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 Table of Contents
 Report of state plant board
 Report of the plant commission...
 Appendix A: Rules and regulations...
 Appendix B: The quarterly bulletin,...














Group Title: Report for the period ... of the State Plant Board of Florida
Title: Report for the period ... /
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098574/00001
 Material Information
Title: Report for the period ... /
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: State Plant Board of Florida
Publisher: State Plant Board of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1920/22
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Protection of -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State Plant Board of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1920/22)- 23rd (1958/60).
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1950/52-1958/60 also called: Bulletin.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098574
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 10989019
lccn - sn 86033752
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report for the biennial period ending ... and supplemental reports to ...
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Report of state plant board
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Report of the plant commissioner
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    Appendix A: Rules and regulations of the state plant board in effect July 1, 1922
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    Appendix B: The quarterly bulletin, volumes V and VI
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Full Text





STATE PLANT BOARD
OF FLORIDA





REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 1, 1920-
JUNE 30, 1922
(Fourth Biennial Report)






With Circulars Nos. 42, 43 and 44
and -
The Quarterly Bulletin
Vols. V and VI


LIBRARy
l IrDA EXPERIMENT STATION
GAINBSVILLB, FLORIDA


FEBRUARY, 1928




/02.
F6 41 '

CULTUBk









STATE PLANT BOARD
of Florida
P. K. YONGE, Chairman ......---.......-- ............--...-..---.....Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN.....................-.............itra
J. B. SUTTON............................................... ............ ..Tampa
JOHN C. COOPER, J......-..-..---------.....--..........................Jacksonville
W. L. WEAVER.................................................... ......Perry
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary ....-...........--...........--............. Tallahasee
STAFF
WILMON NEWELL, Plant Commissioner.......---............Gainesville
E. W. BERGER, Entomologist--......................., ..-...Gainesville
F. M. O'BYRNE, Nursery Inspector.............................Gainesville
J. H. MONTGOMERY, Quarantine Inspector....................Gainesville
FRANK STIRLING, General Inspector, Dept. of Citrus
Canker Eradication-..............Gainesville
J. C. GOODWIN, Apiary Inspector.- ................................Gainesville
Miss LENA R. HUNTER, Chief Clerk-..............................Gainesville











CONTENTS

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL............................ ..... .......... 5
REPORT OF STATE PLANT BOARD.......................... ..---..----- .. 5
REPORT OF THE PLANT COMMISSIONER.....................------------.--. 7
NURSERY INSPECTION-......--..--------.-------------------- 8
QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT..........--------------- --- ---------------- 10
DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY........ ...................................................... 11
SWEET POTATO WEEVIL ERADICATION..........-.......---.. ....-- .------- 12
MOSAIC DISEASE OF SUGAR CANE-...................-----------.----.----- 12
BEE DISEASE ERADICATION............----------- -- ------------------- 13
RULES ....---------..............-- ---- -------- ---- 14
COOPERATION ........----------- ------------ ------ 17
CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT..----.......................--- ----- 19
NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT...-------.............................................. 27
Refusal or Suspension of Certification.................... ............... 28
Permit Certificates......................------------------------...................... 29
Spraying Experiments ...................... ........................................ 29
Inspection Record
Year Ending April 30, 1921......... ......... ..................... .. 30
Period from May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922................................ 32
Certification Refusals ....................--- .................. 33
Certificates Issued .......................------------------ ..... 34
QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT............................................................................
Summary for Year Ending April 30, 1921---..........----.......................... 38
Principal Pests and Diseases Intercepted................................ 38
Pests Intercepted in Mail Shipments ...................................... 48
Summary for Year Ending April 30, 1922........................................ 51
Principal Pests and Diseases Intercepted.................................. 52
Pests Intercepted in Mail Shipments....................................... 61
Summary for the Fourteen Months Ending June 30, 1922............ 63
BEE DISEASE ERADICATION--............................................ d4
PUBLICATIONS ....................----------------------------------------- 64
EMPLOYEES
List of Employees, June 30, 1922................................................... 65
FINANCIAL REPORT
Fiscal Year Ending April 30, 1921........................ .................. 66
Period from May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922................................. 69
ESTIMATES ......------------ ------------------------ 73

APPENDIX A
RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE PLANT BOARD IN EFFECT JULY
1, 1922.

APPENDIX B
THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN, VOLS. V AND VI.







Fourth Biennial Report


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

To His Excellency, January 8, 1923.
Cary A. Hardee,
Governor of Florida.
SIR: Herewith is submitted the report of the State Plant
Board of Florida for the period beginning May 1, 1920 and
ending June 30, 1922. Please submit same to the Legislature.
Respectfully,
STATE PLANT BOARD OF FLORIDA,
By P. K. YONGE,
Chairman.

REPORT OF STATE PLANT BOARD
The activities of the State Plant Board have continued
throughout the period covered by this report along the lines con-
templated in the Florida Plant Act of 1915 (Chapter 6885, Laws
of Florida) under which the Board functions. The report of the
Plant Commissioner, Wilmon Newell, which is made a part of
this report, recounts with more or less detail the field and scien-
tific work which has been prosecuted under the Board's direction
to prevent the introduction into and the spread within the State
of plant pests and to eradicate or control several such pests of
major importance. This work has been done, in the opinion of
the Board, in a satisfactory and economical manner and the re-
sults have been beneficial to the agricultural interests of the
commonwealth.
The financial report showing sources of income and nature of
expenditures is also embodied in this report.
The personnel of the Board is as follows: P. K. Yonge, E. L.
Wartmann, J. B. Sutton, W. L. Weaver and John C. Cooper, Jr.
Messrs. Sutton and Wartmann had been appointed as members
during the preceding biennium. Messrs. Yonge, Weaver and
Cooper were commissioned as Board members by Governor Har-
dee July 8, 9 and 19, 1921, respectively. The present Board or-







6 State Plant Board of Florida

ganized July 11, 1921, by electing P. K. Yonge as Chairman and
J. T. Diamond as Secretary.
The reports of the Plant Commissioner and Secretary are
transmitted herewith.
STATE PLANT BOARD,
P. K. YONGE,
Chairman.







Fourth Biennial Report


REPORT OF THE PLANT COMMISSIONER
For the Period from May 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922
Gainesville, Florida, November 24, 1922.
Honorable P. K. Yonge, Chairman,
State Plant Board of Florida.
Sm: I have the honor to present herewith report covering
the activities of the State Plant Board as conducted through the
Plant Commissioner's Office for the period May 1, 1920 to June
30, 1922.
It will be noted that the time reported on differs from that of
previous reports of a similar nature in that formerly the period
extended from May 1 to April 30, a biennium. It has been thought
best to submit the present report for the period to come up to
June 30, 1922, inasmuch as that is the end of the State's fiscal
year. This report, therefore, is for twenty-six months. This will
make it possible to submit future reports for two year periods
terminating June 30. Thus the reports of the State Plant Board
will conform with respect to the periods reported on to those
of other State governmental bodies.
Respectfully,
WILMON NEWELL,
Plant Commissioner.

The work of the State Plant Board has been conducted through
the several departments very much along the same lines as indi-
cated in previous reports. Grove inspection and citrus canker
eradication have continued to be the chief activity of the Board
and its operating force just as has been the case since the crea-
tion of the Board through the Plant Act of 1915. However, the
relation of the Nursery Inspection and Quarantine Inspection
Departments to this special line of work has been so intimate
that it is difficult to draw a distinct line of demarcation. In
fact, all lines of Plant Board work are very closely linked. It
is a pleasure to report that the various departments have func-
tioned smoothly, both in their special lines of work and in their
joint efforts.
Material reductions in the sums available for prosecution of
grove inspection (citrus canker eradication) have necessitated







State Plant Board of Florida '


marked curtailment in the number of men engaged in this work
with corresponding decline in efficiency to the extent that much
less inspection work could be done. The efficiency of the actual
-inspection has likewise suffered, for the reason that with short-
age of men and the necessity for covering a given acreage of
trees within the period being reported on, the inspectors have
been somewhat "speeded up." This "speeding up," however, is
not applied to the areas regarded as especially dangerous, that
is,-localities where canker had formerly been found. No new
infections and no recurrences of infection have been found dur-
ing the twenty-six months, except for the outbreak at Boynton
in June of 1920 and that at Davie in May of 1922, both of which
are reported on further in this report. Other lines of work have
hot suffered from the same handicap. The Nursery Inspection
and. Quarantine Inspection Departments have been able to main-
tain, and in some respects, improve on the high standard of
service heretofore rendered.

NURSERY INSPECTION
Through the Nursery Inspection Department, distribution of
plant pests within the State has been largely prevented, and
horticulturists have been assured that plant stocks (trees,
shrubs, etc.) are free from especially injurious pests, and when
planted do not suffer from the handicap of being affected by
some disease or insect pest.
On the whole, the nurserymen have cheerfully and willingly
complied with the Board's requirements respecting the inspec-
tion and certification of nursery stock. The nursery business in
Florida is highly developed and is carried on on a huge scale.
This is particularly so with regard to citrus. There have been
inspected during the fourteen months ending June 30, 1922,
3057 nurseries in the State. Many of these are small, while
others are of very large size. The Board does not distinguish
between these classes nor restrict its inspections to nurseries
which are generally regarded as "commercial," but extends in-
spection facilities to the smaller operators. In other words, all
nursery stock which may be distributed is inspected. The acre-
age in the 3057 nurseries totaled 3,815.33 acres distributed as
follows:








Fourth Biennial Report


Citrus ................................................ ......................................... 2,708.45
Pecans ............................................................................................ 283.12
Strawberry ......................... ........................................................... 247.35
A avocados ........................................................................................ 16.37
Peach ............................................................................ ................... 10.12
Ornamental and General ............-................................................. 549.92
On June 30, 1922, 1085 nurseries in the State were holding cer-
tificates from the State Plant Board. These are listed as fol-
lows according to kind of stock:

Number of Certified Nurseries in the State of Florida as of
June 30, 1922

Nurseries listed relative to variety of stock
Citrus ................................ ................. ........... .............................. 723
F ig .......................................................................................................... 1
General .................................................................................. ............ 136
Stock Dealers .............................................................................. .... 25
Ornam mental ...................................... ...... ............. .......................... 115
N on-citrus .............................................................................................. 14
Pecan .................................................................................................. 17
Blackberry ........................................................................................... 10
Banana ............................................. .................................................. 13
Cocoanut ................................................ ................... ...... ......... 6
H huckleberry .................................. ......... ...................................... 1
Raspberry .........-...........................-- ...........---- ...............--..... ......- -...... 1
Grape ....................................................... ............................................. 10
A avocado .................................................................................................. 8
G uava ...................................................................................................... 3
M ango ............................... ........... ................................................... 2
Total.................................................................................................1,085
Several nursery operators were guilty of violations of the
Plant Act or of the rules of the Board. On a number of occasions
the Board has felt that the interests of the public would be pro-
tected by administering a caution or a reprimand to the offenders.
In some instances, however, the offense seemed to be so flagrant
or there were repeated infractions, so that the Board instructed
prosecutions. Twenty-three complaints were filed. 'In nineteen
of these, penalties were imposed by the courts. One case resulted
in acquittal and three cases were dropped.
On May 1, 1920, four cases in which information had previously
been filed had not been disposed of. The same number remaim.in
the hands of the courts at the end of the present report period.
As in former years, the nursery inspection work has been con-
ducted through the medium of Assistant Nursery Inspectors
situated in various parts of the State and operating under the
direction of the Nursery Inspector, Mr. F. M. O'Byrne, who has
had charge of this work since the organization of the Board.







State Plant Board of Florida


There are eleven Assistant Nursery Inspectors in as many in.
section districts. It has been our aim to make four inspections
annually. This has not been possible in all cases.
QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT
The Quarantine Department through its inspectors is pre-
venting the ingress of infected or infested plants from other
states and countries. Not only are the activities of this service
directed to preventing entry of diseased or insect-infested plants,
but the effort is made to prevent entry of pests by any means,
such as, for instance, by affected fruits or vegetables or of parts
of plants which might serve as carriers, and naturally there is a
concentration of effort directed against the entry of pests of a
more serious nature which have not as yet gained a foothold in
Florida. This applies to dangerous material from other states as
well as from foreign countries.
Inspection stations are located at the principal ports of entry,
namely, Pensacola, Jacksonville, West Palm Beach, Miami, Key
West and Tampa. Nine men are engaged in this work. All ma-
terial which comes into-the State from foreign countries and to
which the rules of the State Plant Board or of the Federal Horti-
cultural Board apply, is passed upon by these inspectors. Such
material as is excluded by the rules is prevented entry. Other
material which may come in under restrictions is handled ac-
cordingly. All fruits and vegetables from certain countries where
blackfly exists are inspected or fumigated or both. The inspec-
tion is for the purpose of discovering whether or not dangerous
material such as leaves, twigs, etc. is included. If intended for
delivery in Florida, the shipments are fumigated as well as in-
spected. In the course of their work, the inspectors are also
required to see that shipments of nursery stock from other states
into Florida are made in conformity with the safeguards pre-
scribed by the Board.
All foreign vessels arriving at Florida ports are boarded and
searched in company with the customs officials in the effort to
discover contraband or dangerous horticultural materials.
During the year ending April 30, 1921, 3035 vessels from for-
eign ports and 1949 vessels from domestic ports were boarded;
701,783 packages were inspected, 42,565 fumigated, and 3136
contraband returned or destroyed.
For the fourteen months ending June 30, 1922, 2583 foreign
vessels and 2288 domestic vessels were boarded; 2,084,498 pack-







Fourth Biennial Report


ages were inspected, 93,507 packages fumigated, and 4296 pack-
ages of contraband were returned or destroyed.
For the full period covered by this report (twenty-six months)
209 different plant pests from 42 foreign countries were inter-
cepted. On 15 occasions blackfly infestation was discovered on
horticultural'material. Fourteen interceptions were made of
West Indian fruit fly.

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY

The Entomological Department has continued to function along
the lines originally planned. Specimens submitted by inspectors
of the several field services are examined and identified. Many
thousands of such are received and handled each year. Fre-
quently the decision as to quarantine of nurseries or the dispo-
sition of nursery stock intercepted by quarantine inspectors is
determined by the report from the Entomologist.
The production of pure cultures of whitefly fungus has con-
tinued, and this material has been distributed to growers for
counteracting the whitefly. A natural insect enemy of the cot-
tony cushion-scale, the Vedalia, or Australian lady beetle, has
been collected in quantities by field agents and distributed
through the Entomological Department for liberation in areas
where cottony cushion-scale was present. A certain quantity of
Vedalia has also been reared by the Entomologist. The Ento-
mologist and Associate Entomologist have also on many occasions
identified insects sent to the laboratory by growers and have ad-
vised as to control measures to be made use of. Under direction
of the Board, special investigations have been made with respect
to insects affecting cotton.*
The Plant Board has not had in its employ a Plant Pathologist.
The Pathologist of the Florida Experiment Station has been avail-
able in connection with matters pertaining to plant diseases and
the Station has generously permitted us to call for such help
when necessary. This generosity has been appreciated and the
privilege has not been abused.
*Subsequent to the period covered by this report, announcement was made by the
State Plant Board of the successful outcome of the preliminary investigations made under
direction of the Board. This announcement made public the development of a method of
control of the boll weevil which in extensive field tests showed its efficiency under Florida
conditions. The method is simple, inexpensive and practical. It is believed that as the
result of the investigations of the Plant Board's specialists there will be a return of
profitable cotton growing in Florida. The work done on this project by Associate Ento-
mologist G. D. Smith, the method developed and the results obtained are fully described in
the October, 1922, issue of the Quarterly Bulletin of the State Plant Board and in Bulletin
166 of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.







State Plant Board of Florida


SWEET POTATO WEEVIL ERADICATION
The efforts of the Board to prevent the spread of the sweet
potato weevil have not relaxed. This insect appears to be estab-
lished along the coast line of the peninsula from a point north
of Daytona on the east coast to the north line of Pasco County
on the west coast. The quarantine regulations of the Board cov-
ering the movement of sweet potato tubers, plants, and vines from
the infested areas have been applied as thoroughly under the cir-
cumstances as conditions would permit, and seemingly with suc-
cess, for repeated and frequent inspections by both State and
Federal employees have not shown any marked spread. In Baker
County, where a campaign to eradicate this pest of sweet potatoes
has been in progress for the past several years, very marked
progress has been made. Of the 220 farms which have all told
been found to be infested in the affected area of Baker County,
only 42 are now classified as being actively infested.
MOSAIC DISEASE OF SUGAR CANE
The last biennial report contained rather detailed information
with respect to the discovery of the mosaic disease of sugar cane
in Florida and what steps had been taken to eradicate as well as
to prevent the spread of the disease from the infected areas.
These efforts have been continued by the agents of the Board.
The situation in West Florida was found to be very much more
serious than had been anticipated, the disease having been spread
by various means into many of the fields and into many of the
cane plantings throughout West Florida. Investigations con-
ducted by the Plant Board have shown that the mosaic disease
is fairly generally distributed in all of the counties of North
and West Florida as far east as the eastern boundary line of
Jefferson and Madison Counties. All of this area, under the rules
of the Board, has been placed under quarantine. The quarantine
is of such a nature, however, as not to restrict movement of
sugar cane within the area described. Shipments to points out-
side of the quarantined area are not, however, permitted.
In the peninsular section of the State, where a number of iso-
lated infected cane fields had been discovered, and where eradi-
cation work had been undertaken, the situation was such as to
permit of a successful campaign being waged. All of the cane in
the infected fields was destroyed with the cooperation of the
owners and quarantines imposed. No recurrence of the disease







Fourth Biennial Report


has been discovered, either on the farms where the infected
fields were located, or in any other part of the peninsular sec-
tion. We are much gratified at this most excellent result.
The Board, feeling that eradication of the mosaic disease was
impossible in West Florida, and believing that sooner or later
all sugar cane in that section would be seriously interfered with
by reason of the disease, has undertaken a project which, it is
* hoped, will materially assist the cane growers. It is known that
certain varieties of sugar cane are immune, or at least very
highly resistant to the mosaic disease. Among these varieties,
and perhaps the best, so far as sugar content and production are
concerned, is that known as Cayana 10. This is a very greatly
improved type of the Japanese or East Indian variety of sugar
cane. The Board has been enabled to secure a rather limited
quantity of seed cane of this variety and has made a planting of
it at Gainesville. From this small planting, a larger planting
will be made, and the Board will be in position to distribute in
the spring of 1924, small quantities of seed cane of this immune
variety to individual farmers in the localities where the mosaic
disease appears to be doing the greatest damage. It is contem-
plated that by this means, gradually the immune or resistant
variety will replace on the farms the varieties which are sus-
ceptible to the disease.
BEE DISEASE ERADICATION
The Bee Disease Act of 1919, Chapter 7938, Laws of Florida,
imposed upon the Plant Board the duty of eradicating infectious
diseases of honey bees when found inside the State, and prevent-
ing the spread within and introduction into the State of such
diseases. Mr. C. A. Reese was employed as Assistant to the
Plant Commissioner in Bee Disease Eradication on March 1,
1920, and was in charge of field work under the Plant Commis-
sioner's direction until July 1, 1921, when Mr. J. C. Goodwin
was appointed by the Board as Apiary Inspector. Under Mr.
Reese, and later Mr. Goodwin, inspection work was continued
along the lines previously inaugurated. Local or District Inspec-
tors (experienced, practical beekeepers) were engaged by the
Board and reimbursed for the time when actually employed upon
a per diem basis. These local inspectors, with Messrs. Reese and
Goodwin, have prosecuted the bee disease eradication campaign
vigorously. Inspections have been made of apiaries in various







State Plant Board of Florida


sections of the state for the purpose of detecting any infection of
honey bees which might be present.
Inspectors have been especially interested in the discovery of
American foul brood, which is regarded as the most serious con-
dition affecting honey bees. When a diseased condition has been
found, treatment has been instituted, or, as in the case of Ameri-
can foul brood, the infected colonies have been destroyed. During
the twenty-six months ending June 30, 1353 apiary inspections
were made, these representing 34,602 colonies. In 39 apiaries
American foul brood has been found and 69 colonies have been
destroyed. This disease has been discovered in 6 counties. It is
believed that the disease has been eradicated in all areas except
in several apiaries in Pinellas and Palm Beach Counties. In West
Florida where in certain sections, particularly along the Apa-
lachicola River, the industry is highly developed on a commercial
scale, and where considerable foul brood had been found prior
to 1921, no infections have been found, although the apiaries in
the area have been under close and constant observation. The
inspection of the whole state has not been completed, work only
having been undertaken in such areas as were suspected of hav-
ing American foul brood.
Under the rules of the Board, made for the protection of the
bee industry, certain quarantines are imposed on infected apia-
ries and areas in order to prevent distribution of disease. These
quarantines, with few exceptions, have been observed and the
beekeepers have, with one or two exceptions, cooperated with
the employees of the Board in their efforts. It is a well recog-
nized principle of pest control that prevention is almost as im-
portant as control or eradication. Consequently, the Board passed
rules regulating the shipment of bees and used bee equipment
into the State. The Quarantine Inspection Service has rendered
great help in applying these rules, and on several occasions has
been instrumental in preventing the shipment into the State of
honey bees which were regarded as being possible carriers of
disease.
RULES
To meet new situations or changed conditions, new rules of
the Board have been adopted from time to time or existing rules
have been amended. Authority for this is given under the Plant
Act of 1915. Previous reports have contained a synopsis of the
rules of the Board up to and including Rules 45A and 45B. The








Fourth Biennial Report 15

following rules have been adopted or amended during the period
covered by this report.

Rules and Public Notices
1920
August
(1) Public notice declaring certain areas to be infested with the sweet
potato weevil, adopted.
(2) Public notice declaring certain additional areas to be infected with
scaly bark, adopted.
(3) Provisions of Rules 45A and 45B, with respect to the interstate
movement of cotton, were suspended and Federal Horticultural
Board regulations applied instead.
September
(1) Rule 36 amended.
(Disinfection, etc. in public packing houses)
(2) Rule 40F amended.
(Movement of honeybees into the two-mile zone surrounding a
center of infection by bee disease, prohibited.)
(3) Rule 46 adopted.
(Prohibiting importation into Florida of hosts of West Indian
fruit fly)
October
(1) Public notice with regard to scaly bark adopted, in lieu of all pre-
vious public notices on same subject.
(2) Rule 46 repealed.
(Prohibiting importation into Florida of hosts of West Indian
fruit fly)
(3) Rule 11E adopted.
(Prohibiting importation into Florida of fruit of guava, Surinam
cherry, Cuban plum and mango, on account of danger of intro-
ducing West Indian fruit fly)
(4) Counties of Polk and Orange eliminated from public notice in
regard to mosaic disease, adopted 10-13-19.
November
(1) Public notice adopted, declaring yam weevil to be a public nuisance.
(2) Public notice declaring certain areas within State of Florida to be
infested with sweet potato weevil amended so as to include addi-
tional territory.
(3) Public notice (adopted October 13, 1919) amended by striking
out Counties of Manatee and DeSoto from area infected by mosaic
disease.
(4) Rule 44 amended.
(Prohibiting importation of certain material from areas infested
by Japanese beetle)
December
(1) Rule 4D amended.
(In regard to defoliation of nursery stock before movement)
(2) Public notice (adopted October 13, 1919) amended by striking out
certain territory from area designated as infected by mosaic dis-
ease.
1921
February
Rule 4D amended.
(In regard to defoliation of nursery stock before movement)
March
Rule 4D amended.
(In regard to defoliation of nursery stock before movement)








16 State Plant Board of Florida

April
Public notice (adopted 9-13-17) with regard to areas infested by
sweet potato weevil, amended.
May
Rule 42A amended.
(Concerning movement of sugar cane out of mosaic infected areas)
June
(1) Public notice (adopted 3-12-17) with reference to areas infected
by scaly bark, amended.
(2) Public notice re Mexican bean beetle and Japanese camphor scale,
adopted.
(3) All rules not in conformity with the decision of the Supreme
Court in the Wolyn case were amended.
September
(1) Rule 15 amended.
(Regulating movement of nursery stock grown in scaly bark areas)
(2) Public notice (adopted 9-13-17) declaring certain areas in Florida
to be infested with sweet potato weevil-amended.
October
Rule 4L adopted.
(Providing for recall of nursery certificates upon failure of holder
to comply with rules of Board concerning same, etc.)
November
(1) Public notice (adopted 10-13-19) amended.
(Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with mosaic
. disease)
(2) Public notice (adopted 10-11-20) amended.
(Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with scaly bark)
December
(1) Public notice (adopted 10-13-19) amended.
(Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with mosaic
disease)
(2) Rule 11A amended.
(Prohibiting shipment into Florida of all citrus fruits from the
Gulf States)
(3) Rule 11B amended.
(Prohibiting shipment into Florida of all citrus fruits from Cali-
fornia)
(4) Rule 46 adopted.
(Sale, gift, exchange, movement, etc. of trees or plants brought into
state in violation of law, prohibited)
1922
February
(1) Public notice (adopted 10-13-19) rescinded.
(Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with the mosaic
disease of sugar cane.)
(2) Rules 42A, 42B and 42C rescinded.
(Regarding mosaic disease of sugar cane)
(3) Rule 47A adopted.
(Prohibiting movement of sugar cane out of mosaic infected areas
into other parts of state)
(4) Rule 47B adopted.
(Requiring destruction of all mosaic infected plants)
(5) Rule 47C adopted.
(Declaring every mosaic infected field, garden, yard or plant the
center of an infected and dangerous zone; prohibiting planting of
cane or other host plants in such properties, etc.)
(6) Rule 47D adopted.
(Prohibiting the replanting of mosaic infected properties to sugar
cane or other hosts of mosaic disease for one year after destruction
of infected plants)








Fourth Biennial Report


(7) Public notice adopted.
(Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with mosaic
disease of sugar cane.)
March
Rule 47C suspended.
(Declaring every mosaic infected field, garden, yard, or plant the
center of an infected and dangerous zone; prohibiting planting of
cane or other host plants in such properties, etc.)
April
(1) Rule 4G amended.
(Providing for certain exceptions to the rule requiring certifica-
tion of nursery stock)
(2) Rule 4M adopted.
(Shipment of strawberry plants into State of Florida prohibited
except under certain conditions)
May
(1) Rule 6 amended.
(Providing for issuance of certificates of inspection and defining
the forms of certificates-to be used)
(2) Rule 4A amended.
(Declaring certain insects, pests, etc. to be especially injurious,
etc.)

It was also found necessary to amend a number of the rules
of the Board in order to conform to a decision of the Supreme
Court of Florida. This decision was in a case filed by A. H.
Wolyn of Mary Esther, Florida, in which Mr. Wolyn appealed
to have the rules of the Board regarding shipment of sugar cane
from quarantined areas declared null and void. The Supreme
Court, in its decision, declared the opinion that in the case of
the Board rules which were sought to be set aside, the Board had
exceeded its authority under the Plant Act in delegating to the
Plant Commissioner certain powers with respect to lifting quar-
antines or the time of lifting such quarantines, which powers
could only be exercised by the Board itself. The effect of this
decision was that a number of the rules of the Board had to be
amended in order to conform to the decision of the Supreme
Court. These amendments were made at the meeting of the Board
held at Gainesville, Florida, on June 6, 1921.
COOPERATION

The closest and most cordial cooperative relations with other
agricultural and horticultural organizations have existed. Such
organizations have extended to the Plant Board invaluable help.
The Federal Department of Agriculture through its Bureau of
Plant Industry has continued to aid in the eradication of citrus
canker, and the same Bureau has assisted in the mosaic disease
campaign..








State Plant Board of Florida


Through the Bureau of Entomology, the Department' of Agri-
culture has very materially contributed to the success of our
efforts to control the spread of the sweet potato weevil and to
eradicate this insect from the isolated area in Baker County,
where it had become established.
The Federal Horticultural Board has continued the appoint-
ments of Assistant Quarantine Inspectors of the State Plant
Board as Collaborators of the Federal Board, thus giving author-
ity to the State Inspectors to apply the Federal plant quarantine
rules. The State, however, bears the salary and other expenses
involved.
The Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of
Florida has never failed to lend the support of its experts, and
the Agricultural Extension Division has, on many occasions, sup-
plemented the Plant Board's activities.
Members of the Plant Board staff have been present at, and
participated in numerous meetings of horticulturists and agri-
culturists in all sections of the State. Members of the staff have
also taken part in a limited way as special lecturers and instruc-
tors in the educational work conducted by the College of Agricul-
ture and Agricultural Experiment Station.
In the preceding, an attempt has been made to briefly outline
the activities of the Board. More detailed and statistical infor-
mation as to the special activities of the several departments of
the Board operating under the Plant Commissioner may be
found under the sections of this report devoted to these particu-
lar departments.
During the period covered by this report, economy in expendi-
tures has been practiced. During the fiscal year of 1920-21, all
funds available were utilized to the greatest advantage, and the
year was ended with complete equipment and a large stock of
supplies on hand. Only three cents of the general appropriation
for the year ending April 30, 1921 was returned to the Treas-
urer.
It has always been the policy of the Board since its creation
to, as far as circumstances and demands would permit, conserve
its funds and limit its expenditures in such a manner as to have
available a reserve fund for use in emergencies. This policy was
followed during the year ending April 30, 1922. No situation
developed during this period of sufficient magnitude to call for
the expenditure of the reserve thus created, with the result that







Fourth Biennial Report


there reverted to the State Treasury, May 1, the sum.of $16,775.12.
It must be admitted that there may be some question as to the
wisdom of this policy, for the reserve which reverted as unex-
pended balance was built up at the sacrifice of.efficiency in sev-
eral of the departments. This sum could have, without question,
been expended very advantageously in extending and strength-
ening any one or all of the departmental activities which had
been correspondingly curtailed or weakened in the effort to build
up the reserve. This experience serves in a way, however, to
indicate the necessity for the provision by the legislature of a
reserve fund for use in such emergencies as might arise, and thus
make available for current and actually necessary routine ex-
penses of operation, all of the funds appropriated for that pur-
pose. Such a fund should, in our judgment, be of a size to meet
serious situations which might arise, such as an extensive recur-
rence of citrus canker, or the discovery of the introduction and
establishment of pests of first magnitude. The successful hand-
ling of such situations depends upon the promptness and vigor
of the repressive measures undertaken. As a matter of fact,
just such a serious situation materialized only a short while after
the unexpended balance in the general fund had reverted to the
Treasury. This was the discovery of canker infection at Davie,
which called for a concentration of all of the Board's available
inspectors at this point, and the expenditure of large sums of
money in the attempt to immediately handle the situation.

CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT
Throughout the twenty-six months included in this report,
the work of eradicating citrus canker has continued to be the
main endeavor of the Board. All properties and areas in which
infection has ever been found have been kept under close obser-
vation and inspections have been made of citrus plantings
throughout the State. It is gratifying to report that during the
twenty-six months infections have been discovered in only two
localities in the State.
In July, 1920, a large number of infected trees were found at
a point about three miles west of Boynton in Palm Beach County.
This situation developed undoubtedly as a result of infrequent
inspections due to shortage of inspectors. In all five properties
were found to be infected and 540 trees in these properties were
diseased. By vigorous and prompt measures, including the de-







State Plant Board of Florida


struction of all trees in the infected properties (except one grove,
that of Charles Stitts, located in the town of Boynton) this in-
fection was suppressed. There has been no recurrence. Careful
inspections made at the time of the discovery of the infection
as well as since, have failed to disclose any additional infected
trees.
An almost similar situation was discovered in May of 1922
at Davie, an isolated settlement about ten miles southwest of
Fort Lauderdale in Broward County. This settlement is on re-
claimed Everglade land, and there are no important citrus plant-
ings located within a distance of some three miles of Davie.
This is a fortunate circumstance, for undoubtedly the disease
has been confined, so far as our investigations have disclosed,
to the affected area at Davie itself. In 1915, a few infected trees
had been found and destroyed in this settlement, and the disease
apparently stamped out. Repeated inspections subsequent to
1915 and up until 1922 failed to show any return of the disease.
In May of 1922, however, 216 trees were found in a grove at
Davie, and further search has resulted in locating 14 properties
in which were 753 infected trees.
Fortunately there has been no spread from these two isolated
areas. At least careful inspection all along the lower east coast
section and the following up of all possible means of transmis-
sion of the disease from the affected areas elsewhere failed to
unearth additional infected properties. It is believed that the
situation with respect to the Boynton outbreak is safe, for no
infected trees have been found since early in August, 1920. The
Davie situation is being handled in a satisfactory manner. The
growers in this community have rendered unqualified support
and assistance and have submitted to the necessary quarantine
restrictions without murmur. Indeed, this community presents
a splendid example of complete cooperation.
No explanation of an entirely satisfactory nature can be of-
fered as to the cause of the Davie outbreak. The most plausible
appears to be that the disease "held over" from 1915 either
(a) on some old neglected and undiscovered tree, or (b) in the
soil. The latter possibility is being given special consideration
'by the Plant Pathologist of the University of Florida Experiment
Station.
Owing to lack of funds from both State and Federal sources,
the force of inspectors engaged in grove inspection work had






Fourth Biennial Report


been reduced to twenty men who were available at the time of the
Davie outbreak. In the emergency, the full force was concen-
trated at Davie and inspectors from other departments of the
State Plant Board were drafted for service "on the firing line".
The Board felt that this critical situation should receive prompt
and vigorous attention, even though this would enforce curtail-
ment of inspection work later on.
Through the efforts of the Florida delegation in Congress and
upon representations made by the citrus growers of the State,
and by the State Plant Board, a Federal appropriation was se-
cured, available July 1, 1922. Of this appropriation, $70,000.00
was apportioned by the Bureau of Plant Industry for the con-
tinuation of work in Florida. This sum supplements the allot-
ment made by the Board from State funds of $60,000.00, and the
sum of $5,800.00 from a general federal appropriation. The
combined amount will make it possible to continue the campaign
against citrus canker throughout the fiscal year of 1922 and 23.
Crews of inspectors engaged in grove inspection work have
operated in various parts of the citrus section of Florida, making
general inspections of all citrus plantings. Special inspectors
have continued investigational work in the areas where citrus
canker had formerly been found as well as visited properties
upon which had been planted prior to 1915 citrus nursery trees
from infected nurseries. No canker infected trees have been
found except those reported at Boynton and Davie.
All during the citrus canker eradication work, the State Plant
Board has had the warm sympathy and support of the officials
of the United States Department of Agriculture, and particularly
of Doctor Karl F. Kellerman, Associate Chief of the Bureau of
Plant Industry. Mr. Frank Stirling, General Inspector of the
State Plant Board, has continued, as in the past, to have charge
of the field force engaged in this work.
From May 1, 1920 to April 30, 1921, the expenditures for
citrus canker eradication totaled $100,164.70; $61,587.66 of this
was from State funds and $38,577.04 from Federal funds. For
the fourteen months ending June 30, 1922, $81,555.32 from State
sources and $16,944.42 from Federal appropriations were ex-
pended.
The sums expended in this work in Florida from its inception
are shown in the following tabulation:








22 State Plant Board of Florida

Federal Funds* State Funds Other Sources
Prior to May 1, 1920......................$860,973.51 $362,258.63 $85,019.62**
May 1, 1920 to April 30, 1922...... 38,577.04 61,587.66 ..................
May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922...... 16,944.42 81,555.32 ..................
Totals...................................$916,494.97 $505,401.61 $85,019.62
Total, all sources.............................................................$1,506,916.20***

For convenience of presentation, there are included herewith
_certain tabulations and charts giving statistical information
with reference to the conduct of this phase of the Plant Board
work.
Two charts or diagrams are submitted showing graphically
the number of canker-infected trees found each month to June
30, 1922 (Fig. 1) and the number of canker-infected properties
found in the state for the same period, as well as the number
of these which have been declared by the Board to be no longer
danger centers with reference to the disease (Fig. 2).

The following tabulation shows the same information as is in-
dicated in the diagram, Fig. 1:

NUMBER OF GROVE TREES FOUND INFECTED WITH CANKER, PER
MONTH, SINCE THE WORK BEGAN IN MAY OF 1914

1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922
Jan. 806 Jan. 86 Jan. 14 Jan. 0 Jan. 0 Jan. 0 Jan. 0 Jan. 0
Feb. 165 Feb. 21 Feb. 4 Feb. 1 Feb. O Feb. 0 Feb. 0 Feb. 0
Mar. 444 Mar. 49 Mar. 9 Mar. 1 Mar. 1 Mar. 0 Mar. 0 Mar. 0
Apr. 408 Apr. 49 Apr. 169 Apr. 2 Apr. 1 Apr. 0 Apr. 0 Apr. 0
1~ay 108 May 1042 May 838 May 52 May 1 May 1 May 0 May 0 May 585
June 160 June 772 June 450 June 45 June 10 June 0 June 0 June 0 June 168
July 275 July 651 July 849 July 89 July 0 July 0 July 589 July 0
Aug. 1818 Aug. 1845 Aug. 219 Aug. 80 Aug, 0 Aug. 1 Aug. 1 Aug. 0
Sept. 767 Sept. 618 Sept. 124 Sept. 6 Sept. 0 Sept. 0 Sept. 0 Sept. 0
Oct. 665 Oct. 214 Oct. 451 Oct. 2 Oct. 0 Oct. 0 Oct. 0 Oct. 0
Nov. 77 Nov. 494 Nov. 181 Nov. 1 Nov. O Nov. 0 Nov. 0 Nov.
Dee. 866 Dec. 256 Dec. 27 Dec. 1 Dec. 0 Dee. 0 Dec. 0 Dee. 0
Tot. 4827 67151 2294 872 15 4 540 0

*Does not include special salary increases provided by Acts of Congress.
**Includes donations from inspectors, transportation companies, growers, etc.
***Includes expenditures directly chargeable to citrus canker eradication.








TABLE I
TABULATED REPORT OF THE CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1921


1920
May .......................
June ........................
July ..........................
August ....................
September ..............
October ...................
November ................
December ................
1921
January ...............
February ...............
March ....................
April .......................


Totals ................
Prior to May 1, 1920


Number of trees in- I c
spected for citrus 0 3
canker. (Many trees g :
were reinspected a
number of times. The 'g g
figures below include ,X o
such reinspections.) P
---- i _/* s ,.


Grove

588,326
319,104
311,883
689,336
588,416
495,518
341,402
386,468

373,696
373,696
444.123
701,274


Nursery

4,329,786
4,769,412
4,509,662
2,324,622
4,252.933
5,475,708
5,090,179
5,075,177

6,021,717
1,817,216
6,235,830
5,046,544


5,613,242 54,948,786 I* 5**
57,591,061 194,338,472 I 22 481


Totals ................ 63,204,303 1259,287,258 1 22 1486


Number of trees
found infected
and destroyed.


Grove Nursery


540
13,727


14,267


0
242,254


242,254


Number of "expoi
trees destroyed
a precautionary;
measure.


Grove


sed"
as
y
o .

ery


Nurse


0 0
0 0
544 15,000
0 17,000
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
544 32,000
234,998 2,613,514


1 235,542 2,645,514 I 486


I 481


0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
5
S481


*Infections reported from one county for the year 1920-1921. No newly infected county reported for the year 1920-1921. Total number of counties
infected to April 80, 1921, 22.
**Actual number of properties in which infected trees were found during year 1920-1921.


o
Ia






0



0
0
0
0
0
0




2
479
0
0





2




479


I


- -


. .








TABLE II
TAmBUiATE REPORT OF THE CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT FOR THE PERIOD FROM MAY 1, 1921 TO JUNE 80, 1922


1921
May .....................
June ........................
July .....................
August ..... ..........
.September .............
October .................
November ................
December ................
1922
January ..............
February ..............
March ......................
April .......................
May .......................
June .......... .........


Number of trees in- s z
spected for citrus g

were reinspected a .1 g s
number of times. The -'so g ;' g
figures below include 0
such reinspections.) o U a

Grove Nursery B E


701,539
706,601
496,139
778,858
603,330
479,161
617,552
417,341

752,520
741,104
608,129
817,289
880,972
99,798


Totals .................. 8,718,333
Prior to May 1. 1921 63,204,303


2,882,009
1,244,308
5,272,074
5,470,050
7,911,835
5,974,246
7,465,765
4,748,806

6,470,216
6,315,697
7,149,714
5,283,850
6,851,256
7,936,598


80,976,424
259,287,258


1 9
1 | 8 f
1- 14**
22 486 14.


T 'otalli ........... I


Number of trees
found infected
and destroyed.



Grove Nursery


15,


753
267
,020 1


0
242,254
242.254


Number of "exposed"
trees destroyed as
a precautionary
measure.


Grove


Nursery

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0


| 0 0
235,542 2,645,514
S235,542 12,645,514


I


14 0
486 481
I 500 | 481


*Infections reported from one county for the year 1921-1922. No newly infected county reported for the year 1921-1922. Total number of counties
infected to June 80, 1922, 22.
**Actual number of properties in which infected trees were found during year 1921-1922.


I
]


to


.a








0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

9
5


0
0
0
0
0
o
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
o
0


' ' '


I










.'';-]9 I -''' " s" U I II ,'." I- - -- ..-







500

1914, to Jun I I, 1I922
1914, to June-8 1922.
., l l tl l t f irl l t f l l l. . l l l l l l [ l l l j J 0l
, olr ~l il ll l I\ lI I. I IIi i .. l i it l f il l! l il l J lfif
,OO l A I 11 Il l 1 f f I I ti i i l I li l. I l l
9 l'3, l l0l l f l ll ] l l / l l l f l I I







1914, to June- 0, t922.-


81
za
I.
0
-t
%a
*3

















~I.

-t


I T,!


i LI- I I I I -t tt- I t


Fig 2.-Comparison of infected properties and properties declared no longer danger centers in Florida at different dates.
Light line shows the total number of canker infected properties found in the state up to the end of each month. Heavy
line shows the number of infected properties declared by the Plant Board, up to corresponding dates, as being no longer
danger centers.


II



= I III EIII_
r' ^ 3 s s a = ~ = ...... ^ ^ .== a .i~s -....^ s = ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ = =.. ^ =,= .

. ... t l i _--
h-- --


I


f Tl ll








Fourth Biennial Report


SUMMARY
The following are the essential facts concerning the eradica-
tion of citrus canker in Florida up to June 30, 1922:

Total number of properties found infected in the State.................... 500
Total number declared no longer danger centers................................ 481
Number still classed as active infections, June 30, 1922................. 19
Number of properties declared "clean".........................----- -----------........... 481
Number of properties still under partial or full quarantine,
June 30, 1922....................................... ........................... .... ..... 19
Total number of grove trees found infected May 1, 1914 to
June 30, 1922....................................................................................... 15,020
Total number of nursery trees found infected May 1, 1914 to
June 30, 1922..................................................................................... 342,254
Total number of "exposed" grove trees destroyed, May 1, 1914
to June 30, 1922............................ .................... .......... 235,590
Total number of "exposed" nursery trees destroyed, May 1, 1914
to June 30, 1922.................................... .. ............ ........... 2,645,514

NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT

Practically all states have some form of inspection of nursery
stock and protection against the spread of plant pests into
orchards and ornamental plantings. In some states this service
is more highly developed than in others. In Florida, owing to
the extensive investments in orchards, particularly citrus, and
due to climatic conditions which favor the development of insect
pests and plant diseases, more frequent and thorough inspections
are demanded than in more northern states. It has been the aim
of this Department to make four inspections annually of all. com-
mercial nurseries. This has not been possible in all cases. Never-
theless it is felt that the Florida Nursery Inspection Service is
giving good return to the State for the money expended.
The Florida Service is unique in that it is required that not
only must every shipment of nursery stock be accompanied by a
certificate of inspection (which is a usual requirement in other
states) but must also be reported by the shipper to the Nursery
Inspector's office by invoice. Thus, a complete and permanent
record of all movements of nursery stock is secured. This record
might prove invaluable in event of an outbreak of some serious
plant disease or insect pest in some nursery or in grove plantings.
Should such an unfortunate situation arise, it will be possible by
means of the records filed in the Nursery Inspector's office to








State Plant Board of Florida


follow up each suspicious or dangerous shipment originating in
the affected nursery. Many thousands of dollars would be saved
to the State and the growers through this system.
"There are now eleven Assistant Nursery Inspectors operating
in as many nursery inspection districts. These districts, of
course, vary in size geographically. Some are quite large, while
others are quite limited as to area. The size depends wholly on
the extent of the nursery operations. Each of the Assistant
Nursery Inspectors has a designated headquarters. In some of
the larger districts, the inspector is in a travel status practically
all the time.
The total number of nurseries inspected during the year end-
ing April 30, 1921, was 2,682. The number of inspections made
was 5,450.
\ The total number of nurseries inspected during the year end-
ing April 30, 1922, was 2,947. The total number of inspections
was 5,918.
During May and June, 1922, 886 nursery inspections were
made, For the full period of twenty-six months, 12,254 inspec-
tions were made in 5,739 nurseries.
REFUSAL OR SUSPENSION OF CERTIFICATION
When a condition is found in a nursery which renders the
movement of stock therefrom unsafe, certification is refused, or,
if a certificate has previously been issued, it is suspended. No
certificate is issued or reinstated until the unsatisfactory or
dangerous condition is abated.
During the year ending April 30, 1921, there were 666 such
refusals or suspensions. During the fourteen months ending
June 30, 1922, 772. Five nurseries were refused certification
because of their being located within a one mile zone under quar-
antine on account of citrus canker.
The reasons for refusal or suspension were as follows:
Year Ending April 30, 192i
Reason Number
Avocado scab ............--. ...... ... ....................-..- 15
California red scale.----................. ........... ...-- -.......- 10
Camphor thrips .............-.---......................... 4
Foot rot of citrus................. ......... ..-... ..........-................ ..... 18
Excessive whitefly and scale.... .......... ...................... 462
San Jose scale................... ................ ..- .................. 21
Other causes ....................................... 136
666







Fourth Biennial Report


Period Ending June 30, 1922
Reason Number
Avocado scab ... ................ ......... ............. 22
California red scale ........................ .................... 15
Camphor thrips ............. ..... ....................... 10
Foot rot of citrus.......................... ................. 21
Excessive whitefly and scale............................... .......... 554
San Jose scale......................................... 24
Other causes ..... ........................................ ........ 126
772
PERMIT CERTIFICATES

Under the Florida law (Section 8 of the Plant Act of 1915)
there are certain requirements which must be complied with in
order to make shipments of nursery stock into the State. All
such shipments are subject to inspection when coming under the
observation of inspectors of the Board. Many are handled each
year by inspectors of the Quarantine Service. When found to be
infected or infested, they are either properly treated or refused
delivery.
In order to facilitate movement of stock into the State as
well as to have a record of such movements, the certificate or
permit provided for in Section 8 of the Plant Act is issued to
out-state nurserymen after the Nursery Inspector has been sup-
plied with a signed copy of the certificate issued by the inspector
of nursery stock of the state wherein the nursery is located, and
has also been supplied with such other information as may indi-
cate the reasonable assurance that shipments may be made with
safety. All shipments made under permits must be reported to
the Nursery Inspector by invoice just as are. shipments made
within the State.
During the year ending April 30, 1921, 29,913 permit certifi-
cate tags were issued to 173 out-state nurseries. For the fourteen
months subsequent to May 1, 1921, 238 nurseries secured 35,777
permit certificate tags.

SPRAYING EXPERIMENTS

Although it is not the function of the State Plant Board to
conduct experiments in the field of pest control by means of de-
veloping new spray formulas, the Board's activities being pri-








State Plant Board of Florida


marily of a police or regulatory nature, yet it has been found
necessary to do some investigational work. One of the principal
reasons for refusal or suspension of certification of citrus nursery
stock has been the presence of the disease known as citrus scab.
Producers of such stock have experienced in the past great diffi-
culty in satisfactorily controlling this condition. In the last
report of the Plant Commissioner, mention was made of a series
of experiments then being conducted by the Nursery Inspector
to determine the value of a combination spray consisting of Bor-
deaux mixture and oil. These investigations were continued in
cooperation with the Pathologist of the Experiment Station,
during 1920 and 21. The results have been very satisfactory and
coincide with those obtained by investigators of the Bureau of
Entomology, U. S. D. A. It has been found that the use of a
properly proportioned Bordeaux oil spray will very decidedly
reduce scab infection. Indeed, this combination spray has proven
quite effective in general grove sprayings and is coming to be
accepted by growers as a standard spray mixture for fungous
diseases on citrus trees. By its use, there is obviated to a great
degree the likelihood of an excessive scale infestation which
generally follows the use of plain Bordeaux.


THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION AS TO CERTAIN DETAILS IN CON-
NECTION WITH THE OPERATION OF THE NURSERY INSPECTION
DEPARTMENT HAS BEEN PREPARED BY NURSERY INSPECTOR
O'BYRNE FROM THE RECORDS OF HIS OFFICE.
Year Ending April 30, 1921
INSPECTION RECORD
Total number of nurseries inspected during the year............................ 2,682
Number of properties that were inspected but once............................ 633
Total number of inspections made during the year............................ *5,450
The acreage in the nurseries under inspection was as follows
on April 30, 1921:
Citrus ..... ......................... ............ .............. ... 1,882.82
Pecan .................................. .......... .. .... .... 28.96
Avocado ................................ ................. ............. 16.08
Peach ................................. .. ..... .. ............. 24.77
Strawberry ..................... .................. 105.70
Ornamental and general .................:.......... .......... 398.28
2,756.61
*Most strawberry nurseries were inspected but twice.








Fourth Biennial Report 31

The amount of stock (total number of trees and plants) in the
nurseries was as follows on April 30, 1921:

Citrus-
Grapefruit buds ........................................ 677,439
Orange buds .............................................. 1,945,949
Other buds ................................................. 109,274
Unbudded seedlings ............................... 15,070,776

Total citrus stock....................................... .................. 17,803,238
Citrus refused certification (4-30-21)........................ 596,605

Total marketable citrus stock (4-30-21)..................................... 17,206,633

Pecan-
Budded or grafted ......................-........ 371,685
Unbudded seedlings ....:........................... 743,370

Total pecan stock ........................................-- ...... 1,115,055
Refused certification (4-30-21)................................. 29,770

Total marketable pecan stock (4-30-21)............... ................... 1,085,285

Avocado-
Budded or grafted-not given.
Unbudded seedlings-not given.
Total avocado stock..................................................... 91,925
Refused certification (4-30-21).................................. 58,930

Total marketable avocado stock (4-30-21).................................. 32,995

Peach-
Budded or grafted--......--.. ........-- ..- 75,842
Unbudded seedlings ................................. 118,694

Total peach stock-.......-- --. ....---------- -- 194,536
Refused certification (4-30-21)--........................... 812

Total marketable peach stock-.....................-..--. .......... 193,724

Strawberry-
Total strawberry stock (9-1-20)................................ *8,456,950
Total strawberry stock refused certifi-
cation (9-1-20) .........................- ..........-- ---..... 43,000

Total marketable strawberry stock (9-1-20)..........---................... 8,413,950

General and Ornamental-
Total general and ornamental stock (4-30-21)........ 5,231,715
Refused certification (4-30-21)................................ 23,240

Total marketable general and ornamental stock........................ 5,208,475
*These figures correct September 1, 1920, as strawberry season is annual affair and
plants are all moved before April 30.









State Plant Board of Florida


Recapitulation

Total stock in Florida nurseries............................... 32,893,419
Total stock refused certification............................... 752,357

Total marketable stock in Florida
nurseries (4-30-21) ...........................--- .. .. .... .................. 32,141,062


Period from May 1, 1921, to June 30, 1922

INSPECTION RECORD

Year ending During May Total for
April 30,1922 and June 14-month period
Total nurseries inspected...................... 2,947 110 3,057
Properties inspected but once.............. 1,216 110 1,326
Total number of inspections made.....*5,918 *886 *6,804

The acreage in the nurseries under inspection was as follows:


April 30, 1922
Citrus ................................. ... 2,674.20
Pecan ...................... .................. 283.12
Avocado .......................................... 15.37
Peach .......................-..... .............. 10.12
Strawberry ...................................... 247.35
Ornamental and general.............. 531.48

3,761.64


Added in
May and June
34.25

1.00

18.44

53.69


The amount of stock (total number of trees and plants) in


the nurseries was as follows:


April 30, 1922


Grapefruit buds .......................... 785,839
Orange buds ................................ 2,334,248
Other buds .................................... 495,436
Unbudded seedlings ....................19,990,259

Total citrus stock............-...........23,605,782
Citrus refused certification........ 692,180

Total marketable citrus stock....22,913,602

Pecan-
Budded or grafted..................... 283,000
Unbudded seedlings .................... 459,044

Total pecan stock........................ 742,044
Refused certification .................. 32,000

Total marketable pecan stock.... 710,044
*Most strawberry nurseries were inspected but twice,
inspections are made but once.


Added in
May and June

6,550
9,535
1,400
583,565
601,050
18,250

582,800


Total

792,389
2,343,783
496,836
20,573,824

24,206,832
710,430
23,496,402


............ 283,000
.......... 459,044

... 742,044
............ 32,000

........... 710,044
also many budwood and special


Total
2,708.45
283.12
16.37
10.12
247.35
549.92

3,815.33


Citrus-








Fourth Biennial Report

Avocado-
Budded or grafted....................... 48,000 275
Unbudded seedlings .................... 66,922 3,000

Total avocado stock ................... 114,922 3,275
Refused certification .............. 66,700 ............
Total marketable avocado stock 48,222 3,275


Peach-
Budded or grafted..................... 12,500
Unbudded seedlings .................... 26,328
Total peach stock.......................... 38,828
Refused certification ................ 9,030
Total marketable peach stock... 29,798

Strawberry-
Total strawberry stock
(10-1-21) ...............................19,143,250*
Total strawberry stock refused
certification (10-1-21) ........ 217,000*
Total marketable strawberry
stock ......................................18,926,250*


April 30, 1922
General and ornamental stock............ 5,644,908
Refused certification ............................ 324,395
Total marketable general and
ornamental stock .......................... 5,320,513


............ 12,500
............ 26,328

............ 38,828
............ 9,030
............ 29,798



............ 19,143,250*
............ 217,000*

.......... 18,926,250*
Added in
May and June Total
280,225 5,925,133
1,000 325,395

279,225 5,599,738


RECAPITULATION


Total stock in Florida nurseries..........49,289,734
Total stock refused certification......... 1,341,305
Total marketable stock in
Florida nurseries ........................47,948,429


884,550
19,250


50,174,284
1,360,555


865,300 48,813,729


CERTIFICATION REFUSALS

The policy of the Department as regards refusals to certify
nurseries has been continued on the same basis as during the two
years past. For a detailed description, see those reports.

During the fourteen months period, nurseries were refused
certification as follows:

*These fienres are correct October 1, 1921, as the strawberry season is an annual affair
and the plants are all moved before April 80. The requirement that strawberry plants be
inspected was repealed by the Board in April, 1922.


48,275
69,922
118,197
66,700

51,497








State Plant Board of Florida


Number of Occasions
During May


Reason During Year and June Total
Avocado scab ...................................... 20 2 22
California red scale............................ 11 4 15
Camphor thrips ............................... 8 2 10
Foot rot of citrus................................ 13 8 21
Excessive whitefly and scale............ 459 95 554
San Jose scale...................................... 20 4 24
Other causes ...................................... 107 19 126
S Total........................................... 638* 134* 772*
On April 30, 1922, theie were 268 Florida nurseries refused
certification. By June 30, 1922, this number had been increased
to 296.
CERTIFICATES ISSUED


Certificate tags were issued as follows:

Year Ending April 30, 1921
Total Number
Kind of Tag Tags Issued
Regular tags ..............-...........--- ..-....-- .. 78,942
Scaly bark tags............................................. 3,245
Package tags ...................... ................... 1,913
Stock dealer's tags........................................... 4,951
Permit tags -----........................................... 29,913
118,964


Number Persons
and Firms
765
112
1,434
10
173

2,494


Period from May 1, 1921, to June 30, 1922


Issued
During
Kind of Tag Year
Regular tags .... 97,027
Scaly bark tags 2,355
Package tags .... 3,182
Stock dealer's
tags.................. 5,400
Permit tags ...... 35,144
143,108


Issued
During
May
and June
10,162
71
705

100
633

11,671


Total
107,189
2,426
3,887
5,500
35,777

154,779


Du
Y
1
2


No. Persons and Firms
During
ring May
'ear and June Tot
,218 140 1,35
99 8 10
!,386 528 2,91


17
234

3,954


al
.8
17
14


18
238

4,635


QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT

The only protection which Florida has against the entry of
plant pests from abroad or from other states is in the applica-
tion of the quarantine rules of the State Plant Board and of the
Federal Horticultural Board. There are insect pests and plant
*This includes refusals for both commercial and non-commercial nurseries. Some nur-
series are practically abandoned and are refused four times a year, once for each inspection
made.


DurinL- Mav


-






Fourth Biennial Report


diseases present in certain foreign lands, particularly the tropi-
cal countries adjacent to Florida, which if introduced would
without question occasion untold losses. For instance, in Cuba is
the much dreaded spiny citrus whitefly, commonly called the
blackfly. This same pest is in Jamaica and the Bahamas, as
well as some Central American countries. In Cuba is also the
West Indian fruit fly, which attacks and ruins for market such
fruits as citrus, mangoes and guavas. In Mexico are the Morelos
fruit worm, which damages citrus fruits, and the avocado weevil,
which attacks avocados.
In various of the states of the United States dangerous plant
pests of one kind or another have gained foothold. It is the duty
of inspectors of the Quarantine Department to protect the state
against entry of such pests. There are an insufficient number of
inspectors attached to this service to adequately perform the
duty. The number of men should be greatly increased.
Our inspectors are collaborators of the Federal Horticultural
Board, at nominal salaries, and administer the plant quarantine
regulations of the national government along with those of the
state. By reason of the federal appointment additional authority
is secured and greater protection afforded Florida's agricultural
interests.
The preceding biennial report mentioned the fumigating facil-
ities which had been provided at Key West and Port Tampa for
the purpose of administering a fumigant hydrocyanicc acidegas)
to shipments of fruits and vegetables originating in the West
Indies and other tropical countries and destined for delivery in
Florida. There are large commercial movements of such ma-
terial, particularly from Cuba, and the danger of importing plant
pests in this manner is great. The fumigating plants at Key
West and Port Tampa have been operated satisfactorily and
efficiently. Since the last report a similar plant has been put
into operation at Miami. This plant is located on the city dock
and was constructed by the city of Miami for the use of the
State Plant Board. The fumigating plants at Key West and
Port Tampa were constructed for our use by the transportation
companies, i. e., Florida East Coast Railroad, Atlantic Coast Line
Railroad and the Peninsular & Occidental Steamship Company.
This is an illustration of the cooperative relations existing be-
tween the operatives of the Board and the transportation com-
panies. During the twenty-six months ending June 30, 1922,
136,072 packages were fumigated.








86 State Plant Board of Florida

Following is a summary of the quarantine inspection work for
the year ending April 30, 1921, and the fourteen months period
ending June 30, 1922.
During the year ending April 30, 1921, 89 insect pests and 9
plant diseases were intercepted on material arriving at Florida
ports from 21 foreign countries.

1921
1. Africa 8. Chile 15. Mexico
2. Australia 9. Colombia 16. Nicaraua
8. Bahamas 10. Cuba 17. Porto Rico
4. Brazil 11. Grand Cayman 18. Santo Domingo
5. British Honduras 12. Hawaii 19. Scotland
6. Canal Zone 13. Isle of Pines (Cuba) 20. Spanish Honduras
7. Canary Islands 14. Jamaica 21. Spain
During the fourteen months ending June 30, 1922, 104 insect
pests and 7 plant diseases were intercepted on material arriving
at Florida ports from 35 foreign countries.


1. Africa
2. Bahamas
3. Belgium
4. Bermuda
5. British West Indies
6. Cuba
7. Dominica
8. Dutch West Indies
9. Ecuador
10. Eng:and
11. Fiance
12. Germany


1922
13. Grand Cayman
14. Hawaii
15. Holland
16. Honduras
17. India
18. Ireland
19. Isle of Pines (Cuba)
20. Jamaica
21. Java
22. Mexico
23. Nicaragua
24. Norway


Palestine
Panama
Peru
Portugal
Scotland
Seychelles
Spain
Spanish Honduras
Venezuela
Wales
Windward Isles


The most important of the pests intercepted were:
Number of
Insect or Disease From Shipments
__ Infested
Argentine ant ....................................................... Louisiana ............ 1
Aspidiotus destructor Sign................................. Cuba ................... 52
Aspidiotus orientalis Newst .............................. Cuba and Colom-
bia ................. 84
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby (blackfly)........ Cuba and Baha-
mas ............. 15
Diplodia cacaoicola P. Herm.......................... Santo Domingo 1
Pseudaonidia duplex (Ckll.) (camphor scale).. Louisiana ............ 1
Pseudaonidia paeoniae (Ckll.)............................ Georgia ................ 1
Pseudaonidia tesserata (de Charm).........-----......... Cuba ...................-- 3
Pseudococcus sacchari Ckll................................. Cuba ..... ----............... 1
Pyralid, Plodia sp.............................................. India .............
Strawberry crown borer................................ Georgia and
Arkansas .......... 5
Targionia hartii (Ckll.) ...................................... Grand Cayman.... 2
Targionia sacchari (Ckll.).............................. West Indies ........ 89
Vinsonia stellifera Westw ....... ............. Bahamas .......... 2
West Indian fruit fly.......................... ............ Cuba .................... 14












THE FOLLOWING TABULATION IS PRESENTED SHOWING THE WORK OF THE QUARANTINE
DIVISION BY YEARS SINCE THIS WORK WAS INAUGURATED


May and
1915-16 1916-17 1917-18 1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 1921-22 June, Total
1922

Foreign boats ...................... 166 1240 1777 1724 2458 3035 2225 364 12989 8*
Total boats .......................... 370 3257 4253 3485 4504 4948 4179 697 25693 ;
No. packages arriving by
boat, express, freight,
mail ............................. 500 3105 3422 *69985 336059% 710412% 13333333 747972 3204789% 0
Number packages returned 18 255 485 1521 4936% 2130% 2610 201 12157 C
Number packages destroyed 69 1182 1037% 1743% 2345% 1564% 1757 311 9989
*Prior to August 1, 1918, horticultural material inspected was reported by shipments. A shipment might comprise 1 or 1,000 packages. Subsequent *
to above date reports were made of the number of packages and bulk shipments were reduced to packages on basis of contents of standard containers used
for particular products.








38 State Plant Board of Florida

QUARANTINE INSPECTOR'S SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING
APRIL 30, 1921
SHIPS AND VESSELS INSPECTED:
From foreign ports.-......--- .........----- ...------ ..---.............. 3035
From U. S. ports other than Florida..................................... ... 1425
From Florida ports.. .................... ... ..................... .. .... 524
T otal...................... ....................................................................... 4,984
NUMBER OF PARCELS INSPECTED:
Arriving by water:
Passed .......................... ................. ......... .... 644,183
Treated and passed ..... ..... ...... 54,464
Returned to shipper-...........------.. -.... .. 1,851%
Contraband destroyed ....................................... 1,285
Total................................................................................. 701,783
Arriving by land: Express, freight, wagon, etc.:
Passed ....... -------..-.... -- -------.. 10,314%
Treated and passed .....-- ....--------........ 226%
Returned to shipper............----...................... 183
Contraband destroyed .................................. 256%
T otal ..................................... .................... 10,980
Arriving by mail:
Passed .... .............. ........ .. .............. 1,180
Treated and passed............................. .. 45
Returned to shipper.............. ...................... 96
Contraband destroyed ..................................... 23
Total...--......... .................... ... 1,344
GRAND TOTAL OF PARCELS INSPECTED .......................... 714,107

PRINCIPAL PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED

Shipments by all means of transportation except parcel post
For year ending April 30, 1921

I INumber of
Insect or Disease I Occurring on I From Shipments
SI __Infested
Aleyrodid eggs ............ Citrus ............................ Isle of Pines....... 1
A nt ................................ Soil ................................ Baham as .............. 1
Ant ................................ Sugar cane ................. Cuba .................... 1
Ant ................................ Yam ............................. Nicaragua .......... 1
Ant ................................ Unknown ...................... M exico ................ 1
Ants .............................. Sugar cane .................. Mexico ................ 1
A nts .............................. Yam .............................. Cuba .................... 2
Ants .............................. Unknown ...................... Cuba ................... 1
Anthracnose ................ Jamaica apple ............ Cuba .................... 1
Araucaria ericoccus.... Araucaria excelsa ...... California ............ 1
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. ......................... Coconut ........................ Cuba .................... 21
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. ......................... Vine ............................ Cuba ...................
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .......................... Coconut ........................ Porto Rico .......... 1
Aspidiotus fabernii
Houser .......--- :... Sugar apple .................. Cuba .................. 1
Aspidiotus lataniae
Sign .... -----.. Coconut ..................... Cuba .................. 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. ...................... Banana ........_.............. Cuba .................... 1








Fourth Biennial Report


39


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
__ Infested


Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. .....................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. ....................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst .....................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. ..................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst ......................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst .....................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst ......................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst ............
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. ...................
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. ......................
Aspidiotus palmae
Morg. & Ckll.......
Aspidiotus spinosus
Comst ....................
Aspidiotus sp. .............
Aspidiotus sp ........
Aspidiotus sp..............
Aspidiotus sp. ..............
Aspidiotus sp. ..............
Aspidiotus sp. ..............
Aspidiotus sp. ..............
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser..
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser..
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser..
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser..
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser..
Aspidistra scale.........
Aspidistra scale ........
Aspidistra scale ..........
Asterolecanium sp. ....
Balsam gall midge......
Bamboo scale ..............
Beetle, Cathartus
gemellatus Duv. ......
Beetle, Scymnus sp.....
Beetle, Silvanus suri-
namensis L. .............
Beetle, Tribolium fer-
rugineum Fab. ........
Beetle .........................
Beetle ..........................
Beetle larva .......-
Beetle ........................


Carnation .............. Florida ...........

Coconut ..................... Columbia ............

Coconut ..................... Bahamas .............


Coconut

Coconut


..................... Cuba ................

.................... Mexico .............


Coconut ....................... Nassau ...........

Oleander ..................... Florida .............

Rose ........ ............ Florida ............

Sugar apple ....... Cuba ............

Unknown semi-aerial.. Florida ................


Mango .......................

Rose ...........................
Grape .......................
,oconut ..............
3uava .........................
Mango (leaf) ..............
oleander ......................
Spanish Lime ............
Sugar apple ................

~eba (?) cuttings ......

Hog plum (?) ..........

Palm ........ .......

Soursop .............

Unknown ...................
Fern ............................
Sisal plants ................
Soft plant ...................
Coconut ...................
Spruce .....................
Bamboo ...................


Span. Honduras..

Nassau ..............
North Carolina....
Span. Honduras..
Cuba ...................
Span. Honduras..
Cuba ..................
Cuba ....................
Nassau ................

Cuba ................

Florida ...........

Cuba ..........

Nassau ................

Cuba ....................
Pennsylvania ......
Cuba ...................
Spain ..................
Span. Honduras..
Massachusetts ....
Cuba ...................


Corn ............................. Africa ...............
Rose .......-.............. New Jersey.........


Dates ................. ....

Dates .... ....... ........
Oranges .........
Palm seed ..............
Soil ........... .... .. ..
Sugar cane ..............


Chile, S. A ........ 1

Chile, S. A. ........ 1
Canary Islands.... 1
Australia .......... 1
Pennsylvania ...... 1
Cuba .................... 1








State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease


Beetle ..........................
Beetle ............................
Blackfly ......................
Blackfly ......................
Blackfly ......................
Black Melanose............
Black Melanose............
Black Melanose (?)....
Black Melanose............
Black Melanose............
Black scal ..................
Black scale ............
Black scale ..................
Black scale ..................
Black scale ..................
Black scale ................
Black scale ..................
Black scale ..:............
Black scale ..................
Black thread scale......
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Borer injury .........
Cactus scale ................
Camphor thrips ..........
Cephalosporium sp ....
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ..... .........
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ..... .........
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ..... .........
Chaff scale ....................
Chalcid ..........................
Cherry scale ................
Cherry scale ................
Cherry scale ................
Chrysomelid beetle ......
Chrysomphalus mimo-
sae (Comst.) ............
Chrysomphalus sp.......
Cloudy-winged white-
fly ..............................
Cloudy-winged white-
fly ..... ...........
Cloudy-winged white-
fly ............................
Coccid ..........................
Coccus sp. .......................
Coccus sp. ..................
Coconut mealy-bug ....
Coconut mealy-bug ....


Occurring on


Sweet potatoes ............
Sweet potato ................
Lime ...........................
Orange .......................
Sapodilla ...................
Citrus ............................
Citrus ..........................
Citrus ........................
Lemon ...........................
Lime ...........................
Citrus ..........................
Grape ..........................
Mamey .......................
Olive ? ........................
Sapodilla ......................
Soursop .......................
Sweet olive ................
Unknown ....................
Unknown ....................
Palms .......................
Coconut .......................
Coconut ......... ...........
Orchid .........................
Palm ............................
Palm ............................
Unknown .....................
Unknown ....................
Sugar cane .................
Cactus ........................
Camphor ......................
Corn (green) ............
Asparagus fern ..........
Citrus ............................
Citrus ...........................
Croton .........................
Grapefruit ................
Japonica .......................
Limes ..........................
Orange ........................
Jamaica apple ..........
Peach .........................
Plum ............... .........
Plum ...........................
Common box tree ........


Number of
From Shipments
Infested
Canal Zone .......... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 2
Cuba ................... 1
Nassau ................ 1
Cuba .................... 4
Isle of Pines ........ 1
Span. Honduras. 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba ................... 1
Spain .................... 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
California ............ 1
Bahamas .............. 1
Nassau ................ 3
Louisiana ............ 1
Cuba .................... 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba ................... 13
B. I. ...................... 1
New York ........... 2
B. I ...................... 1
New York ............ 1
New York ............ 1
Porto Rico .......... 1
Cuba .................... 2
New York ............ 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 2
Florida ................ 3
Cuba .................... 1
Isle of Pines........ 1
Florida ................ 1
British Honduras 1
Spain .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Georgia ............... 1
Georgia ................ 1
North Carolina.... 2
New Jersey ........ 1


Hog plum .................... Florida ................
Lime .............................. Span. Honduras..

Citrus ............................ Cuba ................

Citrus ...................... Florida ...........


Lime ..............................
Cactus ..........................
Sapodilla .....................
Sapodilla leaves ..........
Custard apple ..............
Palm ..............................


Cuba ...................
New York ............
Cuba ..... ...........
N assau ..............
Cuba ....................
Cuba ..............


__









Fourth Biennial Report


SNumber of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SI Infested


Coconut mealy-bug ....
Coffee-bean weevil ......
Coffee-bean weevil ......
Coleopteron larvae ?..
Coleopteron larvae ......
Common mealy-bug ....
Common mealy-bug ....

Common mealy-bug ....
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Conchaspis angraeci
Ckll ........................
Conchaspis angraeci
Ckll. .........................
Conchaspis angraeci
Ckll ..........................
Corn ear worm............
Corn ear worm............
Cottony bamboo scale
Cottony cushion-scale
Cottony cushion-scale
Cottony cushion-scale
Crown gall ..................
Crown gall ..................
Crown gall .............
Crown gall .............
Crown gall .................
Cucujid beetle ............
Cyanophyllum scale....
Dictyospermum scale
Dictyospermum scale
Dictyospermum scale
Dictyospermum scale
Dictyospermum scale
Dictyospermum scale
Dictyospermum scale
S Dictyospermum scale
Diplodia natalensis
(fungus) ..................
Diplodia natalensis
(fungus) .................
Dipterous larvae ........
Dipterous larvae ........
Dipterous larvae ?......
Dipterous larvae ........
Eggs of mite or aphid
English walnut scale..
English walnut scale..
Euonymus scale ..........
European fiorinia .....
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........


Soursop ....................
Sugar cane ..................
Unknown pods & seed
Corn ear ........................
Sour orange ................
Cactus ............................
Hawaiian Kukin Nut
Tree .....................
Sweet potato vines......
Citrus ...........................
Citrus ...........................
Cape jasmine ..............
Cape jasmine .............
Citrus ............................
Jasmine ........................
Privet ...........................


Nassau ................ 2
W. Africa ............ 1
W. Africa ............ 1
Nassau ................ 1
British Honduras 1
New York ............ 1

New York ............ 1
Florida ................ 1
Alabama ............. 1
Florida ............... 10
Florida ................ 1
Unknown ........... 1
Georgia ............... 1
Florida ................ 1
Georgia ................ 1


Croton ....................... Cuba ......... ..

Croton ....................Florida ..........


Hibiscus ......... ........
Corn ............................
Tomato .......................
Bamboo ...... ...........
Oleander .................
Acacia .... ...............
Rose ......... ................
Peach .........................
Plum ..........--...........-----
Raspberry .-........----------
Rose ...........................
Rose ..............................
Corn .............................
Eucalyptus ................
Century plant .............
Citrus ......... ..............
Grapefruit ...........-......
Limes .......................
Mango (leaf) ............
Palm ...... .............
Rose ...........................
Vine ..........................


Florida ................
Nassau ................
Nassau ...........
California ...........
Florida ...............
New York ............
Florida ................
Ohio ......................
Alabama ......
New York .........
Illinois ..................
New York..........
Cuba..
Cuba .................
Cuba ......-....- ....
Virginia ..............
Florida ............
Nassau ........
British Honduras
Span. Honduras..
Florida ............
Nassau ................
New Jersey..........


Coconut ..................... Cuba ....................


Coconut ...... ...........
Limes ..........................
Orange .......................
Sapodilla ...................
Unknown .....................
Birch ............................
Plum .............................
W alnut .........................
Euonymus ..................
Coconut ......................
Banana .................
Camphor ...................


Nassau ..............
British Honduras
Nicaragua ........
Bahamas ..............
Cuba ..................
New York ............
Florida ................
Ohio ......................
Unknown ........
Florida ................
Cuba ...................
Florida ...............









State Plant Board of Florida


SNumber of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
__ I Infested


Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale .........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale ..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale..........
Florida wax scale.......
Florida wax scale........
Florida whitefly ........
Florida whitefly ..........
Fungus-Diplodia ca-
caoicola P. Henn.....
Fungus-Diplodia nata-
lensis? ......................
Fungus-Diplodia sp. ?
Fungus-Graphiola
phoenicis ..................
Gray garden slug........
Gray-headed scale
fungus .................
Gray-headed scale
fungus .................
Grape Phylloxera (?)
Greenhouse orthezia....
Hemichionaspis sp.......
Hemipteron ..................
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Ivy scale ......................
Ivy scale ....................
Ivy scale .................
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale .. ..........
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale .............
Latania scale .............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ............
Latania scale ............
Latania scale ...........
Latania scale ..........


Citrus ...-------....................
Citrus ......................
Coconut ........ ...........
Grapefruit ...............
Lime ......................
Mamey .......... ...........
Norfolk Island Pine....
Oleander ...............
Palm .........................
Rose ....................
Sweet olive .................
Unknown ......................
Jasmine ........................
Mango (leaf) ..............
Guava ...-........-...........
Mamey .......................


Cuba ....................
Florida ................
Hawaii ................
Isle of Pines ........
Cuba ...... .........
Cuba .................
Indiana .............
Florida ................
Cuba ................
Florida ................
Louisiana ............
Cuba .................
Florida ................
Span. Honduras..
Florida ................
Cuba ...............


Cocoa bean pod............ Santo Domingo....

Coconut ....................... Cuba ............ ..
Coconut ........................ W. Africa ............

Palm ..............................Florida .......
Citrus ....... ........ New York ............

Chaff scale ................ Cuba ...... ..


Purple scale ..................
Grape ..........-........
Coleus .......................
Jasmine-like plant ......
Dates .... .........
'Bougainvillea ..............
Century plant ..............
Eugenia australia ......
Jasmine .....................
Mamey .........................
Palm ............................
Spanish lime ...............
Stephanotus vine ....--.
Unknown ...................
Unknown ..................
Banana ................ ......
Chinaberry .....-.........
Palm .............................
Banana ........................
Ceba (?) cuttings ......
Fern .........................
Fig .............................
Fig ..............................
Grape ... .....................
Guava ............................
Japonica .....................
Jasmine-like plant ......
Mamey ....................
Palm ............................
Palm ..............................
Rose .........................


Cuba ....... .......
Washington ........
Pennsylvania .....
Africa ..................
Chile, S. A...........
Florida ................
Virginia .......
California ............
Florida ................
Cuba ..............
Cuba .................
Cuba .................
Florida ................
Cuba.........
Florida ................
Cuba ... .. ......
Florida ................
Florida ............
Cuba .. ......
Cuba ...................
Florida ........
Georgia ................
Florida ................
Florida ................
Florida ................
New York ............
Africa ...............
Cuba .... .. .....
Cuba ..............
Florida ................
Arkansas ............


I ^


I









Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or'Disease


Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale .............
Lecanium sp. ..............
Lecanium sp. ............
Lepidopterous egg
mass ............... ....
Lepidopterous pupa....
Lepidopterous pupa
case ..........................
Lepidopterous larva....
Lepidosaphes hawaii-
ensis (Mask) ..........
Lepidosaphes sp. ........
Lepidosaphes sp. ......
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale .......
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale......
Lesser snow scale......
Lesser snow scale......
Lesser snow scale.....
Liparid moth egg mass
Long scale ...... ........
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long scale ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ..................
Mealy-bug .................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ..................
Mealy-bug ...................
Mealy-bug-Pseudo-
coccus sacchari
Ckll ................ ..
Mealy-bug .............
Mealy-bug ........
Mealy-bug .................


Occurring on


Rose ... ......................
Sago palm ...................
Sapodilla ...................
Sapodilla ..................
Unknown .....................
Unknown ...................
Orchid ....................
Unknown ...... ................


From


Florida ...............
Cuba ...... ........
Bahamas ..............
Nassau ..............
Cuba ..................
New York ............
New York .........
Ohio .................


Deciduous leaves ........ Massachusetts ....
Soil .. ....................... Pennsylvania ......

Coconut ....................... Span. Honduras..
Conifer .................... Massachusetts ....
.1


Jasmine like plant......
Coconut ..... ...........
Palm ......-......
Cactus ......................
Cassava ....................
Ceba (?) cuttings ......
Coconut ........ ...........
Coconut ........................
Japanese lantern plant
Oleander ...... .....
Palm ..........................
Soursop .......................
Sugar apple ..............
Sugar apple ......... ...
Conifer ..............--
Lim es ... ...... .......... ...
Avocado .................
Caladium .....................
Citrus .................
Croton -...................
Japonica ...................
Sibocedrus decurrens..
Orchid .....................
Palm ............................
Palm ............................
Soursop ....................
Vine ............................
Lime ............................
Caladiums ...............
Croton .....................
Fern ............................
Hog plum ..................
Mamey .........................
Oleander .....................
Orange ..........................
Soursop ........................
Sugar cane ................


Sugar cane ..................
Sweet potato .draws....
Unknown .....................
Unknown .....................


Africa ................
Cuba ..........
Cuba ...........
Florida ........
Florida ........
Cuba ................
Cuba ....................
Cuba

W. Africa ......
Nassau .........
Florida .......
Cuba ................
B. I. ..............
Bahamas .............
Cuba ...............
Massachusetts ....
British Honduras
New York ...
Virginia .........
New York .......
Bahamas .............
New York ............
California --....
Cuba .................
Cuba ..........
New York....
B. I. .....................
Cuba ..............
Cuba ....................
Cuba .................
Florida ...........
Florida ................
Florida ................
Cuba ................
Florida ................
Spain ...................
Nassau ..............
Cuba .................


Cuba ..................
Florida ..............
Nassau ..............
Pennsylvania ......


Number of
Shipments
Infested


.









State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Mealy-bug .................
Millipedes ....................
Mining scale ................
Mining scale ................
Mining scale .......
Mining scale ..............
Mining scale .........
Mining scale .......
Mining scale ................
Mining scale ................
Mining scale ...........
Mining scale ..............
Mite-Tetranychus sp.
Mite-Tetranychus sp.
M ite ................. ......
M ite ...........................
Mite...............
Mite-Tetranychus sp.
Mite-Tetranychus sp.
Moth, Diatraea sp.......
Moth borer-Diatraea
saccharalis ................
Moth borer ............
Mulberry whitefly ......
Mulberry whitefly ......
Nectria cinnabarina
(Tode) Fr. ..........
Obscure scale ..........
Odonaspis sp.............
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Oyster shell scale........
Palmetto scale ........
Parlatoria-like scale....
Parlatoria-like scale....
Parlatoria-like scale....
Parlatoria sp. ............
Parlatoria sp. .............
Peach tree borer ?.......
Peach tree borer.........
Phylloxera (?) ...........
Pineapple disease .......
Pineapple fungus .......
Pineapple mealy-bug.
Pineapple scale .........
Pineapple scale .........
"Pomace Fly", Famil
Drosophilidae .........
"Pomace Fly", larval
Drosophilidae .........
Powdery scab .............


Occurring on

Yam ...... ..................
Soil ..........
Coffee ..... ...............
Coffee ..........................
Coffee -.--------------------------
Fig .................. ...
Mammee apple ............
Mammee .................
Papaya .......................
Sapodilla ............---
Sugar apple ............
Sugar apple ............
Unknown ..........-----
Croton ..............- .
Rose ...................--
Rose ... ...................
Unknown ..................
Unknown .....................
Coconut .......--...--------
Coconut ........................
Coconut
Sugar cane ............---

Sugar cane ...........---
Sugar cane ... ...
Bougainvillea ........
Jessamine ........ ....


C
I
C
C
I
I

:1


From

Santo Domingo....
Cuba ....................
Costa Rica ..........
Cuba .....
Cuba ........
Cuba
Cuba ....................
Nassau ...............
Cuba ................
Bahamas ..............
Cuba ..........
Bahamas ............
Cuba ... ....
Bahamas ..............
Bahamas ..........
Cuba ..............
Cuba ....................
New York ...........
Panama ..............
Span. Honduras..
Cuba ........

Cuba .......... ....
Cuba ..............
Florida ................
Florida ................


Gooseberry ..........---- New York ...........
log plum (?) .......... Florida ................
ornamentall ............... Florida ...............
Common box tree........ New Jersey.........
Lilac .............--------------..- New Jersey..........
?each ...........-- ....... Indiana ................
?lum ............-- ....------ Indiana ................
Plum or birch (?)........ Massachusetts ....
lose ....... ....------- New Jersey ........
Shrub .................--. Pennsylvania ....
Unknown .................. New York ............
Unknown .................... Ohio...................
Palm ..............---...-- Florida ................
Palmetto ...................... Florida ..............
Unknown ..................... Nassau ................
Unknown ............... South Carolina....
Citrus .......................... Isle of Pines ........
Limes .......................... Honduras ............
Peach .......................... Florida ................
Peach ....................... Georgia ................
Grape ...........----------.... New York ..........
Sugar cane ...........-. Cuba ..................
Sugar cane ................ Cuba ....................
Breadfruit .................... Cuba ....................
Cactus .......................... Florida ................
Jessamine .............. Florida ................

Limes ...................... Honduras ............

Sweet potato ............... Florida .............
Irish potato .......... Scotland ..............


Number of
Shipments
Infested


-1


.=








Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Pseudaonidia duplex
(Ckll.) ......................
Pseudaonidia tesserata
(deCharm) ..............
Pseudaonidia tesserata
(deCharm) ..............
Pseudischnaspis
aliens Newst. ........
Pseudischnaspis
alienus Newst. ........
Pseudischnaspis
aliens Newst. .......
Pseudischnaspis
aliens Newst. .......
Pseudischnaspis
aliens Newst .......
Pseudischnaspis
aliens Newst. .......
Pseudischnaspis sp ....
Pseudoparlatoria
parlatorioides ..........
Psocid ........................
Purple mite ..................
Purple scale ..............
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Pustule scale ................
Pustule scale ..............
Pustule scale ................
Pustule scale ...............
Pustule scale ................
Pustule scale ............
Pustule scale ...............
Pustule scale .............
Pustule scale ...............
Putnam's scale ............
Putnam's scale ?.........
Pyriform scale ............
Pyriform scale ............
Pyriform scale ............
Red-headed scale
fungus ....................
Rice weevil ..................
Rice weevil ..................
Root knot ....................


Occurring on ]


Sweet olive ..................


SNumber of
From Shipments
I Infested

Louisiana ........... 1


Palm ............................. Bahamas ..............

Palm ........................ Cuba ....................

Guava ................ .. Cuba ..............

Mamey ........................ Cuba ....................

Palm ............................ Cuba ...................

Rose ............................. Florida ................

Spanish bayonet .......... Cuba ..............

Sugar apple ........ Cuba ....................
Rose ........................ Nassau ................


Unknown ....................
Coconut ....................
Citrus ............................
Citrus .................... ..
Citrus .......................
Citrus .........................
Croton .... ................
Grapefruit ....................
Grapefruit ..................
Grapefruit ....................
Lemon .......................
Limes ...........................
Lime ..............................
Lime .........................
Oranges .......................
Orange ......................
Orange .......................
Palm ..........................
Sour orange ................
Fig ..............................
Jasmine .......................
Jasmine .....................
Oleander ......................
Oleander ..................
Sapodilla .....................
Sapodilla .....................
Spanish bayonet .......
Vine ...........................
Currant .......................
Grape ...................
Guava ........................
Jasmine .....................
Mango (leaf) ............

Purple scale ............
Palm seed ...................
Sweet potato ..............
Fig ...............................


Cuba ....................
Span. Honduras..
Florida .........
Cuba ...... .......
Florida ................
Isle of Pines........
Bahamas ........
Isle of Pines ....
Mexico ... ........
Nassau .........
Cuba ....................
British Honduras
Columbia .....
Cuba ............-
Canary Islands....
Cuba ....................
Spain ................
Florida ................
British Honduras
Florida ................
Cuba ...................
Florida ...............
Cuba ....................
Florida ................
Bahamas .............
Nassau ................
Cuba ...................
Cuba ..................
Iowa ...............
Florida ................
Florida ................
Florida ................
Span. Honduras..

Cuba ....................
Australia ............
Louisiana ............
Alabama ..............









State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease


Root knot ...............
Root knot ...............
Root knot ........ ....
Root knot .............
Root knot ...............
Root knot ?...............
Root knot .................
Root knot .................
Root knot ..........
Root knot.................
Root knot ......... ........
Root knot..............
Root knot................
Root knot ..................
Root knot .................
Root knot ........... ......
Root knot .................
Root knot .................
Root-worms ..................
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale ...................
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale ............... ...
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale -...................
Rufous scale ..............
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ...............
Rufous scale ..............
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale .............
Rufous scale ..............
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ..............
Rufous scale ...............
Rufous scale ...............
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ..............
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ...............
Rufous scale ................
San Jose scale.............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale.............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale.............
San Jose scale.............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale.............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale.............


Occurring on


Fig ..........................
F ig ................................
F ig ...............................
Fig ..............:.................
Fig
Fig ........... .....
Grape .. .... ........
Mulberry ...........
Oleander ............
Peach ....................
Peach .........................
Peach ..........................
Peach ...........................
Rose ............................
Unknown shrub ..........
Unknown ......................
Unknown ......................
Unknown .....................
Unknown ......................
Strawberry ..........
Blackberry ...............
Dewberry ..................
Himalaya berry ..........
Rose .........................
Rose ...........................
Rose .............................
Coconut ............ .......
Coffee .......................
Croton .....................
Grapefruit ...... .........
Lime ......................
Mamey ........ ............
Oleander .......... ....
Oleander ......................
Palm .............................
Palm .............................
Pandanus ...................
Rose ..............................
Rose .......................
Sapodilla ......................
Soursop .......................
Spanish lime .............
Star apple ..................
Sugar apple ................
Tamarind ...............
Tamarind ....................
Apple .......... ..............
Apple ............................
Citrus .........................
Fig ............................
Gooseberry ..................
Grape ........................
Palm ......--......-------......-........
Peach ...--------. --..-----..
Peach ................ ........
Peach .........................
Peach ............. ......
Peach ........................
Peach ............................


From

Florida ................
Georgia ................
North Carolina....
South Carolina....
Unknown ............
New Jersey..........
Florida ................
Florida ................
Alabama ..............
Florida ................
Georgia ................
South Carolina....
Unknown ............
Florida ...............
Florida ................
Georgia ................
South Carolina....
Virginia ..............
Indiana ...... ......
Georgia ...........
Georgia ..............
Georgia ...............
Florida ................
Louisiana ............
New York ............
Span. Honduras..
Cuba ....................
Cuba ......... .....
Nassau ................
Cuba ..............
Cuba ..............
Cuba ....................
Florida ................
Cuba ................
Florida ..............
Florida .........
Florida ................
Nassau ................
Nassau ................
Nassau .............
Nassau ................
Bahamas ..............
Nassau ...............
Bahamas ............
Cuba .................
Alabama ..............
South Carolina....
Alabama .........
Georgia .............-
Ohio ...................
Georgia ................
Georgia ................
Alabama ..............
Florida ................
Georgia ............
Kentucky .......
North Carolina....
South Carolina....


Number of
Shipments
Infested
12
10
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1








Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease


San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale.............
San Jose scale..............
San Jose scale.........
San Jose scale.........
San Jose scale..........
San Jose scale............
San Jose scale........
Scab-Cladosporium
citri Massee ..............
Scale (?) ................
Scurfy scale ................
Scolytid beetle ........ ..
Seed insect (?) .....
Snow scale ..............
Snow scale ................
Snow scale ................
Soft brown scale-.......
Soft brown scale-.....-
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale ..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale .........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale.........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale.........
Soft rot .......................
Soft scale ................
Soft scale ...................
Soft scale-Lecanium
sp ...... .. .................
Sow bugs .....................
Spider eggs .................
Spotting ? ....................
Stellate scale ................
Subfamily Diaspinae
scale ..........................
Sugar cane borer ........
Sugar cane moth borer
Sugar cane moth borer
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Targionia sacchari
(Ck.) ................


Occurring on

Peach ...........--............
Pear ..............................
Plum ..............................
Plum ..... ........................
Plum ..............................
Plum
Plum .........................
Prune ? ........................
Rhubus sp. (?)...........
Rose .........................
Rose ........... ..............
Rose -
Rose .........................----
Rose
Unknowns ...........................
Unknown ......................

Lim es ............................
Fruit (?) ..................
Currant ...................
Date seeds ..............
Mango (leaf) ........
Citrus ....................
Lime ........... ........
Orange ....................
Century plant ..........
Citrus ............................
Citrus .........................
Citrus ...-..............--- .......
Citrus ..........................
Fern ..........................
Fig ..............................
Norfolk Island pine....
Papaya .......................
Rose .........................
Smart weed (?).........
Vine .............................
Unknown ......................
Jamaica apple ............
Croton ... .........
Palm ...........................

Orchid .....................
Soil ............................
Coconut ....................
Mango leaves ..............
Sapodilla ....................


From

Tennessee ............
Florida ................
Alabama ..............
Florida ................
Georgia ................
South Carolina....
Ohio .....................
Illinois ..............
Florida .............
Georgia .........-
Virginia ..........
Unknown ............
Alabama ..............

British Honduras
Nassau ...........
Iowa ..............
Chile, S. A...........
Span. Honduras..
Cuba ..................
Cuba .....--...........
Brazil ......... ....
Virginia ..........
Cuba .............
Florida ............
Georgia .........
New York........
Cuba ....- ......
Georgia ...........
Indiana ...........
Cuba ..............
Bahamas ............
Florida ...........
New Jersey.........
South Carolina....
Cuba ...-..........
Bahamas ..........
Cuba .......-...-.......

New York ............
Cuba ..................
Span. Honduras..
Bahamas .............
Cuba ...............I


Custard apple ..---..-- Cuba ......
Sugar cane .................. Mexico ..
Sugar cane .................. Bahamas
Sugar cane ................ Cuba ......
Sweet potato ................ Bahamas
Sweet potato ..............-- Cuba ......
Sweet potato ................---Florida ..
Sweet potato ................ Mexico
Sweet potato :........ Nassau ..
Sweet potato ............... Isle of Pi
Sweet potato ................ Porto Ric

Sugar cane ................ Bahamas


ies ........
o--
nes --------
0 ..........


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1
1
1
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
7
2
16
5
1
1
1
1

1


II









State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) .................
Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) ...................
Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) .................
Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) ....................
Termite ..................
Thielaviopsis paradoza
(d. Seyn.) ................
Thrip ............................
Thrips ..........................
Thrip ............................
Unknown .................
Vinsonia stellifera
scale ........................
Weevil (Palaeopus
costicollis Marshall..
West Indian fruit fly..
West Indian fruit fly..
West Indian fruit fly..
West Indian fruit fly..
W. I. sweet potato
weevil ......................
Whitefly .....................
Whitefly ......................
White peach scale........
White peach scale........
Withertip ...................
Withertip ...................
Withertip ....................
Woolly apple aphis......
Woolly whitefly ..........
Woolly whitefly ..........
Woolly whitefly ..........
"Worms" ..................
Yam scale-Targiona
hartii (Ckll.) ..........
Yam Scale-Targionia
hartii (Ckll.) .........


Occurring on


Sugar cane ..............

Sugar cane ..................

Sugar cane ................

Sugar cane ..................
Sea grape ................

Sugar cane .................
Coconut ........................
Coconut ........ ...........
Palm .............................
Potato ... ..................

Sapodilla ......................

Yam .............................
Cuban plum ................
Guava .......................
Mango ..... ................
Peru guavas ................

Sweet potato ................
Eucalyptus ................
Unknown ....................
Peach ............................
Plum ...........................
Citrus .........................
Lime ...........................
Citrus .........................
Apple .......................
Citrus .........................
Citrus .......................
Lime .............................
Yam .............................


From


British Honduras

Cuba ...................

Nassau ................

Grand Cayman ..
Isle of Pines ........

Cuba .................
Cuba ...............
Cuba ...............
Cuba ................
Scotland ..............

Nassau ................

Jamaica ..............
Cuba .........-
Cuba ..................
Cuba --------------------
Cuba ...................
Cuba ..............

Bahamas ..............
Cuba ....................
Cuba ....................
Florida ..............
Florida ...........
New York ............
Cuba ....................
Florida ............
Alabama ..............
Cuba ....................
Isle of Pines ........
Cuba ...................
Isle of Pines ........


Yam ............................Grand Cayman ..

Yam .......................... Span. Honduras..


PESTS INTERCEPTED IN MAIL SHIPMENTS
For year ending April 30, 1921

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
___ Infested
Aphids ........................ Chrysanthemum .......... Georgia ................ 1
Aphids ......................... Chrysanthemum .......... North Carolina.... 1
Aphids .. ..............Spire ............. Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign ....................... .... Coconut ....................... Cuba ................... 2
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. .......................... Palm .............. ..... ........ Cuba .. 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. ................ Coconut ................. Cuba ............... 3


Number of
Shipments
Infested

1

2

4

1
1

1
4
1
1
1

1

2
3
5
1
1

2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1

1

1








Fourth Biennial Report 49

Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
SI Infested
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser Unknown seed pod...... Cuba ................... 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser Unknown plant .......... Cuba .................... 1
Aspidistra scale .......... Fern .............................. Georgia ................ 1
Aspidistra scale .......... Sisal hemp .................. Cuba '.................... 1
Beetle ............................ Seeds .............................. Cuba .................... 1
Beetle ............................ Seeds .............................. Venezuela ............ 1
Beetle ............................ Sweet potato ................ Florida ................ 1
Bud insect injury ....... Nectarine ...................... California ............ 1
Black melanose .......... Citrus ............................ Cuba .................... 2
Black scale .................. Cotton .......................... Cuba ? .................. 1
Black scale .................. Oleander ................... Florida ................ 1
Brown fungus .............. Common whitefly ........ Florida ................ 2
Chaff scale .................. Citrus ............................ Ohio ...................... 1
Cherry scale ................ Pear .............................. Georgia ................ 1
Citrus scab .................. Citrus ............................ Cuba .................... 2
Cloudy-winged white-
fly .............................. Citrus ............................ Cuba .................... 1
Coccus acuminatus
(Sign.) ...................... Fern ? .......................... Cuba .................... 1
Coccus acuminatus
(Sign.) ...................... Jasmine ........................ Cuba .................... 1
(Sign.)-----------Jasmin--------Cua-----------1
Coffee bean weevil........ Sweet potato ................ Florida ................ 1
Common mealy-bug .... Canna ............................ Florida ................ 1
Common mealy-bug .... Chrysanthemum .......... Georgia ................ 1
Common whitefly ........ Cape jasmine .............. Florida ................ 1
Common whitefly ........ Citrus ............................ Florida ................ 2
Common whitefly ........ Citrus ............................ Georgia ................ 1
Common whitefly ........ Citrus (leaf) ................ Florida ................ 2
Common whitefly ........ Jasmine ........................ Florida ................ 2
Common whitefly ........ Jasmine ........................ Unknown ............ 1
Corn-ear worm ............ Indian corn .................. Cuba .................... 2
Cottony cushion-scale.. Rose .............................. Florida ................ 1
Cottony maple scale.... Grape ............................ Florida ................ 1
Cucujid beetle ............ Coconut ........................ Cuba .................... 1
Dipteron ...................... Lily plant (?) ............ Costa Rica .......... 1
Dictyospermum scale.. Limes ............................ Dominica ............ 1
Earthworm .................. Soil about plants ........ France ................ 1
Earwig .......................... Lily plants (?) ........... Costa Rica .......... 1
English walnut scale.. Plum .............................. Florida ................ 1
Euonymus scale .......... Japonica ...................... Florida ................ 1
Euonymus scale .......... Japonica ..................... Georgia ................ 1
Florida red scale.......... Citrus ...................... Cuba .................... 1
Florida red scale......... Citrus ............................ Florida ................ 1
Fungus-Monascus
sp. ...-.............-...... --Citrus ............................ Greece ................. 1
Fungus-Trichospha-
erica parasitica R.
Hartig ? .................... Unknown ...................... Germany .............. 1
Gloomy scale ................ Grape ............................ Kentucky ............ 1
Grape cane borer (?).. Grape ............................ Florida ................ 1
Greedy scale ............... Fig ................................ Florida ................ 1
Greenhouse whitefly ....Chrysanthemum .......... North Carolina.... 1
Hemichionaspis sp. ... Unknown plant .......... Cuba .................... 1
Hemispherical scale .. Fern (?) ...................... Cuba .................... 1
Hemispherical scale .. Palm .............................. Cuba .................... 1
Ivy scale ...................... Oleander ...................... Florida ................ 1








State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

Ivy scale ......................
Ivy scale .. ..........
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ...........
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale .............
Leaf blotch ..............
Leaf spots .................
Lepidopterous egg (?)
Lepidopterous larva ....
Lepidopterous larvae..
Lepidopterous larvae..
Lesser snow scale........
Long scale ..............
Long-tailed mealy bug
Mealy bug ....................
Mealy bug ....................
Mealy bug ...................
Mining scale ? ............
M ite ..................... ...
Mite .....................---
Mite eggs ................
Mite egg cases ............
Mold ..........................
Moth ............................
Mulberry whitefly .....
Oyster-shell scale (?)
Palmetto scale ...........
Parlatoria-like scale....
Parlatoria-like scale....
Peach yellows ? ..........
Pseudaonidia paeo-
niae (Ckll.) ..............
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ..............
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ............
Purple scale ...............
Purple scale ............
Pustule scale ...............
Pustule scale ...............
Pustule scale ..............
Putnam's scale ............
Red Aschersonia ........
Root knot .................
Root knot .................
Root knot ......-............
Root knot (?).............
Root knot ....................
Root knot ............-....
Root knot ....................
Root knot .....................
Root knot ................
Root knot ....................
Rose scale ..................
Rose scale ..................


Occurring on From

Palm ............................Cuba ....................
Palm ................. Florida ................
Grape ..................... .... Florida ...............
Palm ............................. Florida ................
Rose .............................. Unknown ............
Unknown plant ............ Cuba ....................
Rose .............................. Georgia ................
Strawberry .................. New York ............
Spanish bayonet ......... Florida ................
3uairena seed ........... Venezuela ............
Strawberry ................. Georgia ................
tree seed pod ............ Cuba ....................
Cotton ..................... Cuba ? ................
Citrus ............... ........ Florida ................
Oleander .................... Florida ...............
Cactus .......................... Cuba ........ .....
Citrus ........................... Cuba ....................
? ...............................Cuba ....................
? ................................Florida ................
Citrus ...................-.... Florida ...............
Croton .................... ... Cuba ..................
Holly ............................. France ............
Mistletoe ...................... France ...............
Bulb ......................... Pennsylvania ......
Lily plants .................... Costa Rica ..........
Cut flower leaves ........ Georgia ...........
Fig .......................... Florida .............
Palm ............. ........... ? ............
Unknown herb ............ Florida ..............
W ild orchid ..... ............ Florida ................
Peach ........................... Florida ................

Taponica ................ ... Georgia .............
Citrus .......................... Cuba ....................
Citrus ........................ Florida ................
Citrus .......................... Isle of Pines ........
Citrus .......................... Texas ..................
Citrus leaf ............... Florida ...............
Japonica ...................... Georgia ...............
Japonica (?) ............. Georgia ................
Limes ............................ Dominica ............
Fig ................................ Florida ................
Grape ............................ Florida ................
Oleander ...................... Florida ................
Peach (?) ................... Michigan ............
Common whitefly ....... Florida ................
Fig .............................. Florida ................
Fig ............... ......... Georgia .. ...........
Fig ......... ... Georgia .......
Fig .......................... Unknown ............
Mulberry ..................... Unknown ............
Peach ............................ Florida ................
Pecan ......................... Florida ...............
Rose ......................... Georgia ............
Rose ........................... Pennsylvania ......
Unknown ..................... Florida ................
Unknown ...................... Unknown ............
Rose ............................. Florida ................
Rose .............................. Georgia ................


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
3
1


~


I
I
I
t








Fourth Biennial Report


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on I From Shipments
___ Infested


Rose scale ....... ........ Raspberry ..................
Rot ............................. Limes .......................
Rufous scale ............... Citrus ........................
Rufous scale ............... ? ..............................
Rufous scale ................ ? .......... ................
San Jose scale........... Grape ........................
San Jose scale............ Nectarine .................
San Jose scale.............. Peach .......................
San Jose scale.............. Pear ..............................
San Jose scale...... ........ Plum ........................
San Jose scale............. Rose .............. .....
Scale ........................... Jasmine .....................
Scale ............. Sugar cane ..................
Scolytid beetle ............ Seeds........ .....
Soft brown scale ......... Century plant ..............
Soft brown scale.......... Citrus .......................
Soft brown scale......... Citrus .......................
Soft brown scale.......... Japonica ....................
Soft brown scale.......... Jasmine .......................
Soft brown scale (?).. Jasmine ......................
Soft scale .................. Unknown herb ..............
Sowbug ....................... Lily plants (?) .........
Spider ..... ........ Lily plants (?) ..........
Sweet potato weevil.... Sweet potato ................
Termites ..............B..... Blbs ...... ............
Thrips nymphs ....... Chrysanthemum ..........
West Indian fruit fly.. Guava .........................
Whitefly ...... ....... Guava (?) ................
White peach scale........ Pecan ......................
White peach scale........ Unknown ..................
Withertip ................. Citrus leaves ............
Woolly whitefly .......... Citrus .........................


I


I 1


QUARANTINE INSPECTOR'S SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING
APRIL 30, 1922

SHIPS AND VESSELS INSPECTED:
From foreign ports ................................... .................... 2225
From U. S. ports other than Florida....................................... 1338
From Florida ports.....---... ..... ........................... 616
Total............ ....... ......................... .. 4,179
NUMBER OF PARCELS INSPECTED:
Arriving by water:
Passed .................................. ..........1,175,391%
Treated and passed ..................................... 140,988
Returned to shipper .. ..................................... 2,306
Contraband destroyed ................................. 1,477%
Total.... ...............................-. 1,320,163
Arriving by land: Express, freight, wagon, etc.:
Passed .............................. .... ............ 14,780
Treated and passed ...................................... 245%
Returned to shipper............................. .. 206
Contraband destroyed .................................... 250%
Total.............................. ........- ... ..................... 15,482


Michigan ..............
Dominica .....
Cuba .. .......
Florida ......
Mexico ..........
Florida ...............
California ............
Florida ........
Georgia ........
Florida ................
Florida ................
Cuba .............
Cuba ..............
Cuba ...........
Unknown ............
Cuba ....................
Florida ................
Georgia ..... ...
Florida ................
Cuba .......... ...
Florida ..............
Costa Rica ........
Costa Rica ..........
Cuba ................
Alabama ............
North Carolina....
Isle of Pines ......
Mexico ........
Florida ........
Cuba ................
Missouri ..............
Cuba ....................








State Plant Board of Florida


Arriving by mail:
Passed .....---------------------.---.------ 1,834%
Treated and passed......-.......----......-.....----94
Returned to shipper ................-----.----.----- 98
Contraband destroyed ......---...........------.- 28%
Total-----.................------------ --
GRAND TOTAL OF PARCELS INSPECTED....................................
Number of parcels on hand pending determination as to final
disposition---............------------------


2,055
1,337,700

7


PRINCIPAL PESTS AND DISEASES INTERCEPTED

Shipments by all means of transportation except parcel post
For year ending April 30, 1922


Insect or Disease

Actinomyces scabies
Kohn .......................
Actinomyces scabies
Kohn ...................
Actinomyces scabies
Kohn .......................
Actinomyces scabies
Kohn. ....................
Actinomyces scabies
Kohn ...................
Actinomyces scabies
Kohn ........................
Actinomyces scabies
Kohn. ........................
Aleurothrixus howardi
(Quaint.) ..............
Anthracnose ..........
Anthracnose ................
Anthracnose ................
Anthracnose ................
Aphids ..........................
Aphid nymph ..............
Argentine ant ..............
Aspidiotus sp ..............
Aspidiotus cyanophyll
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............


Occurring on


Potato ..............


From


........... England


Potato ............................ Germany ..............

Potato ............................ Norway ..............

Potato ....................... Scotland ..............

Potato .... ... Spain ....................

Potato .............-.. -- ........ England ..............

Potato ...........--..........---- Holland ................


Citrus ...............------- ------
Citrus ......................---
Orange ..........................
Orange --------
Sapodilla ........----...
Sugar cane .... ...-...
Green beans ...........
Oleander ........................
Lettuce .....................---
Chinaberry ..................----


Cuba ....................
Cuba ....................
Spain ... ......
Cuba ..............
Cuba ....................
Nassau ................---
Florida ................
Louisiana ............
Florida ................


? ----...... --------- --... Florida ................

Avocado ................---........ Cuba ....................

Banana ................---.......... Cuba ....................

Coconut .................... .. Cuba ..............

Palm ............................. Cuba .......----.........----

Guava ............................ Cuba ....................


Oleander .....................


Cuba .......-........--..


Poinsettia .................... Florida ................

Unknown ...................... Cuba ...............---


Number of
Shipments
Infested


1

1 .

1

28

4

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1

2

11

1

1

1

1

1


I







Fourth Biennial Report


SNumber of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested
Aspidiotus destructor
Sign. (scale) ............ Jamaica apple........ Cuba .................. 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. (scale) ........ Asparagus sprengeri. Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. (scale) ........ Coconut husk .............. uba .................... 18
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. (scale) .... Rose .............................. Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. (scale) ....... Royal palm ..... Cb.............. Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst. (scale) ........ Royal palm seed .......... Cuba .................. 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser.. Cuttings .............. Cuba .................... 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonae Houser.. Plum ............................. Florida ................ 1
Aspidiotus subsimilis
var. anonas Houser- Jamaica apple ............ Cuba .................... 1
Asterolecanium sp ..- Air plant ...................... Nassau ............... 1
Asterolecanium milia-
ris longum Green.. Bamboo ........................ Cuba ............... 1
Bamboo scale .............. ? ........... Florida ................ 1
Beetle (Carpophilus
sp.) .......................... Chinese date ................ Texas ................. 1
Beetle work ..................Sugar cane .................. Cuba .................... 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) ........................ Avocado ........................ Cuba ................... 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) .....................-- Citrus ..... ................. Cuba .................... 5-
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) ............................ Bay ..-- ----..-- -.. Nassau ............. 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) ... ..................... Spice ---..-.......---........ .. Nassau ................ 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) .........................--- ----- Jasmine .................... Cuba .................... 1
Blackfly (Aleurocan-
thus woglumi Ash-
by) .-..... ------ Sapodilla ............. Nassau ................ 1
Blackberry root gall.... Blackberry .................... Illinois ................ 1
Black melanose ............ Citrus ............. .. Cuba ................. 2
Black melanose ........ Citrus ........................... Isle of Pines ...... 1
Black scale .................. Avocado ........................ California ............ 1
Black scale .................. Soursop ........................ Cuba .................... 1
Black scale .................. Mango .......................... Cuba ................... 1
Black scale ................ Pumpkin ........................ Cuba ................... 1
Black scale .................. Unknown ...................... Cuba .................... 1
Black scale .................. Citrus ............................ Isle of Pines ...... 1
Black scale ................. Cotton ............................ Nassau ................ 1
Black scale .................. Flower cluster ............ Cuba .................... 1
Black scale .................. Oleander ...................... Florida ................ 3
Black scale .................. Poinsettia .................... Florida ................ 1
Black scale .................. Sapodilla ...................... Nassau ............... 1









State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease


Blue green citrus
beetle ........................
Blue mold .................
Blue mold ....................
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Boisduval's scale ........
Borer injury ................
Botrytes sp. ................
California red scale....
Camellia scale (Lepi-
dosaphes camelliae)
Camellia scale (Lepi-
dosaphes camelliae)
Cardin's whitefly ........
Ceroplastes sp. ...........
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ..................
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale ....................
Chaff scale .................
Chaff scale ..................
Chaff scale .................
Chaff scale ..............
Chalcid ..........................
Cherry scale ...............
Cherry scale ............
Cherry scale ................
Chrysomphalus mimo-
sa6 Comst. ..............
Chrysomphalus sp. ......
Citrus scab ..................
Cloudy-winged white-
fly ...........................
Cloudy-winged white-
fly ..............................
Coccinellid ....................
Coccus acuminatus......
Coccus hesperidum ......
Coccus hesperidum ......
Coconut mealy-bug .....
Coconut mealy-bug ...-
Common mealy-bug ....
Common mealy-bug ...
Common mealy-bug ...
Common mealy-bug ....
Common mealy-bug
Common mealy-bug ....
Common mealy-bug ...
Common mealy-bug ....
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly .....
Common whitefly .....
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ......


Occurring on


Pineapple ..................
Orange .........................
Orchid .....................
Coconut husk ..............
Spanish lime ................
Orchid ...................
Sugar cane .................
Potato ...................
Orange leaf ................


From


Cuba ....................
Spain ..................
British W. Indies
Cuba ....................
Cuba .................
New York ..........
Cuba .................
Peru ........... ....
California ............


Cam llia japonica ......Georgia ...............


Camellia japonica ......
Guava ..........................
Unknown ....................
Citrus ..........................
Citrus ..........................
Croton .....................
Citrus ..........................
Orange .........................
Tieze .............................
Orange .........................
Croton .....................
Orange .........................
Chiromoya ..................
Plum ............................
Plum ............................
Unknown ....................

Plum ...........................
Unknown ....................
Citrus ..........................


South Carolina....
Florida ................
Cuba ....................
Cuba ....................
Isle of Pines ........
Ohio .....................
Unknown ...........
Germany ............
Cuba ....................
Spain ....................
Pennsylvania ......
France ................
Cuba ....................
Kentucky ............
South Carolina....
Kentucky ..-..........

Florida ................
Nassau ...............
Alabama ..............


Citrus ............................ Florida ................


Citrus .........................
Banana .........................
Mango ...................
Rose ............................
Unknown ....................
Sugar apple ...............
Soursop ........................
Coconut ........................
Croton .....................
Croton ....................
Croton ...................
Fig ..........................
Geranium ...................
Oleander ..........
Coleus ......................
Hedge plant ..................
Citrus ......................
Jasmine ......................
Jasmine ....................
Jasmine .......................
Unknown ...................
Unknown ....-................


Cuba ....................
Jamaica ................
Florida ................
Florida ................
Cuba ....................
Cuba ..................
Nassau ................
Cuba ....................
Florida ................
Ohio ...................
Pennsylvania ......
South Carolina....
Tennessee ............
Florida ........ ...
North Carolina....
South Carolina....
Florida ................
Florida ................
Georgia ................
South Carolina....
Arkansas ...........
South Carolina....


Number of
Shipments
Infested

1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1

1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
11
1
7
1
1
1








Fourth Biennial Report


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
___ Infested


Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Conchaspis angraeci
Ckll ......... ..........
Corn ear worm..............
Cottony cochineal
scale ........................
Cottony cushion-scale..
Cottony cushion-scale..
Cottony cushion-scale..
Cyanophyllum scale ....
Cyanophyllum scale ....
Crown gall ...............
Crown gall ...............
Crown gall ..................
Crown gall ..................
Crown gall .........
Crown gall ...............
Crown gall .... .............
Crown gall ...............
Diatraea sp. .............
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Diplodia sp. .............
Diplodia sp...............
Dipteron .................
Dipterous pupa ..........
Egg puncture .........-...
English walnut scale..
English walnut scale..
English walnut scale..
Fern scale ..............
Fern scale ...............
Fern scale ...............
Fiorinia theae Green..
Fiorinia theae Green.
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale....... .
Florida red scale.........
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale.........
Florida red scale .......
Florida red scale. ....
Florida red scale..........
Florida red scale....
Florida red scale.__
Florida whitefly ........


California privet .......
Jasmine .....................
Jasmine .......................
Jasmine .......................

Croton .........................
Corn ........................

Cactus ......................
Rose .........................
Rose -- -- ----------
Rose ..............................
Croton .....................
Loquat .........................
Palm ............................
Rose ..........................
Rose ........................
Rose ...... ...................
Rose ...........................
Rose .........................
Rose .............. ........
Rose ........................
Rose ....................... .......
Sugar cane ...............
Coconut ...... .............
Crape myrtle ..............
Lime ...........................
Mango ...--. ..............
Orange .......- .........--
Unknown ........ .....
Cinnamon leaves ........
Citrus .................--....
Coconut ................---
Orange .......--....--- ..-----
Lime ..............--- .........---
Coconut palm .............
Weed ........... ...........
Unknown .-............ .-
Sycamore .................
Coconut ..............----
Peach ..................--.--
Pear ..................--......
Dracena .............-------------
Fern .........-...............
Pandanus ......................
Japonica .....................
Unknown ....................
Oleander ..................
Avocado .........---------
Citrus ----...-- .....-
Rose ....................
Rose ...............- ...........
Banana leaf .......
Citrus ........ .. ......
Citrus ........................
Pandanus ...............
Rose ...... ................
Guava ......................


Florida ................
Louisiana ...........
South Carolina,...
Florida .............

Florida ................
Nassau ..............

Cuba .................
Florida ...............
Florida ................
Florida ................
South Carolina....
Florida ................
Florida ................
Kentucky ............
Minnesota ..........
Missouri ..............
New Jersey .......
Pennsylvania ......
Illinois ...............
Georgia ...............
Cuba ..................
Honduras ..........
Georgia ................
Dominica ..............
Florida ................
Spain ..................
Cuba ....................
Panama ..............
Florida ...............
Cuba ..................
France ..............
Dominica .............
Cuba ..................
Portugal ..............
Cuba ..................
Tennessee ............
Cuba ................
Georgia ...............
Florida ...............
Holland ...............
New York ..........
Cuba ..................
Florida ................
South Carolina....
Florida ..............
Cuba ....................
Cuba .................
Florida ................
Florida ................
Jamaica ............
Cuba ...................
Nassau ................
Cuba ...................
Nassau ................
Florida ................








State Plant Board of Florida


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested


Fly (Fam. Drosophi-
lidae) ........................
Frankliniella cophalica
masoni Watson ......:.
Fungus (Diplbdia sp.)
Fungus .........................
Fungus ........................
Fungus (Fusarium
sp.) .......................
Fungus (Myxomy-
cetes) ..................
Gall ..............................
Grape scale ...............
Greedy scale .............
Greedy scale ............
Greedy scale ...............
Greedy scale ................
Greenhouse thrips ......
Greenhouse thrips ......
Greenhouse orthezia ..
Haplothrips merrilli ..
HBeichionaspis sp.......
Hemichionaspis sp......
Hemipteron eggs ........
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Hemispherical scale ....
Ivy scale ....................
Ivy scale .....................
Ivy scale ...................
Ivy scale ......................
Ivy scale .....................
Ivy scale ....................
Ivy scale ....................
Ivy scale ....................
Ivy scale ......................
Juniper scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ............
Latania scale .............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ............
Latania scale..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..........
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ............
Latania scale ..........


Guava .......... Cuba...............Cuba ............


Unknown ....................
Cocoa bean ..................
Unknown plant ..........
Potato ... ...............


Cuba ...............
British W. Indies
Cuba ................
Germany ............


Corn ............................. N assau ...............


Unknown vine .........
Blackberry ..................
Peach .......................
Bay ..............................
Unknown ......................
Grapefruit ....................
Pear .............................
Citrus .......................
Croton .....................
Rose ...........................
Coconut husk .............
Bobug ............................
Royal poiliciana ..........
Tree ....... ........ .........
Jasmine ........................
Lily ................................
Fern ..............................
Fern ...........................
Soursop .......................
Palm ..............................
Unknown .....................
Unknown .....................
Crape myrtle ..............
Oleander ......................
Palm .............................
Palm .........................
Palm ..............................
Palm ..........................
Chinaberry ................
Chinaberry ................
Ivy ...........................
Palm ..............................
Unknown tree ..............
Unknown tree ..............
Banana .........................
Begonia .......................
Coconut ..................
Unknown cutting ........
Fig ...............................
Fig ..........................
Orange ....................
Palm ............................
Palm ..........................
Rose ...........................
Rose .........................
Rose ...........................
Soursop .. ..........
Unknown ...................


Georgia .........
Kentucky ............
Georgia ................
Florida ................
Georgia .............
Mexico ..............
Spain ....................
Cuba ....................
Cuba .... ........
Nassau ...............
Cuba ........
Isle of Pines .....
Cuba ..................
New York ..........
Cuba ................
Florida ...............
Cuba .................
Florida ...............
Cuba .................
Nassau ................
Florida ..............
Cuba ..................
Georgia ..............
Ohio ..................
New York ..........
Florida ................
Nassau .............
California ............
Florida ..............
Texas ...............
Florida ............
California ............
Florida .............
Cuba ....................
Unknown ............
Florida ................
Africa ..............
Cuba ..................
Georgia ..............
Mississippi ..........
Ecuador ..............
Georgia .............
Cuba ..................
Florida ................
Nassau ...............
South Carolina....
Nassau -............
Cuba ..................









Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
,atania scale ..............
Cepidoptera ..................
bepidopterous larva ....
Lepidopterous larva ....
Lepidopterous larva ....
Lepidopterous pupa
case ......................
Lepidopterous pupa
case ....... .. ............
Lepidopterous pupa
case ...........................
Lepidosaphes sp. ........
Lepidosaphes hawaii-
ensis (Mask.) ..-......
Lepidosaphes hawaii-
ensis (Mask.) ..........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale........
Lesser snow scale.......
Lesser snow scale......
Lesser snow scale-....
Long scale .................
Long scale ....................
Long scale ..............
Long scale ......-.......
Long scale .................
Long scale .................
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Mealy-bug ...................
Mealy-bug ..............
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug ....................
Mealy-bug .................
Mealy-bug ..............
Miner work ................
Mining scale ................
Mining scale .........
Mining scale ................
Mining scale .........
M ite .... ....................
Moth borer ..................
Moth borer ..............
Mulberry whitefly ......
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........


Occurring on

Unknown ......................
Guava ...........................
Guava ..................
Unknown ....................
Strawberry ..............
Tree seed pod ............
Apricot (?) ...............


From

Florida ................
Florida ...............
Cuba ....................
Vermont ..............
South Carolina....
Cuba ...............
New York ..........


Unknown tree .............. Cuba ....................

Cut flower ................... England .............

Citrus ....... .............. Cuba ....................
Lilac .............................. Massachusetts ....

Soursop ........... Cuba .............


? ..............................
Cotton boll ..............
Coconut ...................
Hibiscus .....................
Soursop ........................
Oleander .......... ......
Palm ...........................
Sapodilla ...................
Soursop ........................
Mesembryanthemum ..
Pilea sp. .......................
Palm ...............--- .....
Unknown ...................
Citrus ........-..---.....--.....
Citrus .....................---
Citrus ........................--.
Citrus .........................
Orange ..........................
Orange ..........................
Croton ....................
Unknown .-..................
Banana .......................
Croton .................
Croton .....................
Croton ....................
Cotton boll ..................
Unknown ...................
Unknown ...................
Sugar cane ............
[Orchids ........................
Jasmine .......................
Sapodilla ............. ....
Sapodilla ......................
Unknown ...............
Unknown ......................
Corn .........................
Sugar cane ..................
Bay ............................
Apple (fruit) ..............
Birch hoops ..............
Fig ..........................


Africa ................
Cuba ..................
Cuba ................
Florida ...............
Cuba ................
Florida .............
Nassau ................
Nassau ................
Cuba ........---.......
Florida ...........
Florida ...............
Cuba ....................
Africa ..................
Spain .................
Foreign ................
Florida ...............
Cuba ...............
Florida ...............
Germany ...........
Cuba ....................
Bermuda ..............
Cuba .................
Florida ................
Florida ................
South. Carolina....
Cuba ..................
Cuba ............. ..
Bermuda ............
Cuba ...................
West Indies ........
Cuba ................
Cuba ........... ....
Nassau ...............
Cuba ..................
Florida ...... ...
Nassau ................
Cuba ................
Florida ................
England ..............
Massachusetts ....
South Carolina....


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1

1

.1
1

1

1
1
8
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
14
1
1
1
1









58 State Plant Board of Florida


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
S___Infested


Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale ........
Palmetto scale ............
Pineapple mealy-bug..
Pineapple scale ..........
Pine leaf scale ............
Pseudischnaspis alie-
nus (Newst.) ..........
Pseudischnaspis alie-
nus (Newst.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) .........
Pseudaonidia artiou-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
lCatus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia artiou-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia artiou-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pseudaonidia articu-
latus (Morg.) ..........
Pomace fly .................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ...............
Purple scale ...............


Lilac .............................
Lilac ........................
Lilac .........................
Lilac ..........................
Lilac ............................
Unknown tree ..............
Palm .............................
Pineapple .....................
Pineapple .....................
Spruce .......................

Unknown ...................


Virginia ..............
Illinois ........
Michigan ............
Pennsylvania ......
North Carolina....
New York ..........
Florida ................
Hawaii ................
Hawaii ................
Massachusetts ....

Cuba .. ..........


Unknown ................. Mexico........

Banana ....................... Cuba .................

Citrus ..................... Cuba .................

Citrus ...................... Jamaica .............

Jamaica apple ............ Cuba ............

Rose ...............-- Cuba ...... .....

Spice ...... ... ..........Nassau ............

Tamarind ..................... Nassau ................

Tiesa ..............................Cuba ...........

Acalypha .................. Cuba ..............


Citrus .........................

Coffee .............- ......-.


Nassau ...............

Panama .......


Croton ................... Cuba ...........

Grapefruit ................... Mexico ...............

Oleander ........................ Florida ................

Rose ....................... Florida.......

Rose .............................. Nassau ................

Screw pine .................. Cuba .............


Spice leaves ................

Unknown .....................
Mango fruit ...............
Citrus ........................
Citrus .........................
Citrus ......................
Citrus ........................
Citrus ......................


Nassau ................

Cuba ................
Cuba ................I
Cuba .................
Florida ................
Isle of Pines........
Jamaica ..............
Germany .............


'


I








Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Purple scale ..............
Purple scale .............
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ...............
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ...............
Purple scale ...............
Pustule scale ...........
Pustule scale ................
Pustule scale ...............
Pustule scale ...............
Putnam's scale ............
Putnam's scale ............
Putnam's scale ............
Pyriform scale .......
Pyriform scale .........
Pyriform scale .........
Red spider .....-.---
Rice weevil ............
Root knot ..............
Root knot ....- ....--...
Root knot ......................
Root knot ...............
Root knot ....................
Root knot ..................
Root knot ...................
Root knot ......................
Root knot ......................
Root knot ......................
Root knot ....................
Root knot ....................
Root knot ......................
Root knot ......................
Root knot ............. ....
Rose scale ...............
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale ....... .....
Rose scale ..............
Rose scale .................
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale ....................
Rose scale ...................
Rose scale ....................
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale .............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale .............
San Jose scale ...........
San Jose scale .............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ............
San Jose scale .........


Occurring on


Orange ..........................
Orange ........................-------
Orange .......................
Orange ..............-- .......-.-
Lime .....................
Lime ........................
Tangerine ...................
Unknown cutting ........
Oleander .................
Stephanotus ...............
Unknown tree ..........
Apricot (?) ...........--
Chestnut ..... ...-
Unknown ...................
Guava -----.......................
Guava ......-..................---
Jasmine ........................
Cherry laurel .......-..
Pigeon pea ...................
Fig .....- -..----------...
Fig ...... ...............
F ig ................................
F ig ......... .. ......... ...
F ig ...............................
Fig ---------------.-.-----
Fig ............. ..........
Mulberry ......................
Peach ........--------....
Peach .........-----.......
Peach ..--................
Peach .................
Rose ...................
Unknown ...............
Blackberry .... ....
Blackberry -.... ...
Blackberry ....................
Blackberry .......... ...
Blackberry ..................
Rose .........................
Rose .........................
Rose ... ......................
Rose .... .....................
Apple ..........................
Apple ....................
Apricot (?). ..................
Cherry ........................
Currant ...... .....
Fig ---.--...............--
Fig .. ---........... .......
Fig ......... ...---------..
Grape ........................--
Grape ...........................--------
Grape --- --.--------------------
Grape ...........................
Lilac ... ....-
Peach .............
Peach .......................
Peach ..........................


From

Africa ...............
Louisiana ............
Nassau ................
Germany ............
Nassau ................
Dominica ............
Africa ...............
Cuba ..................
Florida ................
Florida ................
Cuba ...................
New York ..........
North Carolina....
Illinois ................
Florida ...............
Florida ................
Florida ................
Florida ...............
Nassau ................
Alabama ..............
Arkansas ............
Florida ................
Georgia ................
Mississippi ..........
North Carolina....
South Carolina....
Texas ..................
Georgia ................
Florida ...............
Georgia ................
North Carolina....
South Carolina....
Florida ................
Georgia ................
Illinois .................
Florida ................
Kentucky ............
North Carolina....
South Carolina....
Georgia ...............
South Carolina....
Ohio .................
Unknown ............
Kentucky ............
South Carolina....
Kentucky ............
Virginia ..............
Indiana ...........
Georgia ................
Mississippi ..........
South Carolina....
Georgia ................
Illinois ................
Kentucky ............
Virginia ..............
Alabama ..............
Florida ................
Georgia ..............


Number of
Shipments
Infested
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
20
13
2
1
10
1
1
5
8

6
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
6










State Plant Board of Florida


Insect or Disease

San Jose scale .............
San Jose scale .........
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose.scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale .............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
San Jose scale ..............
Scolytid beetle ............
Scolytid beetle ............
Scolytid beetle injury
Scurfy scale ..........
Scurfy scale .........
Snow scale ......... .....
Snow scale ................
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale...
Soft brown scale.........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Soft brown scale..........
Strawberry crown-
borer .................
Strawberry crown-
borer ..........................
Sugar cane moth
borer .........................
Sugar cane mealy-
bug ..........................
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Sweet potato weevil....
Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) ....................
Targionia saccharin
(Ckll.) ................
Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) ......................
Tessellated scale ........
Uredo sp. (Rust) ........
West Indian fruit fly..
West Indian fruit fly..
White peach scale........
White peach scale........
White peach scale........
White pech scale.......
Whitefly .....................


Occurring on

Peach ............................
Peach ............................
Peach ............................
Peach ..........................
Peach .......................
Pea .........................
Pearlum ........................
Plum ...........................
Plum ..............................
Plum ......
Plum ..............................
Poplar ....... ................
Rose .... .......... ..........
Rose .......... ............
Unknown ...................
Unknown ....................
W alnut .....................
Seeds ...........................
Mahogany logs ............
3obug tree ....................
Birch .......................
Ribes sp. ...................
citrus .......................
Citrus .......................
citrus ............ ...........
,itrus .......................
,itrus .........................
Ivy ............................
Tasmine ..... .. ....
Poinsettia .................
Sapodilla ..... .............
Unknown .. ..............


SStrawberry


Number of
From Shipments
SInfested
Kentucky ............ 1
North Carolina.... 2
South Carolina .... 5
Virginia .............. 1
West Virginia .... 1
Florida ............... 3
Florida ............. 2
Georgia ............. 3
South Carolina.... 2
West Virginia .... 1
Georgia ............... 1
Florida ............... 1
South Carolina.... 1
South Carolina.... 1
New York .......... 1
Florida ............... 1
Cuba ................... 1
Nicaragua .......... 1
Cuba ................... 2
Maine ................. 2
Iowa .................. 1
Cuba .................. 1
Jamaica .............. 1
Cuba ................. 5
Florida -............. 1
Jamaica .............. 1
Virginia .............. 1
Cuba ...............-.. 1
Cuba ...............-.. 1
Nassau ............. 1
Florida .............. 1


...-...............Arkansas .....


Strawberry ............ Georgia ................

Sugar cane ......... Cuba ..................


Sugar cane ..................
Sweet potato ................
Sweet potato ..........
Sweet potato .........-
Sweet potato ................


Cuba ..............
Florida ...............
Mexico ...........
Nassau ........
Texas ... ......


Sugar cane ................. British W. Indies

Sugar cane ................. Cuba .......... ...


Sugar cane .................
Star apple ..................
Unknown .....................
Mango ...................
Cuban plum .................
Peach ..................... ....
Plum ...........................
Plum ........................
Unknown ......................
Azalea (?) ..................


Nassau ................ 1
Nassau ................ 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Florida ................ 1
Florida .............. 1
South Carolina.... 1
Florida ............... 1
Germany ...........-.. 1


,








Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Whitefly .....................
Whitefly ...-........--.-.
Whitefly .....................
Whitefly ........... .........
Withertip ......................
Woolly apple aphis......
Woolly apple aphis......
Woolly apple aphis......
Woolly whitefly ...........
Yam scale ..............
Ziziphus scale .............
Ziziphus scale ..............
Ziziphus scale ..............


Occurring on

Guava ...................
Jasmine ...............
Jasmine ................
Jasm ine ....... ...............
Citrus ......................
Apple ..................-
Apple ........-.......
Apple ..............- ....
itrus ........................

Citrus ......---.-.-......-...--
Orange .....................
Tangerine ...............


From


Mexico ................
Florida ................
Texas ..........
Unknown ..........
Alabama ............
Georgia ........-
South Carolina....
West Virginia ....
[Cuba ............
Grand Cayman ..
Foreign ...............
Spain ....................
Africa .....-....


PESTS INTERCEPTED IN MAIL SHIPMENTS
For year ending April 30, 1922


Insect or Disease Occurring on

Aspidiotus destructor I
Sign. ..............-... ICoconut .. ...............
Aspidiotus destructor I
Sign ..--------------- Guava ...... ---....--...... --
Aspidiotus orientalis
Newst........ -- ... .. Coconut ................-.
Aspidiotus subsimilis ,
var. anonae Houser.. Unknown cuttings ......
Aspidiotus spinosus
Comst........... Unknown ....-...... ...... .
Beetle ....--.......--.....--- .... Palm seed .-................
Beetle--Catorama sp... Gourd .......................
Blackfly ............. ... Citrus ............. .......
Black melanose .......... Citrus ......................
Black melanose .......... Citrus .......................
Black melanose .......... Unknown ......................
Black scale ................ Soursop ...-.................
Blue mold ...... .............. Orchid ..........................
Boisduval's scale ........ Coconut ... .......
Boisduval's scale ........ Corojo palm ................
Boisduval's scale ........ Spanish lime ................
California red scale .... Lemon ...... ...
Camellia scale .......... Unknown ......................
Cardin's whitefly ........ Guava ..........................
Caterpillar .................. Unknown tree seed ......
Centipede ...................... Moss ........................
Chaff scale ................ Citrus ...........................
Chaff scale .................. Limes ............................

Cigarette beetle ........ Nutmeg ........................
Cladosporium citri
Massee .................... Citrus .......................
Cloudy-winged white-


From


Cuba

Cuba

Cuba

Cuba


Florida ................
Java ........... ....
Mexico .....- ...
Cuba ..................
Cuba ....................
Isle of Pines ......
Cuba ...................
Cuba .................
Dutch W. Indies
Cuba .....----...............
Cuba ...................
Cuba -.. .
Cuba ....................
Jerusalem ? ........
Georgia ....--.........
Cuba ..................
Venezuela ............
Ireland ................
Foreign ............
Mexico ................
Seychelles, Indian
Ocean ..............


Cuba ....................


fly .......................... Citrus ....................... Bermuda ...........
Cloudy-winged white-
fly ........................... Citrus ....................... Cuba ................
Coconut mealy-bug..... Guava ...................... .. Cuba ..............


Number of
Shipments
Infested


Number of
Shipments
Infested

4

1

2

1

1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1

1

1


I


~I









State Plant Board of Florida


Number of
Insect or Disease Occurring on From Shipments
Infested


Common mealy-bug ....
Common mealy-bug ....
Common whitefly ........
Common whitefly ........
Crown gall ..................
Crown gall .................
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Dictyospermum scale..
Florida red scale ..........
Fungus-Diplodia sp.
Greedy scale ..............
Greenhouse thrips ......
Hemispherical scale...
Hemispherical scale...
Imported cabbage
worm ........................
Ivy scale ......................
Ivy scale ......................
Ivy scale .......................
Ivy scale ......................
Ivy scale (?) ................
Ivy scale ................
Latania scale .............
Latania scale ..............
Latania scale ..............
Lepidopteron ...............
Lepidopterous larva....
Lepidopterous pupa...
Lesser snow scale........
Long scale ...............
Long scale ....................
Long scale ..................
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Long-tailed mealy-bug
Mealy-bug .................
Mealy-bug ....................
Melon aphis ................
Miner work ..................
Mining scale ................
Mite .....................
Mulberry whitefly ......
Oyster-shell scale ........
Oyster-shell scale .......
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Purple scale ................
Pustule scale ..............
Pustule scale ..............
Pyralid, Plodia sp.......

Pyriform scale ............
Pyriform scale ............
Pyriform scale ............
Red-banded thrips ......


Coleus .........-------...
Coleus ....... ................
Citrus ......---...
Jasmine ....... ...
Rose ...----- ..----
Rose ......... ............
Caladium ......................
Oleander ............... ..
Palm .... ..........
Citrus ............
Palm seed ............ ...
Bay ................
Citrus .............
Fern........ ....
Sourso .....................
Soursop ------------------------

Cabbage ...................
Oleander ........ ........
Oleander ............. ....
Palm .... .....................
Palm ........................
Rhododendron ..............
Unknown .................
Caladium ......... ..... -
Fig ............ ...
Unknown cutting ........
Cut flowers ..................
Citrus .......................
Unknown ......................
Coconut ..... .........
Citrus .......................
Limes ............................
Orange (peel) ............
Caladium ......................
Canna .......................
Croton ....................
Unknown .................--...
Cotton bolls .................
Unknown ......................
Cotton ....... ............
Orchid ............................
Unknown ......................
English walnut ............
Bay ................................
Apple (fruit) ............:.
Lilac (?) ......................
Citrus ............................
Citrus .......................
Citrus ............................
Citrus ...........................
Oleander ...................
Unknown cutting ........
Mango seed ........

Cinnamon ....................
Jasmine ...... ......---
Unknown ....................
Guava .-..- ........


Iowa .. ...
Pennsylvania ....
Florida ............
Florida ...............
Iowa ...............
Pennsylvania ....
Cuba ....................
Florida .............
Pennsylvania ......
Cuba .......-.........
Java ................
Florida ...............
Cuba ..... .......
Florida ...............
Cuba ..............


Georgia ................ 1
Florida ................ 2
Ohio ...................... 1
Florida ................ 1
Pennsylvania ...... 1
North Carolina.... 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
Georgia ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
England .............. 1
Cuba ......-- ............ 1
England .............. 1
Cuba ...................- 1
Foreign ................ 1
M exico ................ 1
Spain .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba ...................- 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Cuba .................... 1
Dutch W. Indies 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1
Florida ....---......... 1
England .............. 1
Illinois ...........-------- 1
Bermuda ............ 1
Cuba .................... 8
Florida ................ 1
Isle of Pines........ 3
Florida ................ 1
Cuba ...-- ..----- -. 1
India .......... ........ 2
Windward
Island (?) ...... 1
Florida ................ 1
Florida ................ 1
Cuba .................... 1


Guava ... ...... *** ..............








Fourth Biennial Report


Insect or Disease

Red spider .................
Root knot .............---
Root knot ..................
Root knot ....................
Root knot ............... ...
Root knot ................. .
Root knot ...................
Root knot ...................
Root knot ..................
Root knot ................
Rose scale .................
Rose scale ...................
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ................
Rufous scale ............
San Jose scale ......
San Jose scale ............
San Jose scale ............
San Jose scale ............
San Jose scale .........-
San Jose scale ............
Snow scale ...................
Soft brown scale .......
Soft brown scale ......
Soft brown scale ........
Soft brown scale ........
Spring-tail ..............
Sugar cane mealy-bug
Targionia sacchari
(Ckll.) .....................
Wax scale ....................
Weevil .....................
Whitefly ......................
Woolly whitefly ..........
Ziziphus scale ..............


Occurring on


Cherry laurel ..............
Fig ................................
Fig ..............................
Fig ...............................
Fig ...............................
Peach ..........................
Peach ..........................
Peach ..........................
Rose ..............................
Rose ..............................
Rose ........ ...--.. .......
Rose .........................
Citrus ...........................
Lim es ...........................
Unknown legumes ......
Currant ........................
Fig ...............................
Peach ..... ........... .......-
Peach ..........................
Poplar ........................
U nknow n ...................
Citrus ..........................
Citrus ..........................
Citrus ........................
Ivy .................................
Poinsettia .....................
Canna ..........................
SSugar cane ................


From


Florida ..........--
Florida ................
Georgia ..........
Illinois ................
North Carolina....
Florida ................
Georgia ................
Unknown ............
Florida ...............
Pennsylvania ....
Connecticut ..
Unknown' ..........
Cuba .................
Mexico ..........
Cuba ...............
Indiana ................
Georgia ..............
Florida ..............
Unknown ............
Georgia ..............
New York .....
Cuba ..............
Cuba .............
Italy .................
Virginia ..............
Cuba .................
Cuba ..............
Cuba ............


Sugar cane .................. Cuba .................... 2
Citrus ............................ Cuba .................... 1
Rhododendron .............. North Carolina.... 1
Azalea (?) .................. Germany .............. 1
Citrus ............................ Cuba ................... 3
Citrus ........................... Foreign ............... 1


QUARANTINE INSPECTOR'S SUMMARY FOR THE FOURTEEN
MONTHS ENDING JUNE 30, 1922
SHIPS AND VESSELS INSPECTED:
From foreign ports ..................................... .. ...... .. 2583
From U. S. ports other than Florida---...........-- ..------...-..-- 1568
From Florida ports............................................................... 720
Total .............. ............. .....................- --.......... 4,871
NUMBER OF PARCELS INSPECTED:
Arriving by water:
Passed .............. ..... ......... .... 1,923,363
Treated and passed ..........-.............................. 156,839
Returned to shipper .........------...............................-- 2,507
Contraband destroyed ......-................................. 1,789
Total............................................................ ........---.. 2,084,498


Arriving by land: Express, freight, wagon, etc.:
Passed ...........................-------- 17,227
Treated and passed ..........---......---------- 2,681%
Returned to shipper .-........--.--------------- 224
Contraband destroyed .-.........----......------ -- 261%
Total--..... ---......--..---------------


20,394


Number of
Shipments
Number of








64 State Plant Board of Florida

Arriving by mail:
Passed .................. .............. 2,080%
Treated and passed .............................. .... 106
Returned to shipper .. ......................- ........ ..... 117
Contraband destroyed ..-..................... .......... 32%
T otal........................................... .................................. 2,336
GRAND TOTAL oF PARCELS INSPECTED. ....................... 2,107,228
Number of parcels on hand pending determination as to final
disposition....... ... ........... ..... ......................... 7

BEE DISEASE ERADICATION
There is presented herewith a tabulation showing the amount
of inspection work done during the period from May 1, 1920 to
June 30, 1922. During this period 69 cases of American foul
brood were located. These were distributed by counties as fol-
lows:
Apiaries Colonies Infected
Franklin ............................... 1 3
Hillsboro .......................... .............. 4 12
Manatee .. .... ..................... ......... 1 1
Palm Beach ............................................ 7 21
Pinellas ........................................ 23 27
Volusia ..................-........--........... 3 5

39 69

BEE DISEASE ERADICATION
Report on Inspection and Eradication Work for the Period from
May 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922
Number of apiaries inspected... ................................................. 1,353
Number of apiaries infected with American foul brood......................... 39
Number of colonies inspected .............................. 34,602
Number of colonies infected with American foul brood............... ........ 69
Number of apiaries infected with European foul brood........................ 5
Number of colonies infected with European foul brood...................... 5

PUBLICATIONS

The Board has continued to issue certain publications for
the information of the public. Circulars containing the rules and
regulations of the Board are issued'from time to time. "Quar-
antine Notices" for the special information of transportation
companies and of shippers are published and distributed. The
Quarterly Bulletin of the State Plant Board has appeared reg-.
ularly each quarter and has served a useful purpose in dissem-
inating knowledge regarding plant pests and their control, as
well as information as to the activities of the Board.








Fourth Biennial Report 65

EMPLOYEES
Following is a list of employees of the Board as of June 30,
1922:
LIST OF EMPLOYEES, JUNE 30, 1922

STATE PLANT BOARD
J. T. Diamond -......................... -- .........e... Secretary
J. G. Kellum --... ...--- -------------- .......................Auditor

PLANT COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
Wilmon Newell-....------ --..........-- -- --.............Plant Commissioner
Miss Lena R. Hunter .................................................................Chief Clerk
Miss Elita Lovejoy....................... .......... ...........................Stenographer
Miss Eva C. Means...--.--.-- ...-------..--- -......Filing Clerk
Henry Lloyd (Col.)---- .......... ....------------ ....--- .Janitor

Bee Disease Eradication
J. C. Goodwin --- .....-..-- ....-- ..................-------- ....Apiary Inspector
C. F. Glenn... --...... ......-..... ---........-........................-District Apiary Inspector
J. P. Anthony----......-....-- ...- ...........--............---. District Apiary Inspector
W. H. Henderson...-------....................---.......--- ---...District Apiary Inspector
C. M. Biorseth........ .----.... ---.....--.........-.....-- ...-..District Apiary Inspector
Chas. Mack ...............................................................District Apiary Inspector
J. B. Nordmann-..........-........................-- .....................District Apiary Inspector
D. W. Abbott ...................................................... -Assistant Apiary Inspector
Fred Anthony ........-.................................................. Assistant Apiary Inspector

Cane Disease Survey
C. P. Sheffield--..-----....... -- ..--- .. ---......... ............nspector

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY
E. W Berger....... ................................. ........................Entomologist
G. B. Merrill................................................. ...............Associate Entomologist
Geo. D. Smith................................--................................. Associate Entomologist
Mrs. H. M. Williams....................................................... ........Stenographer

QUARANTINE DEPARTMENT
J. H. Montgomery---........................... .......... ..Quarantine Inspector
A. C. Brown...................... ----..........................-...Assistant Quarantine Inspector
U.. C. Zeluff.........-......................................... Assistant Quarantine Inspector
R. A. Knight ....-.....----..............................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
R. D. Potter ..................................................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
Harold Mowry ............. ...............................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
L. R. Warner.....................................................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
Wm. V. Millington......-------..........................--- Assistant Quarantine Inspector
M. R. Brown........ ...-................ ------- ........... Assistant Quarantine Inspector
J. V. Gist............-..-................................-........-...A-ssistant Quarantine Inspector
Paul Thomas ......------.............----- .....................Assistant Quarantine Inspector
W. N. Hull ..... .......................... ................Deputy Inspector

Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication


S. H. Ronntr
Wm P19


e ..............................................~.-....--..-................ ......... inspector
tt


re va ................................. -................ ....1s snector


. .









66 State Plant Board of Florida

NURSERY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT
F. M. O'Byrne--.....------------------ ----- ------ ---- .Nursery Inspector
. Chaffin .........................-------------- ...................Assistant Nursery Inspector
Chas. M. Hunt................--.. ....----..Assistant Nursery Inspector
P. F. Robertson...................................................... -- -Assistant Nursery Inspector
H. W. Fogg ......... ..........--..-----..Assistant Nursery Inspector
C. A. Bass.............-.................... ----..........- Assistant Nursery Inspector
Jas. Kerr .......................... ..........................----Assistant Nursery Inspector
Geo. H. Baker......................... ..............................--Assistant Nursery Inspector
J. F. Marsh .-...........................-...................... -.-- Assistant Nursery Inspector
John R. Springer........... ........................... Assistant Nursery Inspector
Emory L. Kelly..............................................---- Assistant Nursery Inspector
Archie R. Oakley.................................................Inspector
. T. Stone........................... ........ ...............................Invoice Clerk
Miss L. Mcllvaine..................... ..... .. .......................Stenographer
Miss Janette Roux................................... ..............................Stenographer
Mrs. Genevieve E. White:............................................................Stenographer

CANKER ERADICATION DEPARTMENT
Frank Stirling............................ .............................. General Inspector
Miss Rena Murrill............................. ... .... ......... Stenographer

Assistant District Inspectors


H. D. Bollinger


Arthur Adams
B. F. Adams
D. W. Barber
J. B. Bowers
Chas. M. Brown
Ollie D. Brown
G. F. Burden
H. G. Carter
R. A. Cash
N. L. Chambers
D. S. Conner
H. J. Dillingham
Z. V. Dyson
W. F. Eberhardt
H. D. Eikenberry
Jno. Eiland
Robt. E. Fish
Ed Frierson


S. L. McClanahan
Inspectors
H. H. Frierson
Fritz Fuchs
Harvey Gossman
Don Grace
Clayton E. Hall
Sam P. Harn
Reginald Hart
J. Harvey Henderson
R. C. Henderson
A. S. Hooker
Geo. Janes
J. S. Lange
J. L. Lazonby
Merton LeRoy
R. W. Lindner
C. T. Link
Win. D. Mahan
J. C. Mendel


H. C. Artis


H. C. Parham
Bradley Park
T. R. Robinson
M. W. Rubison
Henry Schumacher
J. S. Sherman
I. M. Shriner
Cleve F. Smith
H. D. Smith
Lonnie S. Smith
Charlie S. Stephens
R. D. Stevenson
Chas. Stitts
Clifton R. Stokes
G. E. Tedder
W. M. Tillman
H. L. Ulmer
J. E. Ulmer


FINANCIAL REPORT
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1921
(Date omitted)
To the State Plant Board:
Gentlemen: I herewith submit the following report of the
finances of the Board for the period beginning May 1, 1920 and
ending April 30, 1921:








Fourth Biennial Report 67

SUMMARY

Resources

General Fund .................... ........................... $ 35,000.00
Citrus Canker Eradication............................................ 76.290.05
Nursery Inspection ..................................................... 30,334.42
Quarantine Inspection ................................................. 33,346.48
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication................................ 14,683.27
Bee Disease Eradication................................................ 7,147.78
Incidental Fund ........................................................... 7,928.72 $204,730.72

Expenditures

General Fund ................................................ ........ 34,999.97
Citrus Canker Eradication.................................. .... 60,586.08
Nursery Inspection ........................................... ...... 22,666.31
Quarantine Inspection .................................................. 26,191.71
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication (Includes $515.51
for Mosaic) ............................................................. 10,955.38
Bee Disease Eradication .... ................................ 5,674.68
Incidental Fund .......................................................... 3,291.86 $164,365.99

Balance from the General Fund to revert to the State .03
Balance Special Funds carried forward May 1, 1921..$ 40,364.70 $ 40,364.73



ITEMIZED EXPENDITURES BY FUNDS

GENERAL FUND

Resources
Appropriation Available May 1, 1920.............................................$ 35,000.00

Expenditures

For Salaries .............. ........................ $ 18,622.61
For Office Expenses.................. ................................ 6,176.65
For Traveling Expenses................................... 5,808.52
For Printing .............................. ........... ... 2,829.45
For General Supplies ......................................... 552.07
For Miscellaneous Expenses .......................-............... 1,010.67 $34,999.97*

Balance Reverting to the State May 1, 1921...................................$ .03

*The disbursement of the General Fund for the fiscal year ending April 80, 1921, classi-
fled by departments rather than by items, was as follows:
Plant Board, expenses .................................... .............. .................................. ...$ 1,194.40
Secretary's Office (Tallahassee) .......................................................................... ........ 1 49.79
General Expenses .......-. ...................................... ................... ............ 17,149.87
Department of Entomology ..................................................................... .......... ......... .. 6,967.00
Banana Root Borer ............ .. ...................................... 295.00
M osaic Eradication ..................... ................. ................. .................................................. 402.77
Nursery Department --.................................................................... .. .................... 5,331.93
Sweet Potato W eevil Eradication ............................................................................................ 649.93
Quarantine Department ............................... .................................................. 657.68
Citrus Canker Eradication ............. ................................................................ 1,001.60
Unexpended Balance Reverting to State .......................... .............- .........-.... .08
Total ...................................... ..-......-.....................................--...$35,000.00
-Plant Commissioner.








68 State Plant Board of Florida

CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION

Resources
Unexpended Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1920......................$ 46,290.05
Appropriation Available July 1, 1920.......................-................. 30,000.00
$ 76,290.05
Expenditures
For Salaries ......................................... ......... ....$ 42,613.05
For Office Expenses.................................. ................. 466.51
.For Traveling Expenses................... ............ 16,220.37
For General Supplies....................... ......... 634.34
For Miscellaneous Expenses......................................... 651.81 $ 60,686.08
Balance Carried Forward May 1, 1921.................................. 15,703.97

NURSERY INSPECTION
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1920....................................... 10,334.42
Appropriation Available July 1, 1920.................... ................-- .. 20,000.00
$ 30,334.42
Expenditures
For Salaries ........................... ..................... .................$ 8,871.94
For Office Expenses.............-............ ............... 704.22
For Traveling Expenses.................... ...... ......... 12,880.69
For General Supplies.... ---..................... .......... 138.51
For Miscellaneous Expenses................................... 70.95 $ 22,666.31
Balance Carried Forward May 1, 1921................. .................. $ 7,668.11

QUARANTINE INSPECTION
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1920................................ ...... $ 8,346.48
Appropriation Available July 1, 1920......................................... 25,000.00
$33,346.48
Expenditures
For Salaries ...... ................................................ $ 19,044.29
For Office Expenses.......................................... ........ 536.41
For Traveling Expenses............................ ... 5,702.38
For General Supplies.............................. 137.82
For Miscellaneous Expenses........................ 770.81 $ 26,191.71
Balance Carried Forward May 1, 1921...............................................$ 7,154.7

SWEET POTATO WEEVIL ERADICATION
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1920........................... ..........$ 4,683.27
Appropriation Available July 1, 1920.............................................. 10,000.00
$ 14,688.3







Fourth Biennial Report 69

Expenditures
For Salaries ....................... ........------ --.----$ 6,080.64
For Office Expenses---................----.......... .. ---- 19.44
For Traveling Expenses............................---- 3,621.18
For General Supplies ....................-................ 783.46
For Miscellaneous Expenses......................-----......... 450.66 $ 10,955.38
Balance Carried Forward May 1, 1921.......................................--- 3,727.89

BEE DISEASE ERADICATION
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1920........................................$ 2,147.78
Appropriation Available July 1, 1920............................. ...--- --------- 5,000.00
$ 7,147.78
Expenditures
For Salaries ................................................................$ 4,222.84
For Office Expenses ............................................ ....... 128.15
For Traveling Expenses.................----- .... ............. 1,098.75
For Printing ............................ ....... .......... 42.75
For General Supplies .-.....-.......-..---.. ......---...- 177.93
For Miscellaneous Expenses-....-......................--..... 4.26 $ 5,374.68
Balance Carried Forward May 1, 1921....------.....................................-- --$ 1,473.10

INCIDENTAL FUND
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1920 ....................................---- $ 4,282.65
Incidental Collections During the Year-------........ ---.........--- ...... 3,646.07
$ 7,928.72
"Expenditures
For Salaries .......------------...............---................. 879.86
For Office Expenses................ ----------------................ 450.91
For Traveling Expenses........................................ 552.65
For General Supplies------------................................ 526.83
For Miscellaneous Expenses.......................................... 881.61 $ 3,291.86
Balance Carried Forward May 1, 1921................................................ 4,636.86
J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary, State Plant Board.

FINANCIAL REPORT

For Period from May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922
Tallahassee, Florida, August 1, 1922.
To the State Plant Board:
Gentlemen: I herewith submit the following report of the
finances of the Board for the period beginning May 1, 1921 and
ending June 30, 1922:








70 State Plant Board of Florida

SUMMARY

Resources
General Fund, continuing appropriation of $35,000 annually........$ 70,000.00
Citrus Canker Eradication.................................................................... 15,703.97
Nursery Inspection ..-- --- -------------.. .............................. 7,668.11
Quarantine Inspection ........................................ .............................. 7,154.77
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication................................................... 3.727.89
Bee Disease Eradication........................................................................ 1,473.10
Incidental Fund ... ........................................................................... 7,628.34
State Plant Board Work, Chapter 8441, Acts of 1921...................... 150,000.00

$263,256.18
Expenditures
General Fund ................ --..... ........ ........... .$ 23,214.29
Citrus Canker Eradication.-..-..-- ..--.......................-. 15,702.27
Nursery Inspection ...............--- .....-..-..... ....--- 7,667.93
Quarantine Inspection ................................ ...---- .... 7,154.49
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication................................ 3,727.31
Bee Disease Eradication ................................................ 1,472.43
Incidental Fund ........................................ 5,852.15
State Plant Board Work, Chapter 8441.................... 150,000.00 $214,790.87

$ 48,465.31
Balance reverting to the State July 1, 1921................$ 3.41
Balance reverting to the State May 1, 1922.....-- -. 16,775.12
Balance carried forward July 1, 1922......................... 31,686.78 $ 48,465.31


GENERAL FUND

Resources
Appropriation Available May 1, 1921................. ........................$ 35,000.00
Appropriation Available May 1, 1922................................................ 35,000.00
$ 70,000.00
Expenditures
For Salaries ............................ .................... $ 15,082.46
For Office Expenses................ ............................. 2,457.99
For Traveling Expenses................................................ 2,666.12
For Printing ..--..............-----.....................---- 1,584.18
For General Supplies........................ .----....--- ...-- .. 818.42
For Miscellaneous Expenses.......................................... 605.12 $23,214.29*

$46,785.71
Balance reverting to the State May 1, 1922..............$ 16,775.12
Balance carried forward July 1, 1922........................ 30,010.59 $ 46,785.71

*The disbursement of the General Fund for the period from May 1, 1921 to June 80, 1922,
classified by departments and projects rather than by items, was as follows:
Secretary's Office ...................................................... ................ ..........................................$ 1,506.51
General Expenses ........................................................................................................................ 12,128.80
Department of Entomology ............................--.......... -........-..............-- 6,581.22
Mosaic Disease Eradication ........... ....... ....... .......... ...... ..................................... 1,678.12
Citrus Canker .Eradication ............................. ..... .................... ............................... 1,801.18
Quarantine Inspection ....................... .................................. ............................................ 18.96
$28,214.29
-Plant Commissioner








Fourth Biennial Report 71

CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION

Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1921.............................................$ 15,703.97

Expenditures
For Salaries .................................. ........................... 8,604.71
For Office Expenses ................................................... 1,244.39
For Traveling Expenses............................................... 4,761.69
For General Supplies ..................................... ....... 1,091.48 $ 15,702.27
Balance reverting to the State July 1, 1921........................................$ 1.70

NURSERY INSPECTION

Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1921..................... ..------.............-- 7,668.11
Expenditures
For Salaries ........................ . ....................$ 2,881.86
For Office Expenses..................................... ......... 1,223.34
For Traveling Expenses................................... 2,452.15
For Printing ........................................---- ... --1,053.50
For General Supplies................................................... 57.08 $ 7,667.93
Balance Reverting to the State July 1, 1921....................................$ .18

QUARANTINE INSPECTION

Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1921............................................$ 7,154.77
Expenditures
For Salaries .................................................................. 4,436.34
For Office Expense........................................................ 697.28
For Traveling Expenses--- --............................. ----- 1,566.39
For General Supplies ........-................................ 454.48 $ 7,154.49
Balance Reverting to the State July 1, 1921...........----........----................ .28

SWEET POTATO WEEVIL ERADICATION

Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1921........................................$ 3,727 89
Expenditures
For Salaries ................... ................................$ 1,177.50
For Office Expenses........................................................ 31.77
For Traveling Expenses................................................ 828.68
For General Supplies ..............................---..........---- 1413.38
For Miscellaneous Expenses........................................ 275.98 $ 3,727.31
Balance Reverting to the State July 1, 1921......................................$ .58









72 State Plant Board of Florida

BEE DISEASE ERADICATION
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1921.............................................$ 1,473.10
Expenditures
For Salaries .................. ..... ...................... ---- $ 1,176.82
For Office Expenses.....-............-- ....... .... -------- 3.82
For Traveling Expenses......................... ....... 290.54
For General Supplies-...........----........ -.. ...... 1.25 $ 1,472.43
Balance Reverting to the State July 1, 1921....................................$ .67

INCIDENTAL FUND
Resources
Balance Brought Forward May 1, 1921..............................................$ 4,636.86
Receipts from May 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922...................................... 2,891.48
$ 7,528.34
Expenditures
For Salaries ...........-----.............. ------............... 1,242.43
For Office Expenses........................-.............. 255.18
For Traveling Expenses..................-...........---- .... 184.34
For Printing ..... ------.................... .............--- 168.75
For General Supplies..................... --------.....-..-- 471.07
For Miscellaneous Expenses.................................... 3,530.38 $ 5,852.15
Balance Carried Forward July 1, 1922 ----....................................$ 1,676.19

STATE PLANT BOARD EXPENSES-CHAPTER 8441, ACTS 1921
Resources
Appropriation Available July 1, 1921...-----..................................... $150,000.00
CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION
For Salaries ..-........- .... ............$ 37,317.39
For Office Expenses.................... -----.--.... ........ 599.40
For Traveling Expenses ----................... .... ---........ 23,791.78
For General Supplies .....................---- ....- .......... 1,456.76
For Miscellaneous Expenses-......-...............-...... ----.. 1,386.54 $ 64,551.87

NURSERY INSPECTION
For Salaries .................. ............--------------....$ 23,531.89
For Office Expenses...................-------------........... 515,84
For Traveling Expenses.......----------....................... 12,543.33
For Printing ...........................----------.............. 194.77
For General Supplies ..........................---------.-- .. 24.56
For Miscellaneous Expenses .......................-- ...-...--..... 159.21 $ 36,969.60

QUARANTINE INSPECTION
For Salaries .......................................... $ 23,830.75
For Office Expenses ................................. ............. 239.93
For Traveling Expenses....... .............................. 6,328.60
For Printing .........--..........--.......--- --- 382.75
For General Supplies ................-...................-..--.. ---- 207.95
For Miscellaneous Expenses.......... -------...................... 114.08 $ 31,104.06








Fourth Biennial Report 73

SWEET POTATO WEEVIL ERADICATION
For Salaries .................- .. ... .................. $ 3,211.23
For Office Expenses-...................... .... ............... 11.29
For Traveling Expenses...................................... 1,847.72
For Printing ...................... ....... ............... 4.50
For General Supplies...................... ............ 53.02
For Miscellaneous Expenses............-............ ......... 675.00 $ 5,802.76


BEE DISEASE ERADICATION
For Salaries ......................................$ 6,863.12
For Office Expenses.................... .................. 73.12
For Traveling Expenses...................................-- 1,963.24
For Printing ..........- ............................ 2.50
For General Supplies......................................... 52.77
For Miscellaneous Expenses.. ----...............-.........- 3.66 $ 8,958.41


BOLL WEEVIL INVESTIGATION CONTROL
For Salaries ........... -........................... $ 1,505.54
For Office Expenses--...................... ........... 49.59
For Traveling Expenses........--..........~.... ......... 507.40
For General Supplies .................... ......... 432.44
For Miscellaneous Expenses......--...--......- ........ 118.33 $ 2,613.30
$150,000.00
Respectfully submitted,
J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary, State Plant Board.


ESTIMATES

The following estimates on the amounts of money required
for carrying out the duties imposed upon the State Plant Board
by the provisions of the Florida Plant Act of 1915 (Chapter
6885) and Chapter 7938, are made with due regard to past ex-
perience in dealing with the problems involved and to the wisdom
of affording the State's varied agricultural interests adequate
protection against insect pests and plant diseases, some of which
may easily cause losses running into the millions of dollars. The
Plant Board is now compelled to pay higher salaries than ever
before to the trained men necessary to efficiently conduct its
work.
The various activities to which these estimates refer and the
necessity therefore are quite fully explained in the foregoing pages
of this report:








State Plant Board of Florida


ESTIMATED EXPENSES PER ANNUM
For Fiscal Years Ending June 30, 1923 and June 30, 1924

GENERAL EXPENSES
Traveling Expenses of Board Members, Salary of Secretary, Salary
of Plant Commissioner, Salaries of Stenographer, Clerks and
Janitor in Plant Commissioner's Office, Publications, Postage,
Stationery, Telegrams, Telephone, Supplies, etc., per annum.... $ 15,000
Quarantine Department
Salaries, Traveling Expenses, Port Expenses, Boat Hire, Quaran-
tine Notices, Parcel Post Plant Inspection, etc., per annum........ $ 50,000
Nursery Inspection
Salaries, Traveling Expenses, Tags, Filing Furniture, Stationery,
Postage, etc., per annum ..............-...................... .... $ 45,000
Citrus Canker Eradication
Salaries, Traveling Expenses, Disinfectants, etc., for Eradication
of Citrus Canker and Maintaining Grove Inspection for Detec-
tion of Citrus Canker, Black Fly and other Dangerous Pests
and Diseases, per annum.................... .......... .............. ..... $125,000
Sweet Potato Weevil Eradication
Salaries, Traveling Expenses, Supplies, etc., for Conducting Eradi-
cation of Sweet Potato Weevil in Baker County in Cooperation
with the Bureau of Entomology, United States Department of
Agriculture, Inspecting Sweet Potato Fields and Plant Beds,
Administering Quarantines to Prevent the Spread of the
Weevil, etc., per annum............... ........... ....... $ 5,000
Control of Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane
For Production of Cayana 10 Variety (resistant to disease) for Dis-
tribution in Infected Areas in North Florida and for Preven-
tion of Spread, per annum............................... ................ $ 2,500
Cotton Boll Weevil Investigations
For Continuing Investigations and Development of Methods of Con-
Strolling Cotton Boll Weevil and Demonstrating Same, per an-
num ..... ..... ...... ... ..... ..... ..... ............ .... $ 10,000
Department of Entomology
Salaries of Entomologist, Associate Entomologist and Stenographer,
Filing Cases and Other Equipment, per annum.........-................- $ 7,500
Bee Disease Eradication
For Eradicating and Preventing Spread of Diseases of Honeybees
in Accordance with Provisions of Chapter 7938, Laws of Flor-
ida, per annum ...... .................................................. .... .................. $ 10,000
Total Requirements, per annum ..................................................... $270,000
Total Requirements for Biennium ............................. ...... 540,000
Less Continuing Appropriation $35,000 per annum...................... 70,000
Special Appropriations Required for Biennium........................... $470,000






Fourth Biennial Report


In addition to the above the Plant Commissioner again urgent-
ly recommends the appropriation of not less than $250,000.00 as
an emergency appropriation to become available for the use of
the State Plant Board, only and in the event that the pink boll-
worm of cotton, the Mexican bean beetle, the Japanese camphor
scale or the blackfly should make its appearance in the State.
Should any one of these pests succeed in obtaining a foothold in
Florida the cost of eradication would be increased to many hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars if the Board were obliged to defer
action until the succeeding session of the legislature.
It is also respectfully suggested that such amount as may ap-
pear to be necessary for the purpose be appropriated for the
erection of a suitable building, on the grounds of the University
at Gainesville, for the accommodation of the Board's offices,
laboratories, etc.
Respectfully submitted,
WILMON NEWELL
Plant Commissioner.
Gainesville, Florida,
November 24, 1922.






















APPENDIX A
RULES, REGULATIONS AND PUBLIC NOTICES OF THE
STATE PLANT BOARD OF FLORIDA
In Force and Effect on
July 1, 1922
(Circulars Nos. 42, 43 and 44)







State Plant Board
OF FLORIDA



CIRCULAR NO. 42




The Florida Plant Act of 1915
(Chapter 6885)


The Bee Disease Act
(Chapter 7938)


of 1919


and


RULES AND REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT
THERETO BY THE STATE PLANT BOARD OF
FLORIDA, AS IN EFFECT JUNE 15, 1921



Orders and Regulations of the
POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT
RELATIVE TO
PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO FLORIDA POSTOFFICES


June 15, 1921























STATE PLANT BOARD.
of Florida

P. K. YONGE, Chatirman ................ --- ...........---........ ..Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN ........----...---.--... .- ....- --..............- .............Citra
J, B. SUTTON ....................................---------........-------Tampa
JOHN C.. COOPER, ... ................. ...... ................................... ..... Ja ksonville
W L. W EAVER:............... .....-- --.. .... ........................... ........Perry
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary..............................................-.......-...Tallahassee
Staff
WILMON NEWELL, Plant Commissioner..............................................Gainesville
E. W B RGER, *Entomologist .......................... .......... .............. ..GainevilU
F. M. O'BYRNE, Nursery Inspector...................... ..-... ...........Gaiasvtlle
FRANK STILING, General Inspector..............................................GainesVille
J3 H. MONTGOMERY, Quarantine Inspector........................................ Gainesvill
J. C. GOODWIN, Apiary Inspector.......................................................Gainesville
MIss ETHEL MURRILL, Chief Clerk...................................Gainesville











CONTENTS
Page
The Florida Plant Act of 1915.................................................................. 8
Bee Disease Act of Florida......................... ...................................... 11
Rules and Regulations of the State Plant Board....................................... 18
Public Notice, declaring certain insects and diseases to be public
nuisances ............ .. ..................................................... 1
Avocado Weevil ........... ................ ............ ......... 13
Banana Root Borer ...................................... 1
Banana Wilt Disease......... ......................................... 13
Brown Rot ................. .................... ... 13
Brown-tail Moth ............ ...................... ........ ... 1
Citrus Canker ............................................ ................. 14
Citrus Knot ................................. .................. 15
Coconut Bud-rot .......................................................... .................. 15
Cotton Square-Weevil ....................... ................ 15
European Corn Borer ...........................................................15
Gipsy Moth ...................................................... ..................... 16
Japanese Beetle ................................................ .............................. 17
Japanese Camphor Scale .................................. ....... 18
Mango Seed W eevil.............................................................. ..... 20
Mediterranean Fruit Fly .................... ..................................... 20
M exican Bean Beetle ........................ ..................................... 21
Mexican Orange Maggot ................................... ............... 21
Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane................................................ 21
Pineapple Black Weevil .............................................. 22
Pink Bollworm ....................................................... .................. 22
Spiny Citrus White-fly, or "black fly".................. ........ 22
West Indian Sweet Potato Weevil.............................. 22
Yam W eevil ............... ................................................................... 22
Rule 1.
Providing for inspection of orchards, nurseries, etc.......................... 22
Rule 2.
Prohibiting the movement of plants infected with citrus canker........ 22
Rule 3.
Providing for the destruction of trees infected with citrus canker, etc. 22
Rule 4.
Prohibiting the movement of nursery stock without certification, etc. 22
Rule 4A.
Declaring certain insects, pests and diseases to be especially injur-
ious, etc. ...................................................................................... ..... 23
Rule 4B.
Regulating the conditions under which certificates of inspection may
be issued, etc. ....................................................... ........................ 42
Rule 4C.
Requiring the complete covering of nursery stock shipments.......... 43
Rule 4D.
Requiring the defoliation of certain classes of nursery stock............ 43
Rule 4E.
Requiring fumigation of all plants subject to attack by San Jose
scale ........... .................. .. ... ... .. ......... ................... 43
Rule 4F.
Conditions under which certificates may be revoked............................ 43
Rule 4G.
Providing 'for certain exceptions to the rule requiring certification
of nursery stock .............................................. ................................ 43
Rule 4H.
Conditions under which nursery inspection certificates may be se-
cured and used ..................................... .......................... .. 44
Rule 41.
Providing for use of Florida permit tag and prohibiting movement
of infested stock.................................................................... 44









4 STATE PLANT BOARD
Page
Rule 4J.
Prohibiting shipment of host plants of cottony cushion-scale.............. 45
Rule 4K.
Providing for scrubbing of nursery stock.................................... 45.
Rule 5A.
Establishing a quarantine zone in every direction from any property
infected with citrus canker and defining the same......................... 46
Rule 5B.
Conditions under which citrus trees may be planted within one-half
mile of a canker-infected property ............................................... .. 46
Rule 5C.
Prohibiting movement of citrus nursery stock from within one nile
of canker-infected property-............................................................. 46
Rule 5D.
Movement of non-citrus from canker-infected property-prohibited.. 46
Rule 5E.
Planting of citrus in properties declared no longer danger centers
with reference to citrus canker-conditions of............................. 46
Rule 6.
Providing for the issue of certificates of inspection and defining the
forms of certificate to be used............................- ............ .... 47
Rule 7.
Providing for a review before the Plant Board of any rule, regula-
tion, etc., on request of the party affected........................................ 49
Rule 8.
Prohibiting cropping in properties infected with citrus canker............ 50
Rule 9.
Regulating the manner of conducting work in properties infected
with citrus canker ........... ................................ 50
Rule 10.
Relative to the harvesting of fruit in properties infected with citrus
canker ............................................................................. ............. 50
Rule 11A.
Prohibiting the shipment into Florida of all.citrus fruits from the
Gulf States ........................................... 51
Rule 11B.
Prohibiting the shipment into Florida of all citrus fruits from Cali-
fornia ............................. ......... ........ .......................... 51
Rule 11C.
Prohibiting the shipment into Florida of various and sundry fruits
from M exico ............. ...... ....................... ........ 51
Rule 11D.
Prohibiting importation into Florida of fruits, vegetables, plants,
etc., from countries where Mediterranean fruit fly exists, with
certain exceptions ....................... ...................... 51
Rule 11E.
Prohibiting the shipment into Florida of various fruits from the
West Indies, South and Central America.................................... 51
Rule 12.
Concerning the use of citrus leaves in disseminating beneficial fungi 51
Rule 13.
Requiring nurserymen to furnish lists of consignees, contents of
shipments, etc. .......... ...................... .................. ..... ......... 52
Rule 14.
Prohibiting the importation of banana plants, coconut plants and
coconuts in husk ................... .................... ........ .............. 52
Public Notice.
Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with scaly bark...... 52







CONTENTS 5

Page
Rule 15.
Regulating the movement of nursery stock grown in scaly bark
areas ................................................ ......4.............................................. 4
Rule 16.
Requiring the posting of properties infected with citrus canker......... 54
Rule 17.
Governing the importation of plants and plant products into Florida 5
Rule 18.
(Repealed November 11, 1918.)
Rule 19.
Prohibiting the shipment of all citrus trees and plants into areas
free from withertip ...................................... ..... .......... 55
Rtule 20.
Providing for the inspection of plants in transit and treatment or
disposition of same when infected or infested or moved in viola-
tion of Board rules........................................................................... 55
Rule 21.
Prohibiting the exchange or sale of trees or plants infested or in-
fected with especially injurious insects or diseases.................... 55
Rules 22A and 22B.
(Repealed July 14, 1919.)
Rule 23.
(Replaced by Rule 41. See page 44.)
Rule 24.
Requiring nurserymen and others desiring inspection to file written
application therefore and providing for payment of inspection
costs by nurserymen who delay filing application......................... 5
Rule 25.
Prohibiting the shipment of citrus trees and plants, and parts
thereof, into Florida from all states and countries...................... 5
Rule 26A.
Importation of trees, plants, etc., from countries where black fly
occurs-prohibited ................. ............................................ 56
Rule 26B.
Disposition of material arriving in violation of Rule 26A.................. 56
Rule 26C.
Providing for inspections for black fly in Florida................................. 56
Rule 26D.
Movement of trees or plants infested with black fly-prohibited...... 56
Rule 26E.
Prescribing treatment of trees, etc., found infested by black fly........ 56
Rule 26F.
Every black fly infested property the center of a dangerous zone-.. 57
Rule 26G.
Movement of plants, etc., within black fly danger zone-prohibited..-. 5T
Rule 26H.
Certification of nursery stock within one mile of black fly infested
property-prohibited -..--.......-- -------. ...............- ..... 57
Rule 261.
Certification of nursery stock exposed to danger of black fly infes-
tation-prohibited ................ ........................................ 57
Rule 26J.
Regulating the manner of conducting work in properties infested
with, or exposed to, black fly.... .... .......... ....................... 57
Rule 27.
Prohibiting the shipment into Florida of plants, etc., from the gipsy
and brown-tail moth areas of New England, except under cer-
tain conditions as to inspection and certification.................. ... 57
Rule 28.
Prohibiting the importation into Florida of all pineapples, pineapple
plants, slips, roots, etc., from Jamaica............................... 58








STATE PLANT BOARD


Rule 29.
Requiring treatment of nursery stock prior to its 'shipment from
areas exposed to infestation by the dictyospermum scale............ 58
Rule 30A.
Providing for Quarantine Tag to indicate that the package or bundle
to which it is attached is held out for inspection............................ 58
Rule 30B.
Movement of box or parcel with Quarantine Tag attached-prohibited 59
Rule 30C.
Providing for disposition of shipment which is found to be infested
or infected ....... ..... ... ..... ........... ............ ... 59
Rule 31.
Specifying the qualifications for inspectors, requiring an examina- .
tion, etc. ... ---....-----.....-- .............--.--- ..--........................ .. .- 60
Public Notice.
Declaring certain areas in other states to' be infested with sweet
potato w eevil .............................................. ....... ....................... ...... 60
,Rules 32A and 32B.
Prohibiting shipment into Florida of sweet potato tubers and plants,
except under certain conditions............................................. ...... 60
Public Notice.
Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infested with the sweet
potato w eevil .......................................... ............................. 60
Rule 33.
Shipment and movement of sweet potato and morning glory plants
from areas in Florida infested by sweet potato weevil-pro-
hibited ..................---.....---- .-- ---............................................. 61
Rule 34.
Movement of sweet potato tubers from areas infested by sweet
potato weevil-prohibited 'except after fumigation........................ 61
Rule 35.
.' Pasturing of live stock in canker-infected properties-prohibited...... 61
Rule 36.
Disinfection in public packing houses................................................ 61
Rule 37.
(Repealed Nov. 11, 1918. For new rule see Rules 45A and 45B on
page 66.)
Rule 38.
Common carriers and agents required to hold under quarantine and
notify Plant Board concerning all shipments and arrivals as to
which the requirements of Florida Plant Act and Rules of
Plant Board have not been complied with........................................ 61
Rule 39A.
Movement of avocado nursery stock from' nursery infected with
scab-prohibited unless treated ----.......-... -----.. .......... 62
Rule 39B.
Treatment of avocado nursery stock infected with scab must be
under supervision of agent of State Plant Board............................ 62
Rule 40A.
Movement or shipment of second-hand bee hives, combs, frames and
other beekeeping equipment into State of Florida-prohibited,
except under certain conditions ................................................. ... 62
Rule 40B.
All apiaries, bee yards and colonies of bees infected with American
Foul Brood or European Foul Brood-quarantined....................... 62
Rule 40C.
Exposing hives, combs, brood or honey from infected apiaries-pro-
hibited ............................. ............ -.............................. 62
Rule 40D.
All queen bees and their attendant bees must be shipped under a
certificate of inspection .......... ....................................... 62









Page
Rule 40E.
Movement of honey from infected apiaries-prohibited, except under
certain conditions .............. ................... ............................... 63
Rule 40F.
Infected apiaries and zones surrounding them-regulations governing 63-
Rule 41.
Shipment of sugar cane into Florida-prohibited except under permit 68
Public Notice.
Declaring certain areas in Florida to be infected with the mosaic
Disease of sugar cane....... .... ............. ................... 64
Rule 42A.
Movement of sugar cane from areas known as infected with the
mosaic disease of sugar cane-prohibited.........................................64
Rule' 42B. ,
Sugar cane in infected fields-destruction of by authorized agents'
S : of the Plant Board.............. ................................. ......................... 64
Rule 42C.
Every field, garden, yard or plant in the State of Florida infected
.with the sugar cane mosaic declared to be the center of an in-
fected and' dangerous- zone .................................................... ........... 64
Rule 42D.
Mosaic infected fields not to be replanted to sugar cane until after
S the lapse of one year......................................................................... 65
Public- Notice.
Declaring certain areas to be infested with the European corn borer.. 65
Rule: 43.8
S Providing 'quarantine measures to prevent the introduction of the
European corn borer into Florida.......................................... 65
Rule 44.
Providing quarantine measures to prevent the introduction of the
Japanese beetle into Florida ............ ....................................... 66
Rule 45A.
Providing quarantine to prevent the introduction of the pink boll-.
worm of cotton into the State of Florida from the States of
Texas and 'Louisiana and elsewhere................................ 66
Rule 45B.
Providing regulations to cover the shipment of cotton seed, seed
cotton, etc., from states other than Texas and Louisiana into
Florida ........ .............................................. ..................... 66
Orders and Regulations of the Postoffice Department Relative to Parcel
Post Shipments of Nursery Stock, Plants, etc.................................... 67
Nursery stock .. ....... ... .............. ................. 67
Terminal inspection of plants, etc., addressed to Florida postoffices.. 67
Act of Congress, etc., providing for terminal inspection................ 67
Summary of requirements, mail shipments................................. ... 70
Mail shipments from foreign countries-prohibited ..... .................. 71
"Nursery stock"---definition of ...-............................................ ... 71








STATE PLANT BOARD


FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915
(Chapter 6885, Laws of Florida)

AN ACT to Prevent the Introduction Into and Dissemination Within This
State of Insect Pests and Diseases Injurious to Plants and Plant Products
of this State, to Create a State Plant Board, and to Prescribe Its. Powers
and Duties, and Making an Appropriation for the Purpose of Carrying
Out the Provisions of Said Act.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE. STATE OF
FLORIDA:
Section 1. This Act shall be known by the short title of "The Florida
Plant Act of 1915."
Section 2. For the purpose of this Act, the following terms shall be
construed, respectively, to mean:
Insect Pests and Diseases.-Diseases and insect pests, injurious to
plants and plant products of this State, including any of the stages of
development of such disease and insect pests.
Plants and Plant Products.-Trees, shrubs, vines, forage and cereal
plants, and all other plants; cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, and all other
parts of plants; and fruit, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, wood, lumber, and
all other plant products.
Places.-Vessels, cars and other vehicles, buildings, docks, nurseries,
orchards and other premises, where plants and plant products are grown,
kept or handled.
Persons.-Individuals, associations, partnerships and corporations.
Words used in this Act shall be construed to import either the plural
or the singular, as the case demands.
Section 3. There is hereby created and established a State Plant
Board, hereinafter called the Board. The said Board, shall be composed of
five members who shall be the same persons who constitute the Board of
Control created and authorized by the provisions of Chapter 5384 of the
Laws of Florida, and all of the authority by this act granted to the Board
herein created and all the duties required of said Board shall be exercised
and performed by the members of the Board of Control, acting as the State
Plant Board. A majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a
quorum for all purposes. The chairman of the Board shall be selected
annually by the members thereof. They shall be provided with a suitable
office or offices at the University of Florida where the meetings, of the
Board may be held and its records shall be kept.
Section 4. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act,
the Board may employ, prescribe the duties of, and fix the compensation of,
such inspectors and other employees as it may require and incur such
expenses as may be necessary, within the limits of appropriations made by
law. It shall cooperate with other departments, boards and officers of this
State and of the United States as far as practicable.
Section 5. The Board shall keep itself informed as to known varieties
of insect pests and diseases, the origin, locality, nature and appearance
thereof, the manner in which they are disseminated, and approved methods
of treatment and eradication. The Board, in its rules and regulations made
pursuant to this Act, shall list the insect pests and diseases of which it
shall find that the introduction into, or the dissemination within, this State
should be prevented in order to safeguard the plants and plant products of
this State, together with the plants and plant products likely to become
infested or infected with such insect pests and diseases. Every such insect
pest and disease listed, and every plant and plant product infested therewith,
is hereby declared to be a public nuisance. Every person who has knowledge
of the presence of any insect pest or disease listed, as required by this Sec-







RULES AND REGULATIONS


tion, in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act, in or upon
any place, shall immediately report the same to the Board or an inspector
thereof, giving such detailed information relative thereto as he may have.
Every person who deals in or engages in the sale of plants and plant prod-
ucts shall furnish to the Board or its inspectors, when requested, a state-
ment of the names and addresses of the persons from whom and the locali-
ties where he purchased or obtained such plants and plant products.
Section 6. The Board shall, from time to time, make rules and regula-
tions for carrying out the provisions and requirements of this Act, including
rules and regulations under which its inspectors and other employees shall
(a) inspect places, plants and plant products, and things and substances
used or connected therewith, (b) investigate, control, eradicate and prevent
the dissemination of insect pests and diseases, and (c) supervise or cause
the treatment, cutting and destruction of plants and plant products infested
or infected therewith. The inspectors and employees employed by the Board
shall have authority to carry out and execute the regulations and orders of
the said Board and shall have authority under direction of the Board to
carry out the provisions of this Act.
Section 7. Whenever such inspection discloses that any places, or plants
or plant products, or things and substances used or connected therewith,
are infested or infected with any insect pest or disease listed as a public
nuisance, as required by Section 5, in the rules and regulations made pursu-
ant to this act, written notice thereof shall be given the owner or other
person in possession or control of the place where found, and such owner or
.other person shall proceed to control, eradicate or prevent the dissemination
of such insect pest or disease, and to remove, cut or destroy infested and
infected plants and plant products, or things and substances used or con-
nected therewith, within the time and in the manner prescribed by said
notice or the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. Whenever
such owner or other person cannot be found, or shall fail, neglect or refuse
to obey the requirements of-said notice and the rules and regulations made
pursuant to this Act, such requirements shall be carried out by the inspec-
tors or other employees of the Board.
Section 8. It shall be unlawful for any person to bring or cause to be
brought into this State any plant or plant product listed, as required by
Section 5, in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act, unless
there be plainly and legibly marked thereon or affixed thereto, or on or to
the car or other vehicle carrying, or the bundle, package,,or other container
of the same, in a conspicuous place, a statement or a tag or other device
showing the names and addresses of the consignors or shippers and the
consignee or persons to whom shipped, the general nature and quantity of
the contents, and the name of the locality where grown, together with a
certificate of inspection of the proper official of the State, territory, district
or country from which it was brought or shipped, showing that such plant
or plant product was found or believed to be free from insect pests and
diseases, and any other information required by the Board.
Section 9. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, give away,
carry, ship or deliver for carriage or shipment, within this State, any plants
or plant products listed, as required by Section five in the rules and regula-
tions made pursuant to this Act, unless such plants or plant products have
been officially inspected and a certificate issued by an inspector of the
Board stating that the said plants or plant products have been inspected and
found to be apparently free from insect pests and diseases, and any other
facts provided for in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act.
For the issuance of such certificate, the Board may require the payment of a
reasonable fee to cover the expense of such inspection and certification;
PROVIDED, however, that if such plants or plant products were brought
into this State in compliance with the requirements of Section eight, the
certificate required by that section may be accepted in lieu of the inspection
and certificate required by this section in such cases as shall be provided for
in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. If it shall be








STATE PLANT BOARD


found at any time that a certificate of inspection issued or accepted pursuant
to the provisions of this section, is being used in connection with plants and
plant products which are infested or infected with insect pests or diseases
listed as required by Section five in the rules and regulations made pursuant
to this Act, its further use may be prohibited, subject to such inspection and
other disposition of the plants and plant products involved as may be pro-
vided for by the Board. All moneys collected by the Board under this sec-
tion or under Section seven or fourteen shall be deposited in the State Treas-
ury to the credit of the general revenue fund receipts.
Section 10. Any person in this State, who receives from without this
State any plant or plant product as to which the requirements of Section
eight have not been complied with, or who receives any plant or plant
product, sold, given away, carried, shipped, or delivered for carriage or
shipment within this State as to which the requirements of Section nine
have not been complied with, shall immediately inform the Board or an
inspector thereof, and isolate and hold the said plant or plant product un-
opened or unused, subject to such inspection and other disposition as may be
provided for by the Board.
Section 11. Whenever the Board shall find that there exists outside
of this State any insect pest or disease, and that, in order to safe-guard
plants and plant products in this State, its introduction into this State
should be prevented, the Board shall give public notice thereof, specifying
the plants and plant products infested or infected or likely to become
infested or infected therewith, and the movement of such plants or plant
products into this State from the infested or infected locality designated in
said public notice, shall thereafter be prohibited until the Board shall find
that the danger of the introduction into this State of such insect pests or
diseases from such locality has ceased to exist, of which the Board shall
give public notice.
Section 12. Whenever the Board shall find there exists in this State,
or any part thereof, any insect pest or disease, and that its dissemination
should be controlled or prevented, the Board shall give public notice thereof,
specifying the plants and plant products infested or infected, or likely to
become infested or infected therewith, and the movement, planting or other
use of any such plant or plant product, or other thing or substance specified
in such notice as likely to carry and disseminate such insect pest or disease,
except under such conditions as shall be prescribed by the Board as to
inspection, treatment and disposition, shall be prohibited, within such area
as may be designated in said public notice until the Board shall find that
the danger of the dissemination of such insect pest or disease has ceased
to exist, of which the Board shall give public notice.
Section 13. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions and re-
quirements of this Act, and of the rules and regulations made, and notices
given, pursuant thereto, the Board and its inspectors and employees shall
have power to enter in or upon any place, and to open any bundle, package
or other container containing or thought to contain plants or plant products.
Section 14. Any person affected by any rule or regulation made, or
notice given, pursuant to this Act, may have a review thereof by the Board
for the purpose of having such rule, regulation or notice modified, suspended
or withdrawn. Such review shall be allowed and considered and the cost
thereof fixed, assessed, collected and paid in such manner and in accordance
with such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Board.
Section 15. Any person who shall violate any provision or require-
ment of this Act, or of the rules and regulations made or of any notice
given pursuant thereto, or who shall forge, counterfeit, deface, destroy
or wrongfully use, any certificate provided for in this Act or in the rules
and regulations made pursuant thereto, shall be deemed guilty of a mis-
demeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a ffine of not
more than five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than six
months or by both such fine and imprisonment at the discretion of the
Court having jurisdiction. Said Plant Board shall have power and author-








RULES AND REGULATIONS


ity to enforce its rules, ordinances and regulations in any court of compe-
tent jurisdiction by civil, as well as criminal proceedings, and if the
remedy to be pursued be by writ of injunction, no court of this State shall
have right previous to a trial upon the merits to set aside such a writ on
bdnd. It shall be the duty of the Attorney General and District Attorneys
to represent said Plant Board whenever called upon to do so. Said Plant
Board in the discharge of its duties and in the enforcement of the powers
herein delegated, may send for books and papers, administer oaths, hear
witnesses, etc., and to that end it is made the duty of the various sheriffs
throughout the State to serve all summons and other papers upon the re-
quest of said Plant Board.
Section 16. In construing and enforcing the provisions of this Act, the
act, omission or failure of any official, agent or other person acting for or
employed by any association, partnership or corporation within the scope
of his employment or office shall, in every case, also be deemed the act,
omission or failure of such association, partnership or corporation as well
as that of the person.
Section 17. That the Board or any of its inspectors or employees shall
be a proper party in any court of 'equity to effectively carry out any of the
provisions of this Act when an injunction would be a proper remedy.
Section 18. This Act shall, not be so construed or enforced as to con-
flict in any way with any Act of Congress regulating the movement of
plants or plant products in inter-state or foreign commerce.
Section 19. If any section or part of a section of this Act shall for any
cause be held unconstitutional, such fact shall not affect the remainder of
this Act.
Section 20. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act,
the sum of thirty-five thousand dollars per annum or as. much' thereof as
may be necessary is hereby appropriated out of any funds in the treasury
not otherwise appropriated, which said sum shall be placed to the credit of
the Board in the hands of the State Treasurer to be expended by the Board
in the manner as provided in Section 34 of Chapter 5384 of the Laws of
Florida, and the further sum of one hundred and twenty-five thousand
dollars is hereby appropriated out of the General Revenues to beset apart
as a specific fund to be known as the Plant Act Special Fund, which shall
be expended by the Board, first for the purpose of eradicating, preventing
and controlling citrus canker, and thereafter so much thereof as may be
necessary, may be applied by the Board to carrying out the general pur-
poses of this Act, but of the funds appropriated by this Act, no more than
the sum of $125,000 shall be expended for the eradication of citrus canker.
Section 21. All Acts and parts of Acts inconsistent with the provis-
ions of this Act are hereby repealed; all that Chapter 6156, Laws of Florida,
1911, known as the State Nursery Inspection Law is hereby repealed.
Section 22. This Act shall take effect upon its passage and approval.
by the Governor, or upon its becoming a law without his approval.
Approved by the Governor April 30, 1915.

"BEE DISEASE ACT" OF 1919
(Chapter 7938, Laws of Florida)
AN ACT To Prevent the Introduction Into and Dissemination Within the
State of Florida of Contagious and Infectious Diseases of Honey Bees;
Providing for the Eradication of Bee Diseases; Authorizing, the State
Plant Board of Florida to Make Rules and Regulations for Carrying Out
the Provisions of This Act; Prescribing a Penalty for Violatibns, and
Providing an Appropriation for Carrying Out the Purposes of This Act.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE. OF
FLORIDA:
Section 1. All honey bees shipped or moved into the State of Florida
shall be accompanied by a certificate of inspection signed by the State
Entomologist, State Apiary Inspector or corresponding official" f the .tati








STATE PLANT BOARD


or country from which such bees are shipped or moved. Such certificate
shall certify to the apparent freedom of the bees, and their combs and
hives, from contagious and infectious diseases and must be based upon'an
actual inspection of the bees themselves within a period of sixty days pre-
ceding date of shipment; provided, that when honey bees are to be shipped
into this State from other states or countries wherein no official Apiary
Inspector or State Entomologist is available, the State Plant Board of
Florida, through its chief executive officer, may issue permit for such
shipment upon presentation of suitable evidence showing such bees to be
free from disease; and provided, further, that the provisions of this section
shall not apply to shipments of live bees in wire cages, when without
combs or honey.
Section 2. The State Plant Board of Florida, created by Chapter 6885,
Laws of Florida, shall have full and plenary power to deal with American
and European foul brood, Isle of Wight disease and all other contagious
or infectious diseases of honey bees which, in its opinion, may be prevented,
controlled or eradicated; and shall have full power and is hereby authorized
to make, promulgate and enforce such rules, ordinances and regulations
and to do and perform such acts, through its agents or otherwise, as in
its judgment may be necessary to control, eradicate or prevent the intro-
duction, spread or dissemination of any and all contagious diseases of
honey bees as far as may be possible and all such rules, ordinances and
regulations of said Plant Board shall have the force and effect of law.
Section 3. The State Plant Board, its agents and employees, shall have
authority to enter any depot, express office, storeroom, warehouse or
premises for the purpose of inspecting any honey bees or beekeeping fix-
tures or appliances therein or thought to be therein, for the purpose of
ascertaining whether said bees or fixtures are infected with any contagious
or infectious disease or which they may have reason to believe have been
or are being transported in violation of any of the provisions of this Act.
The said Board through its Agents or employees may require the re-
moval from this State of any honey bees or beekeeping fixtures which have
been brought into the State in violation of the provisions of this Act, or
if finding any honey bees or fixtures infected with any contagious or in-
fectious disease or if finding that such bees or fixtures have been exposed
to danger of infection by such diseases, may require the destruction,
treatment or disinfection of such infected or exposed bees, hives, fixtures
or appliances.
Section 4. The shipment or movement into this State of any used or
second-hand bee hives, honey combs, frames or other beekeeping fixtures
is hereby prohibited except under such rules and regulations as may be
prescribed by the State Plant Board in accordance with Section 2 of this Act.
Section 5. Any person, firm or corporation violating any of the pro-
visions of this Act or of the rules or regulations of the State Plant Board
adopted in accordance with the provisions of this Act shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be punished by a fine of not
more than five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than six
months in the county jail.
Section 6. The sum heretofore appropriated, at the present session of
the Legislature by an Act known as the Citrus Canker Appropriation Act,
and placed to the credit of the State Plant Board Fund in the State Treasury
for the protection of the honey bee culture, to-wit: the sum of Ten Thousand
Dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be used and ex-
pended for the purpose of enforcing and carrying out the provisions of
this Act, under the direction and control of the State Plant Board.
Section 7. All laws and parts of laws inconsistent with the provisions
of this Act are hereby repealed.
Section 8. This Act shall take effect upon its becoming a law.1
Approved June 9, 1919.
mRules 40A to 40F, inclusive, for carrying qut the purposes of this Act, have been
adopted by the State Plant Board and will be found on subsequent pages of this
Circular.








RULES AND REGULATIONS


RULES AND REGULATIONS MADE BY THE STATE PLANT
BOARD PURSUANT TO THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT
OF 1915, IN EFFECT ON JUNE 15, 1921.
PUBLIC NOTICE.
Declaring Certain Insects and Diseases to be Public Nuisances.
'Under the provisions of the Florida Plant Act of 1915, Chapter 6885,
approved April 30, 1915, the State Plant Board of Florida, in accordance
with Section 5 of said Act, does declare the following insects and diseases,
and each and every plant and thing infested or infected therewith, to be
public nuisances:


Insect or. Disease
Avocado Weevil
(Heilipus lauri Boh.).
Banana Root Borer
(Cosmopolites (Sphenophorus)
sordidus Germar).
Banana Wilt Disease, or "Panama
Disease" (Fusarium sp.).
Brown Rot
(Pythiacystis itrophora Sm. &
Sm.).
Brown-tail Moth
(Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Avocado.
Banana.
Sugar cane.
Banana.
Lemons.
Oranges.
Apple (Pyrus mains)'.
Apple, crab (Pyrus coronaria).
Apricot (Prunus armeniaca).
Ash, Black (Fracinus nigra).
Ash, Blue (Frazinus quadrangulata).
Ash, Red (Fraxinus pennsylvanica).
Ash, White (Fraxinus americana).
Barberry (Berberis vulgaris).
Basswood (Tilia americana).
Beach Plum (Prunus maritima).
Beech, American (Fagus grandifolia).
Birch, Black (Betula lenta).
Birch, Gray (B. populifolia).
Birch, Paper (B. papyrifera).
Birch, Yellow (Betula lutea).
Blackberry (Rubus villosus).
Boxelder (Acer negundo).
Cherry (Prunus avium).
Cherry, wild black (Prunus serotina).
Chestnut (Castanea dentata).
Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa).
Choke Cherry (Padus nana).
Crataegus, all species.
Creeper, Virginia
(Ampelopsis quinquefolia).
Currant (Ribes rubrum).
Elm, American (Ulmus americana).
Elm, Cork (U. racemosa).
Elm, English (U. campestris).
Elm, Scotch.
Elm, Slippery (U. fulva).
Gooseberry (Ribes grossularia).
Grape (Vitis cordifolia).
Hophornbeam (Ostrya Virginiana).


"Adopted May 4, 1915. Amended Feb. 14, 1916, June 5, 1916, Aug. 14, 1916, Jan.
8, 1917, June 18, 1917, Jan. 14, 1918, Oct. 13, 1919, Nov. 8, 1920, and June 6, 1921.
*List from data furnished by the Bureau of Entomology, U. S. D. A.








STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease























Citrus Canker
(Bacterium (Pseudomonas)
citri Hasse).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Hornbeam (Carpinus Caroliniana).
Maple, Cut-leafed.
Maple, Red.
Maple, Sugar (Acer saccharum).
Maple, .sycamore
(Acer pseudo-platanus).
Maple, white (Acer dasycarpum).
Oaks (Quercus sp.).
Peach (Prunus persica).
Pear (Pyrus communis).
Pecan (Carya olivaeformis).
Plum (Prunus domestica.
Pyrus pinnatifida.
Quince (Cydonia vulgaris).
Quince, Japan (Cydonia japonica).
Raspberry (Rubus strigosus).
Rose (Rosa nitida).
Shadbush (Amelanchier canadensis).
Spiraea (Spiraea thunbergii).
Sumac, Mountain.
Sumac, Smooth.
Sumac, Stag-horn.
Walnut, black (Juglans nigra).
Weigela rose.
Willow, weeping (Salix Babylonica).
Wistaria (Wistaria consequana).
Witch-hazel '(Hamamelis Virginiana).
Citrus trees and plants, including the
following:
Bergamont (Citrus bergamia).
Includes various kinds of medicinal
citrus.
Bigarade orange (C. vulgaris).
Includes the bittersweet, sour and
others of this type.
Citron (C. Medical .
Includes various varieties of cit-
rons; also cedrat.
Grapefruit, or Pomelo (C. decumana).
Hybrids.
Includes tle hybrids between vari-
ous species of citrus-known un-
der different names, such as
Morton, Rusk, Citrange, Pomer-
ange, Tangelo, etc.
Kumquat (C. japonica).
Includes the various kinds of kum-
quats.
Lemon (C. limonia).
Includes various varieties of lem-
on, also rough lemon, everbear-
ing lemon, ponderosa lemon.
Lime (C. limetta).
Includes various varieties known
as Key lime, Mexican lime, West
Indian lime, etc.
Mandarin Orange (C. nobilis).
This includes all varieties of "kid
glove" oranges grown in Flor-
ida, such as Satsuma, Tanger-
ine, King, Oneco, etc.









15


RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease











Citrus Knot
(Sphaeropsis tumefacens).
Coconut Bud-rot
(Bacillus coli var.).
Cotton-square-Weevil
(Anthonomus vestitus Boh.).
European Corn Borer
(Pyrusta nubilalis Hubn.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Otaheite (C. sinensis).
Pomelo-See Grapefruit.
Shaddock (C. decumana).
As separate from Pomelo. This in- *
cludes several varieties.
Sweet Orange (C. aurantium).
This includes all round oranges
commonly grown for commercial
purposes in Florida.
Trifoliate Orange or "Citrus trifoli-r
ata" (Ponoirus trifoliata).
Wild Lime (Xanthozylum Fagara).
Citrus
Coconut.

Cotton.

Aster.
Apple of Peru.
Asparagus.
Barnyard grass.
Buckwheat.
Burdock.
Barley.
Beggar-ticks.
Bean.
Beet.
Broom Corn.
Carrot.
Corn.
Chicory.
Crab grass.
Cabbage.
Chrysanthemum.
Celery.
Dock.
Dahlia.
Foxtail.
Goldenrod.
Gladiolus.
Grape.
Horseweed.
Hungarian millet.
Lamb's-quarters.
Lady's-thumb (smartweed).
Lettuce.
Oats.
Pigweed.
Panic grass.
Purslane.
Pepper.
Potato.
Ragweed.
Rhubarb.
Scouring rush.
Sour thistle.
Swiss chard.
Spinach.
Sunflower.
Timothy.









STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected


Tansy.
Thistle.
Tomato.
Turnip.
Wild cucumber.
Wild hemp.
Wheat.
Gipsy Moth Alder, speckled (Alnus incana).'
(Porthetria dispar Linn.). Apple (Pyrus malus).
Ash, mountain (Pyrus americana).
Aspen, American
(Populus tremuloides).
Aspen, large-toothed
(Populus grandidentata).
Balm-of-Gilead
(Populus balsamifera).
Barberry, European
(Berberis vulgaris).
Bayberry (Myrica Carolinensis).
Beech, American (Fagus grandifolia).
Birch, black (Betula lenta).
Birch, gray (Betula populifolia).
Birch, paper (Betula papyrifera).
Birch, red (Betula nigra).
Birch, yellow (Betula lutea).
Blueberry, low (Vaccinium vacillana).
Blueberry, tall
(Vaccinium corymbosum).
Boxelder (Acer negundo).
Cherry, sweet (Prunus avium).
Cherry, wild black (Prunus serotina).
Cherry, wild red (Padus virginiana).
Chestnut (Castanea dentata).
Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa).
Choke Cherry (Padus nana).
Cottonwood (Populus deltoides).
Cranberry, American
(Oxyococcus macrocarpus).
Elm, American (Ulmus americana).
Elm, European (Ulmus campestris).
Elm, slippery (Ulmus fulva).
Fern, sweet (Comptonia peregrina).
Gale, sweet (Myrica gale).
Gum, black (Nyssa sylvatica).
Gum, sweet or red
(Liquiday'bar Styraciflua).
Hawthorn (Crataegus sp.).
Hazlenut (Corylus Americana).
Hazelnut, beaked (Corylus rostrata).
Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis),
Hickory, bitternut
(Hicoria cardiformis).
Hickory, mockernut (Hicoria alba).
Hickory, pignut (Hicoria glabra).
Hickory, shagbark (Hicoria ovata).
Hophornbeam (Ostrya Virginiana).
Hornbeam, American
(Carpinus carolinina).
Larch, American (Lariz laricina).
*List used through courtesy of the Federal Horticultural Board.







RULES AND REGULATIONS


Insect or Disease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Larch, European (Larix decidua).
Linden, American (Tilea americana).
Linden, European (Tilea sp.).
Maple, Norway (Acer platanoides).
Maple, red or swamp (Acer rubrum).
Maple, silver (Acer saccharinum).
Maple, sugar (Acer saccharum).
Oak, black (Quercus velutina).
Oak, rock chestnut (Quercus prinus).
Oak, dwarf chestnut
(Quercus pri oides).
Oak, burr (Quercus macrocarpa).
Oak, pin (Quercus palustris).
Oak, post (Quercus stellata).
Oak, red (Quercus rubra).
Oak, scarlet (Quercus coccinea).
Oak, bear (Quercus ilicifolia).
Oak, shingle (Quercus imbricaria).
Oak, swamp white (Quercus bicolor).
Oak white (Quercus alba).
Pear (Pyrus communis).
Pecan (Carya olivaeformis).
Pine, pitch (Pinus rigida).
Pine, red (Pinus resinosa).
Pine, Scotch (Pinus sylvestris).
Pine, western white
(Pinus monticola).
Pine, white (Pinus Strobus).
Plum, beach (Prunus maritima).
Poplar, Lombardy (Populus nigra,
var. italica).
Poplar, silver (Populus alba).
Rose, pasture (Rosa virginiana).
Sassafras (Sassafras sassafras).
Service-berry
(Amelanchier canadensis).
Spruce, black (Picea Mariana).
Spruce, Norway (Picea Abies).
Spruce, red (Picea rubens).
Spruce, white (Picea canadensis).
Sumac, mountain (Rhus copallina).
Sumac, scarlet (Rhus glabra).
Sumac, staghorn (Rhus hirta).
Willow, white (Salix alba).
Willow, glaucous (Salix discolor).
Willow, sandbar (Salix interior).
Witch-hazel (Hamamelis virginiana).


Japanese Beetle Althaea.
(Popillia japonica Newm.). Apple.
Asparagus.
Azalea.
Birch.
Blackberry.
Bladder-nut.
Button-bush.
Cantaloupe.
Cherry.
Corn.
Dock.
Elderberry.







STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease
































Japanese Camphor Scale
(Pseudaonidia duplex Ckll.).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Elm.
Fern.
Grape.
Hawthorn.
Hemp-tree.
Hollyhock.
Indian mallow.
Iris.
Ironweed.
Ivy.
Japanese flowering cherry.
Jewel-weed.
Lamb's-quarters.
Lima bean.
Locust.
Marigold.
Milkweed.
Morning-glory.
Peach.
Plum.
Ragweed.
Raspberry.
Rhubarb.
Rose.
Sassafras.
Smartweed.
Spirea.
Sweet Potato.
Tamarisk.
Virginia creeper.
Watermelon.
Wild Carrot.
Wild Cherry.
Wild Grape.
Willow.
Althaea."
Andropogon sp.
Aralia papyrifera.
Asparagus Sprengeri.
Azalea.
Bay, sweet.
Banana.
Bridal wreath.
Caladiwm sp.
Calla lily.
Camellia.
Camphor.
Canna.
Caronia aromatic.
Catalpa.
Cestrum nucitans.
Cherry, wild.
Chestnut.
China-ball.
Citrus (several species).
Clematis paniculata.
Crape myrtle.
Cyoas revoluta.
Deutzia.


5List furnished-by Bureau of Entomology, U. S. D. A.








RuLas AND REGuLATIONS


Insect or Diease


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected


Dracaena.
Elderberry.
Escallonia montifidium.
Eurya ochnacea.
Ficus pandurata.
Fious repens.
Fig.
Goldenrod.
Grand Duke.
Grapevine.
Gum, sweet.
Hackberry.
Hibiscus.
Honeysuckle.
IlUicium anisatum.
Ivy, English.
Ivy, poison.
Jasminium revolutum.
Jessamine, night-blooming.
Lantana vine.
Ligustrum (five species).
Linwm sp.
Magnolia fuscata.
Mgola Soulangeana.
Maoonita aquifolijm.
Maple.
Mignonette tree.
Mulberry.
Myrica rubra,
Myrtle.
Oak, live.
Oak, water.
Oleander.
Olive, sweet.
Palms.
Peach, flowering.
Pear.
Pecan.
Persimmon, Japanese.
Plumbago.
Plum, Japan.
Pomegranate, flowering.
Poplar, Lombardy.
Primula sp.
Prunus caroliniensus.
Rhododendron.
Rhus succedanea.
Rhynchospermum.
Rose.
Salisburia adiantifolia.
Saphora sp.
Solanum.
Starcoula sp.
Sycamore.
Tallow tree, Chinese.
Tamarix.
Tilia sp.
Ulmus spp.
Viburnum.
Vinea sp. (Periwinkle).


S "








STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease





Mango Seed Weevil
(Sternochetus (Cryptorhynchus)
mangiferae (Fab.) ).


Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Wandering Jew.
Weigela.
Wistaria.
Xanthozylum sp.
Yucca sp.
Mango fruit and seed.


Mediterranean Fruit Fly Almond (Amygdalus communis).'
(Ceratitis capitata Wied.). Amatungula
(Carissa bispinosa) (C. arduina).
Apple
(Malus sylvestris) (Pyrus malus).
Apricot (Prunus armeniaca).
Avocado
(Persea americana) (P. gratissima).
Banana (Musa sapientium).
Barbados gooseberry
(Pereskia aculeata).
Barbary Fig (Opuntia vulgaris).
Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).
Belladonna (Atropa belladonna).
Carica quercifolia.
Carambola (Averrhoa carambola).
Cayenne or Surinam cherry
(Eugenia uniflora) (E. michelii).
Cerbera thevetia (Thevetia neriifolia).
Cherimoya (Annano cherimola).
Chinese inkberry (Cestrum spp.).
Chrysobalanus ellipticus.
Citron (Citrus medical .
Cocoa-plum (Chrysobalanus icaco).
Coffee (Coffea arabica).
Eggplant (Solanum 'melangena).
Elengi tree (Mimusops elengi).
Fig (Ficus carica).
Granadilla
(Passiflora quadrangularis).
Grape (Vitis vinifera).
Grapefruit
(Citrus grandis) (C. decumana).
Grumixiama or Brazilian cherry
(Eugenia dombeyi) (E. brazilipnsis).
Guava (Psidium guajava).
Japanese persimmon
(Diospyros kaki).
Jerusalem cherry
(Solanum capsicastrum).
Kafir-plum (Harpephyllum caffrum).
Kei apple
(Dovyalis oaffra) (Aberia caffra).
Kumquat (Fortunella japonica)
(Citrus japonica).
Lemon (Citrus limonia)
(C. medical var. limon).
Lime
(Citrus aurantifolia) (C. limetta).
Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica).
*List used through courtesy of the Federal Horticultural Board.







RuLs AND BRsaLATIONS 21

Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Malay apple (CaryophyUus malae-
oensis) (Eugenia maolcconsis).
Mammee apple (Mammea americena).
Mandarin orange
(Citrus nobiis delicioss).
Mango (Mangifera indica).
Medlar (Mespus germanica)
(Pyrus germanims).
Natal pluni (Carissa grandiflora).
Noronhia emarginate.
Orange jessamine
(Chalcas exotica) (Murraya exotica).
Papaya (Carica papaya).
Passion flower (Passiflora caerulem).
Peach (Amygdalus persica)
(Prunus persisa).
Prickly pear (Opuntia tuna).
Quince (Cydonia oblongo)
(Pyrus cydonia).
Red peppers (Capsicum spp.).
Rose apples (Caryophyllus jambos).
(Eugenia jcwbos).
Round Kamani Mastwood
(Calophyllum inophyllum).
Sapodilla, Chicle (Achras sapota).
Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus).
Sour or Seville Orange
(Citrus aurantium).
Soursop (Annona muricdta).
Squash, pumpkin, gourd
(Cucurbita app.).
Starapple (Chrysophyllun cainito).
Strawberry Guava
(Psidium cattleyanmm).
Sweet orange (Citrus sinetsis).
Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).
Winged kamani (Terminalia catappe).
Mexican Bean Beetle Beans, including all common garden
(Epilachna corrupt Muls.). or field beans.
"Greens", i. e., edible plant leaves
such as mustard, chard, spinach,
turnips, beets, collards, cabbage and
lettuce.
Green corn.
Corn in shuck.
Hay.
Forage crops.
Mexican Orange Maggot, or More- Guava (Psidium guajava).'
los Fruit Worm Mango (Mangifera indica).
(Anastrepha (Trypets) ludens Orange
Loew.). (Citrus sinensis and C. aurantium).
Peach (Amygdalus persica).:
Plum (Prunus spp.).
Sapodilla (Achras sapota).
Sweet lime (C. limetta).
Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane Sugar cane.
Sorghum.
Corn.
MList used through courtesy of the Federal Horticultural Board.









STATE PLANT BOARD


Insect or Disease Plants Likely to Become Infested
or Infected
Rice.
Millet.
Crab grass.
Panicum.
Pineapple Black Weevil Pineapple.
(Metanasius ritchiei Marshall).
Pink Bollworm Cotton.
(Pectinophora (Gelechia) gossypi-
ella (Saund.) ).
Spiny Citrus White-fly* Avocado.
(Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby). Capparis spp.
Cestrum nocturnum.
Citrus.
Coffee..
Guava.
Lignum vitae.
Mahwa (Bassia latifolia).
Mango.
Salacea reticulata.
Wampie (Clausenia wampi).
West Indian Sweet Potato Weevil Sweet Potato.
(Euscepes batatae Waterhouse).
Yam Weevil Sweet Potato Yam (Dioscorea sp.)
(Palaeopus costicollis Marshall).
Rule 1.' Inspectors employed by the Plant Board shall examine trees,
plants and plant products in nurseries, orchards and other places within the
State of Florida, in order to determine whether such trees, plants and plant
products are infested or infected with any insect, pest or disease declared
to be. or listed by the State Plant Board as being either a public nuisance
or an especially injurious insect, pest or disease, and shall report their
findings to the Plant Board.
Rule 2.10 The planting, transplanting or otherwise moving of any
plants which are infected with citrus canker, or which are likely to carry
canker infections, is prohibited.
Rule 3.11 All plants found to be infected with citrus canker shall be
entirely destroyed by burning, and without being cut, or otherwise handled
or moved. Further, the ground shall be thoroughly burned for a distance
of three feet beyond the utmost spread of the branches of the infected
plant; provided, however, that the Plant Pathologist, acting under the
direction of the Plant Commissioner, may carry on such experiments with
infected trees as the Plant Board may. deem advisable, as looking toward
the control and cure of citrus canker. Said experiments shall be con-
ducted under such conditions as will not endanger healthy trees by the
spread of citrus canker.
Rule 4.1" The movement from a property or along a public road of
all trees and plants and parts thereof commonly known as nursery stock,
including woody perennials, palms, strawberry plants and banana plants,
and including budwood and scions, intended for propagating purposes, which
do not have attached thereto a proper certificate tag issued by the State
Plant Board and which have not been prepared for movement in accord-
ance with the rules and regulations of the State Plant Board in other
respects is hereby prohibited. Said certificate must be attached conspicu-
ously to the outside of the container holding the nursery stock.
SSAlso known as the "black fly" and (in Cuba) "la mosca prieta."
*Adopted May 4, 1915. Amended Dec. 10, 1917.
"Adopted May 4, 1915. Amended June 6, 1921.
"Adopted May 4, 1915. Amended June 19, 1915, and June 6, 1921.
sAdopted May 4, 1915. Amended Feb. 14, March 18 and April 10, 1916, June 10,
1918, Jan. 18, 1919, and June 6, 1921.




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