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National review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098459/00019
 Material Information
Title: National review
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Office of the Prime Minister
Place of Publication: Castries, Saint Lucia
Publication Date: 08-13-2011
Copyright Date: 2009
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098459:00019

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 2011 nationalreview@pm.gov.lc THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE GOVERNMENT OF SAINT LUCIA FREE The Royal Saint Lucia Police Force is reporting major success strategic approach to crime of reactive, investigative pothe spike in crime, a more ach Central Intelligence Unit (CIU) of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force, prepare themselves for criminal the element of surprise on their Continued on page 3

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Page 2 Saturday August 13, 2011 The Government of Saint Lucia through its Ministry Severin, the current crop of farmers most of them continue to use tranologies he says that are crucial to tunately, those young people with says is helping to make agriculture promote the involvement of at the pace at which the county agriMaking Agriculture Attractive to Young PersonsThe Government of Saint Lucia through the Ministry of Agriculture is helping local pineapple ciency, in pineapple production, by the year 2015. Toward this goal, the Ministry is currently involved in a Pineapple Expansion and Revitalization Proonce Government completes pur million from ta system of growing crops in small says the monies will help with the opment, irrigati plans to institute a mentorship prowith the young entrepreneurs to encourage young entrepreneurs as well as those seeking employment that it is of paramount importance for the country to secure the future of the agricugramme as a key component in ongoing Coordinator of the Pineapple Expansion and Revitalization Programme Eloi Alexis says there is a large mar ket for pineapples on the island, with growing demand among hotels, restaurants and supermarkets for the fruit. The Pineapple Expansion and Revitalization Programme started in 2009 with a Rapid Assessment of the industry by an expert from Trinidad and Tobago, to determine the status of the sub sector and to identify priority areas of intervention following setbacks due to Pink Mealy Bug infestation in the 90s. Under the European Unions Special Framework of Assistance (SFA) 2005, Banana Commercialization and Agriand bananas producers) half a million Eastern Caribbean Dollars was made available to help revitalize the pineapple sub sector. Part of those funds was used to conduct the Rapid Assessment, which in turn recommended training for farmers. In 2010 a number of training initiatives was undertaken, including a workshop in post harvest handling by Dr. Majeed Mohammed. Senior Lecturer, in the Department of Food Production at the University of the West Indies; a workshop on Indices of Maturity by Ronald Pilgrim; as well as training in record keeping. Under the SFA project, EC$250,000 went toward the formation of a Pineapple Cooperative. The Cooperative has since been purchasing and reselling inputs to farmers at subsidised prices and the monies placed in a revolving fund Currently there are 56 pineapple farmers on island. Collectively they pineapples; the most dynamic production areas, being Millet and along the south west coast starting from Choiseul down to Vieux Fort. In 2009 when the programme started there were 38.75 acres under pineapple by about 17 acres, but for the island to this by a further 30 acres. one of the recommendations made in the 2009 Rapid Assessment of the sector was for farmers to adopt higher planting density. Higher planting densities yield more volume. According to the consultant, the spacing used by were generally under populated. One acre can accommodate up to 16,000 plants but the average on island is 6,000 per acre, well below capacity. The Pineapple Expansion and Revitalization Programme is working with farmers to addre ss this. According to Alexis three demonstration plots have been established at La Fargue, Balenbouche and La Resource. These plots, he says show farmers how to plant pineapples properly using the correct density and spacing along with teaching a myriad of other techniques, essential to successful pineapple cultivation. Through of the programmes ability to achieve is inkeeping with the Government's policy to encourage agricultural production in order to achieve food selfimport substitution. Pineapple Farmers Target 2015 to end Importation of the Fruit Fond Assau School Garden Laborie Boys Primary Agricultural Project

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Page 3 Saturday August 13, 2011 tify major crimes likely to escalate the CIU, Saint Lucia is the only information while increasing the port from the Criminal Investigation Unit states that most of the start their criminal careers commitwhich shows Castries as having the presence of the Hewannorra Incal solutions for their information -Police Report Major Successes in Crime FightingIntelligence Driven Police though an ongoing exercise, has three way partnership involving Island Crime Mapping 2010

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Page 4 Saturday August 13, 2011 NEMO Disaster Preparedness Feature WEEK 1Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 jar of peanut butter* 1 large can juice* 1 can meat* hand-operated can opener instant coffee, tea, powdered soft drinks permanent marking pen to mark date on cans (remember 1 gallon of water for each pet) Also: pet food, diapers, and/or baby food if needed. To Do Make a family plan. Date each perishable food item using marking pen. WEEK 2Hardware Store crescent wrench heavy rope duct tape Also: a leash or carrier for your pet, if needed.To Do Check your house for hazards. Locate your gas meter and water shutoffs and attach a wrench near them. WEEK 3Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 can meat* 1 can fruit* sanitary napkins video tape (remember 1 gallon of water for each pet) Also: pet food, diapers, and/or baby food, if needed. To Do Use a video camera to tape the contents of your home for insurance purposes. Store video tape with friend/family member who lives out of town. WEEK 4Hardware Store plumbers tape crowbar smoke detector with battery Also: extra medications or a prescription marked emergency use, if needed. To Do Install or test your smoke detector. Tie water heater to wall studs using plumbers tape. WEEK 5Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 can meat* 1 can fruit* 1 can vegetables* 2 rolls toilet paper* extra toothbrush* travel size toothpaste Also: special food for special diets, if needed.To Do Have a fire drill at home. WEEK 6First Aid Supplies aspirin and/or acetaminophen compresses rolls of gauze or bandages first aid tape adhesive bandages (in assorted sizes) Also: extra hearing aid batteries, if needed. To Do Check with your childs day care or school to find out about their disaster plans. WEEK 7Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 can ready to eat soup (not concentrate)* 1 can fruit* 1 can vegetables* Also: extra plastic baby bottles, formula and diapers, if needed. To Do Establish an out-of-state contact to call in case of emergency. WEEK 8First Aid Supplies scissors tweezers antiseptic thermometer liquid hand soap disposable hand wipes sewing kit Also: extra eyeglasses, if needed. To Do Place a pair of shoes and a flashlight under your bed so that they are handy during an emergency. Family Disaster Supplies CalendarA ChecklistThe Family Disaster Supplies Calendar is intended to help you prepare for disasters before they happen. For example, to prepare for Florida's Hurricane Season, at the beginning of the year, using this calendar, your family can assemble an emergency kit in small steps over a six month period. Check off each week as you gather the items. Supplies may be stored all together in a large plastic garbage can or food may be kept on kitchen shelves. Remember to rotate your perishable supplies and change water every six months. Continued on page 10

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Page 5 Saturday August 13, 2011 Feature ag communities following this months launch of the GovernToma loss, a new sense of community, livering re the community spirit, that was so year, especially among the youth, Progra ng to Prime Minister own liv school visits, community rallies part of Governments commitment to partnering with young people to onstrates Governments conviction that volunteerism is a solution to Mer that will give young people the opportunity to channel their creThe programme will also help practical level they will gain skills, more young people to volunteer, of the major players in youth affairs for a national symposium on representatives from the Ministries ments of n help strengthen existing organisaWorking with the private sector it is their employmen process Promoting the Value of Good Citizenship!Young People Encouraged to SIGN Continued on page 10

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Page 7 Saturday August 13, 2011 Page 6 Saturday August 13, 2011 The Constituency of Gros-Islet has seen a number of infrastructural projects and social amenities being undertaken to improve the lives of residents of every age. One of these is designed to enable people, especially the older persons, to safely navigate the com munity with the construction of a number of sidewalks, allowing residents to walk from Bay Street, considered the farthest point in GrosIslet, to the entrance of the town, without using only the sidewalk. This has been very useful in ensur ing the safety of students making their way to and from school. Several bus shelters have been erected at the Gros-Islet junction; Mon Giraud, Des Rameaux; Marisule, Ravine Mackok, and Malgretoute. Recently a new shelter was erected next to the Gros-Islet Polyclinic following complaints exposed to elements while waiting for the gates of the facility to open. The new shelter is complete with seats and wheelchair access. nity comfortable for visitors and residents alike a number of parks have been constructed or rehabilitated in the constituency. One at Monchy in particular it is hoped, will help dissuade young people from using bars to recreate and socialize. Others include one in the centre of Gros-Islet; another near other in Grand Rivere. The park in Monchy is unique in that it has wireless internet access. The Monchy Park is part of a bigger plan to rehabilitate the entire central Monchy area. Part of this outlook involved to relocation of in the area designated for the Park. These vendors are being transfered to new facilities which has been specially erected for them and which has been designed to integrate into the park. New public facilities have also been established to support activities within the park including the vending booths. A new Human Resource Development Centre or HRDC was also built in Monchy which houses 40 computers. These are being used the building has been made available to various community groups for meetings and an administrator was recently appointed to manage the facility. The Monchy multipurpose court was repaired and lights added. The Monchy Combined School also received assistance with the completion of its resource centre A foot path was constructed to allow easier access to the Monchy multipurpose court from the playplans to erect a community centre next to multipurpose court which will also house computers for use by residents and especially students from the community. taining walls have been built near by. Grand Riviere can now boast of having the largest changing room in the constituency and possibly the island. Road works have been undertaken at Piat and Monier. A changing room has also been built at Corinth and a multipurpose court will be built there soon. Gros-Islet there will get its own provision market shortly. Tenders have sent out to start the process. Also new pre-school is being built in the area. This will necessitate the current pre-schoolers using the Scout Headquarters when school reopens in September, and while their new school is being constructed. A Human Resource Development Centre will also be erected at the old pre-school site and will feature a 500 seat theatre. Public facilities will also be erected in the Gros-Islet centre to serve patrons of the Friday Night Street Party. Apart from the infrastructural work undertaken in the constituency, a number of other social and human development projects have been undertaken in Gros-Islet. A weeks-long entrepreneurial development programme has been ond year theatre training has been staged in Monchy and a theatre group has now been formed in the community. For the third year children in the constituency have beneat which they have learnt windAnother new and exciting project planned for the constituency is the re-establishment of the Gro-Islet Credit Union which should begin unfolding in the next few weeks. borne water, relief is in sight for the residents of Laborne where a water tank has been installed. The installation of the tank is complete ration to begin delivering water to residents. The Monchy wellness centre underwent EC$200,000.00 refur to allow yachter and other boaters to more easily access Gros-Islet and to patronize area businesses. A bridge joining the town to Pigeon Point has also been completed and a lifeguard tower erected near the beach. There are several roads, the maintenance of which is not considered the Ministry of Communications and Works and as such many of these roads are near impassable. One proposal being considered to undertake their repair and maintenance is the creation of a Gros-Islet Foundation which with the blessing of the central Government will use part of property taxes collected in those areas, to repair and construct roads in the constituency. Laborne Water Project Desrameaux Centre Installation of lights at the Gros Islet Playing Field Construction of Court at Monchy Honourable Lenard Montoute Minister for Social Transformation, Public Service, Human Resource Development, Youth and Sports and Parliamentary Representative for Gros Islet Human Resource Development Centre at Monchy

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Page 8 Saturday August 13, 2011 The turn of the 21st century brought with it an increase in the use of technology and new techniques aimed at making life easier for members of society. But which members of society do the focus has been on the development of the youth and providing them with the necessary skills needed for progress. This is only fair as today nearly 75% of Saint Lucias population is categorized in place to support other demo radar and are many times inconspicuous. It is with this in mind that the Ministry of Social Transformation to require Community Developthat are unique to these individuals. It is with this in mind that the took the initiative to source funding for the implementation of the Adult Literacy and Technological Advancement Program (ALTAP). The project was conceptualized and implemented in collaboration the Parliamentary Representative who is also the Minister responsible for Social Transformation among others.So what is A Governments plan to ensure equal recommendation was made that the elderly and persons who were an opportunity to be exposed to some of the new technologies technological aspect of the program was designed to update the older generation on the most basic computer skills they may need to enhance their lives. The use of cell phones is another technological phenomenon that has impacted the lives of many. It is a well known fact that many persons are unable to save numbers on their phones. Many of societys less literate and to retrieve these numbers or send text messages if they need to. As cell phone literacy Adult Literacy and Technological Advancement Program (ALTAP) training would also be given to these individuals under the technological advancement section of this program. say that everyone can do something that may earn a couple dolperson in the community may take up cultivating peppers and ti-loyon to provide for their family or sell at a level that may pay a bill. Another individual may decide to cultivate with their neighbor. The micro enterprise section of this program seeks to provide basic training in ways individuals can develop and society by extension. The programme is completed by Mathematics and English com ponents. It is the subject areas of Mathematics and English that ensure that all other areas of academia on areas such as phonology and sesure that persons are able to carry out withdrawal and credit slips and forms. These are just some of the many areas ALTAP wishes to provide knowledge on. The Ministry continues to welcome suggestions and recommendation for this program. It welcom ment of persons this program seeks to engagethe people of Gros-Islet. The success of this programme is the level of enthusiasm and par ticipation that is has inspired. The project can accurately be described as a people centred project which is contributing to the economic empowerment and growth in individual self-esteem within the commu nity of Gros Islet. Putting People at the Center of Community Development

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Page 9 Saturday August 13, 2011 The Government of Saint Lucia has been applauded by the local Rastafarian community for its decision to observe the International Year for persons of African Descent. The Iyanola Council for the Advancement of Rastafari (ICAR) had been at the foreand its Chairman Aaron Alexander is now the head of Cabinet appointed committee charged with overseeing activities to mark the obser vance. That decision joins the island with over 200 million people who identify themselves as being of African descent who live in the Americas and several milrican continent. In making the decision to observe the ing the international community in recognising that people of African descent represent a distinct group whose human rights must be promoted and protected. representatives from several Government ministries including; Education and ister. Representatives of the the National Youth Council are also part of the committee. The composition of the to the activities that will ensure the calendar of events From Slavery To FreedomCelebrating the International Year for People of African Descentis not closed or exclusive. It is against that background of inclusion and collective planning that the year-long programme is taking shape. been given a mandate to formulate a programme of (August 2011 to August 2012). The main objective of the Year is to raise awareness of the challenges facing people of African descent. It is hoped that the Year will foster discussions that will generate proposals for solutions to tackle these challenges within the context of Saint Lucian society. The year further aims to advance the integration of people of Afrimote a greater knowledge of and respect for their diverse heritage and culture. Comexander hopes through the ness campaigns to develop pride in the African heritage through the teaching of black history and the achievements of various persons of African descent whether as a new part of the school cur ful that the year of activities will help spark wider Caribbean interest in strengthening trade and other ties with the African continent. In communicating Cabinets approval to establish the planof ensuring that we can raise awareness of the historical discan people and to ensure that all their descendants. This suggest that people of African motion of a greater knowledge of and respect for their diverse heritage and culture. held three meetings as it embarks on a very intensive schedule of meetings with the view to submit a plan of proposed activities to Cabinet ahead of the formal launch of aged can be staged shortly within the coming weeks. Government for its part says it is important that all Saint Lucians have some basic and appreciation of the richand their African roots. The knowledge of this is impor tant because it is a history hope even in the face of impossible odds. Saint Lucia is the only Caribbean country that has endeavoured to unprogramme. Government looks forward to the receiving the submission of the partnership with the Iyanola Council for the Advancement of Rastafari and all interested parties in observation of the International Year for People of African Descent.

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Saturday August 13, 2011 Page 10 NEMO Disaster Preparedness Feature WEEK 1Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 jar of peanut butter* 1 large can juice* 1 can meat* hand-operated can opener instant coffee, tea, powdered soft drinks permanent marking pen to mark date on cans (remember 1 gallon of water for each pet) Also: pet food, diapers, and/or baby food if needed. To Do Make a family plan. Date each perishable food item using marking pen.WEEK 2Hardware Store crescent wrench heavy rope duct tape Also: a leash or carrier for your pet, if needed.To Do Check your house for hazards. Locate your gas meter and water shutoffs and attach a wrench near them. WEEK 3Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 can meat* 1 can fruit* sanitary napkins video tape (remember 1 gallon of water for each pet) Also: pet food, diapers, and/or baby food, if needed. To Do Use a video camera to tape the contents of your home for insurance purposes. Store video tape with friend/family member who lives out of town. WEEK 4Hardware Store plumbers tape crowbar smoke detector with battery Also: extra medications or a prescription marked emergency use, if needed. To Do Install or test your smoke detector. Tie water heater to wall studs using plumbers tape.WEEK 5Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 can meat* 1 can fruit* 1 can vegetables* 2 rolls toilet paper* extra toothbrush* travel size toothpaste Also: special food for special diets, if needed.To Do Have a fire drill at home. WEEK 6First Aid Supplies aspirin and/or acetaminophen compresses rolls of gauze or bandages first aid tape adhesive bandages (in assorted sizes) Also: extra hearing aid batteries, if needed. To Do Check with your childs day care or school to find out about their disaster plans. WEEK 7Grocery Store 1 gallon of water* 1 can ready to eat soup (not concentrate)* 1 can fruit* 1 can vegetables* Also: extra plastic baby bottles, formula and diapers, if needed. To Do Establish an out-of-state contact to call in case of emergency.WEEK 8First Aid Supplies scissors tweezers antiseptic thermometer liquid hand soap disposable hand wipes sewing kit Also: extra eyeglasses, if needed. To Do Place a pair of shoes and a flashlight under your bed so that they are handy during an emergency. Family Disaster Supplies CalendarA ChecklistThe Family Disaster Supplies Calendar is intended to help you prepare for disasters before they happen. For example, to prepare for Florida's Hurricane Season, at the beginning of the year, using this calendar, your family can assemble an emergency kit in small steps over a six month period. Check off each week as you gather the items. Supplies may be stored all together in a large plastic garbage can or food may be kept on kitchen shelves. Remember to rotate your perishable supplies and change water every six months. Continued from page 4 WEEK 9Gr ocer y Store 1 can r eady-to-eat soup* liquid dish soap plain liquid bleach 1 box heavy-duty garbage bags Also: saline solution and a contact lens case if needed. T o Do Send some of y our fav orite family photos (or copies) to family members out of state WEEK 10Har d ware Store waterpr oof por table plastic container (with lid) for impor tant papers por table am/fm r adio (with batteries) Also: blankets or sleeping bag for each family member .T o Do Make photocopies of impor tant papers and stor e safely WEEK 11Gr ocer y Store 1 lar ge can juice* lar ge plastic food bags 1 box quick ener gy snacks 3 r olls paper tow els Also: sunscr een, if needed.T o Do Stor e a r oll of quar ters for emer gency phone calls Go on a hunt with y our family to find a pay phone near home WEEK 12Fir st Aid Supplies anti-diarrhea medicine rubbing alcohol 2 pair latex glov es ipecac syrup and activ ated char coal (for accidental poisoning) Also: items for dentur e car e if needed.T o Do T ake a family trip to gas meter and water meter shutoffs .WEEK 13Har d ware Store whistle ABC fir e extinguisher pliers vise gripsT o Do T ake a first aid/CPR class WEEK 14Gr ocer y Store 1 can meat* 1 can fruit* 1 can v egetables* 1 package paper plates 1 package eating utensils 1 package paper cups adult vitaminsT o Do Make a plan to check on a neighbor who might need help in an emer gency WEEK 15Har d ware Store extr a flashlight batteries masking tape hammer assor ted nails L br ackets to secur e tall furnitur e to wall studs wood scr ewsT o Do Br ace shelv es and cabinets WEEK 16Gr ocer y Store 1 can meat* 1 can v egetables* 1 box lar ge heavy-duty garbage bags kleenex 1 box quick ener gy snacks .T o Do F ind out if y ou hav e a neighborhood safety or ganization and join it! WEEK 17Gr ocer y Store 1 box gr aham cr ackers assor ted plastic containers with lids assor ted safety pins dry cer ealT o Do Arr ange for a friend or neighbor to help y our childr en if y ou ar e at work. WEEK 18Har d ware Store child pr oof latches or other fasteners for y our cupboar ds double-sided tape or V elcr o-type fasteners to secur e mov eable objectsT o Do P ack a go-pack in case y ou need to ev acuate WEEK 19Gr ocer y Store 1 box lar ge heavy-duty garbage bags 1 box quick ener gy snacks (such as gr anola bars or r aisins)T o Do Hav e a tornado/hurricane drill at home WEEK 20Har d ware Store camping or utility knife extr a r adio batteries Also: pur chase an emer gency escape ladder for second story bedr ooms if needed.T o Do F ind out about y our workplace disaster plans WEEK 21Har d ware Store heavy work glov es 1 box disposable dust masks scr ew driv er plastic safely goggles WEEK 22 Gr ocer y Store extr a hand-oper ated can opener 3 r olls paper tow els WEEK 23 Har d ware Store battery pow er ed camping lantern with extr a battery or extr a flashlights WEEK 24Gr ocer y Store lar ge plastic food bags plastic wr ap aluminum foilItems marked with an asterisk * should be pur chased for each member of the household. P r ovided by the Ex ecutiv e Office/Emer gency Management. P amphlet designed by Visual Communications Division. (Calendar r eprinted fr om Collier County E.M.) Items marked with an asterisk * should be pur chased for each member of the household.

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Page 11 Saturday August 13, 2011 Another facility has been added to the list of Adult Day Care Centres operating on the island with the establishment of the Fair Helen La Clery Adult Day Care Centre. It joins the more established centre in Mongouge, Choiseul in providing planned programmes for the elderly in the community. These include a variety of health, social and other support services in a protective setting during daytime hours. According the Executive Director, Helen Charles Louis, the centre is designed to meet the individual needs of functionally and cognitively impaired per sons as well. The mission of the facility she says, is to help older persons to enjoy a better qualproviding them opportunities to develop friendships, reduce isolation and keep families together longer. The La Clery centre is run by HELPAGE Saint Lucia-The National Council of and For Older Persons, and boasts a team of 150 trained Caregivers who oversee activities which range from counseling, emotional support, and physical exercise, to manicures and pedicures and The La Clery Adult Day Care CentreImproving the Quality of Life of our Elderly promised a bus to assist with the transportation of clients and participants which it hopes will be delivered soon. They help the organisation achieve its mission of preserving the dignity of older persons through advocacy, education, training support, empowerment and income security. The idea of the La Clery cenwhen a study on care of the elderly on the island was unsome of the major challenges faced by older persons on the island. At the top of the list was the abandonment of older per sons by their families, leaving them to fend for themselves or to rely on government for survival. As a result their quality of life As persons aged and became unable to work it was revealed that they received little or no money to care for themselves. Surveys have shown a significant number of persons above 60, fall below the poverty line the elderly population is unable to provide for their basic needs. The day care facility attempts to alleviate the challenges faced by elderly persons by offering social, recreational, rehabilita tive and educational services in a day care setting that enables them to better function as worthwhile members of society. The La Clery Day Care Centre caters to individuals who cannot manage without help or who are secluded or lonely. It does this by creating an environment in which they can express themselves and regain their self conaddressing nutritional needs and neglect. The facility allows par ticipants to leave the comfort of their own homes for unthreat ening, sheltered and supervised surroundings where they can from a variety of fun and educational activities designed to improve their mental and physical health. It essentially provides a home away from home. The Fair Helen La Clery Adult Day Care Centre targets older persons in the wider La Clery, area, who may live alone or are left home alone when family members go to work. It also accommodates older per sons on days when their existing care givers at home have off days or are on vacation. The Centre also houses the HELPAGE Secretariat as well as the Saint Lucia Pensioners Association and the Ex-Service League The La Clery Day Care Centre was established with funding from the European Union, the SSDF and the Government of Saint Lucia. Additional funding was provided by the Japanese and Taiwanese Governments and from various local businesses. The facility is located within the constituency of Prime Minister Stephenson King who took intimate and personal interest in ensuring that the centre became a reality. The Prime Minister was also very supportive in responding to the various requests for adjustments which required ancial resources. Prime Minister King who has the fortune of a mother who is aged in her 90s has expressed his unwavering support and commitment towards ensur ing the integrity and quality of services of the facility. He has stated his desire to see the Centre become a model facility for day care support to the elderly. The newly constructed Adult Day Care CentreThe Probation and Parole Services Department of the Ministry of with a recommendation for its continuation. The diversion programme is an alternative to traditional court processing for preadjudicated youth who have to rehabilitate school dropouts and other at risk youth between 12 and 19 years. Par ticipants are directed to the by the Ministry of Education list of drop outs for follow up. The department in turn tracks down these drop-outs and meets with them and their parents to encourage their enrolment in the programme. While it is compulsory for probationers as a condition gramme maintains an open door policy for drop-outs and suspended students.The Court Diversion Programmemme was born out of the recognition that for rehabilitation would be undermined by imprisonurgent action was required to minimize the potential damAssistant Director of Probajust completed one year pilot project proves that young vulnerable but have a capacity for change. July 2010 and targeted 100 but this number declined owand lack of commitment on the part of some participants and their parents. The programme wound up with 35 each one with a variety of psychological and other issues. Being thrown together made for an explosive situation and their behaviour proved extremely challenging in the beginning. Conwas the discovery of weapthe vandalism of programme property and furniture. By the end of the programme Louis says participants and improv ed. Structured programs cur rently provided through the programme cover areas such singing). Classes ran from to Thursdays and 9:00 am to overseen by a fulltime Project dinator and a Nutritionist. to do remedial English and Art and Electronics on a part time basis. A P eace Corp volunteer with a background in clinical psychology joined the gramme based on a rehabilitative and restorative rather than punitive approach that Louis says showed remarkable results. The punitive to deal with the underlying causes of criminal activity and delinquency. By engaging youth in a broad holistic proaddresses low self esteem achievement and encourages ticipants learn to change their aviour. the community by assisting the participants to reintegrate into the community. It also assists crime prevention by assisting to reduce the comDiversion Programme are cessfully completing the various programme components the minimum 200 hour requirement. In addition they receive awards for good beregularity. They also get the opportunity to publicly display what theyve learned at the end of the programme. Services Department Louis with parents and community leaders to get more young people into the programme. It will continue fostering partnerships with the private sector developing work links with outside employers with a view to introducing a job placement component to the programme. There are plans to widen the provision of ser vices by creating cross-sector partnerships and improving National Skills Development Centre (NSDC) she hopes pants with the opportunity to acquire valuable employment and vocational skills in order to produce lasting results in The programme which is Government of Saint Lucia tablishing community/parole sentencings potential for reup again in September 2011.. rnment is proud of the success of the court diversion programme. The Administinue investing in the future growth and development of the programme. Government is convinced that through the continued application of this youth can be granted new chances and opportunities to turn their lives around and to aim for new horizons of hope and success. Reforming How We Rehabilitate Young Offenders

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Page 12 Saturday August 13, 2011 Please email your comments or questions to: nationalreview@pm.gov.lcThe sight of large amounts of an unfamiliar vegetative mate the island and washing up along the coastline over the past few weeks gave rise to concerns by marine users and the general public. The Department of Fisheries and the National Emergency swiftly to allay public fears that they may pose some danger and to inform tem that what they were in fact seeing was called Sargassum seaweed. What is the Sargassum? The Sargassum seaweed is a plant that lives in the ocean and is of the same family as brown algae. Sargassum got its name from the Portuguese word for grapes because it has several The leaves are golden-green and feel almost like plastic when touched. There are over 100 species of the Sargassum seaweed. Some are benthic which means that they would attach to the bottom of the sea and some are peall the time. The seaweed that was observed around Saint Lucia about a on preliminary investigations under taken by the Department of Fisheries, included the species called Sargassum natans. However, it is likely that the The Department of Fisheries Addresses Concerns about Seaweed Wash Up on our Coastlinesmats may have also included a related is because these two species of Sargasfrequently found tangled together. Where did it come from? weed species are usually found offshore in large mats throughout the South Atlantic region. Most of these seaweeds come from the Sargasso Sea located in the North Atlantic Ocean, which is about two thirds the size of the United States. What happens is that waves break the plants apart, and these parts multiply. On a seasonal basis, these pieces get caught in the currents and are carried to the Gulf of Mexico where the warm waters help the plant grow rapidly. These mats of vegetation provide crucial habitat for a wide variety of marine animals to hide while they turtles swim near the seaweed looking for an easy meal of shrimp and crabs. Even economically important pelagic species such as tuna, dolphin, wahoo, in Soufriere intimated that when this event occurs, it provides a great oppor h usually spawn/lay their eggs in the mats. Other organisms that could be found in those mats include small are similar in colour to the goldennism which acts as a great aid when hunting food. be, as the waves and currents deposit the Sargassum on the beach or along the coastline, they would pile up near the dunes. This can hold the sandy dunes in place long enough for other plants to take root. As such, this action can help new dunes form thereby reducing beach e rosion. What are some of the problems associated with Sargassum? These plants have several effects associated with it. Considering that they have a characteristic of growing on the surface of the water, it can contribute to a number of problems. Some of them are as follows: 1. The main problem is faced by boaters, swimmers and the other species living under the water. Depending on the thickness and extent of the mats, they can get trapped in the propellers of boats, especially small swimmers, divers, snorkelers and other recreational users of the marine environment. activity usually takes place, it can by causing entanglement. This can lines and nets can be severely damaged. 4. Again, depending on the extent of the mat and its duration in our waters, it can impede the penetration of sunlight to other marine plants in the underwater community. 5. Another problem is that, such large volume of seaweed can result in an oxygen imbalance in the marine enseaweed. This can be particularly a problem if these mats of seaweed were to move into and get trapped in bays. This can result in possible ills. 6. And maybe one of the scariest threats is that, since the seaweed mats would have drifted from oceans afar, there is the possibility that alien and/or invasive plant and animal species would hitch hike on them, in the form of eggs, larvae, other vegetative materials. These can then end up in our local marine environment and become a serious threat to local species. Should we worry about this event? Although there are some problems associated with this event, the public should not be overly alarmed. This phenomenon has happen in the past and it is very likely that it will happen again. Many of the Sargassum leaves are covered in a light grey furry substance which is a community of organisms called bryozoans. As these animals multiply, they weigh the Sargassum down and begin pulling it towards the ocean bottom. Eventually, this leads to death where it decomposes and serves as food for other organisms. It is also worth noting that most span of 1 year or less and since the waters surrounding the islands of the Caribbean is so open, it is not conducive enough for the Sargassum species gasso Sea which is characteristically an enclo sed ring of ocean currents. However, the Department of Fisheries would like to encourage mem bers of the public to remain extremely vigilant and report any strange looking animals or plants to the Department at 468-4143. Government through the Department of Fisheries is committed to addressing concerns of the public and Fisheries sector with respect to the wash-up of seaweed around the island over the past weeks.


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