PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
National review
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098459/00016
 Material Information
Title: National review
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Office of the Prime Minister
Place of Publication: Castries, Saint Lucia
Publication Date: 10-09-2010
Copyright Date: 2009
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098459:00016

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

SATURDAY, OCT OBER 9, 2010 nationalreview@pm.gov.lc THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE GOVERNMENT OF SAINT LUCIA Saint Lucia`s Prime Minister Honourable Stephenson King did not minced words during his address to the 65th session of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly, sounding a warning that the world needs to urgently scale up funding to support the mitigate the impact of climate change. developed world to respect the sovereign rights of Small Island Developing States (SIDS). September 24, 2010 Mr King focused on the accomplishments and shortfalls of Saint Lucia towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, stressing that all of Saint Lucia`s gains would be useless if we could not address the threatening saga of adverse climate change. called for the developed world assist the Government and ing that only ten percent (10%) of international pledges was delivered thus far. on major industrialised countries to urgently scale up funding in countries to mitigate the impact of climate change. ing on the status of negotiations to date on the phenomenon of climate change and the predicament of Small Island Developing States noted: Mr. President, Saint Lucia notes the ongoing negotiations ahead of the Sixteenth Confer ence of Parties to the United Nabe held in Cancun, Mexico, later 15th Conference of Parties, where consensus was not achieved on addressing climate change, Saint Lucia recognizes the critical imlaying a solid foundation for a more favourable outcome in Canpurpose of the Convention and help to ensure the continued existence of ma since moved past the debate over the existence of climate change to a discussion about the severity of its impacts on the nations and regions of the world, which live everyday with its consequences. all Island Developing States of the world, Saint Lucia included, are recognized as being among the most vulnerable to climate change, with this phenomenon posing a threat to the very existence of some of our island despite the fact that SIDS, jointly, contribute a fraction of one per cent to global greenhouse gas emissions. an this year with news solidarity with our sister island and pledged $1.5 billion in asreport that only 10% of the pledgseems to be true for most appeals ence, the most recent country to be hit by a catastrophe, will be more successful. Addressing the humanitarian consequences gencies remain a United Nations encourage those who have shown good intentions but have not yet matched words with action to do so with some urgency. Continued on page 2 FREE

PAGE 2

Page 2 Saturday October 9, 2010 ister who is Caricom lead on issues of Sustainable Development assured the UN Assembly achieving an ambitious, just and legally-binding agreement that will realize the goal of timely and successfully addressing climate change. Mr. King then went on to boldly pronounce: Mr. President, climate change can only be successfully addressed if counnecessary steps to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and provide the development and the transfer of technology for both adaptation and mitigation to those who have to address adequately the ongoing and anticipated impacts of global climate change. Accordtotal annual impact of potential climate change on all CARICOM countries at US$ 9.9 billion of total GDP in 2007 US dollar prices means that we have no choice but to divert critical funding away from our poverty alleviation programmes towards trying to protect our countries from this for that stable long-term funding is of critical importance to developing countries and cannot be underesup, new and additional sources of funding to support mitigation eftarian assistance alone, which only addresses the consequences to such events. development partners are serious about the implementation of meaningful mitigation measures. collective commitment in the provision of new and additional resources. He challenged those good on their promises. As he put it: developing states cannot do it alone, nor should we be penalized for actions of industrialized countries. forts of SIDS through the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS). ognition of the traditional hydrocarbon fuel usage is unsustainable and as result many Small Island ergy sources. Hydropower, wind, solar and geothermal sources and the converting of waste into ener gy were cited as options through which the reliance of small countries on traditional energy sources can be reduced as well as lower quire investments in research and development and infrastructure. ing his address Prime Minister made mention of the anomaly whereby many Small Island Developing States by being categorized as Middle Income Countries and as a result do not qualify for their fair share of assistance. He however pointed out that notwithstanding that categorization; these Countries continue to face support of the International Community he proposed was therefore critical is Saint Lucia and of sustainable development as set out in the Mauritius Strategy for Plan of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Isimprovements in the standard of living and meeting all the MDGs by 2015. during his presentation to address what he described as our moral environment. In doing political persuasions, religion and economic circumstances. Such challenges to global peace and security whilst the world witnessed many mass atrocities. He noted the dilemma that despite numer ous advancements in technology, education, health and an increase in material progress, the world lessness and discontent. Prime not to have found the formula for of searching. ing peace were critical components for sustainable development explained goes far beyond the He noted what he thought was an emerging understanding of the relationship between nontraditional security issues such as poverty and health and other solutions. Prime Minister King made a call during his address for the strengthening of the UN to enable it to play a greater role in the promotion of peace and economic development. He also made a call for reform of the Security Council and for an international system that would allow for a more balanced approach to international security. also told the over one hundred and forty world leaders and seeconomic crisis the Government Of Saint Lucia has implemented with its commitment towards establishing the millennium demeasures were designed to mitilatory challenges of the crisis. Some of the measures employed term employment programmes; and other taxes on basic consumer margins on some basic food items subsidies on basic commodities to vulnerable groups. rity was also addressed by Prime Minister King during his twenty seven (27) minutes presentation. Prime Minister King made mention of the concern that the number of gun related homicides had jumped to unacceptable levels and that this had been aggravated by a worsened economic situation. Prime Minister King went on to state: Another great tragedy of our times is the uncontrolled ilperplexed, therefore, to see the closure of the United Nations Ofsessment of that decision. As well, we call for a comprehensive treaty on small arms and light weapons, alongside the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. Small arms and light weapons account for more deaths than natural causes in some parts of the world. Millennium Development Goals, Climate Change, the US Embargo represents some of the concerns expressed by Prime Minister King during his UN address: ommitments on the MDGs, we have engaged many partners including the United States, the European Union, Canada, our Latin American neighrea, to name a few. I wish, though, body to support the aspirations collaboration, through member and the Climate Change discusand other organizations of a unisought their assistance in these areas match that of any other, for much in return. No country its contribution to humanity for they do share the world with us, and their contribution to health no boundaries. Increased concern for air safety also remains a that ongoing cro Prime Minister King Addresses 65th Session of the UN General Assemblyis a longstanding problem that deserves an urgent resolution acwith the Charter and Principles of the United Nations, as well as the aspirations of peoples for self development and progress. anachronisms that still persist in this world and one of them is have moved from a world where political uncertainty has been replaced by economic uncertainty. Yet, a mechanism that was put in place to deal with a political issue remains today and is being used for an economic strangulation, even as we appeal to everyone else for cooperation and under respect the rights of the people to shape and chart their destiny, as well as respecting the freely expressed wishes of the people of our region. Our region is diverse, but our aspirations are common. Only mutual respect will foster that relationship that is so necessary and vital to the development of our region. Here again, Mr. President, per ruled against our preferential regime on bananas we were told that we had to comply. Now that the forts in the services sector, I address particularly the favourable ruling on the Gaming dispute referred to therefore urge all parties to agree on mutually agreed principles that govern the conduct of relations among States, large or small, to be treated fairly. aggressive domain in which the resources has led to the subver tumultuous times that we live in can only be weathered by continued and increased commitment to human development. Let us all sustainability of both biodiversity to 65th session of the United Nations General Assembly included Health Minister Honourable Dr Keith Mondesir, Minister ResponSait Lucia`s Ambassador to CARICOM and the OECS with direct Continued from front page resources to address adequately the ongoing and anticipated impacts of global climate change. According to World Bank estimates, the total annual impact of potential climate change on all CARICOM countries at US$ 9.9 billion of total GDP in 2007 US dollar prices or about 11.3% of total GDP. This means that we have no choice but to divert critical funding away from our poverty alleviation programmes towards trying to protect our countries from this formidable threat

PAGE 3

Page 3 Saturday October 9, 2010 Overview development and sustainresources of St. Lucia. Over the mandate has expanded as a result of expanding national policies and the local, political, economic and international environment related to management and development within the Ministry of Agriculsome 44 years ago and at that time ber. Sixteen years later, the DiviManagement Unit and by the mid 1980s it transformed into a Department. Management; Extension; Aquaculture; Administration.Ministry of Agriculture, Lands, Forestry and FisheriesFocus on the Department of FisheriesVisionThe highest level of collaboration awareness and information sharing among all stakeholders in ensuring economic growth of St. Lucia.Mission management and sustainable utilizatechnologies; source of protein for local consumption; policies and plans; as regional and international organizations; Key Activities of the Department of Fisheries Hon. Ezechiel Joseph Minister for Agriculture, Lands, Forestry and Fisherieshe Government of Saint Lucia the critical role of information and communication technologies as a vital instrument in the process of governance. Information therefore becomes pivotal to the relationship between Government and the rest of the community. Indeed access to inernment must be regarded as a basic human right. Information is now recognized as a crucial tool for to enable social, economic and political funcformation is therefore characterized by relevancy, quality and timeliness. of information, Government has to ensure the delivery relevant information products to the public through various Government units coordinated by the relevant Minisistries and Departments collect, or ganize and disseminate information on their activities on a routine basis. formation Service (GIS) as a central Government information unit is ability to disseminate in timely and its activities and programmes to the wider population. As such the Government Information Service is of strategic importance to GovernNotwithstanding the recognized mained under resourced over the to upgrade equipment required to enhance the functionality of this critical Government agency. It is that regard that the Government Infor mation Service (GIS) was the recent recipient of the benevolence of the Embassy of the Republic of China Prime Minister Stephenson King, ernment Information Service for the acquisition of new equipment. of operating with the same equipmentis now set for improved efsuite of technical equipment costing near Half a Million EC Dollars. Depserver currently in use has already in programming .... this clearly demonstrates that the new equipment is ncy from the GIS. ated included: 1 digital studio, three studio cameras and camera control units, 1 tricaster studio for video switching, 4 nonlinea editing systems, digital/audio recorder for Information Assistants, 3 camera and tripod electronic news gathering, 6 video monitors, 2 inter screenings and other accessories. e the GIS in a position where it can now fully digitize its studio and allow for greater versatility and improvement with the audio/visual signals. Additionally, there are now high resolution prove the image quality and allow for in built memory card recordrecorded material from a raw stage greater ease a place worn out and outdated video/ audio equipment as well as modernize the current communications systems at the Department with new age doubt improve production output the other media houses. assador to Saint Luout that It is very important for the Government Information Service to have advance equipment, because any government, because this is the Springer the Director of Information Services, who was instrumental in the process of securing the equipment, expressed relief and gratitude on behalf the arrival of the equipment. mitment in ensuring that its information arm is not hindered in any way, and that the capacity to informed and educate the nation is not compromised. Part of Government plans for bringing about improvements at the GIS include the proposed relocation of GIS operations to a more spaGovernment of Saint Lucia is indeed leading information agency. Taiwanese make Major Donation of Equipment to the Government Information Service Mr. Barnabus Anius, DPS of the Ministry of Labour, Information and Broadcasting, recieving equptment for GIS from Taiwanese Ambassador H.E Tom Chou

PAGE 4

Page 4 Saturday October 9, 2010 EASTERN CARIBBEAN EAR THQUAKES system formed at a convergent plate boundary (more plates meet and the denser plate is forced beneath the seismic activity in the Eastern Caribbean. are generated by the movement of magma within the lithosphere. Since magma is less dense than the sur Eastern Caribbean are, therefore, highly susceptible to although the population was small and the economy ing enough to cause the inhabitants to petition the King Caribbean islands. Prior to this event, there was an1692 which resulted in the death of over 2,000 persons and destroyed 90% of then capital, Port Royal. In fact, it even more damage if they were to occur now or in the future because of growing populations and large-scale poorly planned or unauthorized construction. el of activity, no island in the region is completely free Caribbean countries over the past 300 years. through the 20th and 21st centuries. During the 20th and 21st centuries, the vulnerability of all islands to continuous population growth and changes in building and land use practices. At the beginning of the 20th century, most buildings in the region were made of wood or similar materials, which have a high intrinuse of reclaimed land were also uncommon. However, the current situation on every island is such that most buildings are made of masonry or concrete and there are numerous high-rise buildings, of which a high proportion are built in areas which were under the sea less than a century ago, i.e.reclaimed land. 29 November 2007 Eastern Caribbean on 5th December. 12 January 2010 Haitian Earthquake According to the U.S. Geological Survey, at 4:53 p.m. at least magnitude 4.5 have rippled across the region since. 222,570 people died, 300,000 were injured and tion) were displaced. Almost 300,000 homes were destroyed or damaged. 1906 M > 7 North-west of St. Lucia. Severe damage in Saint Lucia and Martinique. No deaths. 1918 M = 6 Northwest of Trinidad. Most masonry buildings in Port-of-Spain destroyed. 1953 M = 7Depth 175 km North-east of St.Lucia Felt at damaging intensities in Saint Lucia, Barbados and St. Vincent. Little serious damage because there were few large buildings at the time. Since then there has been very large-scale development of multi-storey hotels in all islands, particularly in Saint Lucia within 50 km of the epicentre. 1954 M = 6 North of Trinidad In Port-of-Spain good quality maso nry structures collapsed. The number of similar structures has in creased since then by a factor of more than ten. There has been c onsiderable unplanned development on reclaimed land close to the ep icentre and the population has doubled. A repeat of this event would be disastrous. An increase in magnitude by one unit would be catastrophic. The effect of a repeat of the 1766 earthquake is unimaginable. 1974 North-West of Antigua Damage in all nearby islands. Increase in vulnerability. 2004 M=6.3 Northeast of Dominica Felt throughout Dominica as well as Guadeloupe, M ontserrat, St. Maarten, Antigua, Nevis and St. Vi ncent. Structural damage in Dominica. One death in Guadeloupe. This information clearly indicates that Eastern Ca ribbean earthquake activity carried on unchanged through the 20th and 21st centuries. During the 20th and 21st centuries, the vu lnerability of all islands to major earthquakes increased enormously because of contin uous population growth and changes in building and land use practices. At the beginning of the 20th century, most buildings in the region were made of wood or similar materials, which have a high intrinsic earthq uake resistance. High-rise buildings and the use of reclaimed land were also uncommon. However, the cu rrent situation on every is land is such that most buildings are made of masonry or concrete and there are numerous high-rise buildings, of which a high proportion are built in areas which were under t he sea less than a century ago, i.e.reclaimed land. The most striking example is that of Trinidad in 1766; although the population was small and the economy minuscule, the effects of the earthquake were devasta ting enough to cause the inhabitants to petition the King of Spain to allow settlement from other, non-Spanis h, Caribbean islands. Prior to this event, there was another major earthquake in Jamaica (N.W Caribbean) in 1692 which resulted in the death of over 2,000 persons and destroyed 90% of then capita l, Port Royal. In fact, it is cl ear that such major earthquakes are likely to cause even more damage if they were to occur now or in the future because of growing populations and large-scale poorly planned or unauthorized construction. Although there are considerable variati ons in the level of activity, no island in the region is completely free from the threat of earthquakes. Let us now examine the data on the effe cts that earthquakes have had in Eastern Caribbean countries over the past 300 years. Actual earthquake disasters in the Eastern Caribbean over the past 300 years 1690 Close to Antigua. M > 8 Considerable destruction in Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat. Casualties and economic cost unknown. Read an eyewitness account of this event. Please note that th e document is written in old English. 1766 Close to Antigua. M > 8 Total destruction of all masonry buildings in Trinidad. Complete destruction of the economy. Casualties and cost unknown. 1839 Close to Martinique. M ~ 6.5 About 400 dead. Severe damage in St. Pierre and almost total destruction of Fort-de-France. 1843 Between Antigua and Guadeloupe Considerable destructio n in all islands from Saba to Dominica. Nearly 2,000 deaths, mainly in Guadeloupe. Considerable economic disruption in all islands. Read extensive eyewitness accounts of this earthquake. NEMO Disaster Preparedness Feature

PAGE 5

Page 5 Saturday October 9, 2010 Feature hen I was of Keril admit being sceptical; unsure that there existed a boy wonder who wore his obsession with achievement but he came highly recommended by the pillars of Saint Lucian theatre, as well as the veterans of the local education system. Clad in his Sir Arthur Lewis Community College uniform, fresh from his 2010 enrolment, Keril Victor beamed with an unabridged excitement as he began spilling the beans on a journey that I soon discovered was nothing short of extraordinary. rie Anglican Primary School, the now 18-year-old Keril was best rethe playground but a scholar in the classroom. I was extremely troublesome in those days. My reports would always highlight that I was a good student but that I needed to channel my energy in the right way. I got that chance at Church. Keril grew up in the halls of the Catholic Church where he decided ences in front an audience and it is where I really began to discover my talents; who I really am, said Keril. My deep involvement in Church formed the foundation for who I my morals, my view of life, how I it came to my later involvement in dence that was nurtured in Church. the church to help others who had potential and helped them to explore it! In 2005, Keril became a Samarian. He remembered his immediate efforts at becoming someone more productive; shedding his troublesome a lot more positive. Now, when my primary school teachers bump into have become, said Keril. always aspired to becoming some-Keril Victorone who was in the spotlight, on television or radio. In fact, I always wanted to be on television and that wish transformed into wanting to achieve something for myself and was involved in some of the things I loved, he said. the many times forming an all-male mination ironically was born out of his own frustration with being the go-to-guy on any occasion that the school needed someone to sing. He felt that surely, some among his peers would be so-inclined to form hand and the blessings of his Vice Principal, Keril began scouting the lower form students. to get the teachers to support it, beculty supporting an activity where a student is in charge. It was very difbecause of the normal stereotyping, but there were guys who were very down to about 8 or 9. It was really a commitment issue. So I decided we would focus on the upcoming National Secondary School Comimpression, as an all male choir with soprano, tenor and bass features. alongside his dad in the audience at his plays and concerts. He readily admits that as an only child for about 10 years, the focus was always on him. of chap found hanging out of the trees in his Gros Iset community of Monier. bourhood a bit livelier, albeit to the dismay of his neighbours. stopped me from being creative, he said. I cannot ing disturbed the neighhi, I am Keril, your neighbour, you live right next to me...so can I get a when he performed at the production entitled Odyssey staged by Keril sang his selections, I was once again made painfully aware of what a disgustingly bad and awful decision that the judges rendered in not nals of the Secondary Schools Singing Competition. Go Keril! only directed and focussed on muness, a teacher cajoled him into signing up! yourself and equips you with conon stage and in front the mic is the bate Competition where they placed second.. bating really helped to develop my about your society. It is one thing to essay writing. Hanging out with friends is cool, but I wanted something more to do. I always had the desire to do something more. Something that may be grow to become good at, said an ever pondering Keril. lenges, Regional Responsibility, helped to develop during his tenure as president of the Young Leaders Club. Keril highlighted that he was faced with discouragement at the beginning of the project, since his teachers thought that extra-curricuhis academic studies. Keril meanwhile, thought that these activities always complimented his academic something that people have to realactivities also add to your character. It was always a challenge for me to accept that I could not only manage a Young Leaders Club, but challenge of competing in that national comwe were able to execute some of the ideas we came up with. to encourage the students to use the school and made gated platforms for the bins among other things; the Young Leaders Club competition among secondary schools on the island. Keril also composed a song used for the competition. stint as a music composer. In 2009, he wrote a song in both English on to win the competition and his song was used during the festival. contemporary Catholic culture of the archdiocese. Anyone who wants congregation need only exclaim: will be roared ba resonated with congregations evthreatening to usurp that position. two occasions at the Inter Secondary Schools Sports Meet. His passion did not lie in sports though and he articulated that as follows; People always thought that I should have been involved in sports. People say that to be a well rounded individual you must be involved in sports but for me you can be involved only in the arts and still be well rounded because that is your niche. A lot of sports people are not on stage or singing behind the mic but they cause drama is also a lot of physical choice Victor stated simply I am not sure what career I want to eventually pursue, but I am inclined to follow literature because of my love for the arts. He is presently studying Literature, Economics and History at the Sir Arthur Lewis Community College. in the 2010 CXC examinations at St Social Studies, English Literature, History, English A, Principles of one in Geography and Information Grade 2. His head pulled into his chest and his words spilling forcefulcomes a point where you have to decide whether you want to do something great or just be ordinary. Deep down inside it has to be something that you really want to do. It cannot be an idea of forcing yourself to do you are best suited for. Choosing a path that you want to pursue, means you will have the drive and the desire to give your all and the results there are also people who have the drive but do not have the right opclich, I believe that we all have to opportunities may be available in the most unsuspecting way. here is the new idea that there are opportunists, pessimists and the realists; for me there are only opportunists and pessimists; and undermine their actual potenme there is a can do it and a will do, nothing in between!. Government applauds the determination to success and excellence by this outstanding young Saint Lucian academic.

PAGE 6

Page 7 Saturday October 9, 2010 Page 6 Saturday October 9, 2010 National Review met with Dennery MP Hon. Mar cus Nicholas to share his perspective on development initiatives in Dennery North. He pointed out that the onward progress of the valley is based on capacity building and developing competencies, skills and critical awareness. In that regard the reestablishment of the Mabouya Valley Development programme will serve as a critical aspect of development initiates in the community from the stand point of improving incomes at the house hold level, environmental conservation, support to vulnerable areas, land lease and sale, agricultural support services etc. The MP adds that it is extremely important that we maximize the potential of the people it we are to progress from individual action to collective social and economic advancement. Much work has been undertaken in the Dennery North constituency from numerous road improvements and rehabilitation projects, a newly constructed human resource center at Grand Rivierre, sports development programmes, educational programmes and school awards, the establishment of a Local District Council etc. new initiatives that are coming on stream include the development of the Richfond Playing Field into a mini stadium. Additionally the Government of St. Lucia through the Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation is implementing the Community Based Eco-Agro Tourism Project (CBEAT) in the geographic district of Dennery. The project which will be of tremendous benDennery and Mabouya Valley/Dennery North Constituency is being funded by the European Union (EU) through the Special Framework for Assistance (SFA, 2007). The project is designed to support and facilitate the transition and dieconomies, like St. Lucia, from the heavy dependency on the banana trade to sustain their economies. It is envisaged that this adjustment will make it easier to develop and sustain our human capacity development.. The overall aim of the CBEAT project is to create lasting alternative economic activity to generate livelihoods thus increasing incomes and prosperity in the Dennery district including the Mabouya Valley, in order to reduce poverty. reservoir for truly St. Lucian traditions, values and history. The area will see improvements to the landscape through the upgrading of community tourism sites; training and professional development for residents who are most impor tant to the tourism product ing and branding campaign to help Dennery cement its place as part of St. Lucias tourism product. established Dennery village tourism destination. Renovation and upgrade munity based tourism sites, two of which are in North Dennery, the Sankofa Rainbow Roots Farm and Fond Dor Park; the renovations will be made in collaboration with the CBEAT Project and the leadership of these organizations. A most important impact of the project, being led by the community leaders themselves, is the development of the Dennery Mabouya Valley Development Trust (DMVDT). This innovative idea came through the cooperation of twelve Dennery North and South organizations that joined forces to push for the interests of all of Dennery. DMVDT upon its establishment will serve as a secretariat to drive for sustainable development in the district of Dennery in partnership with government and donor organizations. The TRUST seeks to encourage community spirit, promote, encour age and assist the economic, educational, environmental and recreational endeavors of the Dennery community. Hon. Marcus Nicholas MP for Dennery North CARDI Feeder Road Rehabilitation, Mabouya Valley Construction of Montego Bay Road in Aux Leon Newly Built Human Resource Center at Grand Riviere Dennery Residents of Dennery North Conferring with their Parliamentary Representative on Development on proposed Playing Field at Grande Riviere Farm Road Rehabilitation at Bathalon in Aux Leon Refurbished Bus shelter at Derniere Riviere EU Funded EcoAgro Tourism Consultation at La Ressource DenneryConceptual Drawing re: Proposed Upgrade of Grand Riviere Playing FieldPublic Recreaton Park at La Ressource, Dennery Refurbishment of Morne Pannache Derniere Riviere Road One of Numerous drains Constructed in the Community Newly Refurbished Headquaters of the Dennery North Rural Council One of many Football Competition initiated by Dennery North MP

PAGE 7

Page 8 Saturday October 9, 2010 SRDF Education Scholarship ProgrammeThe Soufriere Regional Development Foundation (SRDF) is a nondevelopment initiatives in the Soufriere region. The organization was formed with the for the Soufriere region and its development of the Sulphur terfront, development of an heritage assets, and initiation of an anti-Harassment Proman. Development Foundation is ner that is responsive to the needs and aspirations of the ism and the preservation of the heritage of Soufriere. the Soufriere Regional Development Foundation met and formed a new development friere. As per the 2007 2012 Cultural Development, InfraThe Scholarship Programme the view that the real goal of velop and sustain the human reunderprivileged and outstandSoufriere to allow them to pur disadvantaged and high per forming students of Soufriere support the development of the dents residing in Soufriere Soufriere Regional Development Foundation. Further to need, leadership potential and and start date and no student same. Stuamination results, admissions ments of Need. Following this telephone of the results of their mindful that the tenure of the agree to provide to the student ment of tuition fees, uniforms friere Foundation. (1) sador to the Soufriere Regional The Student agrees to assist (1) The Foundation reserves the right to immeof Student to engage in Foun(2) The Foundation reserves right to withdraw or amend Foundation reserves the right to tion, the Foundation agrees to ing that the student maintains provide an annual information students. ships th students who had heard of the good fortune of their peers apand found that there was a dire at all levels. Based on that inThis was that award) Year Two (tuition and stipend) program has reaped rewards velopment will also result in an overall upgrading of SoufriBoth parents and student parents Mrs. Samantha Clovis Samuel whose son (Anil Clovis) from 2009, pointed out that that and support that is needed to ensure that he maintains his Young Anil who top the grades and will persevere in Chairman of the Foundation gations of the programme so arship Programme is a positive

PAGE 8

Page 9 Saturday October 9, 2010 RISING FROM THE ASHESCHORUS Rising From The Ashes Rebuilding The Love Rising From The Ashes Rebuilding The Love Rising From The Ashes Rebuilding The Love Oh Yeah, Oh Yeah Even With The Hands We Have To Mix The Mortor Everyone Support This Urge From The Ashes A Phoenix Will Emerge St Jude A National Resource Will Be A New Sense Of Pride To All Of Us This National Disaster Has Brought Us All Together Spurred Our National Spirit So Together We Will Rebuild It St Jude Hospital Rising from the Ashes

PAGE 9

Saturday October 9, 2010 Page 10 Saint Lucia Economic Review January to June 2010 (Part 1)OVERVIEWA growth in the wholesale and rea fall in the value of imports tions have dampened the growth of government revenue, while TOURISM the government to turnaround alf of 2009. tourist destination on the ABC review period. of travel within the region. 2010 relative to the same period ing the review period, with that This represented a reversal of the visitors in 2009. and the infestation of pests and diseases. to 1,722.5 tonnes relative to the drought. million pounds, while revenues review period in result of the high temperatures Fisheries water temperatures during the ters. Lower volumes were reings. Despite the high temperathe volume of landings for tuna the review period, growth in this raw materials. tanding the overall 2009 while revenue from food ings from paper and paper prodterials resulted in higher selling responding period of 2009. The materials. ism related Landings and the Tides Sugar

PAGE 10

Construction Manufacturing Agriculture Page 11 Saturday October 9, 2010 the National Hospital representperiod. Prices rd pressure on fo nt). Saint Lucia Economic Review: January to June 2010 TOURISM Table 1: Arrivals by Visitor Category The tourism sector experienced marked recovery during the first half of 2010 compared with the corresponding period in 2009. This performance was driven by an 11.9 percent increase in stay-over arrivals to 162,856, the result of concerted initiatives by the government to turnaround the sector, after this category of visitor arrivals fell by 9.7 percent in the first half of 2009. The initiatives resulted in an improvement in airlift with the introduction of low cost carriers Jet Blue from the US and West Jet fr om Canada, coupled with increases in airlift from existing carriers. St. Lucia was also marketed prominently as a premier tourist destination on the ABC television network sh ow, The Bachelor during the first quarter of 2010. As a result, stay over arrivals fr om the US increased by 31.3 percent to 68,776 during the review period. The Canadian market also experienced growth in arrivals of 7.1 percent to 21,186 visitors during the review period, reflecting the effects of a 35.9 percent increase in monthly airlift capacity. Growth of 29.4 percent was recorded for other European markets (other than the UK), driven mainly by the introduction of a weekly service by Condor airlines directly from Germany to St. Lucia. Visitor Category 2008 2009 2010 Stay -Over 161,230 145,575 162,856 Excursionist 5,392 2,659 2,770 Yacht 13,984 19,271 24,915 Cruise 374,161 403,675 414,847 Total 554,767 571,180 605,388 Stay Over Arrivals by Major Markets0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 2004200520062007200820092010US UK Caribbean Canada Saint Lucia Economic Review: January to June 2010 TOURISM Table 1: Arrivals by Visitor Category The tourism sector experienced marked recovery during the first half of 2010 compared with the corresponding period in 2009. This performance was driven by an 11.9 percent increase in stay-over arrivals to 162,856, the result of concerted initiatives by the government to turnaround the sector, after this category of visitor arrivals fell by 9.7 percent in the first half of 2009. The initiatives resulted in an improvement in airlift with the introduction of low cost carriers Jet Blue from the US and West Jet fr om Canada, coupled with increases in airlift from existing carriers. St. Lucia was also marketed prominently as a premier tourist destination on the ABC television network sh ow, The Bachelor during the first quarter of 2010. As a result, stay over arrivals fr om the US increased by 31.3 percent to 68,776 during the review period. The Canadian market also experienced growth in arrivals of 7.1 percent to 21,186 visitors during the review period, reflecting the effects of a 35.9 percent increase in monthly airlift capacity. Growth of 29.4 percent was recorded for other European markets (other than the UK), driven mainly by the introduction of a weekly service by Condor airlines directly from Germany to St. Lucia. Visitor Category 2008 2009 2010 Stay -Over 161,230 145,575 162,856 Excursionist 5,392 2,659 2,770 Yacht 13,984 19,271 24,915 Cruise 374,161 403,675 414,847 Total 554,767 571,180 605,388 Stay Over Arrivals by Major Markets0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 2004200520062007200820092010 US UK Caribbean Canada performance of the industry was also affected by other factors, chiefly the high cost of inputs and the infestation of pests and diseases. For the six months ending June 2010, banana exports to the UK dropped by 15.3 percent to 13,699 tonnes. This was due largely to the effects of the recent dr ought. The decline was more evident during the second quarter of 2010, during which exports were 2,152 tonnes below that of the same period last year, the lowest the sector has ever recorded. Revenue from banana exports to the UK also fell by 8.9 percent to $25.7 million in the first half of 2010, in keeping with the decline in exports. However, revenue receipts from banana exports declined at a slower rate relative to volume, reflecting increases in production of the more lucrative special packs. Preliminary indicators suggest that output of non banana crops declined in the review period mainly reflecting the adverse impact of the drought on crop cultivation. Domestic sales of fruit and vegetables to hotels and supermarkets fell by 10.2 percent to 1,722.5 tonnes relative to the same period for 2009. Like the banana industry, declines in the purchase of non-banana crops by hotels and supermarkets were more pronounced in the second quarter, recording a 12.1 perc ent decline to 768.4 tonnes in comparison to the second quarter of 2009. Accordingly, reve nue from domestic purchases of fruit and vegetables declined by 4.4 percent to $6.4 million. However, for the month of June 2010, both revenues and purchases of non-ba nana crops by supermarkets and hotels increased by 10.0 percent and 10.1 percent resp ectively suggesting that the sector may be recovering from the impact of the drought. Notwithstanding the overall decline in the manufacturing sector, the value of production of food and beverage products which accounts for 45.5 percent of total manufacturing output, increased by 1.8 percent. This increase stemmed from a 28.9 percent growth in production of non-alcoholic beverages which was driven largely by growth in export demand and the introduction of two new beverages. Gross revenue from the production of alcoholic beverages on the other hand, fell to $23.7 million in 2010 compare d with $24.6 million in 2009 while revenue from food production contracted by 11.8 perc ent to $4.5 million, reflecting the negative impact of the recent dry spell on crop yields Table 2 : Production of Food and Beverages (EC$ Millions) Commodity 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 % Change (2009-10) Food Products 5.62 5.85 5.95 5.15 4.54 -11.8 % Alcoholic Beverages 26.20 21.05 22.30 24.58 23.70 -3.6% Non-Alcoholic Beverages 8.16 7.53 7.71 7.41 9.55 28.9% TOTAL 39.98 34.42 35.95 37.13 37.78 1.8% Mixed performances were recorded in the prod uction of electrical products and paper and paper products. The gross value of production of electrical products was $18.7 million, representing an increase of 3.7 percen t, reflective of increasing demand by the US and Latin American markets. Gross e arnings from paper and paper products declined by 11.8 percent to $10.5 million, owin g largely to the recent drought and the overall decline in commercial activity. No ticeable declines were recorded in the production of banana and commercial boxes by 16.1 percent and 10.2 percent Notwithstanding the overall decline in the manufacturing sector, the value of production of food and beverage products which accounts for 45.5 percent of total manufacturing output, increased by 1.8 percent. This increase stemmed from a 28.9 percent growth in production of non-alcoholic beverages which was driven largely by growth in export demand and the introduction of two new beverages. Gross revenue from the production of alcoholic beverages on the other hand, fell to $23.7 million in 2010 compare d with $24.6 million in 2009 while revenue from food production contracted by 11.8 perc ent to $4.5 million, reflecting the negative impact of the recent dry spell on crop yields Table 2 : Production of Food and Beverages (EC$ Millions) Commodity 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 % Change (2009-10) Food Products 5.62 5.85 5.95 5.15 4.54 -11.8 % Alcoholic Beverages 26.20 21.05 22.30 24.58 23.70 -3.6% Non-Alcoholic Beverages 8.16 7.53 7.71 7.41 9.55 28.9% TOTAL 39.98 34.42 35.95 37.13 37.78 1.8% Mixed performances were recorded in the prod uction of electrical products and paper and paper products. The gross value of production of electrical products was $18.7 million, representing an increase of 3.7 percen t, reflective of increasing demand by the US and Latin American markets. Gross e arnings from paper and paper products declined by 11.8 percent to $10.5 million, owin g largely to the recent drought and the overall decline in commercial activity. No ticeable declines were recorded in the production of banana and commercial boxes by 16.1 percent and 10.2 percent respectively. Also, increases in the cost of inputs and raw materials resulted in higher selling prices of boxes and paper products which further impacted negatively on output. CONSTRUCTION Preliminary indications suggest that constructi on activity declined during the first half of 2010, compared with the corresponding pe riod of 2009. The performance of the sector was influenced by lower activity in th e public and private sectors associated with the effects of the recent global economic and financial crisis. Table 3: Value of imports of construction material January to June (EC$ Million) Materials 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Wood and wood products 13.5 22.1 25.0 27.3 25.2 25.6 20.6 14.7 Sand 1.8 2.3 2.0 1.5 2.0 0.7 1.1 0.1 Cement 6.5 7.3 10.3 12.3 12.2 14.2 13.1 12.9 Prefabricated Materials 2.6 1.5 1.1 3.6 2.2 3.8 1.7 6.5 Steel 0.8 1.7 1.6 3.6 5.7 8.3 2.5 2.6 Other 32.1 34.8 42.5 56.5 37.0 44.8 38.3 39.0 TOTAL 57.3 69.9 82.5 104.7 84.2 97.5 77.3 75.8 Indicative of the level of activity in the co nstruction sector, the value of imports of construction materials fell by 2.0 percent to $75.8 million in the first half of the year. This outturn reflects decreases in imports of all the major categories of construction materials except steel and prefabricated materials. The decline in imports of construction ma terials reflects the number of projects completed or nearing completion including the Bay Walk mall, the Alan Bousqet Highway and the East Coast Road rehabilit ation. Moreover, projects financed by foreign investments fell sharply as the freeze in international credit adversely affected financing of hotel and other tourism related projects. In the private sector construction activity continued on the Landings and the Tides Sugar Beach hotels, the Bank of Saint Lucia Building, Johnson Superstore in Rodney Bay and an office complex in Goodlands. Notwithstanding work on the construction of the new National Hospital, preliminary data suggest that public spending on co nstruction declined by 1.8 percent to $44.2 million over the six months ending June 20 10 compared with one year earlier. Central government expenditure increased by 5.5 pe rcent to $42.6 million while expenditure by statutory bodies declined by 65.5 percent to $1.6 million. Public spending on total fell by 25.5 percent to $16.5 million. Of this amount, central government expend iture fell by 22.9 percent to $15.8 million reflecting expenditure on road infrastructu re ($11.8 m), the Agro processing Plant ($1 m) and water infrastructure ($1m). Outlays on increased by 21.2 percent to $27.7 million reflective of $19.1 million spent on health infrastructure, mainly the New National Hospital ($12.1m) and the National Wellness Centre ($3.7m), and also included the Senior Citizens Home ($1.8m), rehabilitation of schools ($2.7m) and di saster preparation ($1.7m). Work on the National Hospital represented the single largest public construction activity in the review period. Central Government 58.6 62.8 27.8 20.5 15.8 Statutory Bodies 20.4 1.6 1.0 1.6 0.7 Central Government 45.7 49.0 10.4 19.9 26.8 Statutory Bodies 1.5 2.7 4.5 3.0 0.9 Total Central Government 104.3 111.8 38.2 40.4 42.6 Total Statutory Bodies 21.9 4.3 5.5 4.6 1.6 Tables showing the statistics of various sectorsTourism

PAGE 11

Page 12 Saturday October 9, 2010 Please email your comments or questions to: nationalreview@pm.gov.lcAthletes, sports men and who reside in the Castries tries North. Fund (SSDF) has approved fundthree residential properties on the ing with the mandate of the Saint engaging in unwanted and negawho served as the Minister for opment of the vestment in their development. The tion phases. ment. forms part of our development development thrust. through sports.La Clery Playing Field Undergoes Major Upgrade


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs