bahamas...... 15
Diplodia cacaoicola P. Henn...... .... Santo Domingo ........... 1
Mexican orange maggot-............ ..... Mexico .......................... 1
Psendaonidia duplex (Ckll.) (camphor
scale) .......................... Louisiana .................... 1
Pseudaonidia paeoniae (Ckll.)................. Georgia .......................I 1
Pseudaonidia tesserata (de Charm)........ Cuba ........................... 3
Pseudococcus sacchari Ckll..................... Cuba ......................... 1
Pyralid, Plodia sp............... ...... India ....... ................ 1
Strawberry crown borer ......................... Georgia and Arkansas 5
Targionia hartii (Ckll.) .................. Grand Cayman -.......... 2
Targionia sacchari (Ckll.)- .............. West Indies ............. 39
Vinsonia stellifera Westw. .--........... Bahamas .--- ...-. 2
W est Indian fruit fly.............................. Cuba ........ ......... 14


INTERCEPTED DURING YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1924


Insect or Disease


From


Aspidiotus destructor Sign............... West In
Aspidiotus orientalis Newst.................... West In
Blackfly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ash-
by) ......................................... .. ...... .... . Bahama
Blackfly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ash-
by) ..----.............. ........... ... Cuba ...
Blackfly egg spiral................. .. Bahama
Black scale ..................................... ... Cuba ..
Chionaspis salicis (Linn.) ..................... England
Coccus viridis (Green) ...................- ...... Cuba ..
Lecanium viridis (Green).......................... Cuba ...
Pseudaonidia paeoniae (Ckll.)................. South C
Rufous scale ..........................-....... Bahama


Stellate scale ..................... ..... ...............
Spruce cone gall.....................................
Strawberry crown borer .........................
West Indian fruit fly (Anastrepha fra-
terculus Wied.) ...................................
West Indian fruit fly (Anastrepha fra-
terculus W ied.) ........ ........................


Cuba ..
Mexico
Bahama
German
Georgia

Cuba -.

Jamaica


dies ..............
dies ............


Islands...... .....

Islands ........-



arolina..............
Islands .......

Islands ...- ...
..------------------------
y ---------------


No. Ship-
ments in-
tercepted
33
45

1

| 5
I 1


I _


]







State Plant Board of Florida


During the year ending June 30, 1923, insect pests and plant
diseases were intercepted on material arriving at Florida ports
from 26 foreign countries:


Argentine
Bahama Islands
Barbados
Brazil
British West Indies
Canary Islands
Ceylon
Chile
Cuba
Denmark
England
Germany
Grand Cayman


Holland
Honduras
India
Jamaica
Mexico
Nicaragua
Norway
Panama
Peru
Porto Rico
Scotland
Spain
Trinidad


During the year ending June 30, 1924, insect pests and plant
diseases were intercepted on material arriving at Florida ports
from 33 foreign countries:


Argentine
Bahama Islands
Belgium
Bermuda
Brazil
British Honduras
British West Indies
Canal Zone-Panama
China
Colon
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dutch Guiana
Ecuador
England
France
Germany


Gibraltar
Grand Cayman
Holland
Honduras
Isle of Pines (Cuba)
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Mexico
New South Wales
Palestine
Panama
Porto Rico
Santo Domingo
Spain
Sweden


DEPARTMENTS OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT PATHOLOGY

The control of plant pests and the prevention of their spread
is based upon a knowledge of the life history and habits of in-
sects and the causes, symptoms and effects of plant diseases.
Much of this information is available from past work of the
specialists in those lines. Much is yet to be learned.. Also in
regulatory work it is essential that correct identification be
made of conditions found by field investigators. Then, too, new
pests are from time to time reported with which field agents
are unfamiliar or about which accurate scientific knowledge is
lacking.






Fifth Biennial Report


While the State Plant Board is essentially a regulatory or
police organization and not engaged primarily in scientific, re-
search work, yet it is necessary in connection with the regula-
tory work to have available specialists in entomology and plant
diseases to make identifications and to conduct special investi-
gations pertaining to particular activities in preventing, control-
ling and eradicating plant pests. This is particularly true in
handling situations like the discovery of the presence of coco-
nut bud rot in coconut plantings on the lower east coast and
in carrying out the expressed wishes of the State Legislature in
continuing investigations for perfecting measures for the con-
trol of the cotton boll weevil and of cotton diseases.

ENTOMOLOGY

The chief function of the Department of Entomology is to
identify insects collected by the field inspectors engaged in the
work of the other departments. This is especially so with re-
spect to the Quarantine and Nursery Inspection Departments.
Depending on the determination of the identity of insects by
specialists of the Department of Entomology frequently rests
the decision as to whether or not a nursery shall be placed under
quarantine and the length of the quarantine if imposed. Like-
wise, in connection with the work of the Quarantine Depart-
ment, decision as to the disposition of intercepted plants or
plant products is dependent on the identification of insect pests
on the specimens collected. Not only does the identification
work of the Department serve this purpose but it also is avail-
able for grove owners and farmers seeking information as to
the nature of insects affecting their crops. In the course of the
biennium ending June 30, 1924, 6,322 specimens were received,
identified and recorded. This makes a total of more than 20,000
identifications made since the organization of the Board's work.
In the early years of the Board's work it was found desirable
that growers have available a source of supply from Which
could be secured pure cultures of the fungi which are parasitic
on the citrus whiteflies and this project was undertaken.
Growers have secured, at a nominal cost, 1,369 pure cultures
from the Department during the biennium. '"''
The Department of Entomology has also continued to l collect,
rear and distribute Vedalia, a species of lady bird betle which
preys upon and holds in subjection the cottony cus ion-scale.






State Plant Board of Florida


More than 8,000 of these beneficial insects were distributed dur-
ing the biennium. A very small charge is made for this service.
The Department has contributed to the investigation of the
nature of and the control measures for an apparently new aphid
which appeared in the citrus groves of the peninsular section
of the state in 1924. In the early part of this year, 1924, re-
ports of an unusual infestation of aphids on citrus began to
pour in from the vicinity of Tampa and Valrico. The bloom
buds as well as the new growth buds were literally covered with
aphids and much loss of young fruit and stunted growth was
the result. Treatment was in general largely ineffective since
re-infestation took place almost immediately. This condition
prevailed until about June 24th, when an epidemic reduced the
aphids everywhere to practically insignificant numbers except
in the Fort Myers area, where severe infestation continued
several weeks longer. Sooner or later, however, evidence in the
shape of dead aphids began to appear from practically all parts
of Florida where the aphids occurred. We have called this epi-
demic, whatever it is (bacterial, fungoid or hot weather) "nat-
ural mortality." Investigations in an endeavor to isolate the
causative agent have so far been without results, but the aphids
are at least temporarily under control.*
It should be added that with the Tampa area and the Valrico
area as apparent centers, the aphids appeared to spread, first
over Pinellas County, Polk County and southward into the Fort
Myers area, later to the Vero area on the East Coast, including
Georgiana, and finally southward to Homestead. They have
also appeared in the Leesburg, Citra and Gainesville areas. How
far northeast they have spread in the Jacksonville direction is
not known.

SWEET POTATO WEEVIL

In past reports information has been supplied regarding the
work of the Board in connection with the sweet potato weevil
(Cylas formicarius Oliv.). This weevil has been known to be
present in the southern part of Florida for many years and has
seriously handicapped commercial sweet potato growing in
that section. The coastal region from the northern line of Vol-
usia County around the tip of Florida and on up the West Coast
to the northern line of Pasco County for some distance inland
*Subsequent to June 30, 1924 the aphid was identified as Aphis spireacola. The causa-
tive agent of a disease affecting this aphid has also been determined as EntomopthorJ sp.






Fifth Biennial Report


has been infested by the weevil. Several interior counties have
also been found to be infested. The quarantine regulations
safeguarding the shipment of sweet potato tubers and plants
from infested sections have without doubt materially aided in
preventing the spread of the weevil.
In one northern county, Baker, the sweet potato weevil had
gained foothold. In this county the Bureau of Entomology of
the United States Department of Agriculture, in cooperation
with the State Plant Board, undertook to conduct a large-
scale experiment to eradicate the weevil. At this time the ex-
periment gives promise of being successful. At the same time,
somewhat smaller experiments have been conducted in the more
southern counties. Although a definite and positive conclusion
as to the results of this experimental work cannot now be
reached, it appears that eradication in all sections and under all
conditions will not prove practical. In limited, isolated areas
and under favorable climatic conditions such as exist in north-
ern Florida, it may be that eradication could be resorted to with
good prospects of success. The prospect is not so promising in
south Florida. It is hoped, however, that by a continuance of
the work of the Bureau and of this Board a practical, workable
plan may be developed for the control of the weevil on individ-
ual farms to permit of successful commercial growing of sweet
potatoes.

COTTON INSECTS

Brief reference was made in the last biennial report to the
fact that the Plant Board had undertaken investigations with
respect to the boll weevil. The results of the early investiga-
tions were reported in an article entitled "Preliminary Report
upon an Improved Method of Controlling the Boll Weevil," pub-
lished in the Quarterly Bulletin of the State Plant Board, Octo-
ber issue, 1922, Volume VII, No. 1, and as Bulletin 165 of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. In these publications
were presented the investigational work done by Associate En-
tomologist George D. Smith on the life history of the cotton boll
weevil and a description of a method of control which gave
promise of affording a means of successfully combating the wee-
vil under Florida conditions. The announcement of Mr. Smith's
work and of this control method created a great deal of interest
among both cotton growers and entomologists. This work was






State Plant Board of Florida


regarded as a valuable contribution to the efforts of the scien-
tists to evolve a satisfactory control measure. The report of the
work of Mr. Smith and the announcement of the striking re-
sults obtained were not presented as anything other than as a
step in the fight against the weevil. The method of control was
subsequently named "The Florida Method" by Secretary Wal-
lace of the United States Department! of Agriculture and it is
now referred to in this manner by investigators and the public.
The State Legislature at its 1923 session provided for a con-
tinuance of the investigations to develop information regarding
the biology and habits of the boll weevil and other injurious in-
sects affecting cotton and of means of control. The Board has
maintained a field laboratory at Madison, Florida, and has con-
ducted field experiments at that place and at Gainesville. The
main object is to improve on the control methods now in use
and to test various methods of treatment which appear to pos-
sess merit. In the course of this work the Board's entomolo-
gists have discovered that in the application of calcium arsen-
ate in a liquid form as a poison on cotton plants a certain vari-
ation from the formula usually advocated appears to give better
results under Florida conditions than other calcium-syrup-water
mixtures and also that the use of the poison in liquid form gives
as good results as when applied in dust form and at a consider-
ably lower cash cost to the planter. A detailed account of this
work was published in the Quarterly Bulletin, Volume VIII,
No. 2.
At the time of preparing this report the cotton insect investi-
gation is well organized and the efforts to find a solution for the
cotton farmer's big problem, the control of the boll weevil, are
being continued unremittingly. The activities of the Board's
employees have not been directed solely along investigational
lines. They have in conjunction with county agricultural agents
given at various places in the cotton planting section of the
state demonstrations as to the control measures recommended
and have attended numerous farmers' meetings, giving ad-
dresses on the subject. During the current season rather ex-
tensive experimental and demonstrative work is being carried
on in Jackson County,in addition.to that at Madison and Gaines-
ville. In other counties similar work is being done on a some-
what smaller scale ,in. cooperation .with. county, .agents and
farmers.






Fifth Biennial Report 23

PLANT PATHOLOGY

As inspectors of the State Plant Board in their field work en-
counter diseases of plants as well as insects affecting the plants,
it is necessary that provision be made for expert advice regard-
ing these diseased conditions and also that positive identifica-
tions be made by trained specialists possessed of suitable labora-
tory facilities. The Board does not maintain a completely
equipped laboratory of its own. Through a very satisfactory
arrangement which has been made with the Agricultural Ex-
periment Station of the University of Florida, the laboratory
facilities and staff of pathologists of that organization have been
made available for the purpose of identifying specimens of dis-
eased plants and rendering other service as occasion requires.
In partial return for this the Plant Board has from time to time
supplied certain special laboratory equipment and supplies for
the joint use of the two organizations. As an instance of this
may be cited the construction by the Plant Board on the Sta-
tion property of a completely equipped and adequately safe-
guarded and heated greenhouse where intensive studies are be-
ing made of the disease of citrus known as citrus canker. We
desire here to express our appreciation of the great assistance
the Experiment Station staff has rendered the Board. This is
especially so in connection with pathological work. The Plant
Pathologist of the Station has been designated, under the co-
operative arrangement, as Pathologist on the Plant Board staff.

COTTON DISEASE INVESTIGATIONS

As part of the work of the Plant Board, the Legislature of
1923 imposed the duty of conducting investigations of diseases
and insects affecting the cotton plant. Reference has been made
to the cotton insect investigations under the section of this re-
port devoted to the Department of Entomology. In the investi-
gation of cotton diseases the work has been under way such a
comparatively short time that there is but little to present as to
results as of the date of this report.
By direction of the Board a competent plant pathologist was
employed and certain special 'laboratory equipment'vWas secured
for the prosecution of this work. Studies have been inaugu-
rated of the behavior of cotton under Florida conditions, of dis-
eases such as wilt, anthracnose and others common to cotton, of






State Plant Board of Florida


the effects on yield and avoidance of disease through the prac-
tice of delinting of cotton seed, of varieties resistant to disease
and of the influence of fertilizers in combating disease. We are
pleased to report that this phase of the Board's work is in most
excellent shape and with its continuance from this good begin-
ning we may anticipate results of great value.

COCONUT BUD ROT

In the southern part of the peninsula, that is from the lati-
tude of Stuart south, the coconut palm flourishes and by its
beauty and magnificence contributes to the tropical aspect of
that favored part of the state which is developing so rapidly.
The coconut palm, more than any other one thing, perhaps, not
even excepting the genial climate, attracts the winter resident
and visitor, as well as the investor. In the development of this
area hundreds of thousands of coconut palms have been made
use of in producing landscaping effects of surprising beauty. This
demand has resulted in the upbuilding of a large industry, the
coconut palm nursery business. Some extensive commercial
plantings have also been made.
From time to time during the past ten years reports have
been received to the effect that certain coconut palms were af-
fected by a condition which was thought to be the coconut bud
rot, a most serious disease which has devastated coconut plant-
ings in parts of Central America, the Philippines and the West
Indian Islands. Investigation of these reports invariably re-
sulted in our failure to find true coconut bud rot.
In January of 1924, one of the assistant nursery inspectors,
while making the customary inspections of nurseries in Dade
County, noted in a block of coconut palms an abnormal condition
of the palms and submitted specimens to the Plant Pathologist
at Gainesville. These arrived in such a stage of decomposition
that identification of the disease was impossible. Additional
specimens were secured and laboratory examinations confirmed
the suspicion that the disease was true coconut bud rot, caused
by the organism Phytophthora faberi. Further intensive field
inspections resulted in the discovery of what appeared to be the
same disease in several plantings in and near the cities of Miami
and Miami Beach. Diseased palms have also been located in
several coconut palm nurseries. In March a consultation was
held at Miami, participated in by Doctor W. H. Weston of Har-






Fifth Biennial Report


vard University, Doctor W. T. Horne of the University of Cali-
fornia, Doctor O. F. Burger, the Board's Pathologist, and the
Plant Commissioner. At that time Doctors Weston and Horne,
both of whom are eminent plant pathologists thoroughly fam-
iliar with coconut diseases and who were fortunately in Florida
and available for consultation, confirmed the conclusion pre-
viously reached by our own specialists as to the identity of
the disease. Quarantines have been imposed on all plantings
wherein diseased palms have been found and all diseased palms
have been destroyed as found. The cooperation of all interested
and affected parties has been most cordial.
Although no special funds are available for the prosecution
of an eradication campaign, the Plant Board forces have been
active, in so far as resources would permit, in endeavoring to
not only prevent the spread of this disease but to stamp it out.*
The source of the infection is not definitely established.

MOSAIC DISEASE OF SUGAR CANE

In the last biennial report we recounted the efforts to sup-
press and to prevent the spread of the mosaic disease of sugar
cane. This disease had been found in cane fields in a number of
West Florida counties. Efforts at eradication and to minimize
the damage caused by the disease proved ineffective, mainly be-
cause of the indifference or inactivity of cane planters. It was
difficult for them to realize that this disease, unless controlled,
would occasion serious losses. Consequently farmers failed to
cooperate with the Board in its project of eradication and de-
clined to adopt the recommendations with respect to cultural
practices to avoid loss. The result has been that the disease
has become very firmly established in the earlier affected areas
and the farmers are now appreciating the wisdom of the advice
they refused to accept.
The spread of the disease, despite the adoption of quarantine
precautions, has been steadily progressive as was expected.
With the close of the present biennium sixteen counties in North
and West Florida are included in the quarantine rule of the
Board which prohibits shipment of sugar cane from areas in
which the mosaic disease has been found. It is believed that the
*On December 8. 1924. the Governor and the Plant Board authorized the expenditure
from the Emergency Fund of a sum not to exceed $10.000 in the investigation and control
of coconut bud rot. This will permit of the employment of a plant pathologist to study
this disease and the assignment of field inspectors to make a survey to determine the sever-
ity of the infection and the extent of the area involved.






State Plant Board of Florida


utilization of this precaution will retard the rapid spread of the
disease. In the meantime cane growers can be preparing for
the inevitable invasion by securing and propagating varieties
of sugar cane which are immune or highly resistant to the dis-
ease. The Board has endeavored to assist in this by planting,
in cooperation with the Agricultural Experiment Station, a
variety of cane, Cayana 10, which is resistant to the mosaic
disease. During the fall of 1923, 35 carloads of seed cane of
this variety were distributed, free of cost, to farmers in North
and West Florida. The distribution was made mainly through
the County Agricultural Agents. It is our hope that by this
means adequate planting stock will be made available.

APIARY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT

Prior to 1919 no efforts had been made in Florida to eradi-
cate, control or prevent the spread of diseases affecting bees or
to prevent the introduction into the state of such diseases. The
apiary industry of Florida was one of considerable importance
and it was known that in certain localities there existed dis-
eases of bees which were influencing the prosperity of the in-
dustry and unless controlled would further jeopardize it. The
Legislature, responding to the expressed desires of the bee-
keepers, enacted in 1919 a law known as the Bee Disease Act
of 1919 imposing upon the State Plant Board the duty of afford-
ing protection to the apiary interests of the state. An Inspec-
tion Service was developed and the Board adopted the policy of
attempting to eradicate the most serious of the diseases affect-
ing bees, American foul brood. It was known that this disease
had gained foothold in some sections but the extent was not
known.
The preliminary investigation served to show that it was an
entirely practical procedure to undertake the eradication of this
disease by the destruction of all diseased colonies and the prac-
tice of certain recognized sanitary procedures. The work was
launched and has been prosecuted vigorously. Apiary owners
have cooperated fully and on the whole the results have been
most satisfactory. It is now believed that the disease has been
"cleaned up" in the areas where the situation was most seri-
ous and that under a system of continued efficient inspection
the apiaries of the state will be well protected. It is not ex-
pected that there will not be further evidences of American foul
brood found in this state. On the contrary, there will be. We







Fifth Biennial Report


have, however, reached the point of practical, commercial con-
trol.
During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923, 1,012 apiary in-
spections were made. There were comprised in these 23,883
colonies. Eighteen apiaries were found to be infected with
American foul brood. The number of diseased colonies totaled
thirty. For the year ending June 30, 1924, inspections of 21,857
colonies in 785 apiaries were made. The result was the find-
ing of but 13 diseased colonies in only nine apiaries.
The progress of the work of eradication is best shown by the
following table.

SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK SINCE THE
DEPARTMENT WAS CREATED IN JULY, 1919
Colonies in-
SApiaries in- fected with
Apiaries in- Colony in- fected with American foul
Year Ending spected spections American foul brood
brood
June 30, 1920......! 366 15,007 37 103
June 30, 1921...... 739 17,931 21 30
June 30, 1922 ...... 822 22,221 17 34
June 30, 1923...... 1,012 23,883 18 30
June 30. 1924...... 785 21,857 9 13

In the prosecution of the eradication and inspection work the
practice was followed of employing local inspectors who are
practical beekeepers-not technically trained apiarists-who are
thoroughly familiar with bee diseases, especially American foul
brood, and are well trained in inspection methods. These men
are paid only for the time actually employed. The only salaried
or full time employee of the Board engaged in this work at this
time is the head of the Department, who is a specialist in bee-
keeping and particularly well qualified to handle regulatory
work.
The Apiary Inspection Department does not confine its ac-
tivities merely to inspection work, but in the absence of any
other state agency engaged in extension work in apiculture, en-
deavors to be of assistance to beekeepers by giving advice
through, correspondence, bulletins, contributions to the press
and attendance at meetings of beekeepers, During the course
of the annual Farmers', and Fruit Growers' Week meetings
under the auspices of the College of Agriculture, University of
Florida, the Apiary Inspector has given lectures and demonstra-
tions. for the, benefit of beekeepers in attendance.







State Plant Board of Florida


COOPERATION

The closest and most cordial cooperative relations with other
agricultural and horticultural organizations have existed. Such
organizations have extended to the Plant Board invaluable help.
The Federal Department of Agriculture through its Bureau of
Plant Industry has continued to aid in the eradication of citrus
canker, and the same Bureau has assisted in the mosaic disease
campaign.
Through the Bureau of Entomology, the Department of Ag-
riculture has very materially contributed to the success of our
efforts to control the spread of the sweet potato weevil and to
eradicate this insect from the isolated areas in Baker County,
where it had become established.
The Federal Horticultural Board has continued the appoint-
ments of Assistant Quarantine Inspectors of the State Plant
Board as Collaborators of the Federal Horticultural Board, thus
giving authority to the State Inspectors to apply the Federal
plant quarantine rules. The State, however, bears the salary
and other expenses involved.
The Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of
Florida has never failed to lend the support of its experts, and
the Agricultural Extension Division has, on many occasions,
supplemented the Plant Board's activities.
Members of the Plant Board staff have been present at and
participated in numerous meetings of horticulturists and agri-
culturists in all sections of the State. Members of the staff have
also taken part in a limited way as special lecturers and in-
structors in the educational work conducted by the College of
Agriculture and Agricultural Experiment Station, and have
contributed to the success of the "Farmers' and Fruit Growers'
Week" held annually at Gainesville under the auspices of the
College of Agriculture.
RULES

To meet new situations or changed conditions, new rules of
the Board have been adopted from time to time or existing rules
have been amended. Authority for this is given under the Plant
Act of 1915. Previous reports have contained a synopsis of
the rules of the Board up to and including Rules 45A and 45B.
The following rules have been adopted or amended during the
period covered by this report.






Fifth Biennial Report


RULES AND PUBLIC NOTICES

1922
August
(1) Public notice with regard to Scaly Bark, adopted.
(2) Rule 15 adopted.
(Prohibiting movement of citrus trees from Scaly
Bark area.)
September
(1) Public notice with regard to shipments of green
beans and green peas from states in which the Mex-
ican Bean Beetle is known to be present, adopted.
October
(1) Rule 4G changed to read Rule 4.
(2) Rule 4 amended.
(Prohibiting the movement of uncertified nursery
stock.)
(3) Rule 4G amended.
(Listing plants not subject to inspection and certifi-
cation.)
(4) Rule 48 adopted.
(Prohibiting the shipment into Florida of green
beans and green peas from states in which the
Mexican Bean Beetle is known to be present.)
November
(1) Public notice declaring certain insects and diseases
to be public nuisances amended to include the Satin
Moth.

1923
January
(1) Rule 5E amended.
(Citrus seeds added to list of material, the plant-
ing of which is prohibited in canker-infected prop-
erties.)
February
(1) Public notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be
infested with the Sweet Potato Weevil, amended.
(2) Public notice declaring certain additional areas in
Florida infected with Scaly Bark adopted.






State Plant Board of Florida


March
(1) Public notice declaring certain additional areas to be
infected with Scaly Bark adopted.
April
(1) Rule 4D amended.
(Providing for the defoliation of nursery stock be-
fore moving.)
September
(1) Rules 39A and 39B revoked.
Rule 39 adopted.
(Providing for the disinfection of avocado nursery
stock.)
(2) Public notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be
infested with the sweet potato weevil, adopted.
October
(1) Rule 48 amended.
(In regard to the shipment of green beans and green
peas in Florida from states in which the Mexican
Bean Beetle is established.)
November
(1) Rule 4C amended.
(Providing that nursery stock be completely covered
for transportation.)

1924
February
(1) Public notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be
infested with the Sweet Potato Weevil, adopted.
(2) Public notice declaring certain areas in Florida to be
infected with Scaly Bark adopted.
April
(1) Rule 6 amended.
(Regarding certificates to be used on shipments of
citrus nursery stock in Scaly Bark Territory.)
(2) Public notice declaring certain additional areas in
Florida to be infected with Scaly Bark amended.
May
(1) Rule 43 rescinded.
(Prohibiting certain material from areas in other
states known to be infested with the European
Corn Borer.)






Fifth Biennial Report


(2) Public notice defining areas in other states in
which the European Corn Borer is present, specify-
ing the host plants of this pest, and stating condi-
tions under which host plants of the European Corn
Borer may be shipped from the infested areas into
the State adopted.
(3) Rule 44 rescinded.
(Prohibiting certain material from areas in other
states known to be infested with the Japanese
Beetle.)
(4) Public Notice declaring certain areas in other states
to be infested with the Japanese Beetle, specifying
the plants and plant products likely to be infested
by this pest, and stating the conditions under which
the host plants of this pest may be shipped from the
infested areas into Florida.
June
(1) Public notice declaring certain additional areas to be
infected with Scaly Bark adopted.

PUBLICATIONS

The Board has continued to issue certain publications for the
information of the public. Circulars containing the rules and
regulations of the Board are issued from time to time. "Quar-
antine Notices" for the special information of transportation
companies and of shippers are published and distributed. The
Quarterly Bulletin of the State Plant Board has appeared reg-
ularly each quarter and has served a useful purpose in dissemi-
nating knowledge regarding plant pests and their control, as
well as information as to the activities of the Board.

RECOMMENDATIONS AND ESTIMATES

The Plant Commissioner has, prior to the date of this report,
submitted to the Board recommendations and estimates of
amounts of funds believed to be necessary to properly conduct
the inspectional and other activities of the Board for the bi-
ennium beginning July 1, 1925. The estimates are as follows:







State Plant Board of Florida


Administration, Board ..........
Gen. Expenses ....... .............
Citrus Canker and Grove Inspec-
tion ... . . . ... . - ... .
tioQuarantine .......................................
Quarantine -. ---... --
Nursery Inspection ..............
Entom ology ....................................
Plant Pathology .-.........................
Control of Mosaic Disease oJ
Sugar Cane ..................~............
Control of Sweet Potato Weevil.
Cotton Insect Investigation.........
Cotton Disease Investigation.......
Apiary Inspection .........................
Coconut Bud Rot Disease.............


Salaries
.$ 3,000.00
. 17,160.00
. 117,400.00
74,880.00
78,240.00
.14,200.00
.4,000.00


Operating
Expenses
$ 3,000.00
23,040.00
60,000.00
20,500.00
43,400.00
3,600.00
2,000.00


S3,600.00 3,400.00
.. 7,200.00 4,400.00
. 10,600.00 11,400.00
.6,000.00 8,000.00
.14,520.00 7,000.00

$350,800.00 $189.740.00


It is also recommended that the State Legislature be re-
quested to again provide an emergency fund of at least
$50,000.00 per annum for the use of the Board in event of the
occurrence of serious plant pests in the State.

EMPLOYEES

Following is a list of employees of the Board as of June 30,
1924:
LIST OF EMPLOYEES, JUNE 30, 1924
STATE PLANT BOARD

J. T. Diam ond -....-........-... ...... ..................................... ----......................-Secretary
J. G. Kellum........--- -----......- ....-...-----......... ---------..............Auditor

PLANT COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
Wilmon Newell ...........------ -..........--------..............--Plant Commissioner
Miss Lena R. Hunter---........................-- ...........-......----.---......Chief Clerk
Miss Elita Lovejoy.... ...----------------------....................Stenographer
Miss Eva C. Means--.... -.....---. . ----------... ..........Filing Clerk
Henry Lloyd (Col.) .................... ----- ......... .-----..............Janitor

Bee Disease Eradication
J. C. Goodwin ----................... -----.. ... .............. ....---.....-..-------A..-Apiary Inspector
C. F. Glenn-................ .....-........................ ...- ........ ..... District Apiary Inspector
J. P. Anthony--...-...--.....-.............. ..-..-- District Apiary Inspector
W. H. Henderson-..........--.. -......- ..--- ...----District Apiary Inspector
C. M. Biorseth............--..............................--------District Apiary Inspector
Chas. Mack .. ........-- ..-..-- .---- .. ... --...............-..District Apiary Inspector
I. B. Nordmann.........-.................. ........................... --District Apiary Inspector
Tim Tietsema .......--.....................------.......-------------District Apiary Inspector
D. W. Abbott............................-----------.----.--.Assistant Apiary Inspector
Fred Anthony ...........................--............---------Assistant Apiary Inspector

Cane Disease Survey
C. P. Sheffield--.... ............---------......--------Inspector


Total
$ 6,000.00
40,200.00
177,400.00
95,380.00
121,640.00
17,800.00
6,000.00
7,000.00
11,600.00
22,000.00
14,000.00
21,520.00
49,400.00
$589,940.00






Fifth Biennial Report 33

Department of Entomology
E. W. Berger-..................................-.....---- ...-- ....................-Entomologist
G. B. Merrill--...... ................--............-....-...-----...Associate Entomologist
Miss Hazel Turbyfill.----...--...............-.. ...................... ...Stenographer

Boll Weevil Investigations
Geo. D. Smith -................ ........ .......................Associate Entomologist
Chas. A. Bennett-...........---.................-.....-...............--- Assistant Entomologist

Department of Plant Pathology
O. F. Burger -----...........................---- ................----- -.................. Plant Pathologist
A F. Camp-.............................-- --.............-......................... Assistant Pathologist
C. T. Link-..................---------......---------------........----.--..........Inspector

Quarantine Department
J. H. Montgomery..-.......... .......--...............-.......-- ..........Quarantine Inspector
A. C. Brown.............------..................................... Assistant Quarantine Inspector
U. C. Zeluff .........-- ............... ...........-........... .......Assistant Quarantine Inspector
R. A. Knight.....................--....... .. ..................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
R. D. Potter..------..........................-- .....--................---Assistant Quarantine Inspector
L. R. Warner--.....------................ ----........Assistant Quarantine Inspector
Wm. V. Millington.--......--------....................-- Assistant Quarantine Inspector
M. R. Brown---.......--.....--...........................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
P. F. Robertson-.....--......-...........................-------ssistant Quarantine Inspector
Paul Thomas ..---------................................................... Assistant Quarantine Inspector
Sam P. Harn.............................................-... Assistant Quarantine Inspector
J. V. Gist.............................----- ... --........Assistant Quarantine Inspector
H. M. Williams .....................---...--- ......... Assistant Quarantine Inspector

Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication
S. H. Rountree-.. ................. .................... .......................Inspector
W. M. Prevatt --............-------- --..-......-...------....... ....Inspector

Nursery Inspection Department
F. M. O'Byrne-....--.......-.----- ..- .....-..--- ..........Nursery Inspector
Chas. M. Hunt-.............................------...... ...........-Assistant Nursery Inspector
C. A. Bass..... ------..................................-- Assistant Nursery Inspector
J. F. Marsh.....................----.. -----.. ..........Assistant Nursery Inspector
Emory L. Kelley......--........------..........----Assistant Nursery Inspector
. T. Stone ............... ..................... ---------Assistant Nursery Inspector
W. M. Tillman-.............-............--... .--------Assistant Nursery Inspector
J. B. Bowers-----......................................---......--..............ssistant Nursery Inspector
W. F. Eberhardt... ..---.....---..........-------.......Assistant Nursery Inspector
Chas. Stitts .....................---- -- ................. --Assistant Nursery Inspector
Reginald Hart ...................... --------.................. Assistant Nursery Inspector
H. C. Artis................ ............----------- ...... Assistant Nursery Inspector
P. M. Childers ...-- ...... -------........-----.............Deputy Inspector
Wm. Gomme -----..... ... ...........................-------.....Deputy Inspector
Jno. H. Jefferies............. .............. -- -.......................-. .........Deputy Inspector
J. W. Mathison .-...-..........-..............--- ........-....-....-..........Deputy Inspector
Ed L. Ayers....................-........... --..........................................- Deputy Inspector
Miss L. McIlvaine------.......... ..........--- ......---- ..........- ----..-----Stenographer
Miss Pauline Bryan-------........................-- ..--- .-...........---- Stenographer
Miss Janette Roux-.......--....---.--..--...--------.............-........--Filing Clerk

Canker Eradication Department
Frank Stirling ......---------..................................General Inspector
Miss Adelaide Yon-........-- ..... .------.....--.......---..........Stenographer







State Plant Board of Florida


Foremen of Inspectors
H. D. Bollinger S. L. McClanahan
Geo. F. Burden J. L. Lazonby
Special Inspectors


J. Harvey Henderson
Ross W. Lindner
H. G. Carter


H. D. Smith
Ike M. Shriner


Inspectors


Arthur Adams
B, F. Adams
D. S. Conner
Z. V. Dyson
Jno. Eiland
Don Grace
Walter L. Kersey
Merton LeRoy
O. D. Link


Respectfully


R. G. Milner
H. A. Noxtine
D. H. O'Quinn
H. C. Parham
Clifton R. Stokes
Geo. W. Wade
F. J. Wedekemper
Oliver L. White
C. O. Wood

submitted,
WILMON NEWELL,
Plant Commissioner.


Gainesville, Florida,
December 15, 1924.


FINANCIAL REPORT

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1923

Tallahassee, Florida, August 1, 1923
To the State Plant Board:
GENTLEMEN: I herewith submit the following report of the
receipts and disbursements of the Board during the fiscal year
beginning July 1, 1922 and ending June 30, 1923:

SUMMARY

Resources

Plant Act, Continuing Appropriation (6885)
Balance forwarded July 1, 1922............................$ 30,010.59
Available May 1, 1923...... ...........-..- --.. ...... 35,000.00
Incidental Fund:
Balance forwarded July 1, 1922......-................... 1,676.19
Special Appropriation, Chapt. 8441
Available July 1, 1922........ ............. ....... 150,000.00
Incidental Fund:
Collections, July 1, 1922 to June 30, 1923........- 5,146.70 $221,833.48






Fifth Biennial Report


Disbursements

Plant Act, Continuing Appropriation-.......................$ 30,010.59
Special Appropriation, Chapt. 8441-......-...................... 150,000.00
Incidental Fund ............................................. ............... 4,672.08 $184,682.67

Unexpended balance on hand July 1, 1923:
Plant Act, Continuing Appropriation....................$ 35,000.00
Incidental Fund ............................ ... .................. 2,150.81 $ 37,150.81


CONTINUING APPROPRIATION (Chapt. 6885)


Resources
Balance forwarded July 1, 1922.....................................- $ 30,010.59
Continuing Appropriation Available May 1, 1923...... 35,000.00

Disbursements


Secretary's Office:
Salary of Secretary--...........-................$ 1,250.00
Office Supplies. ................................. 89.54


65,010.59


1,339.54


Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ....-....................................$
For Office Supplies ...........................
For Traveling Expenses .................
For Printing .............................
For General Supplies..........................
For All Other Purposes....................

Entomological Department:
For Salaries ........................................$
For Office Supplies ............................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For Printing ........................................
For General Supplies ..........................

Bee Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ..........................................
For Office Supplies.............................-
For Traveling Expenses ..................
For Printing ....................---..............
For General Supplies ......................

Eradication of Mosaic Disease:
For Traveling Expenses ....................$
For General Supplies .....................

Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries ................-...................... -$
For Office Supplies ..............................
For Traveling Expenses ....................


6,505.24
1,492.87
540.65
3,533.11
432.79
60.22 $ 12,564.88

5,901.23
375.69
552.73
112.47
263.08 $ 7,205.20

5,239.30
7.37
2,037.73
20.00
58.14 $ 7,362.54


97.93
349.08 $

235.00,
5.00
225.00 $


447.01



465.00


Quarantine Department:
For Salaries ........................................$ 383.33
For Traveling Expenses ...................... 69.09
For General Supplies .........................---. 174.00 $ 626.42 $ 30,010.59

Unexpended Balance carried forward July 1, 1923-----............................---$35,000.00







State Plant Board of Florida


INCIDENTAL FUND

Resources
Balance brought forward July 1, 1922.-................................---....--- -$ 1,676.19
Collections, July 1, 1922 to June 30, 1923.....................--........-...... 5,146.70

$ 6,822.89
Disbursements
For Salaries ..................-..-..---.. ----------..$ 1,132.09
For Office Supplies .-...................... .--- .. ......... 828.19
For Traveling Expenses ............................-----...... 77.07
For Printing ... -------...................-------....--........ 425.67
For General Supplies ....-..............-..--............ 1,259.70
For All Other Purposes .....-................----............ 949.36 $ 4,672.08

Unexpended Balance carried forward July 1, 1923 ------........................$ 2,150.81

SPECIAL APPROPRIATION, CHAPTER 8441


Resources
Special Appropriation, Chapter 8441:
Available July 1, 1922........ --...................
Disbursements


Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries ........................................-----------$
For Office Supplies ..----.......................
For Traveling Expenses .................-
For General Supplies .........................-
For All Other Purposes ..-..............

Nursery Inspection:
For Salaries ......-----------................. ......- $
For Office Supplies..............................
For Traveling Expenses ..................
For Printing ..........-.............-.............
For General Supplies .......................
For All Other Purposes ..........-----......

Quarantine Department:
For Salaries ...............------ ...---$
For Office Supplies .-................--.......-
For Traveling Expenses .-----.............
For Printing .....................-----------..................
For General Supplies ..........................

Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication:
For Salaries .------..............................----.........$
For Office Supplies ....--------.........................
For Traveling Expenses ....................-
For Printing ..................................-----------..
For General Supplies ..............----.....
For All Other Purposes ...........---......

Bee Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ....................................... $
For Office Supplies ...........................
For Traveling Expenses ......................
For Printing .----------..............................


.................$150,000.00


13,348.61
182.16
47,031.82
5,142.58
1,094.33 $ 66,799.50

10,405.72
1,827.96
16,343.89
613.58
72.35
5.95 $ 29,269.45

25,035.28
606.29
8,456.84
737.25
896.65 $ 35,732.31

1,049.36
48.32
316.95
3.70
464.91
36.66 $ 1,919.90


1,135.66
2.60
207.09
9.00 $


1,354.35







Fifth Biennial Report


Mosaic Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ............................................$
For Office Supplies ............................
For Traveling Expenses ......................
For General Supplies ..........................

Boll Weevil Investigations:
For Salaries .............................. ...--------
For Office Supplies ......................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For General Supplies .................
For All Other Purposes ......................

Entomological Department:
For Salaries ....--..-....-- ..-----.-------$
For Office Supplies ............................
For Traveling Expenses ...................
For General Supplies ..........................
For All Other Purposes ..................
Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries --.............................---------.
For Office Supplies ..............................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For Printing ...---.....----...-.......-- ---
For General Supplies ..........................


Administrative:
For Salary of the Board's Secretary

Respectfully submitted,


633.21
149.52
486.44
772.60 $ 2,041.77

4,501.00
613.83
1,028.94
1,233.08
12.10 $ 7,388.95

1,408.33
294.72
125.27
374.13
38.12 $ 2,240.57


1,359.50
478.97
95.84
1,048.07
20.82 $


3,003.20


$ 250.00 $150,000.00


J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary, State Plant Board.

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1924

Tallahassee, Florida, August 1, 1924
To the State Plant Board:
GENTLEMEN: I herewith submit the following report of the
receipts and disbursements of the Board during the fiscal year
beginning July 1, 1923 and ending June 30, 1924:

SUMMARY

Resources
Balance Forwarded July 1, 1923:
(Continuing Appropriation, Chapt.
6885) ......-----------------.------- $ 35,000.00
Balance Forwarded July 1, 1923:
(Incidental Fund) ............................... $ 2,150.81
Continuing Appropriation May 1, 1924
(6885) ......... ................ ............$ 35,000.00
General Appropriation (9121)
July 1, 1923 ..................................... .. 150,000.00
$185,000.00







State Plant Board of Florida


Citrus Canker ..--...................................$58,500.00
Nursery Inspection.... .......................... 39,000.00
Quarantine ........................................... 40,950.00
Sweet Potato Weevil .......................... 3,412.50
Cotton ............. ---.........................-- 5,850.00
Bee Disease Erad. ................................ 7,830.00
Gen. Exps. P. C. Office ...................... 13,125.00
Dept. of Entomology .......................... 7,800.00
Mosaic Eradication .............................. 2,437.50
Administrative ...................................... 1,500.00
(Travel Bd. Members, etc.)
Reserve ........................... .................... 4,595.00
$185,000.00
Special Appropriation, Controlling the Boll Weevil and
Other Cotton Insects (9187) July 1, 1923..............$ 15,000.00
Incidental Fund Collections, July 1, 1923 to June
30, 1924 ........................................................................ 3,312.23 $240,463.04

Disbursements
Continuing Appropriation, Chapt. 6885-........................ 35,000.00
General Appropriation, Chapt. 9121 .............................. 150,000.00
Special Appropriation, Controlling the Boll Weevil
and Other Cotton Insects, Chapter 9187.......... 10,113.37
Incidental Fund ................................................................ 3,304.07 $198,417.44

Unexpended Balance on hand July 1, 1924.................... $ 42,045.60
Unexpended Balance on hand July 1, 1924:
Continuing Appropriation, Chapter 6885 ......................$ 35,000.00
Incidental Fund ................................................................ 2,158.97
Special Approp., Controlling the Boll Weevil and
Other Cotton Insects, Chapter 9187 ...................... 4,886.63
$ 42,045.60

CONTINUING APPROPRIATION (Chapt. 6885)

Resources
Balance Forwarded July 1, 1923......................................$ 35,000.00
Continuing Approp. Available May 1, 1924.................. 35,000.00 $ 70,000.00

Disbursements


Administrative:
For Salary of Secretary ......................$ 1,250.00
For Travel. Expenses Bd. Members 524.98 $

Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ........................................$ 6,483.60
For Office Supplies ............................ 1,145.84
For Traveling Expenses ...................... 520.74
For Printing ................-----........................ 1,783.03
For General Supplies .......................... 45.69 $


1,774.98





9,978.90


Entomological Department:
For Salaries .......................................... $ 5,250.75
For Office Supplies .............................. 539.83
For Traveling Expenses ...................... 206.47
For General Supplies .......................... 15.82 $ 6,012.87







Fifth Biennial Report


Mosaic Disease Eradication:
For Salaries ..........................................$ 287.59
For Office Supplies .............................. 8.69
For Traveling Expenses .................... 275.06
For General Supplies .......................... 189.57
For All Other Purposes ...................... 1,667.43 $

Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries ..........................................$ 4,201.66
For Office Supplies .............................. 1,145.09
For Traveling Expenses ...................... 2,324.61
For Printing ......................................... 82.83
For General Supplies .......................... 343.61
For All Other Purposes ...................... 10.00 $


2,428.34






8,107.80


Nursery Inspection:
For Salaries ..........................................$ 3,999.98
For Office Supplies .............................. 402.58
For Traveling Expenses ...................... 2,284.55
For Printing ........................................ 10.00 $ 6,697.11 $ 35,000.00

Unexpended Balance Carried Forward July 1, 1924................:.........$ 35,000.00

SPECIAL APPROPRIATION-CONTROLLING THE BOLL WEEVIL
AND OTHER COTTON INSECTS

Chapter 9187

Resources
Available July 1, 1923 .................. .............. .......................... $ 15,000.00
Disbursements


Boll Weevil Investigations:
For Salaries .........................................$
For Office Supplies ...........................
For Traveling Expenses ......................
For General Supplies ........................
For All Other Purposes ...................

Fertilizer & Variety Tests:
For Office Supplies ............................$
For Traveling Expenses ..................
For General Supplies .......................
For All Other Purposes ...................

Demonstrations & Extension:
For Salaries ..........................................$
For Office Supplies ..........................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For Printing ........................................
For General Supplies .....................


4,592.38
146.85
1,035.06
540.95
6.90 $ 6,322.14


11.02
16.10
477.08
109.35 $


12.50
38.96
193.10
21.58
174.30 $


613.55





440.44


Cotton Disease Investigations:
For Salaries .--......---........................$-- 1,784.45
For Office Supplies .......................... 64.35
For Traveling Expenses ...................... 240.97
For General Supplies .......................... 51.46 $


2,141.23








State Plant Board of Florida


Administrative Expense:
For Office Supplies ..-..............--------$ 3.92
For Publications ....-........-- --.----------- 592.09 $ 596.01 $ 10,113.37

Unexpended Balance on hand July 1, 1924....................................$ 4,886.63

GENERAL APPROPRIATION-Chapter 9121

Resources
Available July 1, 1923 ...................... .. ..........--- ... .....$150,000.00
Disbursements
Citrus Canker Eradication:
For Salaries .......................................... $ 35,591.85
For Office Supplies ............................. 175.72
For Traveling Expenses .................. 12,294.86
For Printing ........................................ 26.25
For General Supplies ......................... 4,293.66
For All Other Purposes ................. 45.00 $ 52,427.34

Nursery Inspection:
For Salaries ........................................-- ..$ 20,516.27
For Office Supplies .............................. 716.49
For Traveling Expenses .................... 10,621.72
For Printing .......................................... 258.95
For General Supplies .......................... 8.58 $ 32,122.01


Quarantine Department:
For Salaries .......................................... $
For Office Supplies .......... ..............
For Traveling Expenses ......................
For Printing .......................................
For General Supplies ..........................

Swet Potato Weevil Eradication:
For Salaries .......................................... $
For Office Supplies ..............................
For Traveling Expenses ...................
For General Supplies ....................
For All Other Purposes ......................
Bee Disease Eradication:
For Salaries .......................................---
For Office Supplies .......................
For Traveling Expenses ...................
For Printing ..........................................

Boll Weevil Investigations:
For Salaries .......................................... $
For Office Supplies ..............................
For Traveling Expenses ......................
For General Supplies .........................

Demonstrations & Extension (Cotton):
For Office Supplies ..............................$
For Printing ......................................
For General Supplies ..........................


29,254.38
666.60
9,183.39
90.75
519.44 $ 39,714.56


1,125.65
13.93
946.02
914.37
175.43 $ 3,175.40


4,944.00
389.30
1,956.67
295.54 $ 7,585.51


2,365.18
130.58
713.74
550.46 $ 3,759.96


2.64
52.00
159.20 $


213.84








Fifth Biennial Report


Fertilizer & Variety Tests (Cotton):
For Salaries ......................................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For General Supplies ........................
For All Other Purposes ....................

Cotton Disease Investigations:
For Salaries ......................... ..........
For Office Supplies ...........................
For Traveling Expenses .................
For General Supplies .........................

Entomological Department:
For Salaries ........................................
For Office Supplies .........................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For Printing ..........................................
For General Supplies ......................
Mosaic Eradication:
For Salaries ........................................
For Traveling Expenses ...................

Plant Commissioner's Office:
For Salaries ..................... ......... .....
For Office Supplies ...........................
For Traveling Expenses ..................
For Printing ...................................
Administrative Expense:
For Salary of Board's Secretary......
For Supplies, Board's Office..............
For Supplies, Plant Comm. Office...
For Trav. Exps. Board Members.....
For Printing, Plant Comm. Office....


.$ 401.47
112.31
S 73.42
159.39 $


.$ 1,118.32
S 37.12
S 270.71
1,472.32 $

.$ 1,007.49
S 659.14
128.96
436.80
16.45 $

.$ 1.00
45.00 $

.$ 1,593.33
688.79
10.00
S 1,540.64 $


746.59




2,898.47





2,248.84


46.00




3,832.76


.$ 250.00
504.01
242.89
157.61
74.21 $ 1,228.72 $150,000.00


INCIDENTAL FUND

Resources
Balance brought forward July 1, 1923..........................$ 2,150.81
Receipts collected July 1, 1923 to June 30, 1924........... 3,312.23 $ 5,463.04
Disbursements
For Salaries ............................................... $ 229.29
For Office Supplies ................................. 447.03
For Traveling Expenses ....................... 23.16
For Printing ..................................... 124.67
For General Supplies ......................... ..... 239.82
For All Other Purposes ........................... 2,240.10 $ 3,304.07

Unexpended Balance on hand July 1, 1924 ........................................$ 2,158.97

Respectfully submitted,
J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary, State Plant Board.







State Plant Board of Florida




APPENDIX A


PLANT PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED
BY STATE PLANT BOARD
1922-24

PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED*

Shipments by all means of transportation except
Parcel Post
Year Ending June 30, 1923


Insect or Disease Occurring on From

Aleurodicus cardini
Back. .......................I Guava ............................ Florida ..........
Aleurodicus cocois
Curtis ...................... Coconut ........................ Trinidad ..............
Aleurothrixus how-
ardi (Quaint.) .........-Citrus ............................ Florida ................
Aleurothrixus how-
arcdi (Quaint.)........ Grapefruit .................... Cuba ....................
Ampeloglypter sesos-
tris Lec. (?)............ Grape ............................ Alabama ..............
Aphid ............................ Avocado ....................... Florida ................
Aphid ............................ Douglas spruce .......... Massachusetts ...
Aphid ............................ Guava .......................... Cuba ....................
Aphid ............................ Rose ................................ Alabama ..............
Argentine ant .............. Pineapple ...................... Louisiana ............
Aspidiotus brittanicus
Newst ...................... Pecan ............................ Georgia ................
Aspidiotus destructor |
Sign ........................... Avocado ........................ Florida ................
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign ....................... Banana .......................... Cuba ....................
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .......................... Coconut ........................ Cuba ..............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. ......................... Palm .............................. Trinidad ..............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .......................... Pandanus ...................... Florida ...............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign ......................... Sugar apple ................ Florida .............
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Banana ....................... Cuba ...................
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Chinaberry ................... Florida ...............
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut ..........................Bahama Islands..
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl...Coconut .........................Cuba ........


Number of
Shipments
Infested


*For common and scientific names of Florida scale-insects see Quarterly Bulletin,
State Plant Board, Vol. VII, No. 4, 1923.







Fifth Biennial Report 43

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut .......................... Honduras ......... 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl...iEucalyptus .................. Cuba ................... 1
Aspidiotus orientalis I
cocotiphagus Marl..!Laurel ...................... Cuba ................... 2

cocotiphagus Marl.-.Palm ......................Cuba ........ 2
Aspidiotus orientalis I
cocotiphagus Marl... Palm ...... ............. Florida -............ 1
Aspidiotus orientalis I
cocotiphagus Marl.-.IRose .............................. Bahama Islands- 2
Aspidiotus orientalis !
cocotiphagus Marl... Sugar apple .................. Cuba ................. 1
Aspidiotus sp ............ Coconut ................ Mexico ............ 1
Aspidiotus sp. ........... Magnolia ................ Florida ............... 1
Aspidiotus sp. ........... Mangrove ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Aspidiotus sp. .......... Pecan ............... ...... Georgia ............... 1
Aspidiotus sp. ........ Poinciana seed pod...... Bahama Islands.. 1
Aspidiotus sp. ........... Spirea ............................ Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus sp. ........... Weeping willow .......... Tennessee ............ 1
Aspidiotus sp. ............ (?) ................................ Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus spinosus
Comst. .................... Palm ..................... Cuba ....................... 1
Aspidiotus spinosus
Comst. .................... Palm ............................ New York .......... 3
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser.. Poinciana ................... Cuba ................. 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis I
var. anonae Houser.. Poinciana seed pod...... Cuba .................. 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser. Sugar apple ................. Cuba ................... 1
Bacillus amylovorus... Pear .............................. Florida ............... 1
Bacillus amylovorus... Pear .......................... Illinois .................. 2
Bamboo scale .............. Bamboo ................... Florida ................ 5
Beetle (Bruchus sp.).. Peach ............................ Illinois .................. 1
Beetle larva .............. Strawberry ................. Virginia .............. 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) ............................ Grapefruit .................... Cuba ......2........ 2
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) ........................... Jasmine .................. Cuba ............... 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) .............................. Spice leaf .................... Bahama Islands.. 2
Black melanose............ Citrus ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Black melanose............ Citrus ......... ....... Cuba ................... 2
Black scale .................. Chinaberry ............... Florida ................ 1
Black scale .............. Citrus ......................... Cuba .................... 1
Black scale .................. Herb .......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale ................ Jamaica apple .......... Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale .............. Oleander ..................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale ................. Oleander .................. Florida -.............- 1
Black scale ................Rubber .....................- Florida ............... 1
Black scale ............ Sapodilla ................... Bahama Islands. 1
Black scale ....... .... Spanish lime .......... Bahama Islands. 1
Black scale ............- Star apple ................. Bahama Islands.. 2
Black scale ...........Sweet bay .................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Black thread scale...... Fern .................... ahama Islands.. 1







44 State Plant Board of Florida

1 Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
I Infested
Black thread scale...... Oleander ........................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Black thread scale ......ralm .............................. Cuba --..... 2
Black thread scale...... Palm .............................. Florida ----......... 1
Black thread scale...... Pandanus ...................... Florida ......... .. 1
Black thread scale ......Pandanus ...................... New York ...... 1
Black thread scale...... Sweet bay .................... Bahama Islands..I 1
Blue m old .................... Orange .......................... ?) ---.................. 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Banana ......................... Cuba .................... 2
Boisduval's scale ........ Coconut husk .............. Cuba .................... 3
Boisduval's scale ........ Orchid ............................ Rhode Island ....... 4
Boisduval's scale ........ Palm .............................. New York ............ 1
Calendra oryzae ........ Sweet potato .............. Nicaragua ............ 1
California red scale.... Citrus ............................IHonduras ............ 1
Camellia scale .......... Japonica ...................... Florida ................ 1
Camellia scale ............ Japonica ...................... South Carolina.... 1
Carpophilus sp. ......... Yam .............................. Cuba ..............---- .... 1
Chaff scale .................... Citrus ............................ Cuba .................... 2
Chaff scale .................... Japonica ........................ Illinois .................. 1
Chaff scale ................... Lemon .......................... Georgia.................. 1
Chaff scale .................... Lemon .......................... Pennsylvania ...... 2
Chaff scale .................... Lime .... ................. Trinidad .............. 1
Chaff scale .................... Orange .................. .. Florida ................ 1
Chaff scale ....................Orange............... ..... France ................ 1
Cherry scale ................ Cherry .......................... Florida ............... 1
Cherry scale ................ Crab apple .................. Florida ................ 1
Cherry scale ................ Peach ............................ Virginia ................ 1
Cherry scale ................ Plum .............. .......... North Carolina.... 1
Cherry scale ................ Shrub .......... ....... Georgia ................ 1
Cherry scale ... ....... (?) ............................... Illinois ---........... 1
Chionaspis sp ......... Cedar ........................North Carolina.... 1
Chrysomphalus sp....... Coconut ............... Mexico ........---... 1
Chrysomphalus sp....... Holly .............................. West Virginia .. 1
Chrysomphalus sp....... Orange (fruit) ............Panama ................ 1
Citrus scab .................. Orange ........... Florida ................ 1
Coccus acuminatus...... Jasmine .......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Coccus acuminatus...... Spice .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Coccus pseudohesperi-
dum (Ckll.) ............ Orchid ............................ New York .......... 1
Coccus viridis .............. Coffee ............................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Coccus viridis .............. Sapodilla ...................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Coccus viridis .............. Spice ............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Coccus viridis ............ (?) .................................. Cuba .................... 1
Common mealybug .... Jasmine ........................ Florida ................ 1
Common mealybug .... Jasmine .........-----.. South Carolina.... 1
Common mealybug .. Ligustrum .................... South Carolina.... 1
Common mealybug ....Palm ............-------. Connecticut ........ 1
Common mealybug .... Privet ............................ Georgia ................ 1
Common mealybug ... (?)--... -.................... Florida ................ 1
Common mealybug ....(?) ................................ New York ....... 2
Common whitefly ...... Chinaberry .................. Florida ................ 1
Comnion whitefly ...... Citrus ............................ Florida ................ 2
Common whitefly ...... Jasmine ........................ Alabama .............. 2
Common whitefly ...... Jasmine ........................ Florida ................ 4
Common whitefly ...... Jasmine ........................ Georgia ................ 3
Common whitefly ...... Ligustrum .................... Florida ................ 1
Common whitefly ...... Privet ............................ Florida ................ 1
Common whitefly ...... Privet ............................ Georgia ................ 2
Common whitefly......(?) ......................----.......... Florida ................ 1
Conchaspis angraeci
Ckll. .......................... Croton ............................ Florida ................ 1







Fijth Biennial Report 45

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Conchaspis angraeci
Ckll .......................... H hibiscus ....................... Florida ................ 1
Corn ear worm-........... Corn .............................. Bahama Islands.. 3
Cottony cushion-scale.. Citrus ............................ Florida ................ 2
Cottony cushion-scale. Evergreen .................... New York............ 1
Cottony cushion-scale. Rose .............................. Florida ................ 2
Crown gall .......... Rose ............................. Florida ................ 1
Crown gall .......... ..... Rose .............................. Illinois .................. 2
Crown gall ..... ....... Rose .............................. Indiana ................ 1
Crown gall .. ....... Rose .............................. New York............ 1
Crown gall ................. Rose .............................. Ohio ...................... 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Mistletoe ..................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Palm seed .................... Cuba .................... 1
Cyanophyllum scale... Palm .............................. Connecticut .......... 1
Cyanophyllum scale... (?) ................................ Nebraska ............ 1
Cyanophyllum scale. Pandanus ...................... Florida .............. 1
Cyanophyllum scale... Pandanus ...................... New York .......... 1
Cyanophyllum scale... Rose .......... ......------ Florida ................ 1
Diaspinae ..(Subfam-
ily) ...... ..... Jamaica apple ..... Bahama Islands.. 1
Diaspis pentagon 1
(Targ.) ................... Peach .-----... --......... (?) ............ ...... 1
Diaspis pentagon (
(Targ.) ......---.. --......... Privet ............................ Florida ................ 1
Diaspis pentagon
(Targ.) ................ Privet ............................ Georgia ............. 1
Diaspis sp. ................ Sugar cane .................. Cuba ................. 1
Diaspis sp................ I(?) --------------.............. ... New York ............ 1
Diatraea sp. ................-Sugar cane ..................| Cuba ............. 4
Dictyospermum scale.. Avocado .....................-.. Florida ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Century plant ............| Florida ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Citrus ............... .... Cuba .................... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Citrus .-...------- .- ...Florida ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Citrus ........................New York .. ..... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Citrus ......................- . Spain .----- .... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Ivy ............................... Alabama .. .. 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Orange (fruit) ............ Mexico ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale_. Palm ................----..--... Florida ............... 4
Dictyospermum scale.. Palm ............................ New York ........... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Palm ..----..... ......---- North Carolina... 1
Dictyospermum scale Palm ........... ... Trinidad .......... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Pandanus ...................... Florida ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Rose ................------.- Bahama Islands.. 1
Dictyospermum scale. Rose ........................... .- Florida ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale. Spice leaf ...----. ...---- i Bahama Islands.. 1
Dictyospermum scale. Spruce ....................--- Massachusetts .... 1
Drosophilidae ..............Sweet potato ..-........ Florida ................ 1
Earwig ....---- Yam .... Cuba .................... 1
English walnut scale.- Peach ..................-------.......... South Carolina.... 1
English walnut scale.. Plum .............................. North Carolina.... 1
English walnut scale.. Rose ............................ Florida ....---...... 1
English walnut scale.. Sumac ....................... Florida ................ 1
Eriophyes oleivorus.... Grapefruit .................... Cuba ............... 2
Fern scale ...... ......... Fern -------. Florida ................ 3
Fern scale .................. Ophiopogan juburan.... Louisiana ........... 1
Fern scale ...............- Fern .............................. New York........... 1
Fern scale .................. Fern ............................ Panama ................ 1
Fern scale ................ Palm .............................. New York..... 4
Fern scale .............. (?) ----------------n--- India --- 1
Florida red scale........ Banana ........... .... Cuba .................... 1







46 State Plant Board of Florida

S Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SI m Infested
Florida red scale.......... Camphor ...................... Florida -.............. 1
Florida red scale.......... Grapefruit ................... Cuba ................... 1
Florida red scale.......... Guava ........................Florida ............ 1
Florida red scale.......... Ivy ............................. Alabama -.. .. 1
Florida red scale.......... Jasmine ........................ Alabama 1..
Florida red scale.......... Oleander ..................... Florida ................ 1
Florida red scale.......... Palm ............................ Connecticut .... 1
Florida red scale.......... Palm .................. Florida ................ 2
Florida red scale.......... Palm ......................... Missouri 1......
Florida red scale.......... Palm ....................... New York .......... 3
Florida red scale.......... Palm .....................Ohio ..... ...... 1
Florida red scale.......... Palm ............................ (?) ................ 1
Florida red scale.......... Pandanus .................... Cuba ............ 1
Florida red scale.......... Poinsettia ................. Louisiana 1........ 1
Florida red scale.......... Rose ........................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Florida red scale..........Rose .......................... Cuba ....... ........ 2
Florida red scale.......... Rose ................... Florida ..........
Florida red scale.......... Rubber ................... New York ........... 1
Florida red scale.......... Sago palm .................. Florida ........-.....- 1
Florida red scale.......... Sugar apple ................ Cuba .-------- ........ I 1
Florida red scale.......... (?) ... ..... Cuba .............. 1
Florida red scale.......... () ................ Florida .......1
Florida wax scale...... Grapefruit ..................... Cuba ............... 1
Florida wax scale...... Holly .................. Florida ............ 1
Florida wax scale...... (?) ..................... Florida ... ..... 1
Fly maggot ................ Tieza ...................... Panama --- ...- 1
Fungus-Cladosporiuml
citri ............................Citrus ............................ Cuba ........ 2
Fungus-Cladosporium
citri .......................... Citrus .. ----.................-..- Texas ................... 1
Fungus Colletotri-
chum falcatus Went. Sugar cane ..................Cuba ...... ....
Fungus Colletotri-
chum gloeosporio-
ides ..................... Orange .......................... Cuba .................... 1
Fungus Colletotri-
chum sp ..................Japonica ...................... Illinois .......... 1
Fungus Colletotri-
chum sp. ................... Potato ......................... Chili ---................... 1
Fungus Fusarium
oxysporum ................ Potato .............. Norway ............... 1
Fungus-Fusarium sp. Beans ..................... Georgia ................ 1
Fungus-Fusarium sp. Potato .........Chili ...................... 1
Fungus-Fusarium sp. Potato ....... ....... England .............. 27
Fungus-Fusarium sp. Potato ............... .Germany .............. 2
Fungus-Gray mold.... Dahlia ...................... Mexico ................ 1
Fungus-Pestalozzia I
sp. .............................. Japonica ...................... Illinois ....... 1
Fungus-Rhizoctonia
sp ...... .. .. Potato .......................... Brazil .............. 1
Gall ..............................Buff Coat" ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Gall ............................. Herb ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Gloomy scale ............ (?) .......................... South Carolina.... 1
Grape scale .............. Grape ............................ (?) -........ 1
Greedy scale uniper.......... Junipe... Alabama .......... 1
Greedy scale ......... (?) .............. New York .......... 1
Greenhouse orthezia.... Herb .......................... Bahama Islands. 1
Greenhouse orthezia.... Latania .................... Ohio ................ 1
Greenhouse orthezia.... (?) ......................... New York......... 1
Green scale ................. Lime ....... ...... Barbados ---........ 1






Fifth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Haplothrips mnerrilli
Watson ....-- --. ...---
Hemispherical scale....
Hemispherical scale....
Hemispherical scale....
Hemispherical scale....
Hemispherical scale....
Ivy scale .... ....
Ivy scale ...................
Ivy scale .... ....
Ivy scale .......
Ivy scale ............
Ivy scale .----..--
Ivy scale .-----..
Ivy scale .....--------
Ivy scale .. .........
Ivy scale .---- ..-
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale .............
Latania scale ...........
Latania scale ...........--
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Leaf miner ..................
Lecanium sp --..........
Lecanium sp ..............
Lecanium viridis..........
Lepidopteron ................
Lepidopterous larva....
Lepidosaphes sp. ........
Lepidosaphes sp ......
Lepidosaphes sp ........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale.....
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale-........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale....
Long-tailed mealybug..
Long-tailed mealybug..
Long-tailed mealybug..
Long-tailed mealybug..
Long-tailed mealybug.
Long-tailed mealybug.-


Occurring on From S


Coconut husk .............. Cuba .
Aspidistra ......G.eorgia ............
Fern ............ .... Georgia ....
Fern ...........--------.. Panama .....
Palm .............................. Florida .......
Palm ............................. Georgia ...............
Croton .................... New York....
Fern ............................ Georgia ..........
Lemon .......................... Germany ......
Oleander ...................... Florida ......
Palm .............................. New York ....
Palm ............................ Ohio .........
Sago palm .................... Cuba ..
Sago palm .................... Florida .......
(?) ....----....... ----. Georgia ........
(?) .------............................... Illinois ..
Banana ........................ Cuba
Chinaberry .................. Florida ......
Fern ............................ Florida ............
Fig ................................ Cuba .................
Guava ............................ Cuba ....................
M yrtle .......................... Florida .........
Myrtle ....................----.---. Georgia ----....
Myrtle .......................... South Carolina....
Palm ..........--- .................... Cuba
Palm ........................-..... Florida ........
Pandanus .. ---.................. Cuba .........
Poinciana ...................... Cuba .
Rose .-.-------- Bahama Islands..
Vine ---. - Florida .-----
Sapodilla ...................... Bahama Islands.
Blueberry ... ....------...Florida ...
(?) ..........---------..- South Carolina....
Grapefruit ....................-----Cuba .....
Canna ..... ....--------.. Mexico ........
Hibiscus sp. ......... Honduras ......
Cassava cuttings ........ Cuba ..........
Sea grape .------ Bahama Islands..
White torch wood....-...Bahama Islands..
Asparagus sprengeri.. Cuba .......... ....I
Coconut ........................-------Mexico ................
Coconut husk ......--. Cuba .....
Croton .........--------. Florida ...........
Fern .............................. Bahama Islands..
Hibiscus ..------.....................I Bahama Islands..
H ibiscus ....................... Cuba ....................
Hibiscus ------....................... Florida ...........
Palm ........................ ... Cuba .
Palm .............................. Florida --.-----.
Palm ............................. Trinidad ............-
Poinciana seed pod...... Cuba ..................
(?) .......------........- Cuba ............
(?) .---- --- -- Florida ...............
Banana .............. .... Cuba ...
Bobug tree ..... ....--- Cuba ............ ..
Cactus ...................... New York.....
Croton ............................I New York............
Fern .............................. New York........
Ficus sp ................------...... Cuba ......... ..


lumber of
;hipments
Infested






State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease Occurring on

Long-tailed mealybug.. Rubber ........... .........
Long-tailed mealybug.. Spice .............. .....
Long-tailed mealybug.. (?) ...........................
Long-tailed mealybug.. (?) ........... ........
Long-tailed mealybug.. (?) ..... .......
Long scale .................... Citrus ..........................
Long scale .................... Citrus .................... .....
Long scale .................... Croton .....................
Long scale .................... Japonica ..................
Long scale .................... Spanish orange ..........
Macrosiphum rosea...... Rose ..............................
Masked scale .............. Spice ..............................
Mealybug ...................... Caladium ..................
Mealybug ................ --- Chayote ........................
Mealybug ...................... Lily ................................
Mealybug ...................... Orange ........................
Mealybug ..................... Strawberry ...........
Mealybug .................. Sugar cane ... ...
M ealybug ...................... (?) .............................
M ealybug ...................... (?) ................................
Melanconium sacchari Sugar cane .................
Mexican orange mag-
got (Anastrepha
(Trypeta) ludens
Loew.) ..................-... Orange ........................
Mining scale ................ Black torch .................
Mining scale ................ Bougainvillea ..............
Mining scale ................ Coffee .........................
Mining scale ................ Jamaica apple ............
Mining scale ................ Jasmine .......................
Mining scale ................ Laurel .........................
Mining scale ................ Sapodilla ......................
Mining scale ................ Soursop ........................
Mining scale ................ Star apple ...................
Mining scale ................ Sweet bay .................
M ining scale ................ (?) ............................
Mite (Cheyletus sp).... Coconut husk ..............
Moth borer ... .... Sugar cane ..................
Mulberry whitefly ...... Holly ............................
Obscure scale .............. Pecan ............................
Oyster shell scale........ Grape ......................
Palmetto scale ............ Palm ...........................
Palmetto scale ............ Palm .............................
Palmetto scale ............ Palm ........................
Parlatoria-like scale.... Acalypha ......................
Parlatoria proteus........ Palm ............................
Peach tree borer ........ Peach ..........................
Pineapple mealybug .... Banana ............
Pineapple mealybug .... Jasmine ........................
Pineapple mealybug .... Pineapple ..................
Pineapple mealybug .... Pineapple ....................
Pinnaspis buxi Bouche Pandanus ...................
Pseudaonidia paeoniae Azalea ..........................
Pseudaonidia paeoniae Japonica ......................
Pseudaonidia paeoniae Privet ............................
Pseudischnaspis ali-
enus Newst ............ Rose ............................
Pseudischnaspis ali-
enus Newst ........... Sugar apple ................


From


New York............
Bahama Islands..
Illinois ....-...
SNew York...........
I Virginia ........- ....
Cuba .....- ..........--
I Florida ..........
Florida ................
iSouth Carolina.--
SHolland ........
Cuba .....- ---.-
IBahama Islands.
'Cuba .....-- -----
Cuba ........
New York...........
Mexico --- -.
|Alabama ..............
Bahama Islands..
Cuba ..........- ---
Florida ....- .-- ---
Barbados ............---


Mexico .----........
Bahama Islands..
Bahama Islands.
Bahama Islands..
Bahama Islands..
Bahama Islands.-
Cuba ..... ........
Bahama Islands.-
Bahama Islands..
Bahama Islands..
Bahama Islands..
Cuba ..........
Cuba ..-------------------
Cuba .......
Honduras ...........
West Virginia ....
Louisiana ............
Ohio ......................
Bahama Islands..
Florida ...............
(?) ......................
Florida .............
Florida ................
Illinois ............
Cuba .................
Bahama Islands.
Bahama Islands..
Honduras ...........
New York...........
South Carolina....
South Carolina....
South Carolina....

Florida ...............

Cuba .................


i


I __


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1


1
1
1
1
1
1
I
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1,

1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
88
2
1

1

1


__







Fifth Biennial Report 49


1 Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on I From Shipments
I Infested
Pseudischnaspis ali- i
enus Newst. .........--- (?) ........................... Florida ..... 1
Pseudischnaspis artic-
ulatus .....------- Palm .............................. Cuba .................... 1
Pseudococcus sp ........ Banana ......................... Florida ................ 1
Pseudococcus sp. ........ Mango .......................... Cuba .................... 1
Pseudococcus sp ........ Palm .............................. North Carolina.... 1
Pseudococcus sp ........ Spice leaves .................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Pseudococcus sp ........ Sugar apple .................. Cuba .................... 1
Pseudococcus sp. ........ Sugar cane .................. Cuba .................... 1
Pseudococcus sp ........ (?) ......... -----....................... Cuba .................... 1
Psocid ............................ Mango seed .................. Cuba ...................- 1
Pulvinaria psidii Mask. Ficus sp. ......................IFlorida ................ 1
Purple scale -....-- Citrus ..........................| Bahama Islands.. 1
Purple scale .........-..- Citrus ............-----..--..........Cuba ................. 2
Purple scale ............... itrus ......................... Florida ................I 13
Purple scale ..... ... Citrus (fruit) .............. Mexico ............... 1
Purple scale .... ...... Citrus (fruit) .............. Spain ................. 1
Purple scale ................ Croton ............................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Purple scale ..........-.... Fig ................................ ISouth Carolina ... I
Purple scale ................ Lime ............................. Barbados -....... 1
Purple scale ................ Orange (fruit) .......... France .................. 1
Purple scale ................ Orange (fruit) .......... Mexico ................ 3
Purple scale ................ Orange (fruit) ........ iPanama ................ 1
Pustule scale .............. Coconut ........................ Honduras ........... 1
Pustule scale .............. Hibiscus ........................ Florida .............. 3
Pustule scale .............. Jasmine ........................Bahama Islands.. 1
Pustule scale .............. Oleander .............. .......Florida ................ 6
Putnam's scale ............ Dogwood ....................... Florida ............... 1
Putnam's scale ............(?) ................................Alabama ............ 1
Putnam's scale ............ (?) ................................ Iowa .................... 1
Putnam's scale ............ (?) ................................ South Carolina.... I
Red-banded thrips ...... Spice ............................Bahama Islands.. 1
Rice weevil .................. Yam .............................. Cuba ................---. 1
Root knot ................. Apple .............................. Georgia .----........ 1
Root knot .................... Fig ................................ Florida ................ 12
Root knot .................... Fig ................................ Georgia .........-... 12
Root knot .................... Fig ................................ Louisiana ............ 1
Root knot .................... Fig ............................... North Carolina. 1
Root knot .................... Fig ................................ South Carolina-... 5
Root knot .................... Fig ................................ Virginia .............. 1
Root knot ................... Fig ................................ (?) ---- ..-... 2
Root knot ................... Goldenglow .................. Pennsylvania .... 1
Root knot .................... Hibiscus ........................ Alabama 1...........
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ Alabama ....... ... 1
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ Florida ................ 4
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ Georgia ---.........- 1
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ Kentucky ............ 1
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ South Carolina.... 3
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ (?) --------............ 1
Root knot .................... Rose .............................. Georgia .............. 1
Root knot .................... Rose .............................. Pennsylvania ...... 1
Root knot .................... Stephanotis .................. Florida ................ 1
Root knot ..... .. (?) .................................. Alabama .......... 1
Rose scale .................... Blackberry .................. Alabama .............. 1
Rose scale .................... Blackberry ................ Illinois .................. 4
Rose scale .................... Blackberry ........... ndiana ............. 1
Rose scale .................... Geranium ..................... Florida ................ 1
Rose scale .................... Raspberry ................... Washington, D.C. 1
Rose scale .................... Rose ................................ Georgia ................ 3







State Plant Board of Florida


SNumber of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
1 Infested
Rose scale .................... Rose --......--....-----.... Indiana ............... 1
(?) rot .................... -- Sweet potato ................ Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Bay .--.....-------........... Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Citrus ............................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Citrus ......................--Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale ........... Citrus ............................ Panama .....---... 1
Rufous scale .......-..... Coconut .......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Coconut .......................... Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Ficus sp. ..................... Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Jasmine ..............-............Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Laurel .......................... Cuba ................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Palm ............................ Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Palm ....................-........Trinidad .............. 1
Rufous scale .............. Rose ................................ Bahama Islands. 1
Rufous scale .............. Spanish lime .............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Spice .............................Bahama Islands. 5
Rufous scale ..............Sugar apple ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale ............. Sugar apple ................ Cuba .................. 1
Rufous scale .............. Sugar apple ................ Florida ............... 1
Rufous scale .............. Tamarind ..................... Bahama Islands. 3
Rufous scale ..............---- (?) --------- -----.. Cuba .................... 1
San Jose scale.............. Apple ........................... Kentucky ............ 1
San Jose scale.............. Apple ............................ South Carolina.... 1
San Jose scale.............. Apple ............................ Tennessee ........... 1
San Jose scale.............. Cherry .......................... New York.......... 1
San Jose scale.............. Citrus trifoliata .......... Florida ..----.......... 1
San Jose scale.............. Currant ........................ Georgia ---............. 1
San Jose scale.............. Fig .-- --- ...-- Georgia ............... 1
San Jose scale.............. Fig ...... ...... Florida ...-------- 1
San Jose scale......---....... Grape ---............---- Illinois ...------ .. 1
San Jose scale-.............. Grape ---.............--- Kentucky ......... 1
San Jose scale ............. Lilac ............................. New York --......... 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach ............................ Alabama ......... 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach ...........--- ... ---.............. Florida -----..... 4
San Jose scale---............. Peach ..........------.. Georgia --..---.... 3
San Jose scale ............. Peach ..........-------... Kentucky ............ 2
San Jose scale ............. Peach .........------.. ... Mississippi .......... 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach ..............----..............-- Pennsylvania .... 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach ...--. ......------- South Carolina.... 2
San Jose scale.............. Pear --...............--------. Alabama .............- 1
San Jose scale.............. Pear ---......----.. -- Florida ..............
San Jose scale---............ Pear .......----.-- Georgia ---....... 1
San Jose scale.............. Pear .............................. --------South Carolina.... 1
San Jose scale.............. Pear ............................. ( ) ...................... 1
San Jose scale.............. Plum ............................ Alabama ...... 1
San Jose scale.............. Plum ............................--- Florida .........- 1
San Jose scale.............. Plum ............................Georgia --........... 3
San Jose scale.............. Plum (?) ....................Pennsylvania .... 1
San Jose scale.............. Plum ..........-- -........ Virginia ........ 1
San Jose scale.............. Rose ...... ... Alabama ....... 1
San Jose scale.............. Rose ... Florida ..... 1
San Jose scale.............. Rose -- --- Georgia ............ 3
San Jose scale .............. Rose --------- Indiana .... 1

San Jose scale.............. (?) .. ......--....... Georgia .............. 1
San Jose scale.............. (?) ................................ Kentucky ............ 2
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... Argentina ............ 3
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... Bahama Islands 1
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... Brazil .................. 2
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... Chili .................... 2







Fifth Biennial Report 51

I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SInfested
Scab .......................... Potato .......................... Denmark ............ 1
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... England .............. 27
Scab .............................. Potato ........................ Germany .......... 21
Scab .............................. Potato ....................... M exico ............... 1
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... Norway .............. 1
Scab .............................. Potato .......................... British W est
SIndies ................ 1
Scab ................Potato ....................P..... Peru ...................... 1
Scab ........................ Potato ..........................( Scotland ............. 1
Schizoneura langera I
Houseman ..............Apple .........................ITennessee .......... 1
Schizoneura langera I
Houseman ..............Apple ........................... IKentucky ............
Symphyothrips punc-
tatus Hood & Wil-
liam s .......................... Coconut ........................ Cuba .................. 1
Snow scale ............... (?) ................................ Florida ................ 1
Soft brown scale ........ Caladium ............... Cuba ................... 1
Soft brown scale ........ Citrus .......... .....-- O. -Ohio .................. 1
Soft brown scale ........ Fern .................. Florida ........... 1
Soft brown scale ........ Grape ..--.............. --- ...Alabama 1-..
Soft brown scale ........ Herb --....................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Soft brown scale ........Japonica .............--.....Illinois ................ 1
Soft brown scale ........Lemon ..................-... Connecticut ........ 1
Soft brown scale ........ Oleander .................... Florida ................ 1
Soft brown scale ........ Vine ..... ...... Iowa ............... 1
Soft brown scale ... (?) ... ............ Florida ........... 1
Soft scale (?) ....... (?) ............................. New York........... 1
Sphaerotheca pannosa |Rose ...... .............. Cuba ............. 1
Stellate scale ............. Bay ....................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Stellate scale .--..- Sapodilla ...................... Bahama Islands. 1
Stellate scale ........... Spice .......................... Bahama Islands.. 2
Strawberry crown I
borer .. --... ....Strawberry ................Tennessee ........... 1
Strawberry crown
borer ........ ....Strawberry ............. Arkansas ....... 15
Sugar cane mealybug.. Sugar cane .................. Bahama Islands. 1
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato .............. Bahama Islands. 2
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato ................ Cuba -.................. 6
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato ...............I Jamaica ............. 1
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato ................Louisiana ........ 2
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato ................ Nicaragua ........ 1
Sweet potato weevil... Sweet potato .............. Porto Rico ...... 1
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato ................ Texas .............. 2
Targionia sacchari
Ckll .......................... Sugar cane ................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Tea scale ...................... Japonica ...................... Florida --........ 1
Tea scale .................. Japonica ..................... South Carolina.... 2
Tea scale .... ........(?) ............................ South Carolina.... 1
Tetranychus citri ....... Grapefruit ................ Cuba .................... 1
Tetranychus sp. .......... Verbena ...................... Alabama .............. 1
Toumeyella sp............. Magnolia ...................... Florida ................ 1
West Indian fruit fly.. Cuban guava .............. Cuba ............... 1
West Indian fruit fly.- Cuban mango ........ Cuba .................... 2
West Indian fruit fly.. Cuban plum .......... Cuba .................... 2
Whitefly .................... pice ... .......... Bahama Islands.. 1
Whitefly ..................Tangerine ............... Cuba ............. 1
Yam scale .................. Yam ........................... Cuba ............. 4
Yam scale................... Yam .................... Grand Cayman.... 1
Ziziphus scale .............. Palm ................... Florida ................ 1






State Plant Board of Florida

PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED*

Shipments Made by Mail

Year Ending June 30, 1923


Insect or Disease

Aspidiotus destructor
Sign-. .......................I(
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign ...-................
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl...
Black scale ...........
Black scale ..................
Black thread scale........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Byrobia sp ..................
Chaff scale ............
Chaff scale ..................
Citrus whitefly ............
Common mealybug ...
Common mealybug
Common mealybug
Common mealybug
Common mealybug ...
Common mealybug ....
Common mealybug ....
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Cottony cushion-scale..
Crown gall .................
Crown gall ..................
Crown gall .................
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dipterous larva ..........
Fern scale ............
Fern scale ............
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida whitefly .........
Fungus-Anthracnose.
Fungus Colletotri-
chum falcatum..........
Fungus Colletotri-
chum sp. ..............
Heliothrips rubrocinc-
tus Sign ................
Ivy scale .................
Ivy scale .....................
Ivy scale ....................
Ivy scale .....................


Guava ............................ Cuba ..................

Sugar apple ................ Cuba ....................

Coconut ........................ Cuba ....................
Jasmine .......................... Canary Islands....
(?) ------ -........... Canary Islands....
Coconut ......Cuba.................... Cuba..........
Coconut .......................... Cuba .... ..........
Palm seed .................. M exico ..............
Hibiscus ........................ Cuba .................
Citrus ............................ Pennsylvania ......
Japonica ...................... Alabama ............
Citrus ............................ Florida ................
Acalypha ...................... Cuba ....................
Coleus .......................... Pennsylvania ......
Croton ............................ Cuba ....... ..........
Hibiscus ........................ Florida ..............
Jasmine ....................-- Florida ..............
Orange -------------Florida .............
(?) ................................ Canary Islands....
Citrus ............................ Florida ..............
Euonymus ................... Georgia ................
Ivy .............................. Florida ................
Jasmine ........................ Florida ..............
Acalypha ...................... Florida ................
Raspberry .................... Pennsylvania ......
Raspberry .................... Iowa .. ....
Rose ........................... Pennsylvania ......
Citrus ........................... Florida ................
Oleander ......... ........I Florida ................
Palm --.......-..- ...-..--- I Pennsylvania ......
Avocado ........................ Florida ................
Coconut ........................ Cuba ...... ........
Fern .............................. Florida ..............
Oleander ...................... Florida ................
(?) ............................... Cuba ..................
Avocado ........................ Florida ................
Phlox ............................ Pennsylvania ......

Sugar cane .................. Cuba ....................

Seed .............................. Ceylon ..................

Coconut ........................ Cuba ....................
Oleander ...................... Florida ................
Oleander ...................... Georgia ................
(?) ................................ Canary Islands..
(?) ............................... Georgia ................


*For common and scientific names of Florida scale-insects see Quarterly Bulletin,
State Plant Board. Vol. VII, No. 4. 1923.


Shipments
Infested

1

1

3
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1

1

1
2
1
1
1
1






Fifth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Latania scale .....---........
Latania scale ...............----
Latania scale ...-.........
Latania scale ...--.........
Latania scale ............
Lepidopterous larva....-
Lesser snow scale........
Long-tailed mealybug.-
Mealybug .. ------..........
Mealybug ......................
Palmetto scale .........
Parlatoria sp ..............
Phenacoccus sp.............
Pseudaonidia trilobiti-
formis .. .-------
Pseudischnaspis ali-
enus Newst ..............
Pseudococcus virgatus
Ckll .........................
Pseudoparlatoria par-
latorioides Comst.....
Psocid ........................
Pustule scale ................
Pustule scale .............
Pyriform scale ............
Pyriform scale ............
Rice weevil ..................
Root knot .....--........-
Root knot ....................
Root knot ..............----
Root knot ....................
Root knot ................
Root knot ........----...
Root knot ....................
Root knot ....................
Rose scale ................
Rose scale ..................
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale ....-.........
Rufous scale .............
San Jose scale...........
San Jose scale..............
Scale-Hemichionas-
..pis sp. ....................
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Tea scale ...................
Tetralecia sp....... ----
White peach scale........
Yam scale ....................


SI Number of
Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Euonym us ....................Georgia ................ 1
Fig ................................ M ississippi .......... 1
Rose ................................ Florida ................ 1
Rose of Sharon............ Florida ................ 1
Spiraea ........................ Florida ................ 1
M ango seed .................. Cuba .................... 1
Hibiscus ........................ Cuba .................... 2
(?) ..............-- ............... Florida ................ 1
Banana ...................... ...Cuba .................... 1
Guava ........................... Cuba .................... 1
Palm etto ........................ Florida ................ 1
Lime--------..-.------..-Barbados ------[ 1
Acalypha ...................... Florida ................ 1

Lim e .............................. Barbados ............ 1

(?) ................................ Cuba .................... 1

Chayote .......................--- Cuba .................... 1


A calypha ......................
Lim e ................ ... ..
Oleander ......................
Sea grape ................
Avocado seed ..............
Guava ............................
M ango seed ................
Clerodendron ..............
Fig ..............................
Fig .............................
Fig ................................
Guava ............................
Peach ..........................
Rose ..............................
V iolet ............................
Blackberry ..................
Blackberry ..................
Rose .................... ....-
Rose .............................
(?) ..........................
Fig ...............................
(?) ................................


Cuba ....................
Barbados .
Florida .--.......- -
Florida ................
Florida ...........
Florida .......
Cuba ..........
Georgia ..........
Alabama
Florida .---
Georgia ...........
Florida .............
Florida --------
Florida ...............
Pennsylvania ....
Pennsylvania ......
Georgia ................
South Carolina....
California ........
South Carolina....
Cuba ..........
Georgia ................
Illinois ...........


Avocado ....................... Florida .......--..
Avocado ........................ Florida .....-----.
Ivy .. .......... ... Florida .------
Lemon ..................... ... Connecticut .
Oleander ...................... Florida .......
Orange .......................... Florida .--.....--
(?) ....... ...... Georgia ......
Japonica .......... ..... ... iGeorgia ......
Avocado .. ................. Florida .--.--
Geranium ..................... Florida ...
Yam ............................ Bahama Islands..







State Plant Board of Florida


PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED*

Shipments by all Means of Transportation Except Parcel Post

For Year Ending June 30, 1924


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Acuminate scale.......... Spice leaves ................ Bahama Islands. 1
Alga ............. --. Lime ....................... Honduras ............ 1
Alien scale .................. Rose .......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Alien scale ................. Jamaica apple ............ Bahama Islands. 1
Alien scale ................. Rose .............................. Florida ............... 1
Anthracnose ............. Hydrangea .................... Pennsylvania ...... 1
Aphid .. ......... ibiscus ........................ Bahama Islands.. 1
A phid ........................... ydrangea .................... Ohio ...................... 1
Aphid ............................ Rose .............................. Bahama Islands.. 3
Aphid ............................ Unknown ...-...................Indiana ................ 1
Aphid eggs .........---......... Spice leaves ................ Bahama Islands. 1
Apterygoton ................ Tradescantia ................ Bahama Islands. 1
Aspidiotus sp ............ Rubber ....--............... Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign .................---- Banana .......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .................... Banana .......................... Cuba ........... ... 23
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .......................... Banana .......................... Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign, ....................... Coconut .......................... Cuba .................... 6
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign ..................... Coconut ........................ Isle of Pines..... 1
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .....................-- (?) leaf ......................-- Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Banana .-------......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut ----......... .. Bahama Islands.. 2
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut ........................-- --- Cuba .................... 30
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut ...----. ---. Florida ............... 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut ......--.. ........ Isle of Pines........ 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut palm .............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Coconut palm .............. Florida ................ 6
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Palm .............................. Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Sago palm .................... Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
cocotiphagus Marl... Unknown cutting.......... Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus spinosus..
Comst. ...................... Palm .......... Florida ............. 1
Aspidiotus spinosus..
Comst. ...................... Unknown ......................Florida ................ 1
*For common and scientific names of Florida scale-insects see Quarterly Bulletin,
State Plant Board. Vol. VII. No. 4. 1923.







Fifth Biennial Report 55

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Aspidiotus spinosus.-
Comst. ..................... Unknown ................... Michigan 1............. 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
anonae Houser ........ Mistletoe ..................... Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
anonae Houser ........ Star apple .................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
anonae Houser ........ Unknown ...................... Cuba .................... 1
Asterolecanium milia-
ris longum (Green) Bamboo ................----Cuba .................... 1
Azalea leaf miner........ Azalea ......................... Georgia .............. 1
Bacterium ................... Potato .......................... Argentina ............ 1
Bacterium .................... Potato .......................... England ........... 1
Bamboo scale .............. Bamboo ........................ Florida ................ 1
Beetle (Laemophleus I
sp.) Corn .............................. Bahama Islands 1
Beetle (Silvanus sp.).. Corn .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi
Ashby) ..................... Grapefruit .................... Cuba .................... 2
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi
A shby) ...................... Orange .......................... Cuba .................... 3
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi
Ashby) ..................... Rose .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) ....... .......--- Spice leaves ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale ................. Banana ......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale .................. Bunch bush .................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale .................. Canip ........................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale .................. Hibiscus ........................ Florida 1............ 1
Black scale .................. Mistletoe ........................ Cuba ................ 2
Black scale .................. Oleander ........................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale ..................Oleander ...................... Florida ........... 1
Black scale .................. Orange .......................... Cuba ................. 1
Black scale ................. Poinsettia .................... Florida .............. 1
Black scale ................. Rose .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale .................. Sago palm .................... Florida ............... 1
Black scale .................. Soursop ........................ Bahama Islands.. 2
Black scale .................. Star apple .................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Black scale .................. Sugar apple ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Black thread scale...... Unknown ...................... Cuba -....... 1
Blight (Alternaria).... Potato .......................... Belgium .........----- 1
Blue mold .................... Orange .......................... California .......--... 1
Blue mold .................... Satsuma orange ......... Alabama ............ 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Banana .......... ..........Cuba ---------------.... 5
Boisduval's scale ....... Coconut ................. .... Bahama Islands.. 2
Boisduval's scale ........ Coconut ........ .......------Cuba ................. 4
Boisduval's scale ........ Coconut ......---- ....---. Isle of Pines........ 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Coconut .......................... Panama ............. 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Orchid .......................... Kentucky ............ 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Palm ........................... Florida ......... 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Palm .............................. France .................. 1
Boisduval's scale ........ Palm .............................. Louisiana ............ 1
Bone beetle (Necrobia I
rufipes (De Geer)) Bones ............................ Argentine ........... 1
Borer injury ................ Peach ..... ..... Ohio ............... 1
Borer injury ................ Plum .............................. Ohio ...................... 1







State Plant Board of Florida


I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
__ Infested
Borer injury ................ Sugar cane .................. Honduras -......... 1
Borer injury ..........---... Sugar cane .................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Broad-nosed grain
weevil ..................... Ginger .......................... Jam aica ................ 1
California red scale...... Orange ...........--- ....-....... Bahama Islands.. 1
California red scale...... Orange .......................... California ........ 1
Camellia scale .............. .aponica .------.. ....- South Carolina.... 1
Camellia scale ............ Pittosporum ................ South Carolina.... 1
Cardin's whitefly ..... Guava ............................ Cuba ..--- .......... 2
Chaff scale ......-----.. Citrus ............................ British Honduras 1
Chaff scale .....-----.. .. Citrus ..........--------. Florida ................ 3
Chaff scale ... .... Grapefruit .................... Mexico ................
Chaff scale .......-- Grapefruit .................... Texas ............ 2
Chaff scale ....... .... Grapefruit .................... Spain ................. 1
Chaff scale .....-- -. Lemon .......................... Spain .................. 2
Chaff scale ......-- .. Orange .......................... Cuba ............... 2
Chaff scale ....-----. Orange .......................... Florida ................ 1
Chaff scale ...--- ....... Orange ......................... Mexico ............... 1
Chaff scale .........----- .Orange -------.....--...-............I Spain ..------------ 1
Chaff scale ........ .... Persimmon .................. Isle of Pines........ 1
Chaff scale ...... ...- Pomelo ................. Cuba -............ 1
Chaff scale ................ Unknown ...................... South Carolina.... 2
Chalcid ..........-- .....----- Jamaica apple ..---.... Cuba .................... 1
Cherry scale ........--. Apple ............................ Georgia ................ 1
Cherry scale .... ...- Spirea ............ .....Georgia ................ 1
Chionaspis sp. (?)..... Blue spruce ................. Colorado .............. 1
Chionaspis salicis Linn. Viburnum sp. (?)-........Isle of Pines --. 1
Chrysomphalus sp....... Cactus .......................... Bahama Islands. 1
Chrysomphalus sp....... Cassava .----......................Cuba .................... 1
Chrysomphalus sp....... Unknown leaves .......... Cuba .................... 1
Citrus whitefly .......... Jasmine ..----..... ...... Florida ................ 1
Coconut mealybug ...... Breadfruit .................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Coconut mealybug ...... Coconut palm ............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Coconut mealybug .. Fig ...............................Florida ............... 1
Coconut mealybug Guava ........................... Cuba .................... 2
Coconut mealybug ...... Palm ............................. Florida ................ 1
Coconut mealybug ......Soursop ........---......... Bahama Islands.. 2
Coconut mealybug ...... Unknown leaves .......... Cuba .................... 1
Coleopterous larva........ Orange .......................... Mexico ................ 1
Common mealybug -. Banana -......-..- Cuba .................... 2
Common mealybug .. Croton .......................... Georgia ................ 1
Common mealybug Sugar apple ................ Bahama Islands.. 2
Common whitefly ...... Cape jessamine ............ Georgia ................ 5
Common whitefly ...... Cape jessamine ............ Florida ................ 1
Common whitefly ...... Citrus ............................ Florida ............... 1
Common whitefly ...... Guava ............ ... Cuba .................... 1
Common whitefly...... Jasmine ........................ Florida ................ 1
Common whitefly ...... Jasmine ...---.....-..-. Georgia ................ 2
Common whitefly ...... Jasmine ..... ... South Carolina.... 1
Common whitefly ...... Orange ... .......... Georgia ................ 1
Common whitefly ...... Orange ..... .............. Florida ................ 1
Common whitefly ...... Privet ............................ Georgia ............... 3
Corn ear worm........... Corn ........ ..... Bahama Islands. 5
Cottony cushion-scale Australian silk oak..... Florida ................ 1
Crown gall .............. Pear ................................ California .......... 1
Crown gall .................. ose .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Crown gall .................. Rose ..................----- Florida ................ 1
Crown gall ................ Rose ............ .......... Illinois ................ 1
Crown gall .............. Rose .............................. Maine ....-........... 1
Crown gall .................. Rose ............................. New Jersey ....... 1






Fifth Biennial Report. 57

| Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
I I Infested
Crown gall ..................Rose ..........--......----.. New York .........| 1
Crown gall ...........--- (?) ------------- New Jersey ........ 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Banana ........... ..... Cuba ..- -..... 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Jamaica apple ........... Cuba--............. 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Palm .......... ............ Florida ................ 1
Cyanophyllum scale.. Palm .....................------- ......... Cuba .................. 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Rose .............................. Bahama Islands.., 1
Cyanophyllum scale.... Sweet bay ....................--- --- ahama Islands..[ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Avocado ........................ Florida ----.............. 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Coconut ...................... Panama .......... 1
Dictyospermum scale. Grapefruit ............. Bahama Islands.. 2
Dictyospermum scale. Ivy ..... ..............- New Jersey --...... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Lemon ......... ...........Gibraltar ............ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Mango ...-----........... Cuba ............ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Mango ................Florida ....---......... 1
Dictyospermum scale. Mango ........................ Isle of Pines........ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Orange .......................Mexico ...... 1
Dictyospermum scale Palm ...... ...... Florida ......----.......... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Palm ............................ Illinois --.............. 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Palm ............................ Louisiana ............ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Pomelo ....................... Bahama Islands..- 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Rose ....... .......... Bahama Islands..- 4
Dictyospermum scale.. Rose .............. Florida ................ 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Rose apple ................ Florida ................ 1
Dipterous larvae ........ Mangoes .................... Cuba ................... 1
Drug store beetle....... Ginger ............................ Jamaica .............. 1
Dry rot (Fusarium
sp.) ................... Potato .... ....... Belgium .............. 1
Dry rot (Fusarium
sp.) .............-------- Potato ............................ Germ any ........ 1
Elaterid larva ............ Straw ............................ China .................... 1
English walnut scale.. Peach ........................ Florida ................ 1
English walnut scale.. Holly ........................ Florida --.............. 1
European fiorinia ...... Palm .............................. Florida ... 1
European fiorinia ........ Palm ........................... .Italy .................... 1
Fern scale ................Aspidistra .................INew York ......... 2
Fern scale ...... Fern .......................... Alabama .......... 1
Fern scale ........... Fern .............................. New York ....... 1
Fiorinia theae Green.. Japonica ............. .... South Carolina.... 2
Florida red scale ....... Banana ............. Cuba ............... 1
Florida red scale......... Citrus ....... .............. Cuba .............. 1
Florida red scale ...... Citrus .............. Florida ................ 1
Florida red scale.......... Coconut palm ............. Florida ......... 6
Florida red scale.......... Ficus sp. ...... .... Cuba -............... 1
Florida red scale.......... Grapefruit ...... ....... Cuba ............... 1
Florida red scale ......... Ivy .............. .... New Jersey ........ 1
Florida red scale.......... Lime ....................... Florida ............. 1
Florida red scale.......... Mango ..................... Florida ............. 3
Florida red scale.. .. Oleander ................. Florida ............. 2
Florida red scale.......... Palm ..................... Cuba ............... 1
Florida red scale.......... Palm ............................ Illinois .... ......... 1
Florida red scale.......... Palm ............................ Louisiana .. 1
Florida red scale.......... Rose ......................... Bahama Islands. 2
Florida red scale.......... Rose .. ............ Florida ........ .. 2
Florida red scale.......... Rubber .................. Florida ............... 2
Florida red scale.......... A succulent plant ..... New Jersey ....... 1
Florida wax scale........ Citrus ......................... Florida ................ 1
Florida whitefly ........ Guava ......................... Cuba ............... 1
Fungi (?) ............ Potato ..........................Spain ............... 1
Fungus (Cephaleuros
virescens) ..............Mistletoe .................... Cuba .-..............






58 State Plant Board of Florida

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Fungus (Diplodia ca-
caoicola P. Henn.).. Cacao ............................ Bahama Islands. 1
Fungus (Diplodia sp.) Coconut ........................ Cuba --........-..... 1-
Fungus (Entomoph-
thora fumosa
Speare) r....... Mealybug .................... Florida ................
Fungus (Fusarium
sp.) ........................... Apple .............Italy ---------....-
Fungus (Phoma sp.).. Mango .......................... Florida ........-------
Fungus (Fusarium
sp.) ........----.................. Potato ............................ Argentina .....-.... 1
Fungus (Fusa/rium
sp.) .......-.................... Potato ................ .... Brazil .....-- -- ..
Fungus (Fusarium
sp.) .......----............ Potato ............................ England ....------- 1.
Fungus (Fusarium
sp.) ............................ Potato ............................ France -............- 1
Fungus (Fusarium
sp.) ------ ------- Potato -----------.............--...Holland -..--------------- 1
Fungus (Fusarium I
sp.) ..........---- ... ----- Potato ............................iM exico 1
Fungus (Rhizoctonia
sp.) ........----..... ...- Potato ............................ Belgium -........... 1
Fungus (Rhizoctonia
sp.) ------- ----- Potato ............................ Cuba .--...........-----
Fungus (Rhizoctonia
sp.) .--- -..--. Potato ............................ England ............
Fungus (Rhizoctonia
sp.) ....-.--.---- Potato ............................Germany .....------. 1
Fungus (Rhizoctonia
sp.) ..........-... .......-- Potato ............................ Holland .........------ 1
Fungus (Rhizoctonia
sp.) ........ --- .. Potato ............................ M exico ................ 3
Fungus (Sclerotium
bataticola Taub.) ...... Sweet potato --.. ....-- Cuba ....................
Gall (?) ........................ Tea shrub (?).............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Greenhouse thrips........ Coconut .............. ...--- Isle of Pines........ 1
Green scale ................. Aralia ........... ....... Cuba .-........-......... 1
Green scale .................. Avocado ....................... Bahama Islands-. 1
Green scale ..................IGuava ...................---- Cuba .........-- .. 2
Green scale .................. Mistletoe ............... Cuba -.-.- ..... 1
Green scale .................. Sapodilla .....-----. Bahama Islands.. 1
Green shield scale........ Ficus sp. ...................... Florida ..... 1
Green shield scale........ Mango ............................ Florida ............... 1
Green shield scale........ Rose apple .................... Florida ............. 1
Green spotting ............ Orange ........................Mexico ........... 1
Haplothrips merrilli
W atson ...................... Coconut ........................ Cuba .---. ...-..-- 3
Hemispherical scale.... Fern .............................. New York .......... 1
Hemispherical scale.... Sago palm ................. Cuba ....................------ 2
Ivy scale ..................... Lemon ...........---............... Gibraltar ............ 1
Ivy scale ...................... Lemon ............................ Holland ................ 2
Ivy scale ...................... Palm .............................. Louisiana ............ 1
Ivy scale ...................... Palm .............................. France .................. 1
Ivy scale ...................... Palm .............................. New York .......... 1
Ivy scale .........-----. Sago palm .................. Florida ............... 3
Ivy scale .................... Sago palm .................. North Carolina.... 1
Ivy scale ...................... Unknown ...... ......... South Carolina.... 1
Lasioderma serricorne
Fab. (Beetle) .......... Banana ........................ Brazil .... ---.............. 1







Fifth Biennial Report 59

1 1 Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Latania scale .............. Apple .......................... Georgia ................ 1
Latania scale ............ Banana .................-...... Honduras ............ 1
Latania scale ............. Coconut ......................Panama .............. 1
Latania scale .............. Crepe myrtle (?)....... Florida ................ 1
Latania scale .............. Fig -......................-- Florida ............ 2
Latania scale .............. Fig ..... .... Georgia .......--....... 1
Latania scale ............ Grape .....................Florida ................ 1
Latania scale .............. Ligustrum .................... Georgia ................ 1
Latania scale .............. Loqluat .... Florida ................| 1
Latania scale .............. ...... ....................Florida ...... ..H 1
Latania scale ........... Palm ..............................British Honduras 1
Latania scale ............. Palm .............................. Cuba .--- ............. 1
Latania scale ............. Palm ......... .......... ....... Kentucky ............ 1
Latania scale ............ Palm .............................. Louisiana ............ 1
Latania scale .............. Rose .............................Bahama Islands. 1
Latania scale ............ Rose ...................... Florida .............. 2
Latania scale ...........Rose .............................. Georgia ............. 1
Latania scale ............ Sapodilla ............ Bahama Islands.. 1
Latania scale ........... Sapodilla ...................... Grand Cayman .... 2
Latania scale ........... Star apple .................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Latania scale ..............Tea shrub (?) ............Bahama Islands.. 1
Late blight .............. Potato .......................... Spain .................... 1
Leaf blotch ................ Rose .............................. Bahama Islands. 2
Leaf spot ....................Rose ............................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Lecaniodiaspis sp......... Lemon ......................... Isle of Pines........ 1
Lecan ium sp. (?) ........( ) .............................. Michigan ............ 1
Lepidopteron (?) ........ Potato ........................... Spain .................. 1
Lepidopteron .......... Unknown ...... ..... South Carolina.... 1
Lepidosaphes camel-
liae Hoke.................. Japonica .....................I South Carolina.... 1
Lepidosaphes sp. ........ Pittosporum ................ South Carolina.... 1
Lesser snow scale........ Bobug tree pod............ Isle of Pines........ 1
Lesser snow scale........ Bougainvillea .............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Lesser snow scale........ Coconut ....................... Cuba ..-.............-.. 4
Lesser snow scale........ Coconut palm .............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Lesser snow scale........ Coconut palm .......... Florida ................ 1
Lesser snow scale........ Grape .-......................... Florida ................ 1
Lesser snow scale........ Hibiscus ..................... Bahama Islands.. 2
Lesser snow scale........ Hibiscus ................... Florida ................ 2
Lesser snow scale........ Jamaica apple ............Bahama Islands.. 1
Lesser snow scale .... Oleander ...................... Florida ............. 1
Lesser snow scale ......Ophiopogon sp ....... Louisiana ............ 1
Lesser snow scale...... Palm ..... ..... Florida ............. 2
Lesser snow scale..... .. Poinciana ........... Bahama Islands.. 1
Lesser snow scale ...... Unknown ................ Cuba ............. 1
Lesser snow scale....... Unknown cutting ........ Florida ............. 1
Long scale .......itrus....... ........................... Florida ................ 1
Long scale ............. ....Lemon ................. Isle of Pines........ 1
Long scale ........ Orange............. ........ Isle of Pines........ 1
Long-tailed mealyblg.. Acalypha (?) ............ Florida ............. 1
Long-tailed mealybug Aralia ...................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Long-tailed mealybug. Oleander .................... Bahama Islands. 1
Long-tailed mealybug. Palm .......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Long-tailed mealybug. Spinach ....................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Mealybug .................... Banana ................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Mealybug .................... Banana ........ .... Cuba ............. 2
Mealybug ................... Croton ........ ......... Bahama Islands. 1
Mealybug ...... ..... Chayote ...... ............ Cuba .................... 1
Mealybug .................... Comptie () ...... .... uba ........... 1
Mealybug ......... ............ Fig ......... exas ............ 1
M ealybug ...................... Hibiscus ....................... Florida .... 2







State Plant Board of Florida


I Numb
Insect or Disease I Occurring on From Shipn
Infer
Mealybug ................... Oleander .......... ... Florida ..........-
Mealybug ..............-..... Petunia ... ...------...-- New York ......-...
Mildew .......................... Hydrangea ...---..-..... Pennsylvania ......
Mimosa scale .............. Hog plum ...... -----.... Florida .------....
Mining scale ................ Bobo ...---..... ....... Cuba --------
Mining scale ................ 3unch bush .................. Bahama Islands..
Mining scale ................ Mammee apple .......... Bahama Islands.. 1
Mining scale ................ Sapodilla ...................... Bahama Islands- 1
Mining scale ................ Sapodilla ...................... Grand Cayman.--.
Mining scale ................ Star apple ...... Bahama Islands..
Mining scale ................ Sugar apple --- ... Bahama Islands..
Mining scale ................ Unknown --.. ---- Cuba .----...
Mite (Bdella sp.)....... Scale on coconut.......... Cuba ......-------
Mite (Cheletia sp.) .... Aspidiotus orientalis I
cocotiphagus Marl...jCuba -...-- --..-...


Mite (Cheletia sp.) ....Purple scale ................. -- ahama Islands.
Mite (Cheletia sp.).. Purple scale on orange Cuba--- ....------I
Mite (Cheyletus sp.).. Palm ............................ British Honduras
Mite (Rhizoglyphus
sp.) Breadfruit .................... Grand Cayman....
Mite (Rhizoglyphus
sp.) -------------- Potato .......................... Italy .-- ------
Mites (?) ................... Potato a-..........--n .. ..... S
Moth borer .................. Sugar cane ............. ahama Islands
Moth borer .................. Sugar cane ................ Cuba ------
Mulberry whitefly ...... Myrtle (?) .Bahama Islands-
Obscure scale ---....-- Pecan ..........--.......... Texas ...........
Oyster-shell scale ...... Honeysuckle ......... Maine ..--........
Oyster-shell scale ...... Lilac --..-. ... Illinois ............
Oyster-shell scale ...... Trumpet vine ........-.... Maine ..................
Oyster-shell scale ...... Unknown ..................... -Illinois --........-..-.
Oyster-shell scale ...... Unknown ...................... New York .......-
Parlatoria-like scale.... Comptie ........................ Florida ................
Parlatoria-like scale..-. Palm .............................. Florida ...
Parlatoria-like scale.... Shrub ............................ Bahama Islands..
Parlatoria-like scale.... Spice bush .................... Bahama Islands..
Peachtree borer .......... Peach ............................ North Carolina...
Peachtree borer .......... Peach --- ------South Carolina....
Peachtree borer .......... Plum .-- --.. --......... Georgia .....----...
Phytophthora sp.........Potato ..... Belgium ..............
Pineapple mealybug-... Avocado ....................... Isle of Pines........
Pineapple mealybug.... Banana ...............------.. Cuba ....
Pineleaf scale .............. Blue spruce .................. Colorado ..............
Pinnaspis buxi I
Bouche ...................... A succulent plant........ New Jersey ........
Pomace fly larvae...... Orange .......................... Mexico ................
Pseudaonidia paeoniae
(Ckll.) ....................IAzalea ......................--.- South Carolina...
Pseudaonidia paeoniae
(Ckll.) ...................... Euonymus ................... South Carolina..
Pseudaonidia paeoniae
(Ckll.) ...................... Japonica ....................... South Carolina....
Pseudaonidia paeoniae
(Ckll.) ................. Pittosporum ................ South Carolina...
Pseudaonidia paeoniae
(Ckll.) .................... Tea plant ..................... South Carolina-..
Pseudaonidia paeoniae
(Ckll.) ...................... Unknown ...- ---- South Carolina...
Pulvinaria sp ............. Banana .............. Cuba .. ............
Purple scale ............... Citrus ............................Cuba ............


'er of
ents
sted






I-
L



1

2
1
1


1
1
1



1

1

1
1
2


1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1

1
1

2
1

1
2

1
2
1
2







Fifth Biennial Report 61

|1 Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
I Infested
Purple scale ................ Citrus ............................ Florida .......--..... 4
Purple scale ................ Grapefruit .................... Bahama Islands.. 7
Purple scale ................ Grapefruit .................... Canal Zone ........... 1
Purple scale ................ Grapefruit ....................Cuba .................... 4
Purple scale ................ Grapefruit .................... Grand Cayman... 1
Purple scale ................ Kumquat .... ----..................-- sle of Pines....... 1
Purple scale ................ Lemon .........................Bahama Islands.. 2
Purple scale ......-..........Lemon ---....-........ ... ---- Gibraltar ............ 1
Purple scale ................ Lemon ...--.........-...- i Isle of Pines........ 1
Purple scale ................ Lime .............................. Cuba .................... 1
Purple scale ................ Lime .............................. Grand Cayman... 1
Purple scale ................ Lime .............................. Honduras ........ 1
Purple scale ................ Lime .............................. Mexico ................ 1
Purple scale ................ Orange .......................... Bahamas ............. 27
Purple scale ................ Orange ..............-............Belgium .............. 1
Purple scale ................ Orange ......................... iBrazil .............--- 1
Purple scale ................ Orange ........................ Canal Zone ........ 1
Purple scale ................ Orange .......................... Colon ........------ 1
Purple scale ................ Orange ......................... Cuba .................... 6
Purple scale ................ Orange .................-.... Florida .----.... 2
Purple scale ................ Orange ............... .... Grand Cayman.... 1
Purple scale ................ Orange ..------....------ Mexico ....-........... 1
Purple scale ................ Pomelo ......................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Purple scale ................ Pomelo ......... ..... Cuba .................... 1
Purple scale ................ Satsuma orange .........Alabama ........ 1
Purple scale ................ Sour orange .............--- Bahama Islands.. 1
Pustule scale ............ Australian silk oak.... Florida ................ 1
Pustule scale .............. Fig .----...............................-- Florida ......... 1
Pustule scale .............. Oleander .........-----...... Florida ............... 4
Pustule scale .............. Sapodilla ...................... Bahama Islands. 2
Pustule scale .............. Sugar apple ................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Putnam's scale ............ Unknown .................... North Carolina.... 1
Pyralid larvae ............ Straw ..----..... ....--- Japan .............. 1
Pyriform scale ............ Jasmine --...........--- .. Florida ................----- 1
Quohog-shaped scale
(T. quohogiformis
Merrill) .................... Croton ........-----...... Cuba ....... 1
Red rot ........................ Sugar cane ..-.............. Bahama Islands.. 1
Red rot ........................ Sugar cane .----................ Cuba .--------- 1
Red rot ... .......... Sugar cane ... ---..............Honduras ..........- 1
Root knot .................... Ficus ripens.......... ..... Florida ................ 1
Root knot .................... Fig .............................. Florida ---.......... 10
Root knot .................... Fig --- ------- Georgia ----.... 4
Root knot ................. Fig .............................. Louisiana 2
Root knot ........----............ Fig ...............................North Carolina.... 1
Root knot ........----............ Fig .......... ----...................... South Carolina.... 4
Root knot .................... Fig -----..............................Texas .....--..... 1
Root knot .................... Hibiscus ........-........... Florida ........... 1
Root knot .................... Peach ........................ ... Florida ............... 2
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ Georgia ................---- 3
Root knot .................... Peach ............................ North Carolina.... 1
Root knot .................... Rose ............................-- Bahama Islands.. 1
Root knot .................... Rose ............................. Florida ............ 2
Root knot .................... Rose ............................. New Jersey ........ 1
Root knot .................... Rose .............................. Pennsylvania ...... 2
Root knot .................... Spirea ...........................Georgia ........... 1
Root knot .................... Unknown ................... Florida .......... 1
Rose aphis (?).............. Rose ................................ Georgia ......... 1
Rose scale .................... Blackberry .................. Panama ............. 1
Rose scale .................... Rose ....................... Pennsylvania .. 1







62 State Plant Board of Florida

I Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Rose scale .................... Rose ............................. Rhode Island........ 1
Rot (Saprophytic) .... Apple ............................ France ................ 1
Rufous scale .............. Avocado ........................ Bahama Islands.. 2
Rufous scale .............. Banana .......................... Bahama Islands.. 2
Rufous scale .............. Breadfruit .................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Canna ............................ Cuba --.................. 1
Rufous scale .............. Jasmine ........................ Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Citrus ............................ Cuba ................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Croton ---......................... Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Hibiscus ........................ Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Jamaica apple ............ Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Lime .............................. Cuba ....................
Rufous scale .............. Manga blanca ............ Cuba ....... .......... 1
Rufous scale .............. Oleander ...................... Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Orange ............-..............Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Orange .......................... Cuba ................. 1
Rufous scale .............. Orange .......-.............--Mexico .....-......... 1
Rufous scale .............. Palm .............................. Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Palm .............................. Cuba ................. 1
Rufous scale .............. Rose ................................ Bahama Islands.. 10
Rufous scale .............. Spice .............................. Bahama Islands.. 3
Rufous scale .............. Spice leaves ................ Bahama Islands.. 2
Rufous scale .............. Star apple ................... Bahama Islands.. 4
Rufous scale .............. Star apple .................... Cuba .................... 1
Rufous scale .............. Sugar apple --..........- Bahama Islands.. 1
Rufous scale .............. Tamarind ...................... Bahama Islands.. 2
Rufous scale .............. Unknown ........-.........--Cuba .................... 1
San Jose scale.............. Apple ............................ North Carolina.... 1
San Jose scale.............. Apple .-... ........ Pennsylvania ...... 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach .---......---...-.-..-- California ............ 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach ..--- ---.---....-- .- Georgia ................ 1
San Jose scale.............. Peach ....... ....--------- Indiana ................ 1
San Jose scale............. Peach ............................ North Carolina.... 2
San Jose scale.............. Rose ...-----. ..-....-- Georgia ................ 2
San Jose scale ............. Peach ................. ..... Ohio .-----.................. 1
San Jose scale--..-.......... Pear .............................. Georgia ............ 1 1
San Jose scale---- Plum ..............---------.............. Alabama ........... 1
San Jose scale ------... Plum ------ --------- Ohio 1--------
San Jose scale.............. Plum .............................. Ohio ......................i 1
San Jose scale.............. Rose .............................. Florida ...........---- 2
San Jose scale ............ Rose ----............................. Georgia .----........ 2
San Jose scale.............. Rose .....................-----........ Pennsylvania ...... 1
San Jose scale.............. Rose ..............................--------Texas .........--....... 1
San Jose scale.............. Shrub .----......................--- Florida ............... 1
San Jose scale.............. Unknown ...............----- North Carolina.... 1
Scab (Actinomyces I
scabies) ..................Potato ................. Argentine..... 3
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Potato .----........................-- -Belgium ..--- 4
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Potato --------- Brazil ...----..... 4
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Potato .--------....................... Colon ....-- ..--....
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Potato --------- England .. 3
Scab (Actinomyces I m
scabies) .................... Potato ........Ge............ Germay ........ 3
Scab (Actinomyces I
scabies) -.................. Potato ..-.----.-----..... IHolland ............. 3
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) -------....----- Potato ..--- -- -- --. I Mexico ................ 5








Fifth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease


Occurring on


Scab (Actinomyces I
scabies) .................... Potato ............................
Scab (Actinomyces I
scabies) .-.................. Potato ......... .............
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Potato ........... .............
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Potato ..........................
Scab (Actinomyces
scabies) .................... Irish potato ...........
Scab (Actinomyces I
scabies) ....................-Satsuma orange .........
Scab (Cladosporium I
citri) .......................... Grapefruit .................
Scale set (Aspidiotus
sp.) ............................ Poinciana ....................
Scurfy scale ................ Peach ...........................
Silvanus surinamen-
sis L. (Beetle) .......... Banana ........................
Silver scurf .................. Potato .........................
Silver scurf .................. Potato ............................
Silver scurf .................. Potato ...................
Snow scale .................. Orange .......................
Soft brown scale.......... Palm .........................
Soft rot (Fusarium
sp.) ............................ --------------Potato ..........................
Stellate scale .............. Spice leaves ..................
Strawberry crown
borer .......................... Strawberry ...........
Sugar-cane scale ........ Sugar cane ..............
Sweet potato weevil... Sweet potato ..............
Symphyothrips punc-
tatus (H. &. W.) --. Scales on coconut ......
Termites ..................... Sweet potato ..............
Thrips ..... ..... ..... Coconut ........................
Thrips ........................... Scales on coconut ........
Thrips ......................... Scales on coconut ........
Vinsonia stellifera
West. ........................ Banana ......................
Vinsonia stellifera
West. ........-.... -Sapodilla .................
Vinsonia stellifera
West. ---- pice....................... ice .......
W eevil .......................... Rose ................. ..........
West Indian fruit fly
(Anastrepha frater-
culus Wied.) ............ Guava ............................
West Indian fruit fly
(Anastrepha frater-
culus Wied.) ............ Mango ...........................
West Indian sweet
potato weevil .......... Potato .........................
West Indian sweet
potato weevil .......... Sweet potato ..............
Whitefly ........................ Geranium .....................
Whitefly ........................ Spice leaves ............
White peach scale........ Papaya ..........................
White peach scale........ Sago palm ....................
White peach scale........ Unknown ...............
White peach scale........ Vine ..............................


From


New So. Wales...

Santo Domingo...

Spain ...................


Sweden ................

Cuba ....................

Alabama ..............

Canal Zone ........

Bahama Islands..
Florida ................

Brazil ..................
Bahama Islands..
Brazil ......... ....
Mexico ............
Canal Zone ........
Bahama Islands..

Brazil ..---....-
Bahama Islands..

Georgia ................
Bahama Islands..
Cuba ..........- .....

Panama ................
Santo Domingo....
Cuba ..........--...
Cuba .------
Isle of Pines-.......

Bahama Islands.-

Bahama Islands..

Bahama Islands..
Cuba ..----......--

Cuba ........---...

Jamaica ..........

British W. Indies

Dutch Guiana ....
Georgia ................
Bahama Islands..
Porto Rico ..........
Florida ............
Florida ...........
Georgia ................


.

..

.


Number of
Shipments
Infested

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1
1

1
1
2
1
1
1

1
1

1
2
6

1
1





1
1
1


5

1

1

1

1
1



















APPENDIX B

RULES, REGULATIONS AND PUBLIC NOTICES OF
THE STATE PLANT BOARD OF FLORIDA

In Force and Effect on
July 1, 1924

(Circulars Nos. 45 to 51 Incl.)








State Plant Board
OF FLORIDA





CIRCULAR NO. 45

Supplementary to
Circulars 42, 43 and 44,
And Including Rules, etc., Previously Published in
Circulars 43 and 44. as Amended,






RULES AND REGULATIONS MADE BY THE STATE
PLANT BOARD PURSUANT TO THE
FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915
(Chapter 6885).


Issued Feb. 15, 1923





















STATE PLANT BOARD

of Florida

P. K. YONGE, Chairman................... ...-.............. ..... .............Pensacola
E. L. W ARTMANN---.....-----................. --.................. ........... Citra
J. B. SUTTON...----------- ----.............-- ......- .... ........ ............- Tampa
JOHN C. COOPER, JR.......------.......... ....................................Jacksonville
W L. WEAVER--.. --.--...........-- -------..................... .............. Perry
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary .............. ............... ...... .................. Tallahassee

Staff
WILMON NEWELL, Plant Commissioner ...................... ............... Gainesville
E. W. BERGER, Entomologist-....................-............-......-..... Gainesville
F. M. O'BYRNE, Nursery Inspector..... ................ ......... .........Gainesville
FRANK STIRLING, General Inspector -------.... ........................... Gainesville
J. H. MONTGOMERY, Quarantine Inspector....--- ................... Gainesville
J. C. GOODWIN, Apiary Inspector --........ .................... ..................Gainesville
O. F. BURGER, Pathologist............ .......................................Gainesville
MISS L. R. HUNTER, Chief Clerk.------......... ............. ................. Gainesville










RULES AND REGULATIONS MADE BY THE STATE PLANT
BOARD PURSUANT TO THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT
OF 1915, IN EFFECT ON FEB. 15, 1923
PUBLIC NOTICE.
Declaring Certain Insects and Diseases to be Public Nuisances.
'Under the provisions of the Florida Plant Act of 1915, Chapter 6885,
approved April 30, 1915, the State Plant Board of Florida, in accordance
with Section 5 of said Act, does declare the following insects and diseases,
and each and every plant and thing infested or infected therewith, to be
public nuisances:
Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected


Avocado Weevil
(Heilipus lauri Boh.).
Banana Root Borer
(Cosmopolites (Sphenophorus)
sordidus Germar).
Banana Wilt Disease, or "Panama
Disease" (Fusarium sp.).
Brown Rot
(Pythiacystis citrophora Sm. &
Sm.).
Brown-tail Moth
(Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn.).


Avocado.

Banana.
Sugar cane.

Banana.

Lemons.
Oranges.
Apple (Pyrus manls)'
Apple, crab (Pyrus coronaria).
Apricot (Prunus armeniaca).
Ash, Black (Fraxinus nigra).
Ash, Blue (Fraxinus quadrangulata).
Ash, Red (Fraxinus pennsylvanica).
Ash, White (Fraxinus americana).
Barberry (Berberis vulgaris).
Basswood (Tilia americana).
Beach Plum (Prunus maritima).
Beech, American (Fagus grandifolia).
Birch, Black (Betula lenta).
Birch, Gray (B. populifolia).
Birch, Paper (B. papyrifera).
Birch, Yellow (Betula lutea).
Blackberry (Rubus villosus).
Boxelder (Acer negundo).
Cherry (Prunus avium).
Cherry, wild black (Prunus serotina).
Chestnut (Castanea dentata).
Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa).
Choke Cherry (Padus nana).
Crataegus, all species.
Creeper, Virginia
(Ampelopsis quinquefolia).
Currant (Ribes rubrum).
Elm, American (Ulmus americana).
Elm, Cork (U. racemosa).
Elm, English (U. campestris).
Elm, Scotch.
Elm, Slippery (U. fulva).
Gooseberry (Ribes grossularia).
Grape (Vitis cordifolia).
Hophornbeam (Oatrya Virginiana).


1Adopted May 4, 1915. Amended Feb. 14, 1916, June 5, 1916, Aug. 14, 1916, Jan.
S, 1917, June 18, 1917, Jan. 14, 1918, Oct. 13, 1919, Nov. 8, 1920, June 6, 1921 and Nov.
13, 1922.
zList from data furnished by the Bureau of Entomology, '. S. D. A.







4 STATE PLANT BOARD

Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Hornbeam (Carpinus Caroliniana).
Maple, Cut-leafed.
Maple, Red.
Maple, Sugar (Acer saccharum).
Maple, sycamore
(Acer pseudo-platanus).
Maple, white (Acer dasycarpum).
Oaks (Quercus sp.).
Peach (Prunus persica).
Pear (Pyrus communis).
Pecan (Carya olivaeformis).
Plum (Prunus domestica.
Pyrus pinnatifida.
Quince (Cydonia vulgaris).
Quince, Japan (Cydonia japonica).
Raspberry (Rubus strigosus).
Rose (Rosa nitida).
Shadbush (Amelanchier canadensis).
Spiraea (Spiraea thunbergii).
Sumac, Mountain.
Sumac, Smooth.
Sumac, Stag-horn.
Walnut, black (Juglans nigra).
Weigela rosea.
Willow, weeping (Salix Babylonica).
Wistaria (Wistaria consequana).
Citrus Canker Witch-hazel (Hamamelis Virginiana).
(Bacterium (Pseudomonas) Citrus trees and plants, including the
citri Hasse). following:
Bergamont (Citrus bergamia).
Includes various kinds of medicinal
citrus.
Bigarade orange (C. vulgaris).
Includes the bittersweet, sour and
others of this type.
Citron (C. Medical .
Includes various varieties of cit-
rons; also cedrat.
Grapefruit, or Pomelo (C. decumana).
Hybrids.
Includes the hybrids between vari-
ous species of citrus-known un-
der different names, such as
Morton, Rusk, Citrange, Pomer-
ange, Tangelo, etc.
Kumquat (C. japonica).
Includes the various kinds of kum-
quats.
Lemon (C. limonia).
Includes various varieties of lem-
on, also rough lemon, everbear-
ing lemon, ponderosa lemon.
Lime (C. limetta).
Includes various varieties known
as Key lime, Mexican lime, West
Indian lime, etc.
Mandarin Orange (C. nobilis).
This includes all varieties of "kid
glove" oranges grown in Flor-
ida, such as Satsuma, Tanger-
ine, King, Oneco, etc.






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease











Citrus Knot
(Sphaeropsis tumefaciens).
Coconut Bud-rot
(Bacillus coli var.).
Cotton-square-Weevil
(Anthonomus vestitus Boh.).
European Corn Borer
(Pyrausta nubilalis Hubn.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Otaheite (C. sinensis).
Pomelo-See Grapefruit.
Shaddock (C. decumana).
As separate from Pomelo. This in-
cludes several varieties.
Sweet Orange (C. aurantium).
This includes all round oranges
commonly grown for commercial
purposes in Florida.
Trifoliate Orange or "Citrus trifoli-
ata" (Poncirus trifoliata).
Wild Lime (Xanthoxylum Fagara).
Citrus.

Coconut.

Cotton.

Aster.
Apple of Peru.
Asparagus.
Barnyard grass.
Buckwheat.
Burdock.
Barley.
Beggar-ticks.
Bean.
Beet.
Broom Corn.
Cabbage.
Carrot.
Celery.
Chicory.
Chrysanthemum.
Corn.
Crab grass.
Dahlia.
Dock.
Foxtail.
Gladiolus.
Goldenrod.
Grape.
Horseweed.
Hungarian millet.
Lady's-thumb (smartweed).
Lamb's-quarters.
Lettuce.
Oats.
Panic grass.
Pepper.
Pigweed.
Potato.
Purslane.
Ragweed.
Rhubarb.
Scouring rush.
Sour thistle.
Spinach.
Sunflower.
Swiss chard.
Timothy.






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease







Gipsy Moth
(Porthetria dispar Linn.).













































List used through courtesy of the


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Tansy.
Thistle.
Tomato.
Turnip.
Wheat.
Wild cucumber.
Wild hemp.
Alder, speckled (Alnus incana).'
Apple (Pyrus malus).
Ash, mountain (Pyrus americana).
Aspen, American
(Populus tremuloides).
Aspen, large-toothed
(Populus grandidentata).
Balm-of-Gilead
(Populus balsamifera).
Barberry, European
(Berberis vulgaris).
Bayberry (Myrica Carolinensis).
Beech, American (Fagus grandifolia).
Birch, black (Betula lenta).
Birch, gray (Betula populifolia).
Birch, paper (Betula papyrifera).
Birch, red (Betula nigra).
Birch, yellow (Betula lutea).
Blueberry, low (Vaccinium vacillans).
Blueberry, tall
(Vaccinium corymbosum).
Boxelder (Acer negundo).
Cherry, sweet (Prunus avium).
Cherry, wild black (Prunus serotina).
Cherry, wild red (Padus virginiana).
Chestnut (Castanea dentata).
Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa).
Choke Cherry (Padus nana).
Cottonwood (Populus deltoides).
Cranberry, American
(Oxyococcus macrocarpus).
Elm, American (Ulmus americana).
Elm, European (Ulmus campestris).
Elm, slippery (Ulmus fulva).
Fern, sweet (Comptonia peregrina).
Gale, sweet (Myrica gale).
Gum, black (Nyssa sylvatica).
Gum, sweet or red
(Liquidambar Styraciflua).
Hawthorn (Crataegus sp.).
Hazlenut (Corylus Americana).
Hazelnut, beaked (Corylus rostrata).
Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis).
Hickory, bitternut
(Hicoria cardiformis).
Hickory, mockernut (Hicoria alba).
Hickory, pignut (Hicoria glabra).
Hickory, shagbark (Hicoria ovata).
Hophornbeam (Ostrya Virginiana).
Hornbeam, American
(Carpinus carolinina).
Larch, American (Larix laricina).
Federal Horticultural Board.






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease











































Japanese Beetle
(Popillia japonica Newm.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Larch, European (Larix decidua).
Linden, American (Tilea americana).
Linden, European (Tilea sp.). *
Maple, Norway (Acer platanoides).
Maple, red or swamp (Acer rubrum).
Maple, silver (Ace-saccharinum).
Maple, sugar (Acer saccharum).
Oak, black (Quercus velutina).
Oak, rock chestnut (Quercus prinus).
Oak, dwarf chestnut
(Quercus prinoides).
Oak, burr (Quercus macrocarpa).
Oak, pin (Quercus palustris).
Oak, post (Quercus stellata).
Oak, red (Quercus rubra).
Oak, scarlet (Quercus coccinea).
Oak, bear (Quercus ilicifolia).
Oak, shingle (Quercus imbricaria).
Oak, swamp white (Quercus bicolor).
Oak, white (Quercus alba).
Pear (Pyrus communis).
Pecan (Carya olivaeformis).
Pine, pitch (Pinus rigida).
Pine, red (Pinus resinosa).
Pine, Scotch (Pinus sylvestris).
Pine, western white
(Pinus monticola).
Pine, white (Pinus Strobus).
Plum, beach (Prunus maritima).
Poplar, Lombardy (Populus nigra,
var. italica).
Poplar, silver (Populus alba).
Rose, pasture (Rosa virginiana).
Sassafras (Sassafras sassafras).
Service-berry
(Amelanchier canadensis).
Spruce, black (Picea Mariana).
Spruce, Norway (Picea Abies).
Spruce, red (Picea rubens).
Spruce, white (Picea canadensis).
Sumac, mountain (Rhus copallina).
Sumac, scarlet (Rhus glabra).
Sumac, staghorn (Rhus hirta).
Willow, white (Salix alba).
Willow, glaucous (Salix discolor).
Willow, sandbar (Salix interior).
Witch-hazel (Hamamelis virginiana).
Althaea.
Apple.
Asparagus.
Azalea.
Birch.
Blackberry.
Bladder-nut.
Button-bush.
Cantaloupe.
Cherry.
Corn.
Dock.
Elderberry.







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease

































Japanese Camphor Scale
(Pseudaonidia duplex Ckll.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Elm.
Fern.
Grape.
Hawthorn.
Hemp-tree.
Hollyhock.
Indian mallow.
Iris.
Ironweed.
Ivy.
Japanese flowering cherry.
Jewel-weed.
Lamb's-quarters.
Lima bean.
Locust.
Marigold.
Milkweed.
Morning-glory.
Peach.
Plum.
Ragweed.
Raspberry.
Rhubarb.
Rose.
Sassafras.
Smartweed.
Spirea.
Sweet Potato.
Tamarisk.
Virginia creeper.
Watermelon.
Wild Carrot.
Wild Cherry.
Wild Grape.
Willow.
Althaea.'
Andropogon sp.
Aralia papyrifera.
Asparagus Sprengeri.
Azalea.
Bay, sweet.
Banana.
Bridal wreath.
Caladium sp.
Calla lily.
Camellia.
Camphor.
Canna.
Caronia aromatica.
Catalpa.
Cestrum nucitans.
Cherry, wild.
Chestnut.
China-ball.
Citrus (several species).
Clematis paniculata.
Crape myrtle.
Cycas revoluta.
Deutzia.


4List furnished by Bureau of Entomology, U. S. D. A.







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Dracaena.
Elderberry.
Escallonia montifidium.
Eurya ochnacea.
Ficus pandurata.
Ficus repens.
Fig.
Goldenrod.
Grand Duke.
Grapevine.
Gum, sweet.
Hackberry.
Hibiscus.
Honeysuckle.
Illicium anisatum.
Ivy, English.
Ivy, poison.
Jasminium revolutum.
Jessamine, night-blooming.
Lantana vine.
Ligustrum (five species).
Linum sp.
Magnolia fuscata.
Magnolia Soulangeana.
Mahonia aquifolium.
Maple.
Mignonette tree.
Mulberry.
Myrica rubra.
Myrtle.
Oak, live.
Oak, water.
Oleander.
Olive, sweet.
Palms.
Peach, flowering.
Pear.
Pecan.
Persimmon, Japanese.
Plumbago.
Plum, Japan.
Pomegranate, flowering.
Poplar, Lombardy.
Primula sp.
Prunus caroliniensus.
Rhododendron.
Rhus succedanea.
Rhynchospermum.
Rose.
Salisburia adiantifolia.
Saphora sp.
Solanum.
Starcoula sp.
Sycamore.
Tallow tree, Chinese.
Tamarix.
Tilia sp.
Ulmus spp.
Viburnum.
Vinca sp. (Periwinkle).






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease





Mango Seed Weevil
(Sternochetus (Cryptorhynchus)
mangiferae (Fab.)).
Mediterranean Fruit Fly
(Ceratitis capitata Wied.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Wandering Jew.
Weigela.
Wistaria.
Xanthoxylum sp.
Yucca sp.
Mango fruit and seed.


Almond (Amygdalus communis).
Amatungula
(Carissa bispinosa) (C. arduina).
Apple
(Malus sylvestris) (Pyrus malus).
Apricot (Prunus armeniaca).
Avocado
(Persea americana) (P. gratissima).
Banana (Musa sapientium).
Barbados gooseberry
(Pereskia aculeata).
Barbary Fig (Opuntia vulgaris).
Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).
Belladonna (Atropa belladonna).
Carica quercifolia.
Carambola (Averrhoa carambola).
Cayenne or Surinam cherry
(Eugenia uniflora) (E. michelii).
Cerbera thevetia (Thevetia neriifolia).
Cherimoya (Annano cherimola).
Chinese inkberry (Cestrum spp.).
Chrysobalanus ellipticus.
Citron (Citrus medical .
Cocoa-plum (Chrysobalanus icaco).
Coffee (Coffea arabica).
Eggplant (Solanum melangena).
Elengi tree (Mimusops elengi).
Fig (Ficus carica).
Granadilla
(Passiflora quadrangularis).
Grape (Vitis vinifera).
Grapefruit
(Citrus grandis) (C. decumana).
Grumixiama or Brazilian cherry
(Eugenia dombeyi) (E. braziliensis).
Guava (Psidium guajava).
Japanese persimmon
(Diospyros kaki).


Jerusalem cherry
(Solanum capsicastrum).
Kafir-plum (Harpephyllum caffrum).
Kei apple
(Dovyalis caffra) (Aberia caffra).
Kumquat (Fortunella japonica)
(Citrus japonica).
Lemon (Citrus limonia)
(C. medical var. limon).
Lime
(Citrus aurantifolia) (C. limetta).
Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica).
alAst used through courtesy of the Federal Horticultural Board.






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease


































Mexican Bean Beetle
(Epilachna corrupt Muls.).







Mexican Orange Maggot, or More-
los Fruit Worm
(Anastrepha (Trypeta) ludens
Loew.).



Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Malay apple (Caryophyllus malac-
censis) (Eugenia malaccensis).
Mammee apple (Mammea americana).
Mandarin orange
(Citrus nobilis deliciosa).
Mango (Mangifera indica).
Medlar (Mespilus germanica)
(Pyrus germanica).
Natal plum (Carissa grandiflora).
Noronhia emarginata.
Orange jessamine
(Chalcas exotica) (Murraya exotica).
Papaya (Carica papaya).
Passion flower (Passiflora caerulea).
Peach (Amygdalus persica)
(Prunus persica).
Prickly pear (Opuntia tuna).
Quince (Cydonia oblongo)
(Pyrus cydonia).
Red peppers (Capsicum spp.).
Rose apples (Caryophyllus jambos).
(Eugenia jambos).
Round Kamani Mastwood
(Calophyllum inophyllum).
Sapodilla, Chicle (Achras sapota).
Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus).
Sour or Seville Orange
(Citrus aurantium).
Soursop (Annona muricata).
Squash, pumpkin, gourd
(Cucurbita spp.).
Starapple (Chrysophyllum cainito).
Strawberry Guava
(Psidium cattleyanum).
Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).
Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).
Winged kamani (Terminalia catappa).
Beans, including all common garden
or field beans.
"Greens", i. e., edible plant leaves
such as mustard, chard, spinach,
turnips, beets, collards, cabbage and
lettuce.
Green corn.
Corn in shuck.
Hay.
Forage crops.
Guava (Psidium guajava).'
Mango (Mangifera indica).
Orange
(Citrus sinensis and C. aurantium).
Peach (Amygdalus persica).
Plum (Prunus spp.).
Sapodilla (Achras sapota).
Sweet lime (C. limetta).
Sugar cane.
Sorghum.
Corn.


BList used through courtesy of the Federal Horticultural Board.







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease





Pineapple Black Weevil
(Metamasius ritchiei Marshall).
Pink Bollworm
(Pectinophora (Gelechia) gossypi-
ella (Saund.) ).
Satin Moth (Stilpnotia salicis L.)

Spiny Citrus White-fly'
(Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby).








West Indian Sweet Potato Weevil
(Euacepes batatae Waterhouse).
Yam Weevil
(Palaeopus costicollis Marshall).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Rice.
Millet.
Crab grass.
Panicum.
Pineapple.

Cotton.


Poplar.
Willow.
Avocado.
Capparis spp.
Cestrum nocturnum.
Citrus.
Coffee.
Guava.
Lignum vitae.
Mahwa (Bassia latifolia).
Mango.
Salacea reticulata.
Wampie (Clausenia wampi).
Sweet Potato.

Sweet Potato Yam (Dioscorea sp.)


Rule 4.s The movement from a property or along a public road, or de-
livered for such movement, of all trees and plants and parts thereof con'-
monly known as nursery stock, including woody perennials, palms and
banana plants, and including budwood and scions, intended for propagating
purposes, which do not have attached conspicuously to the outside of the
container holding the nursery stock a proper certificate tag issued by the
State Plant Board to cover the movement of nursery stock and which have not
been prepared for movement in accordance with the rules and regulations of
the State Plant Board in other respects is hereby prohibited. Provided that
shipments of nursery stock consigned to points outside of Florida may have
attached thereto, in lieu of the Florida certificate tag, a permit tag issued
by the state of destination.
Rule 4A.' The following insect pests and diseases are hereby declared
to be especially injurious and are declared to be insect pests and diseases
which should be controlled and their dissemination prevented, within the
intent and meaning of Section 12 of the Florida Plant Act of 1915:


Insect or Disease

Anthracnose of Banana
(Gloeosporium musarum C.&M.).
Argentine Ant
(Iridomyrmex humilis Mayr.).
Australian-pine-tree Borer
(Chrysobothris tranquebara
(Gmil.) ).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Banana.

Fig, Orange.

Australian pine
(Casuarina equisetifolia).


IAlso known as the "black fly" and (in Cuba) "la mosca prieta."
8Adopted May 4, 1915. Amended Feb. 14, March 13 and April 10, 1916, June 4,
1918, Jan. 13, 1919, June 6, 1921, April 14, 1922, and Oct. 9, 1922.
9Adopted April 10, 1916. Amended May 8, Aug. 14 and Oct. 13, 1916, Jan. 8,
Feb. 12, March 12, May 7, June 18 and July 23, 1917, Aug. 12, 1918, March 10, April
14 and July 14, 1919, and May 8, 1922.






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease

Avocado scab (Cladosporium sp.).
Bay-tree White-fly
(Paraleyrodes perseae
(Quaintance) ).
Black Scale
(Saissetia oleae (Bern.) ).


Black Thread Scale
(Ischnaspis longirostris (Sign.) ).

Blight (Bacillus amylovorus
(Burr.) DeToni).
Blue-green Citrus Beetles
(Pachnaeus opalus (Oliv.)), (P.
distans Horn), (P. litus Ger-
mar), and (P. azurescens Gyl-
lenhal).
Boisduval's Scale
(Diaspis boisduvalii Sign.)
Boll Weevil
(Anthonomus grandis Boh.).
Bundle Blight
(Pseudomonas vascularum
(Cobb) E. F. Sm.).
California Red Scale
(Chrysomphalus aurantii
(Maskell) ).
Camphor Thrips
(Cryptothrips floridensis Watson).
Cane Leaf-hopper
(Perkinsiella saccharicida
Kirkaldy).
Cane Sharpshooter
(Delphax saccharivora
Westwood).
Chaff Scale
(Parlatoria pergandii Comst.).
Chestnut Bark Disease
(Diaporthe parasitica Murrill).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Avocado.
Avocado, Citrus, Red Bay
(Persea carolinensis Nees).

Almond, Antidesma, Apple, Apricot,
Aster, Beech, Buckthorn, California
sage, Camellia, Cedrus deodara,
Cestrum, Chrysanthemum, Citrus,
Duranta, Eucalyptus, Fig, Grape,
Grevillea, Grewia, Guava, Holly,
Irish Juniper, Laurel, Lemon, Lo-
cust, Magnolia, Maple, Melaleuca,
Mountain ash, Mountain holly,
Nightshade, Oleander, Olive, Orch-
ids, Oregon ash, Palm, Pear, Pep-
per tree, Phlox, Plum, Pomegran-
ate, Poplar, Privet, Prune, Rose,
Rubber, Sago palm, Sapodilla, Su-
mac, Sycamore, Terminalia catap-
pa, Vitis, Watermelon, Wild rub-
ber.
Coffee, Jasmine, Magnolia, Mango,
Monstera, Palmetto, Palms, Pan-
danus.
Apple, Loquat, Pear.

Citrus.




Acacia, Livistona rotundifolia, Palms,
Seaforthia.
Cotton.

Sugar cane.


Citrus, Rose.


Camphor.

Sugar cane.


Sugar cane.


Citrus, Camellia, Cocos plumosa.


Chestnut.






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease

Citricola Scale
(Coccus citricola Campbell).
Citrus Mealy-bug
(Pseudococcus citri (Risso) ).












Citrus Scab
(Cladosporium citri Massee).
Cloudy-winged Whitefly
(Dialeurodes citrifolii (nubifera)
(Morgan) ).
Cocoanut Mealy-bug
(Pseudococcus nipae (Mask.) ).

Colorado Potato Beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata
(Say) ).
Cottony Cushion-scale
(Icerya purchase Maskell).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Citrus, Elm, Nightshade, Pomegran-
ate, Walnut.
Begonia, Bignonia sp., Bottle Brush
(Callistemon lanceolatus), Bouvar-
dia sp., Ceanothus integerrimus,
Citrus, Coleus, Coffee, Cotton, Cro-
ton, Cyperus alternifolius, English
ivy, Ferns (Filicales), Fuchsia,
Guadalupe Island Palm (Erythea
edulis), Habrothamnus, Ipomoea, Le-
arii, Oleander, Peony, Poinsettia
(Euphorbia pulcherrimma), Pine-
apple, Pumpkin, Purple Passion
Flower (Passiflora violacea), Sola-
num douglasii, Solanum jasmino-
ides, Strelitzia gigantea, Strelitzia
regina, Tobacco, Variegated Wan-
dering Jew.
Citrus.

Citrus, Indian Laurel, Ficus nitida.


Annona muricata, Custard apple,
Guava, Mammee apple, Mulberry,
Palms.
Irish Potato.


Absinthium (see Artemisia absin-
thium L.).
Acacia spp.
Acacia armata.
Acacias, Australian.
Acacia decurrens.
Acacia decurrens var. mollis Lindl.
(see A. molissima).
Acacia, False (see Robinia pseudaca-
cia).
Acacia floribunda (Sidney Golden
Wattle, variety of).
Acacia Julibrissin Willd. (see Albiz-
zia Julibrissin Durazz.).
Acacia latifolia.
Acacia limnoeris.
Acacia melanoxylon (Australian
Blackwood) (Blackwood acacia).
Acacia molissima Willd.
Acacia Nemu (see Albizzia Julibrissin
Durazz.).
Acacia ornata.
Acacia, Yellow (see Robinia pseuda-
cacia).
Acalypha spp.
Acer sp. (Maple).
Achras sapota L. (Sapodilla).
Achryanthes sp. (see Iresine sp.).







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Albizzia Julibrissin Durazz. (Acacia
Julibrissin Willd.) (Acacia Nemu
Willd.).
Alfalfa (see Medicago sativa).
Alligator-tree (see Liquidambar sty-
raciflua L.).
Almond, Dwarf Flowering.
Almond, Flowering (see Prunus tri-
loba).
Althaea officinalis.
Amaranth (see Amarantus sp.)
Amarantus sp. (Amaranth).
Amarantus retroflexus (Beet-root)
(Red-root) (Careless Weed).
Ambrosia sp.
Ambrosia psilostachya.
American Elder (see Sambucus can-
adensis).
American Holly (see Ilex opaca).
Amorpha fruticosa (Bastard Indigo).
Anona.
Antigonon leptopus (Rosa de Mon-
tana) (Mountain Rose) (San
Miguelito) (Corallita) (Love's
Chain).
Apple (see Pyrus malus).
Apricot (see Prunus armeniaca).
Aralia sp.
Aralia papyrifera (see Tetrapanax
papyriferum).
Artemisia absinthium L. (Worm
Wood) (Absinthium).
Artemisia ludoviciana (White Sage)
(Western Mugwort).
Ascyrum sp.
Asparagus (see Asparagus offici-
nalis).
Asparagus officinalis (Asparagus).
Aster.
Aubergine (see Solanum melongena
var. esculentum).
Australian acacias.
Australian Blackwood (see Acacia
melanoxylon).
Australian Silk Oak (see Grevillea
robusta).
Australian Pine (see Casuarina equi-
setifolia).
Baccharis halimifolia.
Bamboo, Wild (see Smilax sp.).
Banana (see Musa sp.).
Banyan, Wild (see Ficus aurea).
Bastard Indigo (see Amorpha fruti-
cosa).
Bauhinia sp. (Mountain Ebony)
(Orchid Tree).







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Bay, Bull (see Magnolia grandi-
flora).
Bay (Laurus nobilis).
Bay, Rose (see Nerium oleander).
Bay, Sweet (see Laurus nobilis).
Bean.
Bean, castor (see Ricinus communis).
Bearberry (see Ilex decidua).
Beefwood (see Casuarina equiseti-
folia).
Beet-root (see Amarantus retroflex-
us).
Beggarweed.
Berberis sp.
Bermuda Grass (see Cynodon dacty-
lon) (Capriola dactylon, Kuntze).
Bidens bipinnata L. (Spanish Needle).
Bidens pilosa.
Bignonia sp. (Yellow Bignonia).
Bignonia, Yellow (see Bignonia sp.)
Bilsted (see Liquidamber styraciflua
L.).
Birch, West Indian (see Bursera
Simaruba).
Black Locust (see Robinia pseudaca-
cia).
Blackwood acacia (see Acacia mela-
noxylon).
Blackwood, Australian (see Acacia
melanoxylon).
Blueberry (see Vaccinum elliottii).
"Blue-Gum."
Bottle Brush (see Callistemon sp.).
"Bottle-Brush."
Bougainvillea sp.
Bouvardia sp.
Box, Dwarf (see Buxus sempervi-
rens).
Boxwood.
Bridal Wreath (see Spiraea cantoni-
ensis).
"Broom."
Broom, Spanish (see Spartium jun-
ceum L.).
Buddleia sp.
Bull Bay (see Magnolia grandiflora).
Bulnesia retano.
Bumelia lanuginosa (Chittim Wood).
Bursera simaruba (Gumbo Limbo)
(West Indian Birch) (Gum Elemi).
Buxus sempervirens (Dwarf Box).
Caladium.
California Laurel (see Umbellularia
californica).
California Pepper Tree (see Schinus
molle).







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Callicarpa americana (Spanish Mul-
berry).
Callistemon sp. (Bottle Brush).
Camphor (see Cinnamomum cam-
phora).
Cane, Sugar (see Saccharum offici-
narum L.).
Canna sp.
Capriola dactylon, Kuntze. (see Cy-
nodon dactylon).
Capsicum sp. (Pepper).
Careless Weed (see Amarantus retro-
flexus).
Carex spp.
Carica papaya (Papaya) (Paw-paw).
Carya pecan (Pecan).
Caryota urens (Toddy-palm) (Wine-
palm) (Fish-Tail Palm).
Cassia marylandica (Wild Senna).
Castor Bean (see Ricinus communis).
Castor-oil plant (see Ricinus com-
munis).
Casuarina equisetifolia (Australian
Pine).
Casuarius.
Catalonian (see Jasminum grandi-
florum).
Cedar of Lebanon (see Cedrus bi-
bani).
Cedrus bibani (Cedar of Lebanon).
Cedar sp.
Celtis sp. (Hackberry) (Sugar-berry)
(Nettle Tree).
Cenchrus gracillimus (Sandspur)
(Sand-bur).
Cereals.
Chaetochloa sp. (Foxtail Grass).
Chenopodium album L. (Lamb's Quar-
ters) (Pigweed).
Chenopodium murale L.
Chittim Wood (see Bumelia lanugi-
nosa).
Chrysanthemum sp.
Chrysanthemum leucanthemum hy-
bridum (Shasta Daisy).
Chrysolidocarpus lutescens.
Cigar Plant (see Cuphea tricolor).
Cinnamomum camphora (Camphor).
Cinnamon vine (see Dioscorea bats-
tas).
Citron (see Citrus medical .
Citrus (all species).
Citrus aurantium (Orange).
Citrus grandis (Grapefruit) (Pome-
lo).
Citrus limonia (Lemon).
Citrus medical (Citron).
Citrus sinensis (Orange).







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Clematis sp.
Coco-grass (see Cyperus rotundus).
Coconut Palm (nuts only) (see Cocos
nucifera).
Cocos nucifera (Coconut Palm).
Coffee Weed.
Coleus.
Common Mallow (see Malva rotun-
difolia).
Cone Flower (see Rudbeckia sp.).
Copper-leaf (see Acalypha sp.).
Corallita (see Antigonon leptopus).
Cork Elm (see Ulmus racemosa).
Corn (see Zea mays).
Cowpea (see Vigina sp.).
Crape Myrtle (see Lagerstroemia in-
dica).
Crataegus sp. (Hawthorne) (Haw-
thorn).
Creeping Fig (see Ficus pumila).
Cuphea tricolor (Cigar Plant).
Cupressus sp. (Cypress).
Curly Dock (see Rumex crispus).
Cycas sp.
Cydonia oblonga (Quince).
Cynodon dactylon (Capriola dacty-
lon, Kuntze.) (Bermuda Grass).
Cyperus rotundus (Coco-grass) (Nut-
grass).
Cypress (see Cupressus sp.).
Daisy, Shasta (see Chrysanthemum
leucanthemum hybridum).
Dandelion (see Taraxacum offici-
nale).
Date Palm (see Phoenix sp.).
Dioscorea batatas (Cinnamon vine).
Dock, Curly (see Rumex crispus).
Dock, Yellow (see Rumex crispus).
Dwarf Box (see Buxus sempervirens).
Dwarf Flowering Almond.
Eagle Fern (see Pteris aquilina L.).
Ebony, Mountain (see Bauhinia sp.).
Eggplant (see Solanum melongena
var. esculentum).
Elder, American (see Sambucus cana-
densis).
Elder, Sweet (see Sambucus cana-
densis).
Elderberry (see Sambucus canaden-
sis).
Elm (see Ulmus sp.).
Elm, Cork (see Ulmus racemosa).
Elm, Rock (see Ulmus racemosa).
English Ivy (see Hedera helix).
English Walnut (see Juglans regia).
Epilobium coloratum (Willow Herb).
Erigeron canadensis.
Escallonia bunda.
Eucalyptus globulus (Blue-Gum).
Eucalyptus sp.






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Euonymus.
Euphorbia pulcherrima (Poinsettia).
False Acacia (see Robinia pseuda-
cacia).
Fern (2 spp.).
Fern, Eagle (see Pteris aquilina L.).
Ficus aurea (Wild Banyan).
Ficus carica L. (Fig).
Ficus nitida (see F. retusa).
Ficus pumila (F. stipulata) (F. re-
pens) (Creeping Fig).
Ficus repens (see F. pumila).
Ficus retusa.
Ficus stipulata (see F. pumila).
Fig (see Ficus carica L.).
Fig, Creeping (see Ficus pumila).
Firs.
Fish Tail Palm (see Caryota urens).
Flamboyant (see Poinciana regia).
Flowering Almond (see Prunus tri-
loba).
Foxtail Grass (see Chaetochloa sp.).
Fragaria sp. (Strawberry).
Fruit Trees.
Furze (see Ulex europaeus L.).
Genista juncea (see Spartium jun-
ceum L.).
Geranium.
Geranium, Ivy.
Geranium, Rose.
Goldenrod (see Solidago sp.).
Golden-chain (see Laburnum sp.).
Golden Willow.
Gorse (see Ulex europaeus L.).
Grape (see Vitis sp.).
Grapefruit (see Citrus grandis).
Grass.
Grass, Bermuda (see Cynodon dacty-
lon).
Grass, Foxtail (see Chaetochloa sp.).
Grass, Johnson (see Holcus hale-
pense L.).
Green Wattle (see Acacia decurrens).
Grevillea robusta (Silk Oak) (Aus-
tralian Silk Oak).
Guava (see Psidium guajava L.).
Guinea squash (see Solanum melon-
gena var. esculentum).
"Gum, Blue" (see Eucalyptus globu-
lus).
Gum Elemi (see Bursera simaruba).
Gum, Red (see Liquidambar styra-
ciflua L.).
Gum, Star-leaved (see Liquidambar
styraciflua).
Gum, Sweet (see Liquidambar styra-
ciflua).
Gumbo Limbo (see Bursera simaru-
ba).
Hackberry (see Celtis sp.).






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Hakea.
Haw, Possum (see Ilex decidua).
Hawthorn (see Crataegus sp.).
Hawthorne (see Crataegus sp.).
Hedera helix (.English Ivy).
Helianthus spp. (Sunflowers).
Hibiscus spp.
Holcus halepense L. (Johnson Grass)
(Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.).
Holly, American (see Ilex opaca).
Holly Oak (see Quercus ilex L.).
Holm Oak (see Quercus ilex L.).
Honeysuckle (see Lonicera sp.).
Hop (see Humulus sp.).
Humulus sp. (Hop).
Hymenoplea salsola.
Ilex decidua (Possum Haw) (Bear-
berry).
Ilex kingerana.
Ilex opaca (American Holly).
Impatiens sp. (Lady-Slipper) (Touch-
me-not).
Indian Jasmine.
Indigo, Bastard (see Amorpha fruti-
cosa).
Inga pulcherrima.
Ipomoea sp. (Japanese Morning
Glory).
Iresine sp. (see Achyranthes sp.).
Iron-weed (see Vernonia sp.).
Italian Jasmine (see Jasminum gran-
diflorum).
"Ivy."
Ivy, English (see Hedera helix).
Ivy Geranium.
Japanese Morning-glory (see Ipo-
moea sp.).
Japanese Pittosporum (see Pittospo-
rum tobira).
Japanese Plum (see Prunus salicina).
Japanese Yew (see Podocarpus sp.).
Jasminum grandiflorum (Italian Jas-
mine) (Royal Jasmine) (Spanish
Jasmine) (Catalonian).
Jasmine, Italian (see Jasminum
grandiflorum).
Jasmine, Royal (see Jasminum gran-
diflorum).
Jasmine, Spanish (see Jasminum
grandiflorum).
Jasmine, Indian.
Jew, Wandering (see Zebrina pen-
dula).
Johnson Grass (lHolcus halepense L.)
(Sorghum halepense L.).
Juglans spp. (Walnuts).
Juglans regiae (English Walnut)
(Persian Walnut).
Kangaroo Thorn (see Acacia ar-
mata).






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Knotweed (see Polygonum sp.).
Kudzu (vine?) (see Pueraria hr-
suta).
Laburnum sp. (Golden-chain).
Lady-Slipper (see Impatiens sp.).
Lady's Thumb (see Polygonum per-
sicaria).
Lagerstroemia indica (Crape Myr-
tle).
Lamb's Quarters (see Chenopodium
album L.).
Lantana sp.
Laurel (see Laurus nobilis).
Laurel, California (see Umbellularia
californica).
Laurel Oak (see Quercus laurifolia).
Laurocerasus Caroliniana.
Laurus nobilis (Laurel) (Sweet Bay).
Laurestinus (see Viburnum tinus L.).
Laurustinus (see Viburnum tinus L.).
Leadwort (see Plumbago sp.).
Legume.
Lemon (see Citrus limonia).
Leptomera acida.
Lettuce, Wild (see Letuca sp.).
Letuca sp. (Wild Lettuce).
Ligustrum sp. (Privet).
Lime, Spanish (see Melicocca bijuga
L.).
Liquidambar styraciflua L. (Sweet
Gum) (Red Gum) (Bilsted) (Star-
leaved Gum) (Alligator-tree).
Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip-tree)
(White Poplar).
Locust.
Locust, Black (see Robinia pseuda-
cacia).
Loggerhead Breast (see Phyllanthus
sp.).
Lonicera sp. (Honeysuckle).
Love Entangle (see Sedum acre).
Love's Chain (see Antigonon lepto-
pus).
Magnolia sp.
Magnolia grandiflora (Bull Bay).
Mallow, Common (see Malva rotundi-
folia).
Malva rotundifolia (Common Mal-
low).
Maple (see Acer sp.).
Marsh Mallow (see Althaea officina-
lis).
Mastic-tree, Peruvian (see Schinus
molle).
Medicago denticulata.
Medicago sativa I. (Alfalfa).
Melicocca bijuga (Spanish Lime).
Mentha piperita (Peppermint).
Mentha pyserifera.
Mentha spicata (Spearmint).






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Mimosa tree (see Albizzia Julibrissin
Durazz.).
Mimosa spp.
Morella cerifera (Myrtle) (Wax Myr-
tle) (Myrica cerifera).
Morning-glory, Japanese (see Ipo-
moea sp.).
Morus spp. (Mulberries).
Mountain Ebony (see Bauhinia sp.).
Mountain Rose (see Antigonon lepto-
pus).
Mugwort, Western (see Artemisia
ludoviciana).
Mulberries (see Morus spp.).
Mulberry, Spanish (see Callicarpa
americana).
Musa sp. (Banana).
Myosporum.
Myrica cerifera (see Morella ceri-
fera).
Myrtle (see Morella cerifera).
Myrtle, Crape.
Myrtle, Wax (see Morella cerifera).
Needle, Spanish (see Bidens bipin-
nata L.).
Nepeta sp.
Nerium lauriforme (see N. oleander).
Nerium oleander (Oleander) (Rose
Bay) (Nerium lauriforme).
Nettle (see Urtica sp.).
Nettle Tree (see Celtis sp.).
Nightshade (see. Solanum nigrum).
Nut-grass (see Cyperus rotundus).
Oak, Australian Silk (see Grevillea
robusta).
Oak, Holly (see Quercus ilex L.).
Oak, Holm (see Quercus ilex L.).
Oak, Laurel (see Quercus laurifolia).
Oaks (see Quercus spp.).
Oak, White (see Quercus alba L.).
Old Man (see Rosmarinus officinalis
L.).
Olea fragrans (see Osmanthus frag-
rans).
Olea sp. (Olive).
Oleander (see Nerium oleander).
Olive (see Olea sp.).
Olive, Sweet (see Osmanthus frag-
rans).
Opopanax.
Orange (see Citrus sinensis) or (C.
aurantium).
Orange, Trifoliate (see Citrus trifo-
liata).
Orchid Tree (see Bauhinia sp.).
Osmanthus fragrans (Sweet Olive)
(Olea fragrans).
Palma christi (see Ricinus commu-
nis).
Palms.
Palm, Coconut (see Cocos nucifera).







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Palm, Date (see Phoenix sp.).
Palm, Fish Tail (see Caryota urens).
Panicum crus-galli.
Papaya (see Carica papaya).
Papyrus antiquorum.
Paradise Tree (see Simaruba glauca).
Paspalum spp.
Papaw (see Carica papaya).
Peach (Prunus persica) (Persica vul-
garis).
Peacock Flower (see Poinciana regia).
Pear (see Pyrus sp.).
Pecan (see Carya pecan).
Pepper (see Capsicum sp.).
Peppermint (see Mentha piperita).
Pepper Tree, California (see Schinus
molle).
Persian Walnut (see Juglans regia).
Persica vulgaris (Peach).
Peruvian Mastic-tree (see Schinus
molle L.).
Phoenix sp. (Date Palm).
Photonia serrulata.
Phyllanthus sp. (Loggerhead Breast).
Pigweed (see Chenopodium album L.).
Pine (see Pinus sp. or spp.?).
Pine, Australian (see Casuarina equi-
setifolia).
Pinus sp. or spp.? (Pine).
Pittospermum (?).
Pittosporum sp.
Pittosporum, Japanese (see Pittospo-
rum tobira).
Pittosporum tobira (Tobira) (Japan-
ese Pittosporum).
Plantago spp. (Plantain).
Plantain (see Plantago spp.).
Plum, Japanese (see Prunus salicina).
Plumbago sp. (Leadwort).
Podocarpus sp. (Japanese Yew).
Poinciana regia (Royal Poinciana)
(Peacock Flower) (Flamboyant).
Poinciana, Royal (see Poinciana re-
gia).
Poinsettia (see Euphorbia pulcher-
rima).
Polygonum sp.
Polygonum persicaria (Lady's
Thumb).
Polygonfum sp. (Knotweed).
Pomegranate (see Punica granatum)..
Pomelo (see Citrus grandis).
Poplar (2 spp.) (see Populus spp.).
Poplar, White (see Liriodendron tu-
lipifera).
Populus sp. (Poplar).
Portulaca oleracea (Purslane) (Pus-
ley).
Possum Haw (see Ilex decidua).
Potato (see Solanum tuberosum).






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Potato, Spanish.
Privet (see Ligustrum sp.).
Prosopis sp.
Prunus armeniaca (Apricot).
Prunus caroliniensis.
Prunus persica (Peach) (Persica vul-
garis).
Prunus salicina (Japanese Plum).
Prunus triloba ?.
Psidium guajava L. (Guava).
Psidium sp.
Pteris aquilina L. (Eagle Fern).
Pueraria hirsuta (Kudzu) (vine?).
Punica granatum (Pomegranate).
Purslane (see Portulaca oleracea).
Pusley (see Portulaca oleracea).
Pyrus sp. (Pear).
Pyrus cydonia (Quince).
Pyrus malus (Apple).
Quercus alba L. (White Oak).
Quercus ilex L. (Holly Oak) (Holm
Oak).
Quercus laurifolia (Laurel Oak).
Quercus spp. (Oaks).
Quince (see Cydonia oblonga) or (Py-
rus cydonia).
Ragweed (see Ambrosia sp.).
Red Gum (see Liquidambar styraci-
flua L.).
Red-root (see Amaranthus retroflex-
us).
Rice, wild.
Ricinus communis (Castor Bean)
(Castor-oil plant) (Palma christi).
Robinia pseudacacia (Black Locust)
'(Yellow Acacia) (False Acacia).
Rosa de Montana (see Antigonon lep-
topus).
Rosa spp. (Rose).
Rose (see Rosa spp.).
Rose Bay (see Nerium oleander).
Rose Geranium.
Rosemary (see Rosmarinus officina-
lis L.).
Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Rosemary)
(Old Man).
Royal Jasmine (see Jasminum grandi-
florum).
Royal Poinciana (see Poinciana re-
gia).
Rubus sp.
Rudbeckia sp. (Cone Flower).
Ruellia sp.
Rumex crispus L. (Curly Dock) (Yel-
low Dock).
Saccharum officinarum L. (Sugar
Cane).
Sage, White (see Artemisia ludovici-
ana).
Salix spp. (Willows).






RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Salvia.
Sambucus canadensis (Elderberry)
(American Elder) (Sweet Elder).
Sand-bur (see Cenchrus gracillimus).
Sandspur (see Cenchrus gracillimus).
San Miguelito (see Antigonon lepto-
pus).
Sapodilla (see Achras sapota L.).
Schinus molle L. (California Pepper
Tree) (Peruvian Mastic-tree).
Sedum sp.
Sedum acre L. (Stone crop) (Wall
Paper) (Love Entangle).
Senna, Wild (see Cassia marylandi-
ca).
Shasta Daisy (see Chrysanthemum
leucanthemum hybridum).
Shepherds Needle.
Sidney Golden Wattle, variety of (see
Acacia floribunda).
Silk Oak (see Grevillea robusta).
Simaruba glauca (Paradise Tree).
Smilax aspera.
Smilax sp. (Wild Bamboo).
Solanum sp.
Solanum blodgetti.
Solanum douglasii.
Solanum melongena var. esculentum
(Eggplant) (Guinea squash) (Au-
bergine).
Solanum nigrum (Night shade).
Solanum tuberosum (Potato).
Solidago sp. (Goldenrod).
Sonchus oleraceus L.
Sorghum halepense (L.) (Pers.) (see
Holcus halepense L.).
Spanish Broom (see Spartium jun-
ceum L.).
Spanish Jasmine (see Jasminum gran-
diflorum).
Spanish Lime (see Melicocca bijuga
L.).
Spanish Mulberry (see Callicarpa
americana).
Spanish Needle (see Bidens bipinnata
L.).
Spanish Potato.
Spartianthus junceus (see Spartium
junceum L.).
Spartium junceum L. (Spanish
Broom) (Genista juncea) (Sparti-
anthus junceus).
Spearmint (see Mentha spicata).
Speedwell (see Vernonia sp.).
Spice tree.
Spirea sp.
Spirea cantoniensis (Bridal Wreath).
Squash vine.
Stachys aequata.






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Star-leaved Gum (see Liquidambar
styraciflua L.).
Stillengia sp.
Stone Crop (see Sedum acre L.).
Strawberry (see Fragaria sp.).
Strophostyles angulosa.
Sugar-berry (see Celtis sp.).
Sugar cane (see Saccharum offici-
narum L.).
Sunflowers (see Helianthus spp.).
Sweet Bay (see Laurus nobilis).
Sweet Elder (see Sambucus canaden-
sis).
Sweet Gum (see Liquidambar styra-
ciflua L.).
Sweet Olive (see Osmanthus frag-
rans).
Synedrela vialis.
Tamarind (see Tamarindus indica
L.).
Tamarindo (see Tamarindus indica
L.).
Tamarindus indica L. (Tamarind)
(Tamarindo).
Taraxacum officinale (Dandelion).
Tecoma sp.
Temorix gallica.
Templetonia sp.
Tetrapanax papyriferum (Aralia
papyrifera).
Three-seeded Mercury (see Acalypha
sp.).
Tinus laurifolius (see Viburnum ti-
nus L.).
Tobira (see Pittosporum tobira).
Toddy-palm (see Caryota urens).
Touch-me-not (see Impatiens sp.).
Tradescantia fluminensis (Wandering
Jew) (Zebrina pendula).
Trifoliata Orange.
Tulip-tree (see Liriodendron tulipi-
fera).
Ulex europaeus L. (Gorse) (Furze)
(Whin).
Ulmus racemosa (Cork Elm) (Rock
Elm).
Ulmus sp. (Elm).
Umbellularia californica (California
Laurel).
Urtica sp. (Nettle).
Urtica urens (Nettle).
Urtica holosericea.
Vaccinum elliottii (Blueberry).
Verbena sp.
Vernonia sp. (Ironweed) (Speedwell).
Veronica sp.
Viburnum japonicum.
Viburnum laurustinus (see Viburnum
tinus).







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease



















































Crown Gall
(Bacterium (Pseudomonas) tume-
faciens (S.&T.) Stev.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Viburnum tinus L. (Laurustinus)
(Laurestinus) (V. Laurustinus)
(Tinus Laurifolius).
Vigna sp. (Cowpea).
Vine.
Viola sp. (Violet).
Violet (see Viola sp.).
Vitis spp. (Grape).
Wall Paper (see Sedum acre).
Walnut, English (see Juglans regia).
Walnut, Persian (see Juglans regia)
Walnuts (see Juglans spp.).
Wandering Jew (see Zebrina pendula)
or (Tradescantia fluminensis).
Wattle, Sidney Golden (see Acacia
floribunda).
Wattles (see Acacia spp.).
Wax Myrtle (see Morella cerifera).
Western Mhgwort (see Artemisia lu-
doviciana).
West Indian Birch (see Bursera si-
maruba).
Whin (see Ulex europaeus L.).
White Oak (see Quercus alba L.).
White Poplar (see Liriodendron tu-
lipifera).
White Sage (see Artemisia ludovici-
ana).
Wild Bamboo (see Smilax sp.).
Wild Banyan (see Ficus aurea).
Wild Grease Wood.
Wild Lettuce (see Letuca sp.).
Wild Rubber (see Ficus areaa.
Wild Senna (see Cassia marylandica).
"Willow, Golden" (see "Golden Wil-
low").
Willow Herb (see Epilobium colora-
tum).
Willows (see Salix spp.).
Wine-palm (see Caryota urens).
Wistaria (see Wisteria sp.).
Wisteria (see Wisteria sp.).
Wisteria sp. (Wisteria) (Wistaria).
Wood, Worm (see Artemisia absin-
thium L.).
Worm Wood (see Artemisia absin-
thium L.).
Yellow Acacia (see Robinia pseuda-
cacia).
Yellow Bignonia (see Bignonia sp.).
Yellow Dock (see Rumex crispus).
Yew, Japanese (see Podocarpus sp.).
Zea mays (Corn).
Zebrina pendula (Wandering Jew)
(Tradescantia fluminensis).
Apple, Grape, Oleander, Peach, Pear,
Plum, Rose.







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease

Cuban Citrus Thrips (Frankliniella
insularis (Franklin) ).



Cuban Laurel Thrips
(Gynaikothrips useli Zimmerman).
Dictyospermum Scale
(Chrysomphalus dictyospermi
(Morg.) ).











Dieback of Pecan
(Botryosphaeria berengeriana
DeNot).
Florida Red Scale
(Chrysomphalus aonidum
(Linn.)).







Florida Wax-scale
(Ceroplastes floridensis Comst.).



Florida White-fly
(Trialeurodes floridensis
(Quaint.) ).
Foot Rot (Phytophthora terrestria
Sherbakoff).
Gray Fungus Gummosis
Green Shield Scale
(Pulvinaria psidii Maskell).

Hemispherical Scale
(Saissetia hemisphaerica (Targ.) ).
Japanese Wax-scale
(Ceroplastes ceriferus (Anderson) ).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Arrowroot, Black willow, Bonaviste,
Citrus, Convolvulus sp., Cordia sp.,
Eddoe, Ground nut, Guinea grass,
Lupine, Natal plum (Carissa gran-
diflora), Onion, Pepper, Pyrol,
Rose, Rhamnus, Royal poinciana.
Citrus, Ficus nitida.

Aloe zeyheri, Anthurium sp., Arbor
vitae, Areca triandra, Avocado, Ba-
nana, Barbados Cherry (Malpighia
glabra), Camphor, Century plant,
Chinese fan palm, Cinnamon, Cit-
rus, Coconut, Creeping cypress,
Croton rose, Cypripendium sp.,
Dendrobium sp., Dictyospermum
album, Erythrina indica, Ficus sp.,
Guava, Jessamine (Jasminum offi-
cinale), Kentia belmoriana, Latania
sp., Mango, Oleander, Pecan, Poin-
settia, Privet, Pandanus graminifo-
lius, Rose, Royal palm, Sabal black-
burnia, Sabal havanensis, Sago
palm, Tea.
Pecan.


Aspidistra lurida, Auracaria bidwelli,
Australian oak (Grevillea robusta),
Banana, Begonia magnifica, Cam-
phor-tree, Cinnamon, Citrus, Coco-
nut, Coffee, Dictyospermum album,
Eucalyptus, Ficus elastica, Ficus
nitida, Guava, Ilex latifolia, Ilex lu-
rida, Japonica, Mammee apple
(Mammea Americana), Mango, Ole-
ander, Palms, Pandanus, Rhododen-
dron arboretum, Rose.
Andromeda, Anona reticula, Anthuri-
um, Cinnamon, Citrus, Euonymus
japonicus, Fig, Guava, Ilex glabra,
Lignum-vitae, Mango, Myrtle, Ole-
ander, Pomegranate, Quince, Red
Bay, Tea.
Avocado, Guava.

Citrus.
Lemon.
Citrus, Fig, Guava, Henna bush, Lo-
quat, Mango, Mastic, Omelet tree
(Blighia sapoda), Sapodilla, Satin-
leaf, Star-apple, Wild Rubber.
Camellia, Croton, Ferns, Jasmine,
Oleander, Orange, Orchids, Sago
palm.
Camellia, Coffee, Gardenia, Hibiscus,
Mango, Myrica cerifera, Mandarin,
Orange, Persimmon, Tea.







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease

Leaf Blotch (Cercospora fusca).
Little Peach. *
Long Scale (Lepidosaphes gloverii
(Packard) ).
Long-tailed Mealy-bug
(Pseudococcus longispinus
(Targ.) ).
Mango, or West Indian Fruit Fly
(Anastrepha fraterculus Wied.).

Melanose
(Phomopsis citri Fawcett).
Mining Scale
(Howardia biclavis (Comst.)).




Nursery Blight
(Phyllosticta caryae Peck).
Oriental Peach Moth
(Laspeyresia molesta Quaint.)
Papaya Fruit Fly
(Toxotrypana curvicauda
Gerstaecker).
Peach Rosette.
Peach Tree Borer
(Sanninoidea exitiosa Say).
Peach Yellows.
Pear Thrips
(Euthrips pyri Daniel).
Pecan Budworm
(Proteopteryx deludana
Clemens).
Pecan Case-bearer
(Acrobasis nebulella Riley).
Pecan Girdler
(Oncideres cingulatus Say).
Pecan Rosette.
Pecan Scab
(Fusicladium effusum Wint.).
Pecan-tree Borer
(Seisa scitula Harris):
Powdery Scab.
Pseudischnaspis aliens News.






Purple Mite
(Tetranychus mytilaspidis
Riley).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Pecan.
Peach.
Citrus, Magnolia fuscata.

Aralia, Bamboo, Croton, Cycas, Ferns,
Fig, Guava, Mango, Palm, Plum.

Coffee, Cuban plum, Guava, Grape-
fruit, Mango, Orange, Peach, Pear,
Plum, Persimmon, Surinam Cherry.
Citrus

A inna muricata, Bixa orellana, Chin-
chona, Coffee, Diospyrus ebernum,
Etaecarpus cyanus, Ficus laurifo-
lia, Flacourtia, Hibiscus aculeatus,
Lime, Microglossa zeylanica, Ochrea
sapota, Tabernaemontana, Tama-
rind, Tea, Wisteria.
Pecan.

Apple, Cherry, Japanese flowering
cherry, Peach, Pear, Plum, Quince.
Papaya (Carica papaya).

Peach.
Peach, Plum.

Peach.
Pear.

Hickory, Pecan.


Hickory, Pecan, Walnut, Wild Crab
(Crataegus).
Hickory, Pecan, Persimmon, Rose,
Walnut.
Pecan.
Pecan.

Chestnut, Dogwood, Hickory, Oak, Pe-
can.
Irish Potato.
Avocado, Australian oak, Caladium,
Cassia obtusifolia, Caimito sp.,
Cattleya Skinneri, Caymito, China-
berry, Clerodendron sp., Datura ar-
borea, Jasmine, Millifores verbena-
cia, Muehlenbeckia platyclada, Mul-
berry, Guava, Rose, Salix biblionica,
Star apple, Yucca gloriosa.
Citrus.







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease

Purple Scale
(Lepidosaphes beckii (Newman)).


Pustule Scale
(Asterolecanium pustulans
(Ckll.) ).

Putnam's Scale
(Aspidiotus ancylus (Putnam) ).


Pyriform Scale
(Pulvinaria pyriformis Ckll.).
Red-banded Thrips
(Heliothrips rubrocinctus
(Giard) ).
Red and Black Citrus Weevil
(Praepodes vittatus Linn., var.
rubrovittatus Jekel).
Root Knot
(Heterodera schachti Schmidt)."o














Rot of Citrus
(Diplodia natalensis).
Rufous Scale, or West Indian Red
Scale (Pseudaonidia (Selenas-
pidus) articulatus (Morg.) ).


San Jose Scale
(Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Banksia integrifolia, Cercidiphyllum
japonicum, Citrus, .Croton, Eleag-
nus, Fig, Ilex cornuta, Oak, Olive,
Pomaderris apetala, Taxus cuspi-
data.
Anona reticulata, Australian silk oak,
Custard-apple, Fig, Grevillea ro-
busta, Hibiscus, Mango, Mulbsrry,
Oleander, Peach, Pigeon-pea.
Apple, Ash, Beech, Bladdernut, Cher-
ry, Currant, Hackberry, Linden,
Maple, Oak, Osage orange, Peach,
Pear, Pecan, Plum, Quince, Snow-
ball, Willow.
Avocado, Cape Jasmine, English ivy,
Guava, Rhynchospermum.
Avocado, Guava, Mango.

Citrus.


Aloysia citriodora, Asparagus,Bana-
na, Bean, Beet, Begonia, Cabbage,
Cantaloupe, Careless weed, Carrot,
Catalpa, Cauliflower, Celery, Chrys-
anthemum, Cissus discolora, Col-
eus, Cotton, Cowpeas (most), Cu-
cumber, Cyclamen, Daisy, Eggplant,
Fig, Geranium, Grapes (old world),
Hibiscus, Honeysuckle, Irish potato,
Ivy, Japanese persimmon, Kale,
Lettuce, Mulberry, Mustard, Okra,
Peach, Peanut, Peas, Pecan, Peony,
Papaya, Pepper, Pineapple, Poke-
weed, Primula obconica, Quince,
Radish, Rape, Rose, Salvia, Soy
bean, Squash, Sweet potato, Sugar
cane, Tobacco, Tomato, Violet,
Watermelon, Wistaria.
Citrus.

Avocado, Citrus, Coffee, Cordyline
terminalis, Custard Apple, Dictyo-
spermum album, Ficus Gardenia,
Jasminum, Mahogany, Mignonette
bush (Lawsonia), Pandanus, Rose,
Star apple, Tamarind.
Acacia, Actinidia, Alder, Almond,
American linden, Apple, Apricot,
Ash, Black walnut, Carolina pop-
lar, Catalpa speciosa, Cedar, Chest-
nut, Citrus trifoliata, Cotoneaster,
Crab-apple, Crataegus, Currant,
Cut-leaved birch, Dogwood, Elm,
English walnut, English willow,
Eucalyptus corynocalyx, Euonymus,
European linden, Golden-leaved
poplar, Golden willow, Gooseberry.


""Heterodera radicola (Muller) Atkinson."







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease














Scab (Actinomyces chromogenus).
Scaly Bark
(Cladosporium herbarum, var.
citricolum Fawcett).
Sericeous Palm Weevil
(Metamasius sericeus (Latr.) ).
Six-spotted Mite
(Tetranychus sexmaculatus
Riley).
Snow Scale
(Chionaspis citri Comst.).
Soft Brown Scale
(Coccus hesperidum (Linn.) ).



Stem-end Rot
(Phomopsis citri Fawcett).
Strawberry Crown Borer
(Tyloderma fragariae Riley)
Strawberry Crown Girdler
(Otiorhynchus ovatus Linn.)
Strawberry Root Louse
(Aphis forbesi Weed)
Striped Citrus Weevil
(Diaprepes abbreviatus Linn.,
var. spengleri Linn.).
Sugar-cane Borers
(Diatraea saccharalis crambi-
doides Grote and D. zeacolella
Dyar).
Sugar-cane Mealy-bug
(Pseudococcus calceolariae
Maskell).
Sweet Potato Weevil
(Cylas formicarius (Fab.) ).



Walnut Scale
(Aspidiotus juglans-regiae
Comst.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Hawthorn, Huckleberry, Japan
plum, Japanese quince, Japan wal-
nut, Juneberry, Laurel, Laurel-
leaved willow, Lemon, Lime, Lom-
bardy poplar, Lonicera xylosteum,
Maple, Milkweed, Orange, Osage
orange, Prunus Avium, Peach,
Pear, Pecan, Persimmon, Poplar,
Prunus domestic, Plum, Prunus
pissardi, Prunus maritima, Ptelea
trifoliata, Quince, Raspberry, Rose,
Snowball, Spiraea, Spruce, Straw-
berry, Sumac, Symphoricarpus ra-
cemosus, Weeping Willow.
Irish potato.
Citrus.


Banana, Coconut palm, Pineapple,
Royal palm, Sugar cane.
Citrus.


Citrus, Euonymus latifolius, Osman-
thus.
Abutilon, Morus nigra, Box, Camel-
lia, Cinnamon, Citrus, Clematis
flammula, Convolvulus tricolor, Cy-
cas revoluta, Holly, Ivy, Jasmine,
Laurel, Mimosa, Myrtle, Oleander,
Phlox.
Citrus.

Strawberry

Strawberry

Strawberry

Citrus.


Corn (maize), Johnson grass, Sor-
ghum, Sugar cane.


Johnson grass, Sugar cane.


Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas),
Morning-glory (Ipomoea pes-caprae,
I. trifida, I. pandurata, I. littoralis),
Moonflower (Calonyction aculea-
tum).
Apple, Apricot, Cherry, Japan plum,
Locust, Maple, Peach, Pear, Pecan,
Walnut.






STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease

White Peach Scale
(Diaspis (Aulacaspis) pentagon
(Targ.) ).















White-winged or Common White-
fly (Dialeurodes citri (Ash.) ).













Withertip
(Colletotrichum gloeosporioides).
Woolly White-fly
(Aleurothrixus howardi
(Quaint.) ).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Acanthus, Apricot, Argyriea speciosa,
Bryophyllum calycinum, Callicarpa
lanata, Calotropis procera, Cape
gooseberry, Capsicum, Carica pa-
paya, Cherry, Chinaberry, Cydus
media, Dwarf Cherry, Dwarf flow-
ering almond, Dwarf peach, Fuch-
sia, Geranium, Gossypium barba-
dense, Granadilla, Grape, Hibiscus,
Hibiscus (Abelmoschus) esculentus,
Japanese varnish tree, Japan flow-
ering cherry, Jassium, Locust,
Morning-glory, Mulberry, Myopor-
um insulare, Oleander, Passiflora
edulis, Peach, Pear, Pecan, Pelar-
gonium, Persimmon, Plum, Polygalo
myrtifolia, Privet, Prune, Prunus
pandula, Prunus pseudo-ceraceus,
Tylophora asthmatica, Walnut, Yel-
low Jasmine.
Blackberry, Boston ivy, Button bush
(Cephalanthus occidentalis), Cape
jessamine (Gardenia), Cherry lau-
rel, Chinaberry, Citrus, Coffee,
English ivy, Ficus sp., Green ash,
Honeysuckle, Japonica (Camellia
japonica), Jessamine (Jasminum
sp.), Mexican orange (Choisya ter-
nata), Oleander, Osage orange
(Maclura aurantiaca), Persimmon
(Japanese and native), Pomegran-
ate, Portugal cherry, Prickly ash,
Smilax, Scrub palmetto, Tree-of-
Heaven, Trumpet flower (Tecoma
radicans), Viburnum nudum, Water
oak, Wild olive.
Avocado, Citrus, Mango.

Citrus.


Zizyphus Scale Citrus, Date palm, Zizyphus pinna-
(Parlatoria zizyphus (Lucas)). christi.




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