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National review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098459/00023
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Title: National review
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Office of the Prime Minister
Place of Publication: Castries, Saint Lucia
Publication Date: 10-08-2011
Copyright Date: 2009
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098459:00023

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SATURDAY, OCT OBER 8, 2011 nationalreview@pm.gov.lc THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE GOVERNMENT OF SAINT LUCIA FREE The Government of Saint Lucia contin normalcy to the lives of victims of last Octobers Hurricane Tomas, in one of the worst affected areas of Soufriere. Providing housing to displaced persons from the community of Fond St. Jacques remains a priority for the Government which has been wrestling with the urgent need for shelter alongside safety consid erations, in an area that remains vulnerable, a year after the disaster. sing, Urban Renewal and Local Government has been an integral part of Gov ernments initial response to the disaster and the ongoing efforts to address the many out of which housing for victims and displaced families surfaced as a major concern. The National Emergency Housing Act stipulates the formation of a diately after a natural disaster. The Urban Renewal and Local GovernDevelopment and the Environment. Immediately after Tomas, this Com action. In the immediate aftermath of the hurricane The Roteract Club idents in Fond St Jacques, Soufriere and given the potential hazards of this situation, the immediate priori two-fold: conducting damage as sessments of the housing at Fond St. Jacques and a socio economic survey of the displaced households from that community as well as the re location of the residents occupying the tents by the end of 2010. a number of hurdles includ ing the unseasonably high rainfall that rendered the area unsafe for months after the hurricane, but members of the committee and the mained resolute. Continued on page 3 FOR HURRICANE VICTIMS IN FOND ST JACQUES, SOUFRIERE

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Page 2 Saturday October 8, 2011 A number of groups from Valley communities came together to launch a novel project designed to economically empower residents, through various activities, and business enterprises that link agriculture with products, services and experiences in tourism. The Dennery Eco/Agro Tourism Proj ects aim is to ensure that agriculture remains relevant in the face of the islands growing dependence on tourism. The project is designed to en courage new and existing rural entities to stay and expand, create and develop new agro/eco-tourism businesses, and improve the rural communities and market them in the wider national tourism drive. The two communities have been branded to accentuate their cul tural uniqueness and strengths. They will get help to develop and upgrade existing products and services.The project is funded by the European Union and the Government of Saint Lucia, the Government of Saint Lucias contribution being largely in kind. The 4.4 million Euro project also has as one of its goals the enhancement of a number of existing and potential tourism sites and ventures, operated by community based organisations. These include two look-out points managed by the Dennery Development Foundation; the Fond dOr Estate; the popular Sea Food Fiesta staged by commu nity seafood vendors on Saturdays; and an organic farm operated by a group of Rastafarians in the com Dennery youth and sports councils have also teamed up to operate nature trails which they will use to promote health and sport tourism in the community. up with the existing Local Government Authorities and Credit Unions ley Development Foundation which will manage the overall brand which has been developed. It will ensure standards are maintained, and that the environment stays pris tine and that the wider community ing such a mix of organisations and personalities can be challenging but is not insurmountable. of Agriculture, Tourism, Physical Development, the National Development Corporation, and the Audie ating opportunities for the sale of agricultural products, the to sell the entire agricultural/rural experience. Visitors can actually hand the process involved in food production. They are also exposed to a number of natural and cultural the project. The idea is to allow the visitor to experience truly authentic Saint Lucian rural life, natural and cultural heritage, folklore and cuisine. ECEAT the European Centre for Ecologic al and Agricultural Tour ism. His job is to work with the community groups in Dennery pacity in enterprise development. He says, apart from the physical enhancements to the various sites, significant resources have been invested in training, branding, and marketing exercises. He describes the project as a really full package ity built in the community to deliver a world class tourism product. The project which started in 2009 will enter a new phase in the coming two look out points in Dennery, and a number of changes to the Village the next tourist season. A mem ber of the community along with a Consultant will be visiting the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Associa the sites and activities. This will be accompanied by an intense marketing campaign of the new brand and to raise awareness of the sites and s. The project in Dennery Patrick says should be a model for commu nity development in other regions. It is a perfect example he says of what can happen when a com munity takes charge of its destiny by managing its own economic activity. ery Eco-agro Tourism Project has the potential to be utilized as a model and success story which can be replicated by rural/ agricultural communities across the island. The importance of interventions of this nature is no doubt critical given the challenges facing rural agricultural communities in particular the fall-out from a shrink ing banana export market. Government is very mindful of this reality hence its commitment and support towards ensuring the success of initiatives like the Dennery Ecoagro Tourism Project. Government recognizes the need to stimulate activity within the rural economy. Government will continue as part of a deliberate policy to facilitate the growth of rural economies through out Saint Lucia. Dennery Mabouya Valley Go Back to R oots with Eco-agro T ourism projectThe Government of Saint Lucia generate economic growth as a means of alleviating poverty and bringing improvement to the lives of people has laid the ground work for the establishment of a National Competitiveness and Productivity Council. According to the Deputy tional Development, John Calixte, this has been very challenging due to the myriad of constraints, including limadequately trained human resources. In addition he says the islands small size, vulnerability to natural disasters, susceptibility to economic shocks and in the global market have not helped.Whilst the country has recorded modest growth in recent years, he says it is clear that a lot more can be done to generate the kind of sustained growth that is necessary to position Saint Lucia and at the same time build resilience in the wake of an uncertain and dynamic global environment. At the heart of this effort is the recognition that there are exist and which limit the islands capacity to achieve the desired results. He says the issues of lack of competitiveness coupled with low productivity are factors that are cur rently crippling the economy and which must be addressed urgently. There is a strong correlation between these two variables as the certainly result in the improvement in indicators for the former, he says.International best practices suggest that the Public Private Dialogue achieve consensus on initiatives to stimulate private sector develop ment, enhance competitiveness and increase economic growth over the medium term he says PPD forums involve widespread consultations and medium size enterprises, busiand civil society. Such forums help to inform government of the likely microeconomic foundations for growth and create a sense of owner ship of reform programmes among business owners, making policies more likely to succeed in practice. According to Calixte few formal opportunities for public private ful of the critical need to increase productivity in the economy and to address this lack of formal dialogue, Cabinet has approved the establish ment of a National Competiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) which will act as the main forum for the private public dialogue on the countrys private sector develop ment, competiveness and economic growth. In addition Cabinet also approved the formation of a steering The work of this council will be based on the principles of partici pation and consensus building of multi-sectoral partners because of the multifaceted nature of the is its inaugural meeting recently and the Terms of Reference have subsequently been prepared to guide the it relates to the kind of support to be provided by the NCPC. Government has also sought support from the Inter-American Compete Caribbean programme to develop and implement a project to support the establishment of the NCPC and a Technical Secretariat to support its work. The launch of the National Productivity and Competitive Council is an initiative all levels and maximization of our human resources. Improving National Competitiveness and Productivity

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Page 3 Saturday October 8, 2011 The Government of Saint Lucia has partnered with the the services offered by the Grospartnership involves the expansion of the hours of operation at the Poly clinic as well as the clinics physical facilities. has developed a dynamic working renowned Washington Adventist University (WAU), one of the oldest educational institutions in the US, under the Seventh Day Adventist is now in a po -Government Partners with the American International Medical University to Improve Health Services at the Gros Islet Polyclinicteen years of medical experience as a result of the partnership. A partnership he hopes will allow the island to develop a more special ized, highly technical level of health care that includes diagnosis and treatment of disease and disability, to compliment the existing primary and secondary healthcare services. other resources toward the achieve ment of that goal. concerned about the prevalence of diabetes on the island, the related kidney issues and the need for diily in the establishment of a URO NEPHRO CENTRE OF EXCEL LENCE in the north of the island. The University believes it is a much needed service in light of its own research which shows that 40% of the people in need of dialysis are from the northern part of the island.Limited physical space at the Gros-Islet Polyclinic made expan sion of the facility impractical, so the additional labs on its premises, from to the Polyclinic. Some of the new labs will also be used to provide students. about the need to provide better emergency service to Gros-Islet resi dents. The size of the constituency and the increase in commercial and such a service even more critical, in light of the re sul encountered when travelling from the north to the capital. In a medical emergency, this can pose serious problems for medical professionals, who must carry out critical life saving measures within what is termed the golden hour. In emergency medicine, the golden hour refers to a time period lasting from a few minutes to several hours following traumatic injury being sustained by a casualty, during which there is the highest likelihood that prompt med ical treatment will prevent death. the extension of the opening hours imity to the clinic, the University support services to make this a real ity. The University has e stablished a doctors clinic, labs and a radiology centre, which can all be used by the Polyclinic to supplement its existing services. level in their various disciplines. The team includes five doctors; three nurses, and three allied health that the Government use these persons some of whom have twenty and thirty years medical experience, to eventually extend the operating time to twenty four hours. Under the arrangement the University has agreed to pay 50% of the doctors wages. million dollars, including infra structure development and equipment. The Parliamentary Repre has played an instrumental role in negotiating with the management be derived from the collaboration is expected to commence shortly on the implementation of the joint initiative between the Government of Saint Lucia and American International University. Continued from page 1 Physical Development conducted its own assessment of the damage to housing in the Fond St Jacques community. The assessment showed that there were houses which were damaged beyond repair, those that were destroyed altogether and those which found themselves in very unstable and vulnerable areas. As a result of the objective of removing people out of accommodation within tents, the identifying alternative housing. ing had, months before the disaster, completed construction of fourteen houses at Cresslands in Soufriere as tion project. Cresslands, although impacted by the hurricane was deemed safe by engineers who conducted preliminary structural examinations of the site. They discovered that even though the site has been impacted by a debris largely intact and that the debris if removed could make the site suitable for relocating displaced residents. the challenge of providing for occupants of twenty two (22) tents between the St. Phillips school yard and the Fond St. Jacques a dozen houses in the available area at Cresslands. As a result, the Committee had to determine priority cases to move from the tents into the temporary housing. The Local Government arm of the and Local Government, working with the Soufriere Regional Development Foundation, the Soufriere Town Council, and the Saint Lucia Elec tricity Services Limited (LUCELEC) began work to clear the site, erecting electricity poles and reinstating power to the area in preparation for moving displaced families into structures erected at Cresslands, with the un derstanding that they would remain in those structures, until they could return home or could be accomm o dated elsewhere. lies (approximately 40 individuals) to the Cresslands site. Working with the Soufriere Regional Develop ment Foundation and Saint Lucia Social Development Fund (SSDF), houses were constructed and rental accommodation was found for two other households affected by the hurricane. meet with the community members along with representatives from the Works and Agriculture to both get a sense of peoples issues, and also Government to bring them relief. The ment to identify persons from Fond St Jacques who were displaced by the disaster and who were not living in tents but perhaps living with other people in neighbouring communities such as Choiseul. ites h as possible locations for temporary or semi permanent housing for those persons. Among the visited sites were Diamond Estate, Delcer friere. Site suitability and other assite near the Fond St Jacques area was by far the most suitable site because of its proximity to Fond St. Jacques other favourable characteristics. The of Planning prepared preliminary designs for low cost, (about $80, 000.00 per unit) multi family timber units. tional Emergency Advisory Council but funding was an issue. World Funds would take time to approve and disburse. A National Recon struction Unit was established. The Unit was charged with the imple mentation of Governments National Vision Plan a blueprint for the development of the country. Hur ricane Tomas brought into sharp focus the need to fast track some of the developmental plans outlined in the National Vision Plan. It is for that reason, that the National Reconstruc tion and Development Unit (NRDU) was conceptualized with a view to strengthening the institutional framework necessary to accelerate the implementation of the Vision Plan and related projects. information compiled by the Committee including socio-economic surveys, damage assessment sur veys and site suitability surveys for Renewal and Local Government continues to liaise with the Unit and continues to manage those house ment Team. That team continues to deal with social and other issues, being experienced by the relocated families. It continues working with the Reconstruction Unit to help persons from LEtan in Fond St Jacques who, although their homes were not damaged by the hurricane, had to be removed because of concerns for their safety. The Reconstruc tion Unit has contracted experts to conduct further survey of the area to determine its safety and which households if any, can be returned to the area and those which will be veloped with a joint investment of lars. Of this amount the Government of Saint Lucia is making a The Government of Saint Lucia acquired seven (7) acres of land for the purpose of the housing development for Fond St. Jacques victims. The realisation of the project to date has been achieved through intensive negotiations with a Trust Fund entity and the French Red Cross. A total of twenty seven houses will be constructed. To date initial work has been undertaken involving preparation. Actual construction work is expected to begin in mid October. The houses which will be constructed on 3,000 sq feet cost. Arrangements have been made with two Credit Unions to for residents. of Housing and the National Reconstruction and Development Unit continue to work diligently to bring comfort and stability to Jacques. Notwithstanding the staggering cost associated with persons, the Government of Saint solving this issue which is for it a priority concern. Government Provide Shelter for Hurricane Victims in F ond St Jacques, Soufriere

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Page 4 Saturday October 8, 2011 Continued from the last issue It is understood that the disaster cycle lends itself to a comprehensive approach to disaster management, whether within the the Caribbean Disaster Emergency new direction for disaster management for the 21st century. It moves away from the relief and response mode to a comprehensive approach which takes disaster and mitigation considerations into account during the planning and development stages. It also expands the partners to include economic, social, and environmental planners, architects, engineers, and health profession als among others. [CDERA Press integrate Comprehensive Disaster planning process, it is this committees intension to weave Compre hensive Disaster. Disaster Section 11(3) -The National Disaster Response Plan shall in clude (a) procedures for, mitiga tion of, response to and recovery from emergencies and disasters Departments of Government, statutory bodies, local government units, and persons or organization volunteer or are required by law to perform functions related to the mitigation of, preparedness for response to and recovery and recovery from emergencies and disaster in Saint Lucia 2010 by Cabinet Conclusion No. 911/2010; 24 September, 2009 by 2009 by Cabinet Conclusion No. Conclusion No. 497/2009; 2 Au gust, 2007 by Cabinet Decision No. dination of all resources involved in emergency management and is to be referred to in any emergency situation. The pur pose of the National outline preparedness, prevention mitigation and response activities to an emergency situation associated with natural/man-made disaster or technological incidents on the island. It provides operational concepts re lating to the various emergency situ ations, describes the overall respon sibilities of the National Emergency and the role of all concerned sectors in assisting in minimizing loss of life ing. sponse to such disasters through maximum use of Local, Nation al, Regional and International resources. eas of prevention and mitigation are not fully developed they are referred to in Annexes later in the plan. -NEMO Disaster Preparedness Feature commitment to disaster preparedness, prevention, mitigation and ganisational and functional mechanisms and procedures for carrying out a disaster program. annually. ions are done under Secretariat; comments from all the public, private and social organisations involved are included in the new version of the National Plan. The document is then sent to the National E the plan(s) is sent to the Cabinet of The N agement Plan, with its various sections and subsections can be accessed on the Internet at the Government of Saint Lucia offi cial Webpage: http://stlucia.gov. lc/ne mp Page | 48 Drought Susceptibility Map By Dr. Christopher Cox Page | 48 Drought Susceptibility Map By Dr. Christopher Cox Drought Susceptibility MapBy Dr. Christopher Cox Page | 49 Landslide Risk M ap By the OAS Page | 49 Landslide Risk M ap By the OAS Page | 49 Landslide Risk M ap By the OAS Page | 49 Landslide Risk M ap By the OAS Landslide Risk MapBy the OAS

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Page 5 Saturday October 8, 2011 Feature Twenty eight year -old Garey the West Indies team on September 25th, 2011 during the second Twenty20 international match in the series against England that left England all out for 88 in reply to the West Indies 113-5. He ended gures of 3 wickets tant role. His five brothers com peted in every sport imaginable, encouraged young Garey to do the same, but it was cricket he says that attracted him the most. From as young as seven he remembers debut his brothers thought he was too young to play. His determination once they recognised his raw talent and love for the game they began encouraging him to play. Coach same talent in him while a student and Garey was encouraged to play for the school. Even though he participated in other sports, he says cricket had a special appeal. He the game. To him it was an art form. One he wanted to master. under fifteen programme began, to play at age eleven. He progressed steadily playing in under nineteen competitions at the local and re on the Saint Lucia senior team. He admits to having made a lot of sacof them were not always popular, especially with his mother. She was not happy about how much of her sons precious youthful time was devoted to cricket or the fact that he was constantly travelling represent ing Saint Lucia and the Windward Islands. She was fearful about what it would mean for his future. Determined not to let her down, he worked as hard at his school work as he did at cricket, and mad her proud on both counts. own rewards. Even if he never made the West Indies team, he says he would still be proud of his accom plishments in the game, because of the lessons it has taught him and the man that it has helped to mould him into. apart from playing cricket, he recalls after school I would rush playing. I would come home from school late many times after playing cricket which upset my mother a lot. thoughts of a career in law enforcement but even then cricket won, demanding as it did, more and more opportunities to travel and play overseas. He tried working a as a Customer Service Representative with the Saint Lucia National of Saint Lucia in Vieux-Fort but he admits it really wasnt my thing. of relief that comes with making the West Indies team; a sense that all the but in another sense he feels, the real work has just begun. Now he says, he has to ensure that he keeps his place on the team and makes the island and region proud and he is working hard to do just that. is up by 5:00 am and hits the road to visits the gym from 10:00 am, gets some practice in on afternoons, and regime all over the next day. you must always be on the go main shape and ensuring that whenever youre called you can deliver the goods. but he is not losing sight of the big picture. I dont want to be seen as just a twenty20 cricketer. I want to take it one step at a time and go on to the one day international team and then the test team, he says As to how Im going to accomplish that Im just going to keep doing what Ive been doing working hard, means to enhance my art, stick ing to it and staying grounded at all timesbecause it could all be of that so I want to stay humble and take as much advice as I can and make sure when I retire that Im remembered for something and not just being on the West Indies team. The Government and people of Saint Lucia are proud of the and stands ready to support him and other aspiring young sports men and women. During a recent Garey back home, the nations leader made the following remarks which captures Goverments comcalled upon to respond to the love of their sons and daughters who see an area that they can make a contribution to the countrya social and economic contribution. Therefore I want to join the minister in assuring you of the full support and commit ment of the Government of Saint Luciamy personal support in fact. We will do what is necessary, we will make the necessary investments and we will continue to make that investment!" CONGRATULATIONS TO GAREY! for 9 runs in four ov ers, leading the West Indies to a 25 run win over the English team. His exploits on that day included bowling out the likes refused to let him p lay street cricket with them, leaving him instead to fetch dispatched balls from the bush. Those early days he says taught him some hard but valuable lessons about determination, and hard work. which sports played a very imporGarey Mathurin Reaping the Reward of Hard Work

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Page 7 Saturday October 8, 2011 Page 6 Saturday October 8, 2011 Construction of Bridge at Fond St.JacquesCommunity infrastructure investment is a key component of community development in the Soufriere constituency. Funds have been allocated to build and renew local infrastructure such as roads and bridges much of which was damaged by Hurricane Tomas in October last year. Heavy rain and sustained winds of 75mph (120km/h) struck St Lucia leaving the normally lush green Soufriere area looking like a war zone. The roads le ading into town were either washed away or covered by land slides or mudslides. Entire homes were covered by mountainsides collapsing. continue, with the priority be ing the construction of housing for displaced residents. A number of projects that suit the needs and priorities of and planned for implementa tion. This unique approach ensures that community in in the planning and design of the various projects. To this end, a wide variety of programs, projects and activities that directly impact residents have been under taken since the passage of the hurricane. Numerous footpath con struction projects have been completed in the town, with the most recent construction of footpaths taking place at Migny. Additional footpath construction and drainage works were undertaken in the Sulphur Springs area to provide improved access to residents. undertaken at the Humming bird Beach. Apart from the beautification project, other initiatives will be undertaken to make the beach more touristfriendly and comfortable for use by locals. Work was done on the reconstruction of the Soufriere Hospital Road to Wingsville. A Soufriere Hos pital enhancement project was undertaken. Hurricane To damage. contribution sports make to individual wellbeing, and to the development of the economy, environment and society, attention has been given to a number of sporting facilities in the community. Upgrades have been made to the Soufriere & Fond St. as to the Soufriere basketball court. Significant road repairs have been undertaken in the constituency along with the construction of a retaining wall in Palmiste. Major works have been undertaken on the road at Esperance leading to Diamond. The main bridge in Fond St, Jacques has been replaced and public facilities at Palmiste have also been upgraded. Walkway to provide comfort to residents Construction of Laundry Room in Palmiste Palmiste Public Facilities Before Palmiste Public Facilities Presently Palmiste road before Retaining wall Palmiste road after construction of Retaining Work in Progress Footpaths and Drains in Migny Upgrage & Lights Soufriere Basketball Court Work in Progress Humming Bird Beach Soufriere Hospital Enhancement Project Reconstruction of Hospital Road Work in Progress Soufriere Playing Field Upgrade Soufriere Playing Field before

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Page 8 Saturday October 8, 2011 Just over tw enty years ago, a small group of Laborians got together, with a commitment to promote cultural activities in their communities. What began as a small local initiative has become a unique experience in linking arts and culture with community development, and in connecting community ac tion with regional and international cultural networks. for-profit community-based or ganisation and its main objective is to promote genuine community development through arts and culture, by bringing quality cultural performances to the south of Saint Lucia and by improving the skills and visibility of local artists and performers. Ultimately, the goal of social togetherness and harmony and to promote economic development through cultural events and expression. organised more than 300 events and activities, in music, educa tion, dance, drama and visual arts. Its main production is Jazz in the South, which started in 1997 and has since featured over 140 bands from all over the Caribbean, with performers from many countries in the region, including Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Cuba, Domi nica, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago, and with guests from Africa. en years, Jazz in the South has established itself as a Fes tival in its own right, with the objec tives of promoting and supporting Caribbean music and musicians and supporting economic activity, business opportunities and social cohesion in host communities. In the has brought to Saint Lucia many of the most talented and creative musicians from our region, and is now recognised by jazz experts and others as a major date on the Caribbean cultural calendar. all a cultural event, it is also an instrument of community development, as community festivals are also good for the local economy. In the past few years, for example, Labowi Promotions Community Development through Arts and Culturetwo surveys of local vendors have been carried out in the South of the island, and they have both indicated that vendors from Laborie place Jazz in the South as their most important activity in terms of revenue. And it tions ensures that all the services needed are provided locally when available. An event like Jazz in the South therefore means business opportunities for vendors, but it also means additional income for taxi drivers, restaurants and caterers in Laborie, hotels in Vieux Fort, and many others. development actually characterises tions, including regular events such as the commemoration of Nobel Laureate Week or occasional activities. This is why, in addition to the cultural performances that it stages, which started in 2006, thanks to the support of the Cultural Develop Reduction Fund. The vision was to provide a range of social, eco participants, with enhanced social cohesion, economic opportunities, and a source of community pride, empowerment and cultural identity. heights thanks to its collaboration with world-renowned composer, band leader and performer Andy Narell, who provided two weeks of coaching to the band members in February, and returned to Saint part of Jazz in the South 2011. This collaboration, which was sponsored partners in Jazz in the South, has greatly enhanced the musical standards of the group, and has given its members additional pride and willingness to sustain and expand ning and preparing for several events and activities. In December, it will participate in a meeting of a newly-formed network of Carib bean jazz festivals in Guadeloupe. In January 2012, as part of Nobel Laureate Week and as one of the activities planned to mark its 20th anhost a retrospective of the work of painter Jonathan Gladding, who has over the past twelve years captured the vibrancy and pride of Laborian life and culture. And preparations for Jazz in the South 2012 are well advanced, with an exciting pro gramme already drawn up. of its three voluntary Directors (Augustin Barthelmy, Len Leonce and Yves Renard), but it is also very much the product of the support and collaboration of many part ners in and outside Laborie. This includes co-founders Grelle Joyeux of young professionals coordinated by Andy Simeon and Rohan Joyeux, and several community organisa tions, including the Laborie Development Foundation and the Laborie Co-operative Credit Union. cinema, the vision of arts and culture as vehicles of community development has been largely realised. ent recognizes the work motions. This entity stands out as a success story which shows what can be achieved when community people show dedication and commitment towards advancing and managing the development of their own communities. The Govern ment of Saint Lucia salutes the munity development through Arts and Culture. Seminar on constitutional reform, Nobel Laureate Week 2008 Laborie Pan Project Jazz in the South 2008 Rudy John Beach Park

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Page 9 Saturday October 8, 2011 OVERVIEW Lucia. reporting, there were just fewer than 50 hotels, providing just under 4,000 rooms. SUPPLY IN THE SECTORHow big is the accommodation sector? As at June 2011, there were 47 hotels in the Ministry of Tourism & Civil Aviation database1 Those 47 businesses accounted for 3,770 rooms on the island. All Inclusive hotels supplied over 50% of total capacity. How is capacity spread in the sector? Of the 47 hotels mentioned above, 53% had less than forty rooms, with 23% between 7 19 rooms, 15% between 30 39 rooms, and 11% between 20 29 rooms. Fifteen percent of the remaining establishments had 101 200 rooms, while 11% had over 200 rooms. How many persons are employed2 in the accommodation sector? For the period January to June, a total of 6,632 persons were employed in the catThis comprised 3,150 males and 3,482 females. DEMAND IN THE SECTORHow many bed nights3 were spent? The period January to June recorded 1,061,354 bed nights, down from 1,103,987 for the same period in 2010. This was a reduction of 3.9% or 42,633 bed nights. the lowest 139,981. Number of Hotels Share of Rooms All Inclusive 9 54% Other Hotels 38 56% P R O F IL E O F T H E H O T E L S E C T O R J A N U A R Y J U N E 2 0 1 1 OVERVIEW This report provides a summary of various attributes of the hotel sector in Saint Lucia. Visitors to the island have a range of accommodation establishments to choose from, including hotels, villas/cottages, guest houses and apartments. At the time of reporting, there were just fewer than 50 hotels, providing just under 4,000 rooms. The island hosted just over 1 million bed nights to 157,401 visitors. SUPPLY IN THE SECTOR How big is the accommodation sector? As at June 2011, there were 47 hotels in the Ministry of Tourism & Civil Aviation database1. This figure does not include villas/cottages, apartments, or guest houses. Those 47 businesses accounted for 3,770 rooms on the island. All Inclusive hotels supplied over 50% of total capacity. Table I: Share of Hotel Rooms Number of Hotels Share of Rooms All Inclusive 9 54% Other Hotels 38 56% How is capacity spread in the sector? Of the 47 hotels mentioned above, 53% had less than forty rooms, with 23% between 7 19 rooms, 15% between 30 39 rooms, and 11% between 20 29 rooms. Fifteen percent of the remaining establishments 1 Those accommodation establishments certified by the Saint Lucia Tourist Board. had 101 200 rooms, while 11% had over 200 rooms. Chart I: Hotels by Number of Rooms How many persons are employed2 in the accommodation sector? For the period January to June, a total of 6,632 persons were employed in the category Hotels, Camping Sites and Other Provision of Short-Stay Accommodation. This comprised 3,150 males and 3,482 females. DEMAND IN THE SECTOR How many bed nights3 were spent? The period January to June recorded 1,061,354 bed nights, down from 1,103,987 for the same period in 2010. This was a reduction of 3.9% or 42,633 bed nights. 2 Source: National Insurance Corporati on. The figures represent the active insured population all registered persons who have paid at least one month's contribution in the review period. It is the most accurate means of retrieving a figure that reflects the true employment level in the sector. 3 Bed nights are less persons staying in private accommodation. Chart I: Hotels by number of rooms Bed nights by market Of the total bed nights on the island during January to June 2011, the USA accounted for 41%, followed by the UK (29%) and Canada (15%). What types of establishments are used4? Between January and March5, 54% of respondents stayed at All Inclusive hotels. This was followed by Other Hotels (21%) and Apartments/Villas (10%). Profile of the Hotel Sector Prepared by the Research Unit Page 2 of 3 The month of April had the highest total bed nights 193,168, while June had the lowest 139,981. Chart II: Bed Nights by Month There was a positive relationship observed between bed nights and arrivals. Chart III: Bed Nights and Arrivals Bed nights by market Of the total bed nights on the island during January to June 2011, the USA accounted for 41%, followed by the UK (29%) and Canada (15%). Chart IV: Bed nights by Country of Origin What types of establishments are used4? Between January and March5, 54% of respondents stayed at All Inclusive hotels. This was followed by Other Hotels (21%) and Apartments/Villas (10%). Chart V: Type of Accommodation Used What is the occupancy rate in the sector? For the period January to June, average occupancy for All Inclusive, Conventional and Small Hotels was 61%. February had the highest average occupancy (68%) and June the lowest 50%. How long do visitors stay? For the period January to June, visitors stayed an average of 8.41 nights. The shortest stay was reported by visitors from the Caribbean (6.53 nights) and the United States (7.72 nights). The longest stay was reported by visitors from Central America (13.56 nights) and Other6 (17.50 nights). VISITOR CHARACTERISTICS Origin of visitors Forty two percent of visitors to the island were from the United States, followed by the 4 Data garnered from the Visitor Expenditure & Motivation Survey (VEMS). 5 At the time of reporting, data entry was underway for the April to June VEMS. 6 This category includes countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Chart II: Bed Nights by Month Profile of the Hotel Sector Prepared by the Research Unit Page 2 of 3 The month of April had the highest total bed nights 193,168, while June had the lowest 139,981. Chart II: Bed Nights by Month There was a positive relationship observed between bed nights and arrivals. Chart III: Bed Nights and Arrivals Bed nights by market Of the total bed nights on the island during January to June 2011, the USA accounted for 41%, followed by the UK (29%) and Canada (15%). Chart IV: Bed nights by Country of Origin What types of establishments are used4? Between January and March5, 54% of respondents stayed at All Inclusive hotels. This was followed by Other Hotels (21%) and Apartments/Villas (10%). Chart V: Type of Accommodation Used What is the occupancy rate in the sector? For the period January to June, average occupancy for All Inclusive, Conventional and Small Hotels was 61%. February had the highest average occupancy (68%) and June the lowest 50%. How long do visitors stay? For the period January to June, visitors stayed an average of 8.41 nights. The shortest stay was reported by visitors from the Caribbean (6.53 nights) and the United States (7.72 nights). The longest stay was reported by visitors from Central America (13.56 nights) and Other6 (17.50 nights). VISITOR CHARACTERISTICS Origin of visitors Forty two percent of visitors to the island were from the United States, followed by the 4 Data garnered from the Visitor Expenditure & Motivation Survey (VEMS). 5 At the time of reporting, data entry was underway for the April to June VEMS. 6 This category includes countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Chart III: Bed Nights and Arrivals Profile of the Hotel Sector Prepared by the Research Unit Page 2 of 3 The month of April had the highest total bed nights 193,168, while June had the lowest 139,981. Chart II: Bed Nights by Month There was a positive relationship observed between bed nights and arrivals. Chart III: Bed Nights and Arrivals Bed nights by market Of the total bed nights on the island during January to June 2011, the USA accounted for 41%, followed by the UK (29%) and Canada (15%). Chart IV: Bed nights by Country of Origin What types of establishments are used4? Between January and March5, 54% of respondents stayed at All Inclusive hotels. This was followed by Other Hotels (21%) and Apartments/Villas (10%). Chart V: Type of Accommodation Used What is the occupancy rate in the sector? For the period January to June, average occupancy for All Inclusive, Conventional and Small Hotels was 61%. February had the highest average occupancy (68%) and June the lowest 50%. How long do visitors stay? For the period January to June, visitors stayed an average of 8.41 nights. The shortest stay was reported by visitors from the Caribbean (6.53 nights) and the United States (7.72 nights). The longest stay was reported by visitors from Central America (13.56 nights) and Other6 (17.50 nights). VISITOR CHARACTERISTICS Origin of visitors Forty two percent of visitors to the island were from the United States, followed by the 4 Data garnered from the Visitor Expenditure & Motivation Survey (VEMS). 5 At the time of reporting, data entry was underway for the April to June VEMS. 6 This category includes countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Chart IV: Bed nights by Country of Origin Profile of the Hotel Sector Prepared by the Research Unit Page 2 of 3 The month of April had the highest total bed nights 193,168, while June had the lowest 139,981. Chart II: Bed Nights by Month There was a positive relationship observed between bed nights and arrivals. Chart III: Bed Nights and Arrivals Bed nights by market Of the total bed nights on the island during January to June 2011, the USA accounted for 41%, followed by the UK (29%) and Canada (15%). Chart IV: Bed nights by Country of Origin What types of establishments are used4? Between January and March5, 54% of respondents stayed at All Inclusive hotels. This was followed by Other Hotels (21%) and Apartments/Villas (10%). Chart V: Type of Accommodation Used What is the occupancy rate in the sector? For the period January to June, average occupancy for All Inclusive, Conventional and Small Hotels was 61%. February had the highest average occupancy (68%) and June the lowest 50%. How long do visitors stay? For the period January to June, visitors stayed an average of 8.41 nights. The shortest stay was reported by visitors from the Caribbean (6.53 nights) and the United States (7.72 nights). The longest stay was reported by visitors from Central America (13.56 nights) and Other6 (17.50 nights). VISITOR CHARACTERISTICS Origin of visitors Forty two percent of visitors to the island were from the United States, followed by the 4 Data garnered from the Visitor Expenditure & Motivation Survey (VEMS). 5 At the time of reporting, data entry was underway for the April to June VEMS. 6 This category includes countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Chart V: Type of Accommodation Used Continued in the next issue PROFILE OF THE HOTEL SECTOR JANUARY JUNE 2011

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Saturday October 8, 2011 Page 10 launched on September 9th, 2010. The project components include: (a) demolition works in relation to surgical building, (b) reconstruction of the surgical building, (c) demolition and replacement of roof structure for east & west wings, (d) renovation of east & west wings and ancillary building; and (e) installation of support services (water storage, sewage treatment, inventory management). modern health sector standards. Below is a chronological representation of progress and work carried out to date.St Jude Reconstruction Project Progressing Smoothly Update Report Arrival of Materials, Feb. 2011 The dreadful night of September 9th, 2009 Members of the media being briefed. Media tour, March 2011 Foundation of burnt out Surgical Unit Press Tour, March 2011

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Page 11 Saturday October 8, 2011 Work in Progress, Eastern Wing Press Tour, March 2011 Work in Progress, Western Wing Press Tour, March 2011 Western Wing Sept. 2011 Eastern Wing Sept. 2011 Work in Progress. Expanded Surgical Unit, Sept, 2011 Prime Minister Tour of SJH September 2011 Interior Work Eastern Wing Prime Minister Tour of SJH September 2011 Work in Progress. Expanded Surgical Unit, Sept. 2011

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2010 nationalreview@pm.gov.lc The Government of Saint Lucia continues its forward march in spearheading initiatives that are geared at sustaining economic growth despite a global recession unprecedented since the 1930s. During an address to the nation, Prime Minister presented the welcomed news that his Government had approved the submission of the Saint Lucia Air and Sea Ports Authority for the redevelopment of the Hewanorra International Airport during an address to the nation on Wednesday, September 15th, 2010. During his address, Prime Minister King noted that despite what he referred to as a Global Tsunami his Government has remained focussed on keeping the ship state steady within the context environment sparked by the world wide recession. The Prime Minister explained what he said was a deliberate and aggressive posture to confront the external shocks while at the same time preparing the Country for anticipated opportunities as the global recession waned. The Saint Lucian Leader referred to the theme of the 2010 2011 budget: The Road to Recovery: Engineering Growth, Engendering Social Cohesion and Building Resilience to External Shocks as capturing his Governments strategy. Mr. King stated: In this regard, Governments policy has been one based on the approach of applying public investment as a strategy for stimulating economic activity. Minister listed a number of projects undertaken to date, which he explained as: public sector investment initiatives not only to generate economic activity and provide employment, but also to position our nation at the forefront of emerging trends and technological advancements. The projected he noted had contributed to the creation of jobs and critical advancements in the health, communications, agriculture, and other sectors. He noted that the Administrations determination to continue its programme of modernizing and stimulating economic growth deain elements to ment. Prime Minister king stated the following: In the process of advancing their self-serving agenda, the opposition has resorted to attacking the integrity and professionalism of persons who proudly serve this nation. We Saint Lucians fully understand the enormous challenges faced by their Government against phenomenal odds. Continued on page 3 Page 12 Saturday October 8, 2011 Please email your comments or questions to: nationalreview@pm.gov.lcThe community of Babonneau will soon have its own Police Station. According to Acting Police Commissioner Vernon Francois, the new facility when constructed will play a critical role in the Departments crime says the Police Department was integrally involved from the onset in the design process. Because of the nature of the facility, the views of the Police would be critical in terms of ensuring relevance from a functional standpoint. Towards this end there was constant communication with the Ministry of Plannings Architects along with representatives from The National Insurance Property Development and Management Company (NIPRO). This helped set the stage for the design of a modern and dynamic facility that would, in turn, shape and support police operations in the wider Babonneau area. Acting Commissioner Francois says, ment wants to be able to operate. With a strong focus on community policing already in place, the department wants the new facility to be open and inviting to the public. At the same time, the facility needs security perimeters to prevent unauthorized access to law enforcement operations areas. tion near the Babonneau playing central location in the community, near the Roman Catholic Church and Community Centre. The new facility will replace the site of the community square. Acting Commissioner Francois says this is a more strategic location, if only for the simple reason that it places the station at the main entrance to the interception and other enforcement activity. a number of satelleite communities that make up the Babonneau constituency, including; Cacoa Girard; Hill Twenty; Fond Assau; Des Vollieres; Talvern; Cabiche; Balata; Resinard; La Croix Chaubourgh; Garrand; Work Begins on New Police Station for BabonneauBoguis; Des Barras; Upper Monier; Chassin; La Guerre; Plateau; Morne Citon; Desrameaux; Grande Anse and others. Planning and Project Manager at NIPRO the site originally proposed was adjacent to the Primary School. NIPRO made a counter proposal. It involved the location of the proposed facility away from the school but in the general vicinity. The challenge he said, was that the new location would involve the use of three plots of land, some of which was privately owned. It would also involve the closure of one road and the widening of another, to accommodate the station, while allowing for the free flow of traffic in the area. In fact Richards says, the new realigning the road, thought had to be given to parking, service relocation, retaining walls and drains and a host of other considerations. The original plans were altered following a series of meetings with ments, within the available space. The construction of the new station forms part of a plan to make Gros-Islet into a new Police Divian area to be policed by that division. Currently the Police Department has two Divisions-a Northern Division based in Castries, and Southern Division based in VieuxFort. At present Babonneau and Gros-Islet are parts of the northern Division. Over the years Acting Commissioner Francois says, GrosIslet has outgrown its policing because of the rapidly growing populations and the increase in commercial and tourism activity in the community. police both regions properly and wider policing structure is an imperative. At this stage he says Gros-Islet needs its own Special Services Unit ment and Criminal Investigation Department (CID) which would in turn service the Babonneau region. cruitment of additional manpower and Acting Commissioner Francois says the Police Department has made a case to Government for that additional manpower for the new Babonneau station but theyve done so with the understanding that employing more officers at the recruit or Constable level will of the Police Department. This he says will require some internal restructuring or re organisation to provide proper supervision for the to be completed in one year which Francois says ought to be enough time to undertake the required changes and preparations within the Department. for Babonneau Hon. Ezechiel Joseph says he is very excited about this next stage in the communitys growth, saying that the new building is located at an increasingly important corner of the community that also allows it to blend in with the exciting development happening all around us. tions location and the visibility it will give to law enforcement. He thinks that when the new Police Station is completed is will result in an improvement in response times and services from the Police Department in the community. The construction of the Babonneau Police Station marks a major milestone in the policy of the current Government to enhance and establish key administrative components of Government in key population centres. As part of this process a decision was taken in 2010 to establish a Rural Council for the district. These developments are expected to eventually lead to the elevation of Babonneau Babonneau Police Station will be constructed at an estimated cost of EC$3.1 million. Computer generated model of the Babonneau Police Station when completed