• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Review of literature
 Determination of vanadium in biological...
 Dietary vanadium toxicity...
 Influence of dietary vanadium on...
 Comparative and acute toxicity...
 Effect of vanadium intake on excretion...
 Dietary vanadium toxicity in the...
 General discussion and summary
 Appendix
 Bibliography
 Biographical sketch






Group Title: Toxicity and physiological movement of vanadium in the sheep and rat /
Title: Toxicity and physiological movement of vanadium in the sheep and rat
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098312/00001
 Material Information
Title: Toxicity and physiological movement of vanadium in the sheep and rat
Physical Description: xiv, 190 leaves : ill. ; 28cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hansard, Samuel Leroy, 1944- ( Dissertant )
Ammerman, C. B. ( Thesis advisor )
Allen, Charles M. ( Reviewer )
Arrington, L. R. ( Reviewer )
Feaster, J. P. ( Reviewer )
Simpson, C. F. ( Reviewer )
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1975
Copyright Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Animal Science thesis Ph. D
Vanadium -- Physiological effect   ( lcsh )
Dissertations, Academic -- Animal Science -- UF
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: Experimental feeding trials involving 66 sheep and 142 rats were employed in conjunction with radioisotopic and chemical measurements to investigate the toxicity and physiological behavior of vanadium and quantitative relationships to animal performance. In a growth study, 24 lambs, individually fed supplemental levels of 0, 10, 100, 200, 400 or 800 ppm dietary vanadium (ammonium metavanadate) , showed clinical toxicity signs only on the two highest levels. Dietary quantities up to and including 200 ppm added vanadium for 84 days resulted in small initial negative effects on feed intake and tissue content was increased. No effects on hemoglobin, hematocrit or growth rate were detected. Lambs fed the two highest levels, 400 and 800 ppm, ceased eating after initial exposure, but subsequent refeeding of the basal diet resulted in an apparent complete recovery within 8 days. Fourteen sheep were fed 0, 50, or 200 ppm supplemental vanadium and were administered radiovanadium either orally or intravenously prior to a 144-hr blood-clearance and tissuedistribution study. Limited intestinal absorption was indicated but dietary vanadium did influence 48V retention; less of the isotope was retained in kidney (P < .01) and major organs of sheep receiving the highest dietary vanadium level. Kidney, bone, liver and spleen retained (in decreasing order) the highest activity 144 hr after dosing, and patterns of deposition were similar for both methods of administration. Clearance of the isotope from circulating blood was initially rapid, was not significantly altered by dietary treatment and could be described by a model having three exponential components. An experiment was conducted with 12 wether lambs which were administered three vanadium compounds by capsule. Daily dosage rate was increased by 50 mg vanadium at 2-day intervals to minimize delayed effects of toxicity. Onset of toxic effects did not differ significantly for calcium orthovanadate, calcium pyrovanadate or ammonium metavanadate when 25% reduction in feed intake was used as an indicator of response. Animals were adversely affected by dosage levels of 400 to 500 mg vanadium per day administered in this manner, corresponding to a range of 9.6 to 12 mg/kg body weight. Signs of toxicity included elevated tissue vanadium, fatty degeneration of liver, diarrhea and . mortality . An additional 16 lambs were fed 0, 5 or 2 00 ppm supplemental vanadium for 9 days; coccygeal vertebrae were sampled before and at 15- to 30-day intervals after imposing the dietary regimen to examine the effect of dietary intake on deposition of the mineral with time. Bone content of the element was elevated (P < .05) after feeding 200 ppm added vanadium for 15 days, but nonsignificant . increases occurred thereafter. In a subsequent balance study, urinary vanadium excretion was directly related to dietary intake of the mineral. Results of a series of investigations with the rat indicated that both ^ feed intake and growth rate were depressed when 4 ppm vanadium was fed in combination with semipurified diets. Vanadium content of bone and kidney was increased (P < .01) by 20 ppm added vanadium, but effects of elevated dietary protein on both performance and tissue content were non-significant. Hematocrit decreased linearly with increased dietary vanadium. When rats receiving 20, 4 or 8 ppm vanadium in semi-purified diets were compared to pair-fed controls, growth rates of the former group were negatively affected to a greater extent than the latter, although feed intakes of both were depressed with increasing dietary vanadium. Greater depression in growth at the 80 ppm level (P < .05) relative to pair-fed controls indicated that . reduced feed intake was not the only mechanism in the growth impairment.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Florida, 1975.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 175-188).
General Note: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
Statement of Responsibility: by Samuel Leroy Hansard II.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098312
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000424505
oclc - 38046279
notis - ACH2946

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    List of Tables
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    List of Figures
        Page x
        Page xi
    Abstract
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Review of literature
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
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        Page 17
        Page 18
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        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Determination of vanadium in biological materials
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
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        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Dietary vanadium toxicity in sheep
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
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        Page 66
        Page 67
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    Influence of dietary vanadium on metabolism of vanadium-48 in sheep
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
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        Page 100
        Page 101
    Comparative and acute toxicity of vanadium compounds in sheep
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
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        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Effect of vanadium intake on excretion and deposition in bone of sheep
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
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        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Dietary vanadium toxicity in the rat
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
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    General discussion and summary
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Appendix
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Bibliography
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Biographical sketch
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
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