Title: Alternative models of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098283/00001
 Material Information
Title: Alternative models of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation
Physical Description: xi, 234 leaves : graphs ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crino, Michael Dwain, 1947- ( Dissertant )
Feldman, Jack M. ( Thesis advisor )
Reitz, Joseph H. ( Reviewer )
Shaw, Marvin E. ( Reviewer )
Young, Jerald W. ( Reviewer )
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1978
Copyright Date: 1978
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Employee motivation   ( lcsh )
Management thesis Ph. D   ( lcsh )
Dissertations, Academic -- Management -- UF   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: Theorists and practitioners alike are concerned with the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic sources of worker motivation in organizational settings. A number of relationships between the receipt of intrinsic and extrinsic incentives and subsequent motivation have been suggested in the motivation literature. Among them are: a) Positive dependent--through the process of secondary reinforcement one's feelings about the task are bound to improve regardless of prior feelings, b) Interactive--1) Negative: making extrinsic rewards contingent upon task performance may reduce intrinsic motivation; 2) Positive: the more intrinsically motivating a task is, the more motivating a given level of task-contingent extrinsic rewards will be. c) Corequisite--l ) No extrinsic motivation can exist in the absence of intrinsic motivation; 2) No intrinsic motivation can exist until basic lower-level needs are adequately satisfied via extrinsic rewards, d) Independent--the motivation generated by performance-contingent extrinsic rewards and the level of intrinsic motivation are unrelated and contribute to overall motivation independently via direct functional relationships. Theorists and practitioners alike are concerned with the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic sources of worker motivation in organizational settings. A number of relationships between the receipt of intrinsic and extrinsic incentives and subsequent motivation have been suggested in the motivation literature. Among them are: a) Positive dependent--through the process of secondary reinforcement one's feelings about the task are bound to improve regardless of prior feelings, b) Interactive--1) Negative: making extrinsic rewards contingent upon task performance may reduce intrinsic motivation; 2) Positive: the more intrinsically motivating a task is, the more motivating a given level of task-contingent extrinsic rewards will be. c) Corequisite--l ) No extrinsic motivation can exist in the absence of intrinsic motivation; 2) No intrinsic motivation can exist until basic lower-level needs are adequately satisfied via extrinsic rewards, d) Independent--the motivation generated by performance-contingent extrinsic rewards and the level of intrinsic motivation are unrelated and contribute to overall motivation independently via direct functional relationships. of overall motivation was consistent with both the additive and positive dependent models. This is due, in part, to the similarity of the hypotheses for overall motivation derived from these two theoretical positions. It was noted that both the positive dependent and simple additive models predict increases in overall motivation as contingent intrinsic or extrinsic incentives (or both) are increased, although the underlying dynamics are not similar. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. Practical implications include the suggestion that organizations may provide intrinsic and extrinsic incentive combinations without fear of decreasing overall worker motivation. The positive dependent relationship, however, requires that more attention be paid to the specific characteristics of positive reinforcers. Important directions for future research are suggested.
Thesis: Thesis--University of Florida.
Bibliography: Bibliography: leaves 227-233.
General Note: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael Dwain Crino.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098283
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000079183
oclc - 04942733
notis - AAJ4487

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